Video Transcript

Fast clips play of a large tanker floating along the ocean. An aerial view from a helicopter shows the wide expanse of the Pacific Ocean. The scene changes to beneath the water’s surface. The Great Barrier Reef is teeming with colourful corals. Schools of fish, turtles, and octopi swim around in swarms as researchers scuba dive alongside them.

Newsreader says TONIGHT, A
POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER
ON THE GREAT BARRIER REEF.

Narrator says THE FIGHT IS ON
TO RESCUE THE LARGEST LIVING
STRUCTURE ON EARTH.
THE GREAT BARRIER REEF IS THE
ONLY LIVING THING THAT CAN BE
SEEN FROM OUTER SPACE.
IT IS ALREADY THREATENED BY
CLIMATE CHANGE.

David Wachenfeld says THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF HAS LOST ABOUT
HALF OF ITS CORAL.

Narrator says IT NOW LIES
DIRECTLY IN THE PATH OF A
TANKER SUPER HIGHWAY.

Multiple tankers are shown floating alongside one another in the Pacific.

Newsreader says THE
SHEN NENG 1
CRUSHED THE REEF AS IT RAN
AGROUND.

Alistair Heron says IF IT WAS A
MAJOR CATASTROPHE, THE LONG
TERM EFFECT ON THE BARRIER
REEF WOULD BE AN ABSOLUTE
DISASTER.

Scientists are shown handling tortoises and other aquatic life.

Narrator says IT'S A FULL-ON
SPRINT TO FIND ANSWER TO PULL
THIS UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE
SITE BACK FROM THE BRINK OF
COLLAPSE.

The scene changes to an image of the globe. Highlighted on its surface are famous landmarks. A close-up reveals the Statue of Liberty and its longitudinal coordinates. The image zooms out from New York City and focuses on an image of the Palace of Versailles, followed by a temple in Kyoto, and, finally, the Taj Mahal. The globe spins as the name of the show appears. It reads "Access 360. World Heritage. Great Barrier Reef."

The scene opens with a long tanker ship navigating through the Pacific Ocean. The scene changes to the captain’s deck where multiple sailors are shown analyzing read-outs of their coordinates.

Narrator says 220 KILOMETRES
OFF QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA.
A 93,000 TON KOREAN CARRIER IS
LEAVING THE OPEN WATERS OF THE
PACIFIC AND CLOSING IN ON A
UNIQUE ECOSYSTEM AND UNESCO
WORLD HERITAGE SITE...
THE GREAT BARRIER REEF.
THE CAPTAIN MUST PILOT THE
300-METRE SHIP THROUGH A NARROW
GAP IN THE PRISTINE CORAL.
AND HE'S NEW TO THESE WATERS.
HE'S GOT AN EMPTY HOLD, BUT HE
HAS TONS OF TOXIC FUEL ABOARD.
THE GAP HE MUST NAVIGATE
THROUGH IS SO NARROW, AT TIMES
HE'LL HAVE LESS THAN HALF A
KILOMETRE TO EACH SIDE.
A SINGLE MISSED COURSE CHANGE
AND HE RUNS AGROUND ON ONE OF
THE MOST FRAGILE ECOSYSTEMS ON
EARTH.
THIS IS NO ABSTRACT THREAT.
IT'S ALREADY HAPPENED.

A clip plays of a tanker, stagnant in the water. A caption reads "April 3, 2010."

Newsreader says THE CHINESE
SHEN
NENG 1
RAN AGROUND AT FULL
STEAM OFF THE CENTRAL QUEENSLAND
COAST CARRYING MORE THAN 60,000
TONS OF COAL.

A helicopter is shown landing on a helipad on the tanker’s surface.

