Transcript: Imprint season 14 episode 10 | Nov 27, 2002

Tina Srebotnjak stands in a studio with pieces of art in red and orange hanging in the background.
She’s in her late thirties, with short chestnut hair and bangs. She’s wearing a long gray blazer.

Tina says HELLO THERE, I'M TINA
SREBOTNJAK.
TIME FOR ANOTHER FIRST EDITION
OF "IMPRINT."

(music plays)

A book cover features the profile picture of a woman, followed by black and white pictures of a brunette woman.

Tina says TONIGHT, "FLINT AND
FEATHER."
A BIOGRAPHY ABOUT THE LIFE AND
WORK OF MOHAWK PERFORMANCE
POET, PAULINE JOHNSON.

Charlotte Gray sits in a room. She’s in her forties, with short blond hair.

In a clip, Charlotte says THERE WAS
THIS SAVAGE, UNTAMED WOMAN,
TALKING ABOUT HURON MAIDENS
MURDERING THEIR KIDNAPPERS, AND
THEN SUDDENLY YOU KNOW, SHE
PUTS ON A CORSET AND A
BEAUTIFUL HAT, AND SHE BECOMES
THE WOMAN THEY MIGHT SIT NEXT
TO AT DINNER.
I MEAN IT'S THE SORT OF
CLASSIC, VICTORIAN EROTIC
FANTASY.

Tina says INPENETRABLE BOOKS.
IS IT THE WRITER'S FAULT IF THE
READER JUST GIVES UP?

Ian Brown and Suanne Kelman sit one next to the other. Ian is in his forties, clean-shaven with blond hair.

Ian says YOU'VE GOT TO BE
ON THE SIDE OF, IT'S THE
WRITER'S RESPONSIBILITY.

Suanne is in her fifties, with short gray hair.

Suanne says I'M NOT
SAYING THAT EVERYTHING HAS TO
BE EASY, BUT THERE HAVE TO BE
THE REWARDS THERE FOR THE
READER.

A book cover shows a painting of Shakespeare, followed by newspaper articles.

Tina says AND "SHAKESPEARE'S
FACE."
HOW ONE PORTRAIT OF THE BARD
HAS CAPTURED THE IMAGINATION OF
FANS AROUND THE WORLD.

Stephanie Nolen sits by a piano. She’s in her thirties with short brown hair.

Stephanie says WE DON'T
KNOW WHAT HE LOOKED LIKE WHEN
HE WROTE "ROMEO AND JULIET,"
WHEN HE WROTE "KING LEAR."
WE DON'T KNOW WHAT THAT FACE
WAS LIKE, AND PEOPLE WHO CARE
ABOUT THE WRITING SEEM TO CARE
ABOUT THAT DESPERATELY.
THEY WANT TO KNOW WHO THAT MAN
WAS, WHERE THIS CAME FROM, WHAT
THAT FACE LOOKED LIKE.

Theme music plays as the opening sequence rolls.
Fast clips show books and maps in hues of orange and red.

Back in the studio, Tina says
Tina says WHAT DID WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE LOOK LIKE?
THAT QUESTION HAS BEEN A HOT
TOPIC IN LITERARY CIRCLES EVER
SINCE NEWS BROKE OF A PAINTING
FOUND IN AN OTTAWA BASEMENT.
A PAINTING THAT MAY BE A
PORTRAIT OF THE BARD HIMSELF.
LAST YEAR, EXPERTS AT A
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO SYMPOSIUM
CONCLUDED IT'S ALMOST CERTAINLY
THE REAL THING.
SO, WHY ARE WE SO FASCINATED BY
THE MAN BEHIND THE PLAYS?
WE ASK GLOBE AND MAIL REPORTER,
STEPHANIE NOLEN, WHO WROTE A
BOOK ABOUT THE PORTRAIT CALLED,
"SHAKESPEARE'S FACE."

At the interview, Stephanie says WHEN I
FIRST HEARD ABOUT THE STORY, I
THOUGHT RIGHT, THE ONLY
PORTRAIT OF SHAKESPEARE, AND
IT'S BEEN UNDER SOME GUY'S
GRANDMOTHER'S BAG, AND NOW HE
HAS IT IN THE CUPBOARD IN
OTTAWA.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Stephanie Nolen. Shakespeare’s Face."

Stephanie continues THIS IS ONE OF, LIKE THIS IS
ONE OF THESE STORIES THAT JUST,
THIS JUST ISN'T TRUE.
AND THEN IN THE SORT OF FIRST
TWO DAYS THAT I SPENT REPORTING
THIS STORY, AND I KEPT LOOKING
FOR THE BIG PROBLEM, THE BIG
FLAW AND IT DIDN'T TURN UP.
AND AT THE END OF TWO DAYS,
WHEN I SAT DOWN AND WENT
THRO+ MY NOTEBOOK AND IT WAS
STILL PLAUSIBLE, IT STILL HELD
WATER.
IF THERE WAS A MAJOR FLAW IN
THIS STORY, IT WAS GONNA TAKE A
LOT OF SORT OF REALLY CLOSE
SLEUTHING.
BUT WE COULD SAY THAT THIS
STORY WAS THE, THE PORTRAIT WAS
POTENTIALLY REAL.
THEN I GOT THAT THING THAT
REPORTERS GET ON THE BACK OF
YOUR NECK, WHEN YOU THINK, WOW,
THIS IS A REALLY BIG STORY.

The caption changes to "Alexander Leggatt. University of Toronto." Alexander sits by a library. He’s in his sixties, with receding white hair.

Alexander says
SHAKESPEARE HAS A VERY PECULIAR
POSITION IN MODERN SOCIETY, AND
HAS HAD THAT POSITION FOR A
COUPLE OF CENTURIES, WHICH IS
WHY THE DEGREE OF INTEREST IN
THIS PORTRAIT IS QUITE UNUSUAL.
WHY MY PHONE STARTED TO RING
FROM NEWSPAPERS ALL OVER NORTH
AMERICA AS SOON AS THE STORY
BROKE, AND WHY STEPHANIE
NOLEN'S PHONE I THINK PROBABLY
RANG EVEN MORE VIGOROUSLY AND
MORE OFTEN.

Stephanie says PEOPLE ALL
OVER THE WORLD, THE DAY THAT
THE PORTRAIT WAS FIRST IN THE
GLOBE AND MAIL, I MEAN I HAD
PHONE CALLS FROM HANOI.
I MEAN THERE WAS, THERE'S THIS
GLOBAL INTEREST IN THE MAN, AND
A VERY HUMAN NEED TO WANT A
FACE THAT GOES WITH THE MAN.
AND I THINK THE INTEREST IN
SHAKESPEARE AS A WRITER
ENDURES, BECAUSE THE PLAYS
ENDURE, BECAUSE THEY ARE 400
YEARS OLD, AND YET THEY ARE
ABOUT SITUATIONS AND PEOPLE AND
EMOTIONS THAT ARE COMPLETELY
REAL TO US TODAY.

