Transcript: Imprint season 14 episode 9 | Nov 20, 2002

Tina Srebotnjak stands in a studio with pieces of art in red and orange hanging in the background.
She’s in her late thirties, with short chestnut hair and bangs. She’s wearing a long dark blue blazer.

Tina says TONIGHT ON "IMPRINT" WHY
WINNING ISN'T EVERYTHING.

A white book cover appears next to a basketball. The cover features a pair of sneakers.

Tina continues "MY LOSING SEASON" WHAT
PAT CONROY LEARNED FROM
PLAYING ON A LOSING BASKETBALL
TEAM IN COLLEGE.

Pat is in his fifties, with white hair.

In a clip, Pat says THERE'S NOT EVERYONE THAT
HAS LIVED THAT UNDERSTAND THE
DIMENSION AND THE SADNESS AND
I THINK ALSO THE GREAT
LEARNING CURVE THAT COMES FROM
LOSS.

Tina says "PASSAGES" WELCOME HOME TO
CANADA.
FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS FOR
CANADIAN IMMIGRANT WRITERS.

Pictures show two young men, a family and a couple sitting on the beach.

In a clip, a man in his thirties says IN READING THIGHS STORIES
AND THE POIGNANTSY, HOW
DIFFICULT, YET HOW REWARDING
THE EXPERIENCE OF THE PASSAGE
TO CANADA IS FOR EACH OF THESE
AUTHORS.
I THINK THAT CALL BE THE
BUILDING BLOCK FOR GREATER
TOLERANCE.

Six women clap their hands and sing standing in a circle.

They sing GET OUT, GET UP AND TRY IT.

Tina says A GROUP OF WRITERS TURNED
PERFORMANCE ARTISTS BANDING
TOGETHER TO CELEBRATE THEIR
SIZE.

Theme music plays as the opening sequence rolls.
Fast clips show books and maps in hues of orange and red.

Back in the studio, Tina says WE BEGIN WITH A GROUP
OF YOUNG WRITERS WHO'S MESSAGE
IS AS BOLD AS THEIR ART.
THEY CALL THEMSELVES PRETTY,
PORKY AND PISSED OFF.
WHEN THE TORONTO WOMEN REALISE
THEY ALL LIKE TO WRITE ABOUT
THE SAME THEMES THEY DECIDED
TO GET TOGETHER AND MAKE A
SHOW OF IT.
THEY ARE DETERMINED TO
CELEBRATE THEIR SIZE, BOTH
THEIR BOOKS AND ON STAGE.

A series of pictures show female models.

The women continue singing RIOT, DON'T DIET.
GET OUT, GET UP AND TRY.
RIOT, DON'T DIET.
GET OUT, GET UP AND TRY.
HEY, GIRL GET YOUR PHASE OUT
OF THAT MAGAZINE, YOU ARE MORE
THAN A BEAUTY MACHINE.
YOU HAVE ANGER, SOUL AND MORE.
TAKE TO THE STREETS AND LET IT
ROAR.
RIOT, DIET.
DON'T DIET GET UP, GET OUT AND
TRY.
U HUH.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Allison. Tracy. Mariko. Joanne. Lisa. Zoe."

Now, they sit on a couch. Allison is in her twenties, with short black hair.

Allison says WE SAY PRETTY PORKY AND
PISSED OFF IS LARGE AND IN
CHARGE PEOPLE WHO ARE OUT TO
SORT OF SMASH, MYTHS AND
STERIOTYPES ABOUT FAT PEOPLE.
AND GET THE POINT ACROSS
THAT'S EVERY BODY IS A GOOD
BODY.
THAT IS OUR STOCK ANSWER.

Mariko says IT IS A GOOD ANSWER.
I THINK IT IS TRUE.

The caption changes to "Allyson Mitchell. Pretty, Porky and Pissed off."

Allyson says THE WRITING I HAVE DONE
ACADEMICLY IS A LOT ABOUT
CULTURAL PRODUCTION AND GIRLS
FINDING A VOICE FOR
THEMSELVES.
THAT'S WHAT PRETTY PORKY AND
PISSED OFF IS ABOUT.
IT IS ABOUT TRYING TO FIND A
VOICE TO TRY TO BREAKTHROUGH
STERIO TYPES ABOUT WOMEN'S
BODIES.

As she speaks, pictures show Allyson biting a pill that reads "Don’t diet," a magazine cover reading "Fat-tastic! Allyson Mitchell makes fat fun and fashionable" and a newspaper photo of her under the title "Get yummy with your tummy."

She continues WHO GETS TO BE SEXY.
HAVE FUN, BE ON STAGE, HAVE
THE MICROPHONE AND HOLD A PEN
AND GET PUBLISHED, TOO, RIGHT?

Allyson reads I ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO PICK
UP A MARKER, PIECE OF CHALK,
OR TUBE OF LIPSTICK AND LEAVE
THE MARK ON THE SPACES YOU
MOVE THROUGH THE EVERYDAY LIFE.

Mariko is in her twenties, with short red hair.