Narrator says FORTUNATELY, THE
COAL STAYED ABOARD.
BUT THE SHIP LEAKED 4 TONS OF
BUNKER OIL ONTO THE REEF.
WINDS, AND STRONG OCEAN SWELLS
PUSHED THE SHIP ACROSS THE
REEF DESTROYING MORE THAN 11
HECTARES OF CORAL AND
WILDLIFE.
AUSTRALIA'S COAL AND GAS
BUSINESSES ARE BOOMING.
TO CARRY THOSE TOXIC
COMMODITIES TO WORLD MARKETS,
MORE AND MORE SHIPS MUST PASS
THROUGH THE REEF.
OVER THE PAST DECADE, SHIPPING
HAS INCREASED BY 24 PERCENT,
AND THE SHIPS THEMSELVES ARE
BIGGER THAN EVER.
IN 15 YEARS, THEY'VE NEARLY
DOUBLED IN SIZE.

Fast clips play of industrialized cities.

Narrator continues
THE EXPORT BOOM IS WELCOMED BY
MANY FOR THE JOBS AND WEALTH
IT BRINGS.
BUT OTHERS INSIST IT'S COMING
AT A TERRIBLE PRICE AND COULD
RING THE DEATH KNELL FOR THE
GREAT BARRIER REEF.
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF KEEPING
THE KOREAN TANKER FROM RUNNING
AGROUND FALLS ON ALISTAIR
HERON, A REEF PILOT.

The clip changes to the inside of a helicopter. Alistair Heron sits alongside the pilot. He is in his sixties, sports a white goatee, and cropped, greying brown hair. He is wearing headphones, a blue shirt, and slacks. A caption reads "Alistair Heron. Reef Pilot."

Alistair Heron says MY ROLE IS
TO PILOT A VESSEL IN THROUGH
HYDROGRAPHERS PASSAGE, WHICH
IS A FAIRLY NARROW ENTRANCE
THROUGH THE REEF, ABOUT 120
MILES EAST OF MACKAY.

Narrator says THE SHEN NENG 1
DISASTER BROUGHT STIFFER
CONTROLS.
AND AUSTRALIA NOW REQUIRES
SHIPS PASSING NEAR THE MOST
SENSITIVE AREAS TO BE JOINED
BY REEF PILOTS LIKE ALISTAIR.

Alistair Heron says THIS IS THE
ACTUAL PASSAGE HERE.
EXTENSIVE REEF HERE, WITH
NARROW PASSAGES THROUGH IT,
AND STRONG CURRENTS.
IF A SHIP HAD REASON TO GO
AGROUND HERE, IT COULD DESTROY
A LARGE AMOUNT OF REEF BECAUSE
THERE'S SO MUCH OF IT HERE.

An aerial view of the reef shows turquoise waters with colourful coral systems below the surface. They look like small islands submerged underneath the water’s surface.

An image of the globe outlines the extent of the Great Barrier Reef in highlighter blue. It circumvents the majority of Australia.

Narrator says SO LARGE, IT'S
VISIBLE FROM SPACE.
THE MASSIVE REEF IS MORE THAN
2,000 KILOMETRES LONG.
AND IN TOTAL, IT COVERS AN
AREA AS LARGE AS JAPAN.
BECAUSE ITS CORAL ARE ALIVE,
IT'S CONSIDERED THE LARGEST
LIVING STRUCTURE ON THE
PLANET.
IT ALSO SUPPORTS MORE THAN
1,600 SPECIES OF FISH.
ITS NATURAL BEAUTY AND
DIVERSITY OF HABITATS AND
LIFE, LED TO ITS WORLD
HERITAGE DESIGNATION IN 1981.

Alistair Heron says I NEVER
CEASE TO BE AMAZED AT THE
AMOUNT OF REEF AND THE COLOURS
WHEN WE FLY OUT HERE.
I'M ALWAYS APPRECIATIVE OF
WHAT MOTHER NATURE HAS TO
OFFER.
AND IT IS SOMETHING WE SHOULD
GO TO ANY LENGTH TO PROTECT
AND PRESERVE.

Narrator says AS THE MASSIVE
TANKER BEARS DOWN ON THE
FRAGILE REEF, ALISTAIR'S SKILL
AND INTIMATE KNOWLEDGE ARE
ABOUT TO BE PUT TO THE TEST.
HE HAS JUST 35 MINUTES BEFORE
THE HANJIN PORT WALCOTT ENTERS
THE CHANNEL THROUGH THE REEF.