Book pages read "The Tempest, The Second Part of King Henry VI."

Stephanie continues WHAT WAS A BIT OF A REVELATION
TO ME WAS THAT, THAT THERE
WOULD BE SO MUCH INTEREST IN
HIM AS A PERSON AND FOR THIS,
THIS SORT OF BIG PRIZE.
A PICTURE THAT COULD REALLY BE
HIM.
WE DON'T HAVE A PORTRAIT THAT
WE KNOW WAS PAINTED WHILE HE
WAS ALIVE.
AND SO, WE DON'T KNOW WHAT HE
LOOKED LIKE WHEN HE WROTE
"ROMEO AND JULIET," WHEN HE
WROTE "KING LEAR."
WE DON'T KNOW WHAT THAT FACE
WAS LIKE, AND PEOPLE WHO CARE
ABOUT THE WRITING SEEM TO CARE
ABOUT THAT DESPERATELY.
THEY WANT TO KNOW WHO THAT MAN
WAS, WHERE THIS CAME FROM, WHAT
THAT FACE LOOKED LIKE.

Alexander says HE'S GOT
THE STATUS OF BEING MORE THAN
JUST AN INTERESTING WRITER.
HE'S SOMEBODY THAT PEOPLE CAN
GET OBSESSED BY, AND THE
OBSESSION WILL OFTEN TAKE VERY
INTERESTING, VERY PECULIAR
FORMS.
JUST WHEN, WHEN SOMEBODY IS ON
A PEDESTAL THAT HIGH, THERE'S A
NATURAL TENDENCY TO PICK UP A
FEW ROCKS AND START THROWING
THINGS AT HIM.

Stephanie says I FELL A
LITTLE BIT IN LOVE WITH THE MAN
IN THE PORTRAIT.
WHEN I LOOK AT THE PORTRAIT I
SEE THIS SORT OF KIND OF
CHARMING, FLIRTATIOUS, VERY
ENGAGING, VERY DROLL FELLOW.
WHO LOOKS FIRST OF ALL, LIKE HE
HAS A STORY TO TELL YOU.
BUT ALSO TO ME, LOOKS LIKE
SOMEBODY WHO WANTS TO HEAR
PEOPLE'S STORIES.
I SORT OF EXPECT TO FIND HIM
KIND OF PROPPED UP AT THE END
OF THE BAR, WAITING TO BUY
SOMEONE A DRINK AND HEAR A GOOD
TALE, YOU KNOW.
UM, HE LOOKS CHARMING AND
ENGAGING TO ME, AND THAT, THE
FACT THAT I MEAN I THINK
BECAUSE IT'S POTENTIALLY
SHAKESPEARE, MAYBE WE READ MORE
THINGS INTO THAT FACE.
BUT IT IS A REMARKABLY ENGAGING
FACE TO ME, IN COMPARISON WITH
SORT OF LOTS AND LOTS OF STUFFY
TUDOR PORTRAITS I'VE SEEN ON
WALLS IN ENGLISH MUSEUMS, YOU
KNOW.
HE'S, IT'S VERY ENGAGING.
THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT THE
QUIRKY SMILE, AND SOMETHING
ABOUT THE EYES, THAT, THAT'S
VERY ATTRACTIVE.
AND SO, THAT'S WHAT I WANT
SHAKESPEARE TO LOOK LIKE.
PEOPLE'S FIRST QUESTION TO ME
IS ALWAYS, IS IT FOR REAL?
IS THIS REALLY SHAKESPEARE OR
NOT?
AND WELL THAT'S, I MEAN IF I
KNEW THE ANSWER TO THAT, IT
WOULD BE A ONE WORD ANSWER, YES
OR NO EITHER WAY, AND WE
WOULDN'T STILL BE HAVING THIS
CONVERSATION.
AND SO, FOR ME ONE OF THE MOST
EXCITING THINGS ABOUT THE BOOK
IS THAT THE, ABOUT THE PORTRAIT
REALLY, IS THAT THE, THE
CONVERSATION'S STILL GOING ON.
AND PEOPLE ALL THE TIME HAVE
NEW IDEAS AND NEW THEORIES, AND
BECAUSE WE'RE MISSING HOLES IN
THE EVIDENCE, BECAUSE THERE
ISN'T A WATERTIGHT ANSWER TO
THAT, THIS SORT OR CONVERSATION
GOES ON, AND THE MYSTERY IS
NEAT, IN THAT THERE'S ALWAYS
NEW THINGS YOU CAN DISCOVER.

Tina says "SHAKESPEARE'S FACE."
BY STEPHANIE NOLEN, IS
PUBLISHED BY KNOPF CANADA.

(music plays)

Tina says UP NEXT, "FLINT AND
FEATHER," THE LIFE AND WORK OF
MOHAWK POET PAULINE JOHNSON.
AND LATER, DIFFICULT BOOKS.
IS THE WRITER TO BLAME IF THE
READER CAN'T COPE?

Now an animated book sitting on a fence opens to reveal two book covers.

Back in the studio, Tina says SHE WAS THE TOAST OF
VICTORIAN SOCIETY, PART POET
AND PART DANCE HALL PERFORMER.
PAULINE JOHNSON MESMERIZED
AUDIENCES ACROSS CANADA AND THE
UNITED STATES BACK IN THE LATE
1800S.
THIS DAUGHTER OF A MOHAWK CHIEF
AND AN ENGLISH WOMAN, IS THE
SUBJECT OF "FLINT AND FEATHER,"
A NEW BIOGRAPHY BY RENOWNED
CANADIAN WRITER, CHARLOTTE
GRAY.
AND WHERE BETTER TO LAUNCH THIS
BOOK THAN AT CHIEFSWOOD, THE
HOME ON ONTARIO'S SIX NATION
RESERVE WHERE PAULINE JOHNSON
WAS BORN.

A plaque reads "E. Pauline Johnson. 1861-1913."

[Birds chirping]

Roberta Jamieson speaks in front of an audience. She’s in her fifties, with short gray hair.

Roberta says WELL,
WELCOME EVERYONE.
SAGAL, SCANOS, VOVAGA, BONJOUR.

The caption changes to "Roberta Jamieson. Six nations Council Chief."

Roberta continues IT'S WONDERFUL TO SEE SUCH A
GREAT TURNOUT, AND WHY NOT.
THIS IS A VERY IMPORTANT EVENT
AT SIX NATIONS.
THE LAUNCHING OF CHARLOTTE
GRAY'S WONDERFUL BOOK, "FLINT
AND FEATHER," THE LIFE AND
TIMES OF E. PAULINE JOHNSON
TEKAHIONWAKEH.