Mariko says WE ARE VERY CONSCIOUS
PEOPLE.
I THINK IT IS ALL ABOUT
THINKING AND WANTING TO DO
SOMETHING ABOUT IT.
I THINK A LOT OF THE THING I
WRITE OR FAIRLY CRITICAL
THINGS.

A red book cover reads "True Lies."

Mariko continues A LOT OF THE STUFF I WRITE
TENDS TO BE SORT OF LOOKING AT
SOCIETY AND HAVING AN OPINION
ABOUT IT JUST TRYING TO PHRASE
THAT OPINION IN THE NICE,
INTERESTING AND, FUNNY WAY.

In a bar, standing on a stage, Mariko reads DEAR MISS MACKY I AM AFRAID
I MUST REQUEST YOU SEES
REFERRING TO YOURSELF AS A
WRITER.

The caption changes to "Mariko Tamaki. Pretty, Porky and Pissed off."

Mariko continues reading WE HAVE QUALIFY SEVERAL OF
YOUR PEERS CONDUCTED A FORMAL
INVESTIGATION AND DISCOVERED
YOU HAVE HAD NEVER AN
DIFFICULT CHIDE OR OUNCE OF
INTEGGY.
IT WAS REVEALED YOU SPENT YOUR
GRANT MONEY ON SHOES AND CHIPS
AT THE 7-11 YOU HAVE BEEN
HEARD MAKING FUN OF MARGARET
ATWOOD AND EXPRESSING AN
INTEREST OF MONEY TOGETHER
UNITED STATES.

The audience laughs.

The caption changes to "Ann Decter. Creative Writing Teacher." Ann stands near the stage. She’s in her forties, with shoulder-length blond hair.

Ann says WHEN I MET HER SHE CAME TO
A COURSE I TAUGHT AT GEORGE
BROWN COLLEGE.
THEY WOULD COME IN THESE GET
UPS AND THEY -- IT WAS -- TO
ME IT WAS A NEW GENERATION
WALKING INTO THE CLASSROOM.
SOMEONE WOULD READ AND
THEY GO AWSOME!
WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE
YOU KNOW.

Sitting on the couch, Joanne says THE WRITERLY ASPECT THE
FACT THAT WE PUT OUR THOUGHTS
ON PAPER IT MAKES IT A LITTLE
EASIER TO ACTUALLY GET UP IN
FRONT OF A LOT OF PEOPLE AND
TALK ABOUT THESE THINGS.

They all laugh.

Allyson says WE HAVE A COMPLEX THEORY
BEHIND WHAT WE'RE DOING.
IT IS NOT JUST WE'RE DOING A
SWEET DANCE WITH CAKES OR
BALLERINNA OUTFITS.
WE'RE NOT JUST FITTING FOR THE
RIGHT TO BUY PLUS SIZED
CLOTHING.
WE'RE INTO QUESTIONING WHY
NORTH AMERICAN BODIES ARE
GROWING AND WHY WE IS HAVE
SUCH A MORAL ATTITUDE TOWARDS
THAT.
I THINK THAT'S WHERE OUR
WRITERLY BACKGROUNDS HAVE COME
INTO FILLING OUT THE COMPLEXTY
OF OUR FUN AND FUNNY
PERFORMANCES.

As she speaks, a clip shows the six of them performing and dancing.

The caption changes to "Elizabeth Ruth. Writer." Elizabeth is in her thirties, with short brown hair.

Back at the bar, Elizabeth says I THINK THEY'RE THE
FUNNIEST PERFORMANCE TROOP I
HAVE EVER SEEN.
IT TAKES FAT ACTIVISM TO A NEW
LEVEL.
EVERYONE IN THE AUDIENCE CAN
RELATE.
MAIL OR FEMALE LARGE OR SMALL.
THEY'RE HILLAROUS I THINK THEY
SHOULD GO TO NEW YORK.

The caption changes to "Trish Salah. Poet." Trish is in his thirties, with curly red hair.

Trish says THEY ARE DOING INTERESTING
WORK.
THERE ISN'T ANYONE ELSE DOING
THE ACTIVIST WORK THEY ARE IN
THIS CITY ANYWAY.

The caption changes to "R. M. Vaughan. Writer." Vaughan is in his forties, with blond hair.

Vaughan says THEY ARE TAKING AN IMPORTANT
ISSUE AND TEACHING PEOPLE HOW
TO OPEN THEIR MINDS, BUT
THEY'RE ALSO HAVING FUN WHILE
THEY DO IT.

Lisa sits on a bed covered with clothes. She is in her twenties, with short black hair.

Lisa says IT PROVIDES A SENSE OF
CONFIDENCE FOR ME TO FEEL I
CAN EXPRESS MYSELF AND MY
EXPERIENCES.
WHICH I USUALLY DO IN MY
WRITING.

The caption changes to "Lisa Ayuso. Pretty, Porky and Pissed Off."

Lisa continues INSTEAD OF IGNORING A BIG PART
OF MY LIFE DEALING WITH FAT
AND FAT ACTIVISM.
I'M ABLE TO INCORPORATE IN MY
WORK, WHICH I ENJOY, I DON'T
THINK THEY ARE SEPARATE.

