It began in November of 2012 in protest to the Canadian government's so-called, omnibus bill C45, which became known as the Jobs and Growth Act. Four women in Saskatchewan concerned about the bill eroding Indigenous treaty rights and environmental protection, staged a ,teach-in, called Idle No More. From there, demonstrations popped up across the country, including outside then-prime minister Stephen Harper's office in Ottawa. It's since grown into a worldwide movement. This 2013 panel comprising the movement's organizers, supporters, and observers discussed its objectives and significance.
Episode:
Idle No More's Momentum and Meaning
Related tags:
The Agenda in the Summer
Aired:
Aug 04, 2021
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