[Crowd talking]

A woman in her forties says WELL, WE'RE VERY PLEASED TO,
TO HAVE CHARLOTTE COME OUT TO
SIX NATIONS TODAY, TO PROMOTE
HER NEW BOOK "FLINT AND
FEATHER."
IT WILL CERTAINLY ESTABLISH
PAULINE'S NAME BACK INTO THE
COMMUNITY, AND I THINK WITH A
PROFILE LIKE CHARLOTTE GRAY,
THAT WILL CERTAINLY RE-
ESTABLISH THE LITERARY ASPECT
THAT PAULINE HAD, THAT WENT
LARGELY MARGINALIZED EVEN UP TO
40 YEARS AGO.

Roberta says I HOPE BY
READING THIS AND LEARNING MORE
ABOUT PAULINE, PEOPLE WILL GAIN
AN INSIGHT INTO WHAT IT WAS
LIKE IN THOSE DAYS FOR OUR
PEOPLE.
AND LEARN A LITTLE BIT MORE
ALSO THEN BE INFORMED ABOUT WHO
WE ARE TODAY.

A man with a moustache says THERE'S BEEN A RESURGENCE OF
INTEREST IN PAULINE OVER THE
LAST FEW YEARS AND I'VE SEEN
THAT, I'VE SEEN THAT BUILD UP,
SO CHARLOTTE'S BOOK IS
DEFINITELY GONNA BE A, A HUGE
PART, PLAY A HUGE ROLE IN
BRINGING THE MEMORY OF PAULINE
BACK AND I THINK INTO, INTO THE
LIVES OF CANADIANS AGAIN.

Speaking in front of the audience, Charlotte says AND I JUST
WANT TO TELL YOU, THAT THIS IS
PERHAPS THE MOST PRECIOUS
MOMENT TO ME SINCE THE BOOK HAS
BEEN PUBLISHED.
THAT TO BE HERE AT SIX NATIONS
OPPOSITE CHIEFSWOOD, LOOKING AT
TREES THAT PAULINE HERSELF MUST
HAVE KNOWN, BEING AMONGST
PEOPLE FOR WHOM PAULINE IS MORE
THAN JUST SOMEBODY THEY READ IN
THEIR THIRD GRADE READER.
BUT WHO WAS A PERSON WHO FACED
MANY OF THE CHALLENGES AND
FOUGHT MANY OF THE BATTLES THAT
SHE HAD TO FIGHT.
AND IT'S VERY, VERY MOVING FOR
ME TO BE HERE.

[Audience applauding]

Now a clip plays of Tina interviewing Charlotte Gray in a dining room.

Tina says HELLO, CHARLOTTE GRAY.

Charlotte says HI, TINA.

Tina says NOW, WE'RE ALL
PRODUCTS OF OUR CHILDHOOD OF
COURSE.
BUT SHE, PAULINE JOHNSON SEEMED
EVEN MORE SO, IN THE SENSE THAT
SHE HAD A MOHAWK FATHER AND AN
ENGLISH MOTHER.
TELL ME ABOUT HER UPBRINGING
AND HOW THAT AFFECTED HER.

Charlotte says IT WAS AN
EXTRAORDINARY UPBRINGING.
SHE HAD AS YOU SAY A MOHAWK
FATHER, WHO, AND HE WASN'T, BUT
IT WASN'T JUST SORT OF ANYONE.
HE WAS A SORT OF AN ARISTOCRAT
WITHIN HIS OWN COMMUNITY.
HE WAS A STRIKINGLY GOOD
LOOKING MAN WHO LOVED TO DRESS
UP.
I MEAN HE WAS QUITE THE
PEACOCK.

An old photograph shows a native man wearing a fancy jacket sitting next to a young woman wearing a black dress.

Charlotte continues AND THEN HER MOTHER WAS
ENGLISH.
PROBABLY AS, SORT OF SOUNDED AS
ENGLISH AS I DO, AND SHE CAME
FROM A SORT OF ESTABLISHMENT.

The caption changes to "Charlotte Gray. Flint and Feather."

Charlotte continues NOT GRAND, BUT SORT OF
RESPECTABLE ENGLISH BACKGROUND,
BUT HAD GROWN UP IN THE STATES.
AND SO PAULINE GREW UP IN THIS
BEAUTIFUL HOUSE ON THE SIX
NATIONS RESERVE, BELIEVING THAT
SHE REPRESENTED THE BEST OF TWO
TRADITIONS.
SHE REPRESENTED THE MOHAWKS AND
SORT OF BRITISH EMPIRE, AND
THAT SHE WAS SORT OF THE UNION
OF TWO GREAT CIVILIZATIONS.

Black and white pictures of Pauline in her childhood appear.

Tina says IT'S INTERESTING
THOUGH THAT ALTHOUGH ALL HER
LIFE SHE WAS PROUD OF HER
MOHAWK HERITAGE, AND YOU KNOW,
WE'LL TALK ABOUT HER
PERFORMANCES, BUT SHE REALLY
DIDN'T HAVE, HER CLOSE FRIENDS
WERE NOT, SHE DIDN'T LEARN THE
LANGUAGE.
SHE DIDN'T HANG OUT WITH MOHAWK
GIRLS.
I MEAN SHE REALLY TENDED MORE
TOWARDS THE BRITISH SIDE,
DIDN'T SHE?

Charlotte says SHE DID
BECAUSE AS A POET AND AS A
PERFORMER, THAT'S WHERE THE
AUDIENCE WAS.
SHE WAS ALWAYS APPEALING TO A
WHITE, TO A NON-NATIVE
AUDIENCE.
AND THEY WERE THE PEOPLE WHO
WOULD BUY HER POETRY, AND COME
TO HER PERFORMANCES, SO SHE HAD
TO PLAY TO THEM.

Tina says WELL, IT'S INTERESTING
BECAUSE HER POETRY, SHE STARTED
WRITING POETRY, BUT IT WASN'T
HER POETRY REALLY THAT MADE HER
FAMOUS, IT WAS THIS
PERFORMANCE.
AND YOU DESCRIBE AN EVENING, I
THINK IT'S A SNOWY NIGHT IN
TORONTO, BUT YOU DESCRIBE AN
EVENING WHERE SHE GOES UP AND
RECITES IT, AND REALLY HER
CAREER TOOK OFF FROM THERE,
DIDN'T IT?