Lisa reads WHEN I WAS A BABY I BARELY
FIT INTO MY MOTHER'S BELLY.
I BECAME TOO BIG FOR MY CRIB.
TOO HEAVY FOR TEETER-TOTTERS,
STUFFED WITH THE GILLS WITH
NOTHING LEFT ON MY PLATE.
THEN I TURNED 12, 15, 21 STILL
TRYING TO FIT IN THE SPACE NOT
QUITE READY FOR ME.
STILL NOT READY FOR ME.

Tracy says DOES ANYONE WANT TO WEAR
THIS?

Zoe is in her twenties, with short blond hair.

Zoe says I GET A LOT OF CONFIDENCE
AND IDEAS FROM THE OTHER
CHICKS IN PRETTY PISSED OFF IF
I WANT TO ATTACK BODY OR BODY
IMAGE OR ACTIVISM OR THAT SORT
OF THING.

A pink book cover featuring a young woman reads "The Best 10 Minutes of Your Life."

Zoe reads I WAS BORN IN MY MOTHER'S
FIFTH MOTHER AND DID MY TIME
IN INCUBATORS, PREVERBAL
PLEASE GOD SAVE ME BEFORE THE
ONE YEAR MARK.

The caption changes to "Zoe Whittall. Pretty, Porky and Pissed Off."

Zoe continues IT READ BABY WITH ONE IN A
THOUSAND CHANCE OF LIVING 1976
FARMER DAUGHTER'S MIRACLE. WHEN
MY LIFE CIRCLES I CALM NOT SO
SMALL AGAINST THE FAMILIAR
WALLS.
THINKING IF I EVER GET
OFF THIS COUCH I WILL BE
UNSTOPABLE.

Mariko says THE CENTRE ON STANDARDS AND
MAKE YOUR OWN STAGE.
ONE OF THE THINGS WE HAVE
DONE IS SET OUR OWN STANDARDS.
WE JUST KNOW -- EACH OTHER,
YOU'RE VERY PRETTY.
IT WORKS.
AND IF -- IF VOGUE WON'T PUT
YOU ON THE COVER.
MAKE YOUR OWN MAGAZINE.
IF YOU ARE NOT ACCEPTED IN THE
BROADWAY SHOW, MAKE YOUR OWN
BROADWAY SHOW.
THAT IS A BIG MESSAGE.

Allison says IF YOU CAN'T GET IN
THEMATIONAL BALLET OF CANADA,
MAKE UP YOUR OWN DANCE TROOP.

The six of them sing LIBERATE THE BEAUTY QUEEN.
LET'S GET, MEAN!
ARRRG.

Now an animated book sitting on a table opens to reveal an old picture of a basketball team, followed by a book cover and a clip of a man and two children crossing the street.

Tina says UP NEXT, COLLEGE
BASKETBALL MEMORIES FROM
AMERICAN WRITER PAT CONROY.
LATER, PASSAGES.
WRITERS REFLECT ON THE JOURNEY
TO A NEW LIFE IN CANADA.

Back in the studio, Tina says WHO SAYS WINNING IS BETTER
THAN LOSING?
CERTAINLY NOT PAT CONROY.
THE WRITER WHO BROUGHT YOU
"THE PRINCE OF TIDES" HAS JUST
PUBLISHED MY LOSING SEASON.
THE MEMOIR ABOUT HIS SENIOR
YEAR PLAYING COLLEGE
BASKETBALL.
AS THE TITLE SUGGESTS HIS TEAM
ENJOYED FEW VICTORIES AND
SUFFERED SOME CRUSHING
DEFEATS.
IN THE END IT WAS ONE OF THE
MOST FULFILLING YEARS OF PAT
CONROY'S LIFE.
I MET HIM DURING THE
INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF
AUTHORS.

Now a clip plays of Tina interviewing Pat in a small restaurant.

Tina says PAT CONROY WELCOME.

Pat says THANK YOU.

Tina says WHY A BOOK ABOUT THIS
PARTICULAR YEAR?

Pat says IT WAS AN ACCIDENT.
I WAS ON TOUR.
NOTHING EVER HAPPENS ON TOUR.
I LOOKED UP AT THE END OF THE
SIGNING AND SAW A GUY A PLAYED
GUARD WITH.
I SAID DEBROS EVER BEEN IN A
BOOKSTORE BEFORE?

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Pat Conroy. My Losing Season."

Pat continues HE SAID ONCE.
I WAS LOST.
HE SAID WOULD YOU GO HOME AND
BEAT MY WIFE AND KIDS -- MEET
MY WIFE AND KIDS THEY DON'T
BELIEVE I KNOW YOU.
ON THE WAY HOME IN THE OLD
LOCKER ROOM TALK.
HE SAID DO YOU REMEMBER HOW
YOUR CAREER ENDED?

I SAID I CERTAINLY DO.

A black and white picture shows young basketball players. Pat appears next to John.