Alistair Heron says ALL SHIPS,
ALL SHIPS, ALL SHIPS, THIS IS
THE HANJIN PORT WALCOTT
IN-BOUND AT HYDROGRAPHERS
PASSAGE.

Narrator says PILOT HERON TAKES
THE HELM.

Alistair Heron says ENTERING
THE CHANNEL, YOU'LL BE ABLE TO
SEE THE REEF ON EITHER SIDE OF
YOU.
IT'LL BE QUITE CLOSE AND
QUITE SPECTACULAR.
YOU'LL GET THE PERSPECTIVE OF
JUST HOW BIG THIS VESSEL IS
AND NOW CLOSE THE REEF IS TO
US.

Narrator says THE PASSAGE IS
NARROW, AND IT'S NOT A
STRAIGHT SHOT.

Alistair Heron says THE BARRIER
REEF ITSELF IS QUITE A
COMPLICATED AREA TO NAVIGATE
THROUGH, MAINLY BECAUSE OF THE
NUMBER OF COURSE ALTERATIONS.

Narrator says ALISTAIR MUST
CHANGE COURSE CORRECTLY 12
TIMES TO CROSS THE REEF
SUCCESSFULLY.
MISS JUST ONE, AND THE HANJIN
PORT WALCOTT WOULD RUN AGROUND
IN MINUTES.

A clip plays of Alistair in his quarters measuring coordinates.

Alistair Heron says WE'RE
LOOKING FOR, VIRTUALLY, A HOLE
IN THE WALL.

Narrator says THE SHIP'S SIZE
AND WEIGHT ALONE IS ENOUGH TO
DESTROY HECTARES OF CORAL AND
MARINE LIFE.
AND IF IT WERE TO SPILL ITS
TOXIC FUEL, THERE COULD BE
IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGE.

Alistair Heron says POTENTIALLY,
WE COULD HAVE GROUNDINGS.
IF THERE WAS A MAJOR
CATASTROPHE, WITH A HEAVY
CRUDE OIL SHIPS USE FOR BUNKER
FUEL THESE DAYS, THE LONG-TERM
AFFECT ON THE BARRIER REEF
WOULD BE AN ABSOLUTE DISASTER.
THINGS DO GO WRONG.
THERE'S NO QUESTION ABOUT
THAT.

Clips play of lush and thriving ecosystems juxtaposed to construction of industrial fleets. Black soot dirties the water beneath the new infrastructure.

Narrator says INCREASED
SHIPPING IS ONE BY-PRODUCT OF
AUSTRALIA'S EXPORT BOOM.
JUST 160 KILOMETRES FROM THE
REEF, ON THE MAINLAND, IS
ANOTHER.
RAPID PORT EXPANSION AND
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT.
AS MANY AS 35 NEW PROJECTS
ARE ON THE DRAWING BOARD.
THIS NOT ONLY MEANS EVEN MORE
SHIPPING, IT WILL ALSO LEAD TO
THE DESTRUCTION OF COASTAL
HABITATS THAT HELP KEEP THE
REEF HEALTHY.
ALL OF THIS COMES AFTER A
DECADE OF RISING TEMPERATURES
AND CLIMATE CHANGE.
ONE MAN KNOWS THE DANGERS
BETTER THAN MOST.
DAVID WACHENFELD IS A
SCIENTIST WITH THE GOVERNMENT
AGENCY RESPONSIBLE FOR
MANAGING THE REEF AND
PROTECTING ITS FUTURE.

A clip plays of a small boat speeding across the water. On board is David Wachenfeld, a clean-shaven man in his late forties with short, styled brown hair. He is wearing a green polo and slacks.

David Wachenfeld says IT'S THE
SIZE AND INTEGRITY OF THE
WHOLE ECOSYSTEM THAT MAKES IT
SO AMAZING.
IT'S GOT EVERYTHING FROM THE
TINIEST LITTLE ANIMAL, RIGHT
UP TO BIG WHALES.
AND IT'S JUST AN INCREDIBLE
HUGE, INTACT, HEALTHY
ECOSYSTEM.