Charlotte says IT WAS
AMAZING.
IT WAS IN 1892, SO SHE IS NOW
31, AND SHE'S BEEN WRITING AWAY
SINCE SHE WAS IN HER TEENS,
TRYING TO GET ESTABLISHED.
BUT LUCKILY, SHE KNEW THIS
YOUNG MAN WHO WAS PUTTING ON AN
EVENING OF CANADIAN, CANADIAN
POETRY.
AND HE'D INVITED SOME OF THE
BIG NAMES OF THE TIME AND TO
PERFORM, AND HE'D INVITED
PAULINE WHO HE'D BEEN AT SCHOOL
WITH.
WHAT HE'D COMPLETELY MISJUDGED
WAS WHETHER THE AUDIENCE WAS
READY FOR RECITATIONS OF
POETRY.
AND THE FIRST THREE OR FOUR
SPEAKERS WERE DEADLY BORING, I
MEAN JUST DEADLY BORING.

Tina laughs.

Charlotte continues IT WAS A SNOWY NIGHT, THE HALL
WAS CROWDED, IT WAS TOO HOT,
EVERYBODY SPOKE TOO LONG, AND
THE AUDIENCE WAS LEAVING, AND
THEN PAULINE STEPPED ON THE
STAGE.
AND WHAT YOU HAVE TO REMEMBER
IS THAT SHE WAS BEAUTIFUL, SHE
WAS REALLY BEAUTIFUL.
AND SHE HAD ALSO TRAINED, SHE,
SHE WAS SELF TAUGHT, BUT SHE'D
SORT OF HUNG AROUND WITH AN
ACTING TROUPE.

Tina says MMM-HMM.

Charlotte says AND SHE HAD
GREAT VOICE CONTROL, AND SHE
RECITED HER POETRY, EVERYONE
ELSE HAD READ THEIR RATHER
BORING POETRY, AND SHE RECITED
THESE AMAZING, AMAZING SORT OF
BALLADS AND OF BRAVE INDIANS,
AND UM, JUST, AND, AND THE
AGONY OF, OF A BATTLE BETWEEN
NATIVE PEOPLES AND WHITE
SOLDIERS.
SHE HAD THE AUDIENCE EATING OUT
OF HER HAND.
THEY JUST ADORED HER.

Tina says AND THAT WAS THE START
OF HER PERFORMANCE CAREER.

Charlotte says THAT WAS THE
START OF HER PERFORMANCE.

Tina says BECAUSE REALLY SHE WAS
A PERFORMANCE ARTIST, I MEAN
SHE WAS A POET, BUT SHE WAS
REALLY QUITE MODERN IN THAT, IN
THAT SENSIBILITY OF PERFORMANCE
ARTIST, AND THE THING WHICH IS
I MEAN SUCH A METAPHOR, SHE
WOULD DO THE FIRST HALF OF HER
SHOW DRESSED IN MOHAWK REGALIA.

Charlotte says I KNOW.

Tina says AND THE SECOND HALF OF
HER SHOW, DRESSED WHAT, AS A
VICTORIAN LADY WITH THE SASHES
AND THE --

Charlotte says YES, AND YOU
SEE TO HER, THEY WERE BOTH
COSTUMES.
THE FIRST ONE IN FACT WAS A
COMPLETELY SYNTHETIC COSTUME.
I MEAN IT, HER AUDIENCE ALWAYS
THOUGHT THAT IT WAS THE DRESS
THAT HER ANCESTORS ALWAYS WORN,
AND IN FACT SHE GOT IT FROM THE
HUDSON BAY COMPANY IN WINNIPEG.

Tina says DON'T YOU LOVE THAT?

Charlotte says AND THEN
SORT OF --

Tina says FROM A CATALOGUE.
[ Laughs ]

Charlotte says FROM A
CATALOGUE.
AND THEN DOLLIED IT UP A BIT
WITH, PUTTING A RABBIT PELT
HERE AND A WOMPOM BELT, AND A
FEW SCALPS AT HER WAIST.
AND THEN THE SECOND COSTUME,
THAT SHE CAME ON AFTER THE
INTERVAL, WHERE SHE WAS JUST
EVERY INCH THE VICTORIAN LADY,
THEN THAT WAS A COSTUME THAT
SHE'D BOUGHT ON KENSINGTON HIGH
STREET IN LONDON.
AND TO HER THEY WERE BOTH
COSTUMES, IN FACT TO HER,
NEITHER OF THEM REALLY EMBODIED
THE INNATE PAULINE JOHNSON.
THEY WERE COSTUMES THAT SHE
NEEDED FOR HER ACT.
BUT TO HER WHITE COSTUME, WHITE
AUDIENCE, WHAT THEY SAW WAS
THIS SAVAGE, MOHAWK MAIDEN,
MORPHING INTO ONE OF THEM.

Tina says WHICH WOULD HAVE BEEN
VERY COMPELLING.

Charlotte says WELL, IT WAS
VERY COMPELLING FOR TWO
REASONS.
ONE POLITICALLY, THAT THIS WAS
WHAT THEY WANTED THE NATIVE
PEOPLES TO DO.
THEY WANTED NATIVE PEOPLES TO
JUST INTEGRATE INTO EUROPEAN
SOCIETY.
BUT THE OTHER THING, THE OTHER
ASPECT OF IT IS WAS, IT WAS
DEEPLY EROTIC.
THAT THERE WAS THIS SAVAGE,
UNTAMED WOMAN TALKING ABOUT
HURON MAIDENS MURDERING THEIR
KIDNAPPERS, AND THEN SUDDENLY
YOU KNOW, SHE PUTS ON A CORSET
AND A BEAUTIFUL HAT, AND SHE
BECOMES THE WOMAN THEY MIGHT
SIT NEXT TO AT DINNER.
I MEAN IT'S THE SORT OF
CLASSIC, VICTORIAN EROTIC
FANTASY.

A clip shows a woman paddling a canoe.

A Female Narrator says WE'VE RACED THE RAPID, WE'RE
FAR AHEAD, THE RIVER SLITS
THROUGH ITS SILENT BED.
SWAY, SWAY AS THE BUBBLES SPRAY
AND FALL IN TINKILING TOMBS
AWAY.
AND UP ON THE HILLS AGAINST THE
SKY A FIR TREE ROCKING ITS
LULLABY.
SWINGS, SWINGS ITS EMERALD
WINGS, SWELLING THE SONG THAT
MY PADDLE SINGS.

At the interview, Tina says ONE OF HER MOST FAMOUS
POEMS WHICH I THINK MAYBE A LOT
OF PEOPLE WOULD HAVE KNOWN FROM
SCHOOL IS "THE SONG MY PADDLE
SINGS."

Charlotte says THAT'S
RIGHT.