He continues I SAID REMEMBER WHAT HAPPENED?
I DO, BUT I NEVER MENTIONED IT
MUST BE PAINFUL.
JOHN MISSED A LAYUP IN THE
LAST SECOND OF THE OVERTIME
GAME.
LOSING AND IT WAS THE END OF
MY CAREER.
JOHN DEBROS WHO IS NOT A
TOUCHY FEELLY MAN.
NOT AN EARTH SHOES KIND OF
MAN.
AT A STOP LIGHT REACHES OVER
AND SAYS CONROY, I THINK
MISSING THAT LAYUP PARTIALLY
RUINED MY LIFE.
I HAD NO IDEA THAT ANYONE ON
MY TEAM FELT AS DEEPLY ABOUT
THAT SEASON SO LONG AGO AS I
DID.
I WENT BACK TO PUT MY TEAM
TOGETHER.

Tina says MISSING THE LAYUP
MEANS MISSING THE SHOT HE
SHOULD HAVE MADE AND DIDN'T
GET IT.

Pat says CANADA, IT IS LIKE MISSING
A GOAL --

Tina says THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

She laughs.

Tina says WE ARE CLEAR ON THAT,
BASKETBALL OBVIOUSLY MEANT AN
ENORMOUS AMOUNT TO YOU.
YOU TALK ABOUT WHAT IT MEANT
WHEN YOU WERE YOUNG.
CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THAT?

Pat says IT WAS A BIG PASSION IN MY
LIFE.
IT BROUGHT ME MORE JOY THAN
ANYTHING I HAVE DONE.
I LOVE IT.
IT WAS A FAST MOVING
MOVING -- BEAUTIFUL GAME.
I MEAN -- ALL SPORTS, IF YOU
LOVE A SPORT, IT IS THE BEAUTY
OF THE SPORT THAT CAUSES YOU
JOY LIKE NOTHING ELSE.
WHEN I LOST IT IS ONE OF THE
MOST DEVASTATING THINGS THAT
EVER HAPPENED.

Tina says YOU SAY BASKETBALL
KEPT YOU FROM KILLING YOUR
FATHER?

Pat says YES I HAD A TERRIBLE,
TERRIBLE CHILD HOOD.
I THINK I COULD HAVE BEEN ONE
OF THOSE KIDS THAT PUT PAY
BUTCHER KNIFE THROUGH OUR
FATHER'S NECK.
I HAD THE SPORTS, THE THING,
THE OUTLET ECOULD ALWAYS TURN
TO.
AND TURN TO WITH LOVE AND
DEVOTION.
TURN TO I THINK PARTIALLY
BECAUSE MY FATHER HAD BEEN SO
GOOD AT IT.
TURN TO THINKING I WAS
HONOURING HIM.

Tina says YOU'RE PROBLEMATIC IT
IS A EUPHEMISM YOU WROTE "THE
GREAT SAN TINNI" THE FAMILY
WAS HORRIFIED WHEN YOUR DAD
DIED A FEW YEARS AGO.
HE SAID HE DIED A BELOVED AND
EVEN ADORED MAN.

Pat says DAD HAD ONE OF THE GREAT
SECOND ACTS WHEN I WROTE "THE
GREAT SAN TINNI" HE HATED THAT
BOOK WITH HIS BODY AND SOUL.
MY MOTHER TOOK THE BOOK AND
GAVE IT TO THE JUDGE IN THE
DIVORCE COURT AND SAID IT IS
ALL HERE.
IT IS ALL RIGHT THERE.
MY SON WROTE IT DOWN.
THERE'S NOTHING TO TESTIFY
ABOUT.
WHEN DAD CAME TO ME-- YOU
KNOW -- HORRIFIED I THINK HIS
FEELINGS GREATLY HURT.
I SAD I'M SORRY I HURT YOUR
FEELINGS BUT NOTHING WILL MAKE
UP FOR MY RUINED CHILDHOOD.
WHEN MY FATHER DID THAT I AM
GRATEFUL TO,
HE SPENT THE REST OF HIS LIFE
TRYING TO PROVE THAT "THE
GREAT SAN TINNI" WAS A LIE.

Tina says DID YOU LIKE ROBERT
DUVALL AS YOUR DAD?

Pat says I LOVED IT.
MY FATHER DIED THINKING
HE HAD MADE
ROBERT DUVALL’S CAREER.

A movie clip plays.

The caption changes to "The Great Santini."

A man with a moustache and a male teenager stand in a basketball court.

The man with a moustache says YOU HAVE TO WIN BY TWO .
HEY-- MOMMA'S BOY I BET YOU
WILL CRY.
COMON MOMMA'S BOY LET'S SEE
YOU CRY.
COME ON CRY.
COME ON -- COME ON.

The man repeatedly hits the teenager’s head with a basket ball.

The man continues JUST A FEW.
SQUIRT A FEW.
CRY.
CRY.
ONE, TWO, THREE, CRY.
ONE, TWO, THREE, CRY.

The teenager walks into a house without saying or doing anything as the man follows him bouncing the ball on the back of his head.

The man continues COME ON.
COME ON, BABY.
COME ON LITTLE GIRL, CRY.
CRY.
MY FAVOURITE DAUGHTER, I SWEAR
TO GOD YOU YOUR MY SWEETEST
LITTLE GIRL.

The teenager yells THIS LITTLE GIRL JUST
WINNIPEGGED YOUR ASS GOOD,
CORNELL.

