Archive: Multiple Sclerosis, Cathy Crowe

More To Life

Multiple Sclerosis usually strikes people between the ages of 20 and 40, and the effects, both physical and mental, can be devastating. But with the advent of new drug therapies and greater understanding of the disease, patients have a lot to be hopeful about. Here to discuss treatment and how to cope with chronic illness are Dr. Brenda Banwell, director of the Paediatric M.S. Clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children. And Louise Giroux, a psychotherapist and the author of many books on chronic illness, including "Making Good Use of Illness: An Adlerian Approach to Chronic Illness." For the past 15 years, street nurse Cathy Crowe has worked tirelessly on behalf of the homeless of Toronto. As co-founder of the Toronto Disaster Relief Committee, she helped put the plight of the homeless on the political agenda by declaring the problem a national disaster and a human rights violation. And that fight has led to many honours for Crowe - the latest is the Atkinson Charitable Foundation's Economic Justice Award. And she's our next X-Factor profile.
Aired:
Aug 10, 2004
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