Tina says AND I GATHER THAT IF
YOU'RE OF A CERTAIN VINTAGE,
YOU WOULD'VE LEARNED THAT IN
SCHOOL.
BUT IN READING THAT POEM AND IN
ALL THAT STUFF ABOUT HER, I DID
THINK THAT THE HAPPIEST PAULINE
WAS THE PAULINE IN HER CANOE.

Charlotte says YES.

Tina says THAT IF YOU COULD JUST
GIVE HER, HER CANOE AND A
PADDLE SHE WAS JUST HAPPY AS A
CLAM.

Charlotte says WELL, ONE OF
THE THINGS ABOUT HER IS
SOMETHING THAT YOU KNOW, WE
COMPLETELY UNDERSTAND TODAY,
BUT WE REALLY, THOUGH VICTORIAN
SOCIETY DIDN'T.
SHE WAS A VERY GOOD ATHLETE.
SHE WAS A VERY, VERY GOOD
CANOEIST.
SHE'D LEARNED AS A VERY YOUNG
WOMAN, WHEN SHE WAS ON,
CANOEING ON THE GRAND RIVER
WITH HER FATHER, AND UM, SHE
TAUGHT A WHOLE GENERATION OF
YOUNG MEN IN BRANTFORD.
I MEAN THE IRONY WAS THAT
THEY'D HAVE CANOE REGATTAS, AND
SHE AS A SINGLE WOMAN WOULDN'T
BE ALLOWED TO ENTER IN THE
REGATTAS, SO SHE'D SEE ALL HER
PUPILS WIN THE CUPS.
BUT SHE REALLY HAD A SENSE OF
PHYSICAL ACHIEVEMENT.

Tina says MMM-HMM.

Charlotte says AND JOY IN
DOING SOMETHING WELL, THAT
ANYBODY TODAY WOULD UNDERSTAND,
BUT WAS COMPLETELY FOREIGN TO A
VICTORIAN WOMAN.

Tina says BUT WAS SHE, CAUSE
THERE WAS A KIND OF CANOE
CRAZE, WHICH YOU DESCRIBE IN
YOUR BOOK.

Charlotte says MMM-HMM.

Tina says WHICH CERTAINLY HIT
ENGLAND.
DO YOU THINK SHE CONTRIBUTED TO
THAT?
THAT THERE WAS THIS EXOTIC
PRINCESS YOU KNOW, WITH HER
CANOE?

Charlotte says OH, SHE
PLAYED INTO IT, DEFINITELY.

Tina says OH, SHE DID?
SHE KNEW A MARKETING
OPPORTUNITY WHEN SHE SAW ONE.

Charlotte says SHE WAS
ACTUALLY VERY SMART ON
MARKETING OPPORTUNITIES.

Tina says YES.

Charlotte says YOU KNOW,
WHETHER IT WAS REALIZING THAT
HER OWN, TO GIVE HER AN EDGE IN
THE POETRY MARKET PLAYING UP
HER MOHAWK HERITAGE WAS GOING
TO GIVE HER SORT OF AN ANGLE
THAT NOBODY ELSE HAD.
OR THAT YOU KNOW, HER CANOE
POEMS MADE HER THE ABSOLUTE
DIVA OF ALL THE CANOE MEETS.
WHENEVER THE AMERICAN CANOE
ASSOCIATION MET THEY ALWAYS
INVITED PAULINE JOHNSON TO COME
AND RECITE.

Tina says HMMM.

Charlotte says AND SHE HAD
GREAT JOIE DE VIVRE, GREAT
ADVENTUROUS SPIRIT, AND A
WONDERFUL SENSE OF HUMOUR.

The Female Narrator says ME THINKS I SEE YOUR MIRROR
FRAME ORNATE WITH PHOTOGRAPHS
OF THEM.
PLACE MINE THEREIN FOR ALL THE
SAME, I'LL HAVE MY LITTLE
LAUGHS AT THEM.
FOR GIRLS MAY COME AND GIRLS
MAY GO.
I THINK I HAVE THE BEST OF THEM
AND YET THIS PHOTOGRAPH I KNOW,
YOU'LL TOSS AMONG THE REST OF
THEM.

The clip ends.

Back in the studio, the book appears briefly.

Tina says "FLINT AND FEATHER" BY
CHARLOTTE GRAY IS PUBLISHED BY
HARPER FLAMINGO CANADA.
OKAY, ADMIT IT.
WE'VE ALL BEEN THERE.
GIVING UP ON A NOVEL BECAUSE
IT'S JUST TOO WEIGHTY AND TOUGH
TO FINISH.
ARE YOU LAZY, OR DID THE AUTHOR
LET YOU DOWN?
WE'VE BROUGHT IN PROFESSIONAL
HELP TO PONDER THIS QUESTION.
SUANNE KELMAN IS HEAD OF
BROADCAST JOURNALISM AT RYERSON
UNIVERSITY.
IAN BROWN IS A WRITER AND
BROADCASTER.
HELLO, HELLO.

Suanne and Ian sit in front of Tina.

Suanne says HELLO.

Ian says HELLO.

Tina says SO, SUEANN, WHO'S
FAULT IS IT WHEN A BOOK IS JUST
TOO DARN HARD?

Suanne says I WOULD SAY
THAT IT IS THE WRITER'S FAULT.
I, I HATE TO TAKE THE VULGAR,
CONSUMER POSITION HERE AND I'M
NOT SAYING EVERYBODY HAS TO BE
WILDLY POPULAR, BUT IN GENERAL,
I'M VERY MUCH IN FAVOUR OF
TALENT.

The caption changes to "Suanne Kelman. Ryerson University."

Suanne continues A, A CONCEPT YOU'RE NOT EVEN
SUPPOSED TO ADMIT TO
RECOGNIZING THESE DAYS AND
CRAFT.
I THINK THE WRITER SHOULD BE
DOING MOST OF THE WORK FOR THE
READER.
AH, CERTAINLY THERE ARE READERS
WHO GIVE UP TOO EASILY.
CERTAINLY THERE ARE PEOPLE OUT
THERE WHO ONLY WANT TO READ
JUNK, BUT I FEEL THAT IN THE
END THE WRITER OWES IT TO ME TO
HAVE MADE THE EFFORT TO MAKE
HIS BOOK OR HER BOOK
INTERESTING OR INTELLIGIBLE.

Tina says OKAY, IAN, DOES THE
WRITER OWE US THAT?
DOES HE, IS IT, IS IT HIS JOB
OR HER JOB TO PLEASE THE
READER?

Ian says I THINK THAT'S
THE ONLY POSITION YOU CAN TAKE,
BECAUSE IF, IF THAT'S NOT THE
CASE, IF IT'S NOT THE WRITER'S
REPSONSIBILITY THAN THAT
CREATES PRIESTS YOU KNOW,
WITHIN THE LITERARY COMMUNITY.