The teenager walks into a room.

The clip ends.

Pat appears reading his book on split screens.

Pat reads I WOULD NOT SELL MY SOUL TO
BE PLAYING COLLEGE BALL
SOMEWHERE IN THIS COUNTRY, BUT
I WOULD GIVE LONG AND SERIOUS
CONSIDERATION.
IT IS ONLY WHEN I GAVE UP
BASKETBALL THAT I ATTRACTED
THE UNFAVORABLE ATTENTION OF
THE REST OF THE WORLD.
BASKETBALL PROVIDED A
LEGITIMATE PHYSICAL OUTLET FOR
ALL THE VIOLENCE, RAGE AND
SADNESS I LATER BROUGHT TO THE
WRITING TABLE.
IT KEPT ME FROM FACING THE
RUINED BOY WHO PLAYED
BASKETBALL, INSTEAD OF KILLING
HIS FATHER.
IT WAS ALL FROM THE MAIN
LANGUAGE THAT ALLOWED FATHER
AND SON TO TALK TO EACH
OTHER.
IF NOT FOR SPORTS I DID NOT
THINK MY FATHER WOULD EVER HAVE TALK TO
ME.

A the interview, Tina says OBVIOUSLY YOU THINK
THERE IS MORE TO BE LEARNED
FROM A LOSING SEASON THAN A
WINNING WON.

Pat says I DON'T KNOW YOU.
I KNOW YOU HAVE BEEN GOTTEN.
I HAVE BEEN FIRED FROM A JOB
JOB -- "THE WATERS WIDE" I
SHOULD HAVE LEARNED MORE FROM
GETTING FIRED THAN I LEARNED
FROM GETTING A JOB.
THIS WONDERFUL -- I GUESS I
WAS THINKING THAT LOSS

- WINNING PREPARING ME
FOR THE DEATH OF MY MOTHER.
WINNING DID NOTHING FOR THAT.
I HAVE BEEN ON WINNING TEAMS
IT DIDN'T DO ONE THING FOR THE
AGONY AND THE HORROR OF
DEALING IN A WORLD WITHOUT MY
MOTHER.
THERE'S NOT ANYONE THAT HAS
LIVED THAT DOESN'T UNDERSTAND
THE DIMENSIONS AND THE
SADNESS.
I THINK ALSO THE -- ALSO THE
GREAT LEARNING CURVE THAT
COMES FROM LOSS.

Tina says THE EXPERIENCE MUST
HAVE BEEN AN INTERESTING ONE.
HERE YOU ARE IN MIDDLE AGE
LOOKING BACK AT A BOY THAT WAS
1920, 21.
YOU KNOW, THAT OLD ADAGE THEY
SAY THAT LIFE IS LIVED FORWARD
AND UNDERSTOOD BACKWARDS?
DID YOU FIND THAT IN WRITING
THIS?

Pat says THERE IS NO QUESTION ABOUT
IT.
I TELL PEOPLE NOW I DID NOT
KNOW ONE SINGLE THING IN THE
WORLD, UNTIL I TURNED 50.
I SIMPLY WAS ON CRUISE
CONTROL.
SUDDENLY THE GREAT -- THE
GREAT I THINK THE IMPOSSIBLE
DILEMMA OF BEING MIDDLE AGED
AND KNOWING HOW IT IS.
LOSING BOTH OF MY PARENTS.
ALL OF THAT HAD TO BE IN PLACE
TO FIND THIS TEAM I HAD NOT
SEEN FOR 30 YEAR.
TO FIND MYSELF.
I THINK WHEN I WENT BACK
TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHO THE
BOY I WAS.
FOR THE FIRST TIME I HAD TO FALL
IN LOVE WITH THAT BOY.

Pat reads SPORTS BOOKS ARE ALWAYS
BEEN WINNING BECAUSE IT IS
MORE PLEASURABLE THAT LOSING.
WINNING IS WONDERFUL IN EVERY
ASPECT.
THE DARKER MUSIC OF LOSS ALSO
RESONATES ON DARKER DEEPER
PLAINS I THINK ABOUT ALL THE
GAMES THAT PLAYED INTO A PART
OF SHAPING IT.
IT IS THE LOSSES.
THE LOSSES THAT STAND OUT.
THEY STILL MAKE THEIR APPROACH
WITH THE EXTRATIES TO ONE
INTACT.
WINNING SHAPES THE SOUL OF BAD
MEMORIES AND NOVELS AND IN
LIVES.
IT IS THE SUBJECT OF THOUSANDS
OF INSUFFERABLY BAD BOOKS.
IT IS OFTEN, A SWORN ENEMY OF
ART.

Tina says YOU MENTIONED IN THE
COURSE OF THIS THAT YOU
USUALLY HAVE ONE CRACK UP, I
THINK YOU USED DURING THE
WRITING OF EACH OF THE NOVELS.

Pat says IT HAS BEEN TRADITIONAL.

Tina says YOU HAVE A NERVOUS
BREAKDOWN.

Pat says IT IS WHAT I CALL THE
NERVOUS BREAKDOWN.
THE DEPRESSION, IMMOBILIZES IN
PUTS ME OVER LIKE A JACKKNIFE.
AND IT USUALLY TAKES SIX
MONTHS TO ENTERINTO INTO AND
GET OUT OF.