A caption reads "David Wachenfeld. Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority." A clip plays of David dawning scuba dear and diving off the boat. He photographs the colourful yellow, orange, and variegated fish and other marine life below.

Narrator says DAVID TAKES
REGULAR CLOSE-UP LOOKS AT
WHAT'S REALLY AT STAKE BELOW
THE SURFACE.

(music plays)
HE HAS WATCHED, WITH
PARTICULAR DISMAY, THE DAMAGE
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
WARMER TEMPERATURES HAVE
BROUGHT DEVASTATING WEATHER TO
THE GREAT BARRIER REEF.

David Wachenfeld says BETWEEN
ABOUT 2002 AND 2011, WE HAD
RECORD-BREAKING FLOODS.
WE HAD A RECORD-BREAKING HEAT
WAVE.
WE HAD A SERIES OF VERY LARGE,
SEVERE, TROPICAL CYCLONES.
AND ALL OF THAT EXTREME
WEATHER HAS REALLY TAKEN ITS
TOLL.

A clip plays of storms raging along the coastline.

Narrator says TROPICAL CORALS
ARE ALSO VERY SENSITIVE TO
TEMPERATURE.
WHEN THE WATER WARMS, THEY DIE.

David Wachenfeld says OVER A
27-YEAR PERIOD, THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF HAS LOST ABOUT
HALF OF ITS CORAL.
THERE ARE TIMES WHEN MY JOB
TAKES ME TO AN INSHORE REEF
WHERE WATER QUALITY HAS
DEGRADED, AND THERE IS VERY
LITTLE CORAL.
AND WHEN I SEE THAT, IT JUST
MAKES ME INCREDIBLY SAD.
THAT'S ALMOST HEART BREAKING.
THERE IS NO QUESTION.
IT IS A REALLY STARTLING
WAKE-UP CALL.

Narrator says DESPITE THE
DESTRUCTION, DAVID IS HOPEFUL.
ESPECIALLY WHEN HE VISITS THE
PARTS OF THE REEF THAT ARE
THRIVING.

Fast clips show David’s pohotgraphs of marine life of all shapes, colours, and sizes.

David Wachenfeld says IF WE GET
A BREAK FROM EXTREME WEATHER,
I THINK THE GREAT BARRIER REEF
IS GOING TO LEAP FORWARD, AND
IT IS GOING TO SHOW US HOW
HEALTHY AND VIBRANT IT IS.
THE BIGGEST CONCERN IS FOR THE
LONG TERM.
AND THERE IS A LIMIT TO HOW
MUCH THE GREAT BARRIER REEF
CAN TAKE.

Narrator says DAVID'S PHOTO
DIVES ARE HIS INFORMAL TOOL TO
LEARN WHAT'S HAPPENING ON THE
REEF.
BUT THERE ARE ALSO MORE
RIGOROUS SCIENTIFIC STUDIES
IN THE WORKS.

A clip plays of researches dressing in scuba gear. A man places a knife in a holster on his leg.

The man says CAN’T BE TOO CAREFUL
WHEN YOU HAVE
A KNIFE ON.

Narrator says A GROUP OF RESEARCHERS ARE
SPENDING LONG DAYS ON THE
GREAT BARRIER REEF TO LEARN
JUST HOW MUCH THIS NATURAL
WONDER CAN TAKE.
THE TEAM IS LED BY RESEARCHER
DAVID WILLIAMSON.

David is shown navigating a small boat with 3 other researchers. He is in his late thirties with a day’s worth of stubble, and short, salt-and-pepper hair. He is wearing a scuba suit.

David Williamson says OKAY, SEE
YOU LATER.
SO TODAY WE ARE HEADING OUT
DIVING.
WE ARE GOING TO SURVEY CORALS
AND FISH AT ONE OF OR
MONITORING SITES.
WE SURVEY ABOUT 160 SPECIES OF
FISH.
AND THAT GIVES US AN ESTIMATE
OF THE PERCENT COVER OF LIVE
AND DEAD STUFF ON THE REEF.

A caption reads "David Williamson. Marine Biologist."