The caption changes to "Ian Brown. Writer/Broadcaster."

Ian continues NOT THAT THERE AREN'T PLENTY OF
THEM, YOU KNOW, AND ALWAYS
TRYING TO, AND BADLY BEHAVED
ONES TOO.
BUT IT, IT CREATES PRIESTS WHO,
WHO MAKE THESE DISTINCTIONS.
YOU KNOW, LITERATURE HAS BEEN
PLAGUED BY THIS DISTINCTION FOR
ALWAYS.
YOU KNOW, THE POETS ARE ALWAYS
UNTRUSTWORTHY, THEY INFLAME THE
PASSIONS.
THEY YOU KNOW, THEY MAKE PEOPLE
MISBEHAVE AND BE DISOBEDIENT,
SO WE NEED A SORT OF A CAST OF
YOU KNOW, INTELLECTUALS WHO
WILL TELL YOU WHAT IS GOOD,
WHAT IS NOT.
WHO WILL SAY, THIS IS DIFFICULT
AND YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND IT,
BUT THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT WE
NEED.
WHEREAS THE, YOU KNOW, A, A
SMARTER AND MORE PROGRESSIVE
POINT OF VIEW IS YOU KNOW, LIKE
MATTHEW ARNOLD WHO, WHO SAID
THAT YOU KNOW, GREAT CULTURE
ALWAYS TRIES TO TAKE KNOWLEDGE
OUT OF THE, THE ELITE OF THE
CULTIVATED AND THE LEARNED AND
ADMITS TO NO CLASSES AT ALL.
BUT IF YOU, IF YOU SAY THE
WRITER'S WRONG YOU'RE, THEN
YOU'RE MAKING CLASSES.
SO, YOU, YOU'VE GOT TO BE ON
THE SIDE OF IT'S THE WRITER'S
RESPONSIBILITY.

Tina says OKAY.
SO, IF A BOOK THOUGH IS
DIFFICULT, AND THERE ARE
DIFFICULT BOOKS.

Suanne says YEAH.

Tina says AND YOU KNOW, JAMES
JOYCE COMES TO MIND.
I MEAN WHO EVER DID MAKE IT
THROUGH "FINNEGAN'S WAKE"?
NOBODY I'VE EVER MET.
AND YOU KNOW IS, IS THERE, IS
THERE A PART WHERE THE READER
JUST THINKS, WELL, I JUST
DIDN'T KNOW ENOUGH?
I JUST YOU KNOW, MISSED ALL THE
LITERARY REFERENCES.

Suanne says I'M SO GLAD
THAT YOU RAISED THIS, SO GLAD,
BECAUSE HERE'S, HERE'S WHAT I
THINK ON THIS.
JAMES JOYCE WAS A GREAT GENIUS
AND IT'S UNFORTUNATE THAT HE
EVER LIVED, BECAUSE OF THE
INFLUENCE THAT HE HAD.
THERE WAS ONLY JAMES, ONE JAMES
JOYCE.
THE PEOPLE WHO IMITATE HIM DO
NOT HAVE THIS EXTRAORDINARY
MIND THAT HE HAD, AND I BARELY
STARTED "FINNEGAN'S WAKE."
I THINK I MADE IT THROUGH THREE
PAGES.
BUT I REALLY LIKE "ULYSSES" AND
THE EARLY STUFF.
THE, THE PEOPLE--

[Both talking at once]

Ian says GEN-GENIUS
DOESN'T ALWAYS LAST.

Suanne says NO, NO, NO,
AND --

Ian says YOU KNOW, YOU CAN
BE A GENIUS FOR ONE BOOK AND
THEN NOT BE A GENIUS FOR
"FINNEGAN'S WAKE."

Suanne says YES.
BUT -

Ian says OR THREE BOOKS--

Suanne says FOR THREE
BOOKS.
UM, IN GENERAL, LITERATURE THAT
PASSES THE TEST OF TIME IS
LITERATURE THAT PEOPLE CAN
UNDERSTAND.
IT'S TRUE THAT SOMETIMES THE
GENERATION IT COMES OUT IN
DOESN'T GET IT.
"MOBY DICK" WAS NOT WIDELY
POPULAR IN ITS OWN PERIOD.

Tina says MMM-HMM.

Suanne says BUT WE CAN
READ IT NOW AND SEE THAT IN
FACT, I'M NOT SAYING THAT
EVERYTHING HAS TO EASY.
BUT THERE HAVE TO BE THE
REWARDS THERE FOR THE READER,
AND I THINK THAT THERE ARE TOO
MANY WRITERS OUT THERE TODAY,
NOT NECESSARILY CANADIAN
NOVELISTS, BUT SAY IN THEATRE,
AMONG SOME OF THE AMERICAN
NOVELISTS, AND ITS RAMPANT IN
EUROPE, WHERE THE IDEA IS THAT
THE READER IS UNWORTHY, AND THE
WRITER WILL SHARE A LITTLE BIT
OF HIS CONSCIOUSNESS.

Tina says GIVE ME AN EXAMPLE.

Suanne says OF THAT KIND
OF A --

Tina says YEAH.

Suanne says ALL SORTS OF
FRENCH PEOPLE.
YOU LOOK AT SOMEONE LIKE LACON.

Tina says ALL SORTS OF FRENCH
PEOPLE.

Tina laughs.

Suanne says WILLIAM GATT,
NOW JONATHAN FRANZEN JUST DID
AN ARTICLE ON THIS ISSUE --

Ian says HE'S A GOOD
EXAMPLE.

Suanne says JONATHAN
FRANZEN HIMSELF IS NOT A GOOD
EXAMPLE.
WE'LL FIGHT ABOUT THAT LATER.

Tina says YES, HE'S A WONDERFUL
WRITER.

Suanne says JONATHAN
FRANZEN LAST MONTH OR THE MONTH
BEFORE HAD AN ESSAY IN THE NEW
YORKER IN WHICH HE DIVIDED
NOVELS INTO TWO CLASSES, STATUS
NOVELS AND CONTRACT NOVELS.
STATUS NOVELS ARE THE NOVELS
YOU READ TO SHOW THAT YOU ARE A
MEMBER OF THE INTELLECTUAL
ELITE.
NO ONE COULD ACTUALLY ENJOY
THEM, THEY'RE VERY HARD WORK,
AH, BUT THEY ESTABLISH YOUR
SUPERIORITY.
CONTRACT NOVELS ARE WHERE THE
WRITER SAYS, TELL YOU WHAT, YOU
READ MY BOOK AND YOU'LL HAVE A
GOOD TIME AND MAYBE LEARN
SOMETHING ALONG THE WAY.

Tina says MMM-HMM.