Tina says YOU DON'T THINK IT IS
TOO HIGH A PRICE TO PAY.

Pat says I LOVE WRITING.

Tina says NEAR THE END OF THE
BOOK YOU SAY I CAME TO THE
WRITING LIFE AS A POINT GUARD.
IT BECAME THE METAPHOR OF MY
TRANSITION.
HOW IS WRITING LIFE BEING LIKE
A POINT GUARD’

Pat says A POINT GUARD, YOU GET OUT OF
THE CHAIR.
YOU CAMERAMAN BEAT IT.
AROUND RUN THIS PLAY, GOT IT.
AS A NOVELIST.
ALL THE CHARACTERS YOU MOVE
THEM AROUND, THEY DO WHAT YOU
SAY.
YOU'RE IN CHARGE OF WHAT THEY
SAY.
THEY TALK, IT IS YOU.
THE POINT GUARD WAS THE GUY
THAT GOT IT ALL DONE AND
ORGANIZED IT.
LET'S GET THIS THING GOING.
AND IN THE WRONG PLACE GET OUT
ACROSS THE COURT.
NOVEL WRITING SEEMED LIKE
PLAYING.GAR.
IT SEEMED LIKE THE POINT GUARD
IS A PERFECT PREPARATION FOR
ME GOING INTO THE WRITING
LIFE.
ALTHOUGH I DID NOT KNOW WHAT
THE WRITING LIFE WAS.

Tina says YOU ARE A WONDERFUL
WRITER AND GLAD YOU CHOSE THAT
PROFESSION.

Pat says I'M DELIGHTED YOU THINK SO.

Back in the studio, Tina says "MY LOSING SEASON" IS
PUBLISHED BY DOUBLE DAY.
OKAY.
SO WE KNOW PAT CONROY'S OTHER
TALENT IS BASKETBALL.
WHAT ABOUT OTHER SCRIBES, WE
ASKED A GROUP OF PUBLISHED
AUTHORS TO REVEAL THEIR HIDDEN
TALENTS.

Now on an animated slate, clips show different authors answering the question "Do you have any hidden talents?"

The caption changes to "Charlotte Gray." She’s in her forties, with short blond hair.

Charlotte says I THINK MY TALENT FOR BEING
OBLIVIOUS TO EVERYONE AROUND
ME BECAUSE I'M READING A GOOD
BOOK IS UNSURPASSED.

The caption changes to "Katherine Govier." She’s in her fifties, with short blond hair.

Katherine says CAN I SAY I HAVE A BLACK
BELT?
I HAVE BLACK BELT IN
WEAPONS.

The caption changes to "Michael Chabon." He is in his forties, with shoulder-length dark hair.

Michael says I HAVE THE FOUR MOVES
MINUTES MINDS WITHOUT KNOWING
ABOUT IT.

The caption changes to "Camilla Gibb." She’s in her forties, with shoulder-length hair.

Camilla says MAKING A MEAN MARTINNI.

The caption changes to "Stephen Brunt." He is in his forties, with dark hair and a goatee.

Stephen says I AM A MEDIOCRE TROMBONE
PLAYER.
YOU CAN'T BRING IT OUT
SOCIALLY.

The caption changes to "Gail Bowen." She’s in her fifties, with short blond hair and bangs.

Gail says A CHICKEN THERE ARE A FEW
THING ON A LOVELY DAY TO BRING
YOU MORE PLEASURE THAN KILLING
A CHICKEN AND FEATHERING.

The caption changes to "Eric McCormack." He is in his sixties, with a white moustache and gray hair.

Eric says NONE WHATEVER.

The caption changes to "John Bentley Mays." He is in his fifties, balding and clean-shaven.

John says WELL I DO, BUT I WOULDN'T
MENTION IT ON TELEVISION.

The caption changes to "Maxine Hong Kingston." She is in her sixties, with long white hair.

Maxine says I AM A TAB DANCER.
I AM A ROLLERBLADER.

The caption changes to "Bernadine Evaristo." She is in her forties, with curly brown hair.

Bernadine says I'M MIMIC-- ONLY WHEN I AM
A RELAXED, DRUNK WITH A LOTS OF FRIENDS.

The caption changes to "Molly Peacock." She is in her fifties, with short gray hair and bangs.

Molly says I MAKE AN EXTREMELY MEAN
GINGER PEACH MUFFIN.

The caption changes to "Tim Wynveen." He is in his fifties, with short gray hair.

Tim says I'M A PRETTY GOOD COOK.

The caption changes to "Michel Faber." He is in his thirties, with blond hair.

Michel says I'M VERY GOOD AT
COMMUNICATING WITH CATS.
I SPEAK A SORT OF CAT LANGUAGE,
WHICH STRIKES A CHORD WITH
ANIMALS.