Narrator says WILLIAMSON IS
HEADED FOR AN AREA JUST 120
KILOMETRES FROM ONE OF
AUSTRALIA'S PORT EXPANSION
PROJECTS.
BUT IT'S A PROTECTED PART OF
THE REEF, WHERE COMMERCIAL
SHIPPING IS HEAVILY
CONTROLLED, AND FISHING IS
COMPLETELY OFF LIMITS.

David Williamson says WE'RE 47
METRES OFF THE SITE.
THEY ARE LOOK BUT DON'T TOUCH
AREAS.
THEY ARE PLACES WHERE YOU GO
INTO, YOU EXPERIENCE THEM FOR
THEIR NATURAL BEAUTY, AND THEN
YOU LEAVE, LEAVING THE PLACE
AS IT WAS WHEN YOU ARRIVED.

Narrator says IT'S A PERFECT
PLACE TO GAUGE HOW THE REEF
OPERATES AND SURVIVES WHEN
DIRECT HUMAN IMPACT IS
LIMITED.

David Williamson says THAT'LL DO
US.

Clips play of David and his team swimming underneath the water’s surface.

Narrator says THE TEAM HAS BEEN
TO THE SITE NUMEROUS TIMES,
LOGGING EVERY SPECIES THEY
SEE.
TODAY'S NEW DATA WILL TELL
THEM IF THE FISH POPULATIONS
HAVE GONE UP OR DOWN SINCE THE
LAST TIME THEY CAME.
THAT'S ONE MEASURE OF HOW THE
REEF IS DOING.

David Williamson says IT'S
DYNAMIC.
AND IT'S CHANGING, YOU KNOW,
ON A SCALE OF WEEKS, MONTHS,
YEARS, DECADES.
SO GETTING OUT THERE AND
MEASURING THOSE CHANGES IS A
BIG CHALLENGE.

Narrator says THE GREAT BARRIER
REEF IS MORE THAN A VITAL
NATURAL PRESERVE.
ITS RENEWABLE RESOURCES
PROVIDE A LIVING FOR MANY.
LYLE SQUIRE IS A FIRSTHAND
WITNESS TO THE CHANGES
HAPPENING ON THE REEF.
HE'S SPENT A LIFETIME WORKING
HERE.

The clip changes to Lyle Squire and his team hauling an animal onto the ship. He is in his forties, clean-shaven, with medium-length greying brown hair. A caption reads "Lyle Squire. Aquarium Supplier."

Lyle Squire says WE SPECIALIZE
IN PROVIDING LARGE ICONIC
ANIMALS TO PUBLIC AQUARIA.
AND FOR US, THAT'S REALLY
WHERE THE PASSION LIES AND
WHERE WE TRULY GET EXCITED
ABOUT WHAT IT IS THAT WE DO.
SO WE'VE GOT A PRETTY BUSY
DAY TODAY.
WE'VE GOT A COUPLE OF PALLETS
GOING TO THE WORLD'S LARGEST
AQUARIUM IN SINGAPORE.
AND WE'VE GOT SOME REALLY
LARGE ICONIC ANIMALS FROM THE
GREAT BARRIER REEF.

(music plays)

Narrator says TODAY, LYLE AND
HIS TEAM ARE PACKING AND
SHIPPING A SHOVEL-NOSED RAY,
AND A TAWNY NURSE SHARK.
IT'S A BIG JOB, AND THEY ARE
ON THE CLOCK.
THEY HAVE A SCHEDULED FLIGHT
TO CATCH, AND THE PILOT WON'T
WAIT AROUND.
THE COMPANY WAS SET UP IN THE
1960s BY LYLE'S GRANDFATHER.

A rapid succession of sepia coloured photographs show Lyle’s grandfather and other family members deftly handling sharks, rays, among other marine life. One photograph shows a gentleman standing in front of a sign that reads "Oceanarium."

Lyle Squire says I WAS BORN
INTO THIS INDUSTRY, REALLY.
MY GRANDFATHER HAD A PUBLIC
AQUARIUM WHEN I WAS A SMALL
CHILD.
MY MOTHER AND FATHER WORKED AT
THE AQUARIUM.
MY FAMILY HAS ALWAYS BEEN
CLOSELY TIED TO THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF.
IN THOSE YOUNG YEARS, YOU
CAN'T HELP BUT BE SIGNIFICANTLY
IMPACTED BY THE AMAZING
CREATURES THAT I WAS EXPOSED
TO.