Suanne says I'M ALL IN
FAVOUR OF THE CONTRACT GUYS.

Tina says BUT THE CONTRACT GUYS,
I MEAN YOU CAN HAVE WHAT'S
CALLED A CONTRACT NOVEL AND
STILL LEARN SOMETHING.
IT CAN STILL BE A WONDERFUL
LITERARY PIECE OF, PIECE OF
ART.

Suanne says ABSOLUTELY.

Tina says CAN'T IT, IAN?
I MEAN THEY'RE NOT MUTUALLY
EXCLUSIVE.

Ian says WELL, ONLY A
POINTY HEAD LIKE FRANZEN WOULD
MAKE A DISTINCTION LIKE THAT IN
THE FIRST PLACE YOU KNOW, AND
TRY AND ORG --
I THINK, I THINK WHAT WE MISS
SOMETIMES IS THAT THERE IS SUCH
A THING AS THE GIFTED READER.
YOU KNOW, THE TALENT, THERE'S
THE TALENTED WRITER AND THE NOT
SO TALENTED WRITER.

Tina says MMM-HMM.

Ian says AND YOU KNOW,
THEY'RE NOT REALLY IN CONTROL
OF IT.
I MEAN THEY GO OUT, THEY WRITE,
THEY'RE POOR, YOU KNOW,
SOMETIMES THEY WIN A PRIZE.

Tina says YES.

Ian says YOU KNOW, THEY
GET A DATE ONCE IN A WHILE.
VERY, VERY RARELY.
BUT THE TALENTED READER,
SOMEBODY WHO CAN MAKE IT
THROUGH A DIFFICULT TEXT.
YOU KNOW, WHO CAN ACTUALLY MAKE
IT ALL THE WAY THROUGH
BECKETT'S "MALLOY."
YOU KNOW, WHICH IS UNREADABLE,
DESPITE THAT FACT THAT 50 percent OF
IT IS ABOUT PASSING WIND.
YOU KNOW, WHICH YOU WOULD THINK
WOULD BE YOU KNOW, A SUSTAINING
SUBJECT.

Tina says WELL, YOU WOULD.

Ian says WELL, A LOT OF
PEOPLE WOULD.
BUT SO, THERE'S, THERE'S A
READER WHO CAN FORCE THEIR WAY
THROUGH "PARADISE LOST," YOU
KNOW.

Tina says YES.

Ian says AND, AND REALIZE
THAT GETTING THERE IS, IS HALF
THE FUN.

Tina says YOU TEACH YOUNG
PEOPLE.

Suanne says YES.

Tina says ARE READERS TODAY LESS
EQUIPPED THAN IN GENERATIONS
PAST TO DEAL WITH WHAT MIGHT BE
DIFFICULT TEXTS?
I MEAN YOU KNOW, IS IT, IS
"MIDDLEMARCH" A BOOK THAT'S
JUST TOO HARD FOR THIS, FOR
YOUNGER PEOPLE TODAY?

Suanne says OH, REALLY
HERE'S THE, THIS IS A PERFECTLY
GOOD QUESTION, BUT
UNFORTUNATELY AT THIS STAGE
IT'S THE WRONG QUESTION.
SOME OF THEM ARE OVER EQUIPPED
FOR READING "MIDDLEMARCH,"
BECAUSE THEY'VE DONE DEGREES IN
LITERATURE.
SO THEY, THEY HAVE SUPER
EQUIPMENT FOR EXAMINING ANY
TEXT.
A LOT OF THE OTHERS COULD READ
IT IF THEY WANT TO, BUT THE
DIFFICULTY IS, THEY DON'T WANT
TO.
UM, THE DIFFICULTY IS NOT IN
THE INDIVIDUAL WORDS ON THE
PAGE, IN THE DIFFICULTY OF
READING, BUT THEY'RE USED TO
EVERYTHING BEING EMOTIONALLY
RELEVANT TO THEM.
ALSO YOUNGER PEOPLE READ LESS
THAN PEOPLE OF OUR AGE DO FOR
ENTERTAINMENT.

Tina says MMM-HMM.

Suanne says THEY HAVE
OTHER SOURCES.
THEY HAVE MUCH SHORTER
ATTENTION SPANS, AND I WORRY
MUCH MORE ABOUT THAT.
IT'S NOT A QUESTION OF WHETHER
DIFFICULT NOVELS OR EASY NOVELS
WILL SURVIVE, BUT WHETHER THESE
PEOPLE ARE GOING TO BE WILLING
TO READ ANYTHING LONG AT ALL?

Tina says IAN.

Ian says I DON'T THINK
THAT'S TRUE AT ALL.
IN FACT THERE ARE STUDIES THAT
SHOW THAT ATTENTION SPANS ARE
ACTUALLY LENGTHENING NOT, NOT
GETTING SHORTER.
UM, JUST FOR STARTERS, BUT I, I
THINK IT'S YOU KNOW, 80 percent OF ANY
PROF --
80 percent OF THE DOCTORS IN THE
WORLD, 80 percent OF THE, OF THE
BUREAUCRATS IN THE WORLD, 80 percent
OF THE JOURNALISTS ARE
MEDIOCRITIES.
80 percent OF THE READERS ARE NOT VERY
GOOD AT IT, AND THE SAME IS
TRUE OF THE WRITERS.
THESE, YOU HAVE A LOT MORE TO
TAKE UP YOUR ATTENTION AND
YOUR, AND YOUR TIME NOW.
YOU'VE GOT THE TURNER CHANNEL,
YOU'VE GOT THE INTERNET, YOU'VE
GOT THE BOTTLE OF GIN, YOU'VE
GOT YOU KNOW THIS AND THAT, BUT
THAT HAS ALWAYS HAS BEEN THUS
AND ALWAYS WILL BE SO.

Suanne says OKAY, HAVING
GRANTED THAT I DO WANT TO SAY
THAT THERE ARE A LOT OF
WONDERFUL READERS OUT THERE.
I KNOW CAUSE I TALK TO BOOK
CLUBS.

Tina says YEAH.

Suanne says AND I AM JUST
AMAZED BY THESE PEOPLE WITH
JOBS, WITH FAMILIES, WITH OTHER
DEMANDS ON THEIR TIME WHO SHOW
UP ONCE A WEEK OR ONCE A MONTH
AND THEY'VE READ THE BOOK.
AND THEY HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT
THE BOOK, AND THEY'RE REALLY
ENGAGED AH, SOMETIMES WITH
WONDERFUL WORKS OF FICTION.
SOMETIMES BY BOOKS BY KASIRO
MISHIGURA, THEY PROBABLY WOULD
HAVE BEEN BETTER OFF WATCHING
CNN.
BUT --

Tina chuckles.