Back in the studio, Tina says IT IS OFTEN SAID THAT
CANADA IS A NATION OF
IMMIGRANTS.
COMING HERE TO MAKE A NEW LIFE
IS NO EASY FEET.
THERE'S A NEW BOOK BUT OUT
CALLED "PASSANGS WELCOME HOME
TO CANADA" IN IT SOME OF THE
MOST CELEBRATED WRITERS
CELEBRATE THE EXCITEMENT AND
ANGUISH OF LEAVING THEIR HOME
COUNTRIES.

A book cover features black and white family pictures.

Tina continues WE FEATURE TWO OF
THOSE WRITERS SHARING THEIR
FIRST HAND ACCOUNTS OF MAKING
CANADA THEIR HOME.

(violin music plays)
A slate reads "Ken Wiwa. Son of murdered Nigerian activist Hen Saro Wiwa. 1999 moved to Canada."

Ken stands outdoors. He’s in his thirties, with short black hair.

Ken reads THE DEEPER I WAS DRAWN INTO HIS WORLD,
THE MORE RESENTFUL I BECAME.
SO MANY CHOICES HAVE BEEN
MOTIVATED BY DESIRE TO ESCAPE
HIS INFLUENCE.
RATHER THAN WHAT I WANTED FOR
MYSELF.
I WAS TORN BETWEEN THE
IDENTITY AS HIS SON AND THE
APOLITICAL IDENTITY EYED HAD
IN ENGLAND I WAS HOVERING
BETWEEN A COUNTRY I TRIED TO
LEAVE BEHIND AND FORGET AND A
COUNTRY TRYING TO ENTERAN
IDENTITY THAT NO LONGER FITTED.

Pictures of Ken as a child and his father pop up.

Ken continues BY THE TIME I WAS 29 I HAD NO
IDEA WHO I WAS.
I HAD NO CONCEPT OF WHERE HOME
WAS OR WHOM OR WHAT I OWNED MY
ALEAGUENCE.
I WAS A DRIFT IN THE WORLD.

The caption changes to "Ken Wiwa. Writer."

Ken says I HAD BEEN IN ENGLAND 20
YEARS AND STARTED WRITING
ABOUT MY FATHER.
ONE OF THE ISSUES IS BEING
KENSARY, Jr. AND ENGLAND I WAS
STRUGGLING TO ESCAPE THAT
IDENTITY AND REALLY I WAS
TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHAT MY
IDENTITY WAS AND CANADA GAVE
ME THE SPACE TO COME AND DO
THAT.
I LIKE THE WAY THE COMMUNITY
HAS ADOPTED MY FATHER'S STORY
AND POLITICIAN HAVE BEEN
SUPPORTIVE.
THERE HAVE BEEN A NUMBER OF
GOOD REASONS TO COME HERE.

Old footage shows Ken’s father smoking a pipe and people demonstrating in the street.

Rudyard says KEN’S ESSAY IS ONE OF THE
MORE POWERFUL ONES IN THE
BOOK FOR ME.

The caption changes to "Rudyard Griffiths. The Dominion Institute." Rudyard sits in a room. He’s in his forties, clean-shaven with short brown hair.

Rudyard says KENNAN SAYS CANADA DOESN'T
HAVE A -- A KIND OF TOP DOWN
IDENTITY IN THE SAME WAY
AMERICA HAS A OF IDEALS AND
WLEEFZ THIS IS WHAT YOU IT
MEANS TO BE AMERICAN.
CANADA PROVIDES A WRITER WITH
SOME FLEXIBILITY.
HE CAN BE BRITISH, BECAUSE HE
HAS THAT HERITAGE AND
EXPERIENCE AND THAT PART OF
HIS LIFE.
HE CAN ALSO BE AFRICAN HERE.
IN OTHER WORDS HE CAN HE HAVE A
MULTIPLE IDENTITY, BUT THAT
MULTIPLE IDENTITY IS GROUNDED
IN -- I THINK BEING CANADIAN.

A newspaper article showing a picture of Ken reads "How I found my voice."

Rudyard continues THIS BOOK GREW OUT OF
WORK THE DOMINION INSTITUTE
HAS BEEN DOING TO GET
CANADIANS THINKING ABOUT THEIR
CITIZENSHIP.
I THINK A LOT OF US WHO ARE
BORN IN THIS COUNTRY ARE VERY
UNREFLECTIVE WHEN IT COMES TO
UNDERSTANDING THE
PSYCHOLOGICAL JOURNEY FROM THE
COUNTRY OF ORIGIN TO
CANADA AND THE RELATIONSHIP
NEW CANADIANS THEN DEVELOP
WITH CANADA.
WE THINK THERE IS SOMETHING
REALLY IMPORTANT THERE.
A LESSON FOR ALL CANADIANS TO
LEARN IN TERMS OF BEING
SELF-REFLECTIVE.
AND THINKING ABOUT THAT
IDENTITY.
AND IMMIGRANTS THAT MAKE THAT
INCREDIBLE JOURNEY AND VOYAGE
FROM COUNTRY OF ORIGIN, FAMILY
AND FRIENDS AND ULTURE THAT IS
HOME, TO A NEW CULTURE THAT IS
CANADA.

The slate changes to "Shyan Selvadurai. Author of Giller nominated ‘Funny Boy.’ 1983 moved to Canada from Sri Lanka."

A clip shows civil war scenes.