Tina says BUT I AGREE WITH YOU.
I MEET THEM ALL THE TIME.
PEOPLE ARE DYING TO TALK ABOUT
BOOKS.
AND THEY'RE DYING TO TALK ABOUT
YOU KNOW, WHAT WAS INTERESTING
OR DIFFICULT ABOUT THEM.

Suanne says AND IT'S NOT
THE EASY BOOKS.
THEY WANT SOMETHING THEY HAVE
TO WORK WITH.

Tina says THEY WANT, THEY WANT,
OKAY, LET ME ASK IAN, THE LAST
QUESTION.
SO THEN IS IT A GOOD TIME TO BE
A WRITER?
I MEAN IS IT A GOOD TIME TO BE
A, A, A LET'S, MAYBE NOT
DIFFICULT, BUT LITERARY WRITER,
TO WRITE THINGS THAT ARE
CHALLENGING AND, AND, AH --

Ian says WELL, IF I, IF I
WERE A GREAT LITERARY WRITER
I'D BE ABLE TO SAY THAT.
BUT I, I DO THINK IT'S, ONE
THING IS TRUE.
THAT WE HAVE THIS SO-CALLED
INFORMATION EXPLOSION GOING ON
NOW.
WHERE CONSTANTLY WE ARE TOLD,
BOMBARDED BY INFORMATION.
BUT IN FACT YOU KNOW, IT'S THE
SAME INFORMATION.
IT'S THE SAME FIVE PERCENT OF
EXPERIENCE REPEATED ENDLESSLY.
WHEREAS IN FACT 95 percent OF THE
WORLD IS PRETTY MUCH UNTOUCHED.
THERE IS A LOT OF PACK WRITING
THESE DAYS.
WHETHER IT'S PACK JOURNALISM.

Suanne says YEAH.

Ian says PACK FICTION.
I MEAN A LOT OF THE BOOKS IN
BOOK CONTESTS NOW, YOU KNOW,
THE, THE VARIOUS TOURNAMENTS
THAT ARE YOU KNOW, THE PRIZES
ARE BEING AWARDED NOW --

Suanne says TOURNAMENTS?

Ian says ARE VERY, VERY
SIMILAR.
THEY HAVE A SIMILAR FEEL, THE
SIMILAR TONALITY, A SIMILAR
POINT OF VIEW.
I'D SAY MOST OF THE WORLD IS
BEING IGNORED, AND EVEN MORE
IGNORED THAN IT NORMALLY WAS
AND THAT MAKES IT A GREAT TIME
TO BE A WRITER.
BECAUSE THEN YOU CAN STAND UP
AND SAY, YOU KNOW WHAT?
I ACTUALLY CAN WRITE.
I, I BET SOMEBODY LIKE
NICHOLSON BAKER WILL PROBABLY
DO THIS.
I CAN ACTUALLY WRITE A WHOLE
BOOK ABOUT HIM, A, A PACK OF
MATCHES, AND NO ONE ELSE HAS
THOUGHT OF IT, BUT IT'S BEEN
SITTING THERE IN FRONT OF YOU
ALL THIS TIME.

Suanne says I HOPE YOU
ENJOY IT WHEN IT COMES OUT.
I'LL BE SKIPPING THAT ONE.

Tina laughs.

Ian says WILL YOU?

Suanne says YEAH, FOR
SURE.

Ian says WELL, YOU'LL BE
MAKING A TERRIBLE MISTAKE.
IT'S JUST NOT FALLING INTO
WHAT'S SUPPOSED TO BE WRITTEN
ABOUT.

Tina says OKAY, WELL AFRAID THIS
IS RUNNING OUT OF TIME.
SO, THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR
COMING IN.
SO, IN CLOSING TONIGHT, WHAT DO
READERS MAKE OF THE PROBLEM OF
HARD TO READ BOOKS?
ARE THEY WILLING TO TOUGH IT
OUT IF THE GOING GETS TOUGH?
HERE'S WHAT SOME READERS HAVE
TO SAY.

An elderly woman says WELL, IF I READ A BOOK AND I
FIND IT'S HARD GOING UM, I'LL
CARRY ON FOR A WHILE, OR I
MIGHT EVEN CHEAT AND READ THE
END OF IT.

A man in his sixties says SOME BOOKS JUST DON'T SEEM
TO WORK FOR ME AND I GIVE UP ON
THEM.
BUT MOSTLY, I FEEL OBLIGED TO
COMPLETE THEM.

A woman in her late thirties says I USUALLY PUT IT ASIDE FOR A
WHILE, AND THEN I USUALLY COME
BACK TO IT.
I FIND THAT SOME DAYS I'M JUST
NOT IN THE MOOD FOR THAT TYPE
OF MATERIAL, OR MAYBE FINDING
IT A LITTLE BIT DIFFICULT, AND
I'LL COME BACK TO IT LATER.

An old man says I THINK MY TENDENCY IS FIRST
AND FOREMOST TO BLAME MYSELF
FOR NOT BEING UP TO UM, WHAT
HE, THE AUTHOR WAS TRYING TO
CONVEY.

A man in his thirties says SOMETIMES IT'S A PIECE OF
ARTWORK, OR IT'S, THEY CONSIDER
THEMSELVES ARTISTS, SO, IF YOU
DON'T UNDERSTAND THEIR WORK AND
YOU CAN KIND OF WORK THROUGH IT
OR ABANDON IT.
IF YOU ABANDON IT, IT'S OKAY.
IT'S NOT THE END OF THE WORLD,
IT JUST MEANS THAT YOU GUYS
DIDN'T CONNECT.

A woman in her forties says I'LL GIVE IT MY BEST SHOT.
I WON'T PLOW THROUGH IT,
BECAUSE IT'S SUPPOSED TO BE FUN
AND, AND LIFE'S TOO SHORT TO,
TO WASTE TIME ON, ON SOMETHING
THAT'S REALLY UNPLEASANT.
WHAT I WILL OFTEN DO THOUGH IS
PUT A BOOK AWAY AND TRY IT
AGAIN LATER.
AND I'VE BEEN DOING THAT FOR
THE LAST 30 YEARS OR SO WITH
WILLIAM FAULKNER, AND
EVENTUALLY MAYBE ONE DAY I'LL,
I'LL GET TO HIM.

Theme music plays as the end credits roll.

Special thanks Jain Dickson. Colborne Lodge Museum, High Park.

Host, Tina Srebotnjak.

Executive Producer, Doug Grant.

Director, Michael Smith.

Music by Joe Sealy.

Imprint. C/O TVOntario. P.O. Box 200. Station Q, Toronto, Ontario. M4T 2T1.

E-mail: imprint@tvo.org.

Website: www.tvo.org

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 2002, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: Imprint season 14 episode 10