Shyan sits in a garden. He’s in his forties, with curly black hair and clean-shaven.

Shyan THE POLITICAL SITUATION
FROM THE TIME I WAS A CHILD IT
WAS BEGINNING TO HEAT UP
BETWEEN THE ETHNIC MAJORITY
AND THE ETHNIC MINORITY THE
TAMUL.
MY AMONG IS SINGALLESE AND MY
FATHER IS TAMUL.

The caption changes to "Shyan Selvadurai. Writer."

Shyan continues WE HAVE A TAMUL LAST NAME AND
MAKES US TAMUL A LOT OF TAMULS
LOST NOT JUST THEIR HOMES AND
ALSO FAMILY MEMBERS AND
LIVELIHOODS AND STUFF.
AND -- YES, IT WAS A TERRIBLE
SITUATION.
THAT'S WHY WE LEFT.

Shyan reads EVEN BEFORE WE ARRIVED IN
THIS COUNTRY MY MOTHER HAD
ALREADY ACCEPTED THAT SHE
WOULD NEVER BE ABLE TO
PRACTICE MEDICINE HERE.
AND LIKE IN AMERICA, WHERE SHE
WOULD HAVE ONLY HAD TO SIT IN
EXAM.
HERE SHE WOULD HAVE TO DO AN
INTERNSHIP AS WELL AND A MERE
HANDFUL OF INTERNSHIPS FOR
FOREIGN DOCTORS APPLIED MY
MOTHER HAS ALSO REALIZED TO
SEE THAT SHE IS A DOCTOR ON A
RESUME INTIMIDATED PEOPLE WHO
MIGHT HIRE HER.
SHE HAS DOCTORED IT DOWN,
FIRST TO A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE,
AND FINALLY TO -- TO A
HOUSEWIFE.

Shyan says IN SRI LANKA MY MOTHER WAS
A DOCTOR AND MY FATHER WAS A
BUSINESSMAN I GUESS THEY HAD A
EEASY LIFESTYLE.
I DON'T THINK THEY WERE HAPPY
TO COME HERE.
I THINK THEY FELT IT WAS
SOMETHING THEY HAD TO DO FOR
THEIR CHILDREN'S SAFETY.
I THINK THEY SOMEHOW WOULD
HAVE GOT ON.
FOR THEIR CHILDREN, THEY FELL
THERE WAS NO LIFE IN SRI
LANKA.

Rudyard says WHEN IMMIGRANTS COME HERE
LIE SHYAN’s MOTHER THEY
QUICKLY FIND OUT IN THEIR OWN
COUNTRY THEY MIGHT HAVE HEL
THE RESPECTED POSITION OF
DOCTOR, SOMEONE ESTEEMED
WITHIN THE COMMUNITY.
SUDDENLY THEY COME UP AGAINST
BUREAUCRACY AND
ENTRENCHED INTERESTS ON THE
PART OF OUR EXISTING
PROFESSIONS WITHIN CANADA TO
BAR OUTSIDERS, TO BAR
COMPETITION AND BAR ACCESS.
I THINK IT IS INCREDIBLEABLY
HYPOCRITICAL FOR US AND MAYBE
A FALSE PLEDGE.
WHAT WE'RE TRYING TO DO
WITH PASSAGES TO CANADA IS GET
CANADIANS THINKING
ABOUT -- NOT JUST IMMIGRATION,
BUT THE -- BUT THE ACTUALLY
LIFE EXPERIENCES OF IMMIGRANTS
TO PERSONALIZE IT.
TO HUMANIZE IT.
MAYBE THROUGH THAT, AT LEAST
FOR ME, I THINK IN READING
THESE STORIES AND THE
POIGNANCEY OF THIS, HOW
DIFFICULT, YET HOW REWARDING
THE EXPERIENCE OF THE PASSAGE
TO CANADA IS FOR EACH OF THESE
AUTHORS.
I THINK THAT CALL BE THE
BUILDING BLOCK FOR GREATER
TOLERANCE.

Fast clips show the everyday life of Canadian people.

He continues AND -- YOU KNOW WE'RE DAM
LUCKY TO HAVE THEM.
WE SHOULD TRY TO DO OUR
BEST TO MAKE THEM FEEL LIKE
THEY BELONG HERE IN THE WAY
THEY WANT TO BELONG HERE.

The clip ends.

Back in the studio, the book appears briefly.

Tina says PASSAGES WELCOME HOME
TO CANADA IS PUBLISHED BY
DOUBLE DAY CANADA.
THAT'S IT FOR IMPRINT
THIS WEEK.
REMEMBER YOU CAN ALWAYS LOG ON
TO OUR WEB SITE FOR READING
LISTS. I’M TINA SREBOTNJAK, GOOD NIGHT.

Theme music plays as the end credits roll.

Special thanks International Festival of Authors. Canoe Restaurant. The Dominion Institute. Trish Salah. Women’s Press.

Imprint. C/O TVOntario. P.O. Box 200. Station Q, Toronto, Ontario. M4T 2T1.

E-mail: imprint@tvo.org.

Website: www.tvo.org

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 2002, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: Imprint season 14 episode 9