Narrator says TODAY, LYLE SEES
THE ANIMALS HE EXPORTS AS
AMBASSADORS FOR THE REEF.
AND NOW IT'S TIME TO GET THEM
PACKED AND READY FOR SHIPPING.
THE SHARK AND THE RAY ARE EACH
ABOUT TWO METRES LONG.
THE RAY NEEDS A PARTICULARLY
LARGE CONTAINER.

Clips play of medium sized sharks and rays swimming around in tanks.

Lyle Squire says WHEN THAT
CONTAINER IS PACKED, IT WILL
WEIGH AROUND 2.6 TON.
SO IT'S QUITE A MASSIVE WEIGHT
TO HAVE IN THE UNDERBELLY OF
AN AIRCRAFT.

Narrator says IT'S JUST PART OF
THE JOB HERE TO CLIMB INTO A
TANK FILMED WITH SHARKS AND
RAYS.
BUT ONE STAB OF THAT TAIL
COULD BE DEADLY.
THIS COMPANY HAS ALWAYS
PLEDGED TO CATCH AND SHIP ONLY
HEALTHY ANIMALS.

Lyle Squire says YOU'RE GOING
TO HAVE TO PUSH HIM A BIT
HARDER.

Narrator says THESE ARE NO
EXCEPTION.

A clip plays of a worker inside a large tank attempting to grab a shark swimming around in the shallow water.

Lyle Squire says HE'S AVOIDING
YOU.
TRY AND GET HIS HEAD IN ABOUT
THERE, SO AS YOU BRING HIM UP
THE SIDES, WE CAN LATCH ONTO
THE TAIL.
PREVENT YOU FROM GETTING A BIG
SLAP ON THE BACK.

The worker grabs the shark and maneuvers it towards his co-workers. With their help, they remove the shark from the tank and transfer it to its own container.

Lyle Squire says ALL RIGHT.
IT'S LITTLE
BIT TOO BIG FOR THE BAG, THIS
GUY.

The man steps out of the tank. He says STILL GOT ALL 10 TOES.

Lyle Squire says THROUGH THE
HATCH.

They carry the shark towards a new container and release him.

Narrator says THE NURSE SHARK
IS SAFELY MOVED.
THE RAY IS NEXT.
A 50-KILOGRAM LOAD.

Lyle Squire says ONE OF THE
THINGS THAT MY GRANDFATHER
IMPRESSED UPON ME FOR MANY
YEARS WAS THIS CONCEPT THAT WE
CAN HAVE SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON
OUR ENVIRONMENT.
CERTAINLY, HE WOULD RELATE
STORIES ABOUT TRAVELLING
ACROSS THE CAIRNS INLET AND
SEEING STINGRAYS JUMPING OUT
OF CRYSTAL CLEAN WATER AND
SANDY BEACHES AND THINGS LIKE
THAT.
AND TODAY THAT IS COMPLETELY
CHANGED.

Narrator says SHOVEL-NOSED RAYS
ARE STILL PLENTIFUL ON THE
REEF.
BUT PROTECTIONS HAVE HAD TO BE
PUT IN PLACE TO SAVE OTHER
SPECIES.

A clip plays of a Lyle and his co-workers carrying a large bag with a ray to a large blue tank and release the ray through a small opening at the top.

Narrator says THE DAY'S
CHALLENGES AREN'T OVER.
HEADED TO THE SAME AQUARIUM IS
THIS QUEENSLAND GROPER.

Lyle Squire says THIS IS A
PROTECTED SPECIES AND WITH
THAT COMES A GREAT AMOUNT OF
RESPONSIBILITY.
WE TREAT THIS ENTIRE PROCESS
WITH A FAILURE-IS-NOT-AN-OPTION
TYPE APPROACH.

Narrator says AND THIS ONE IS
THE BIGGEST OF ALL.
MOVING ANY FISH THAT WEIGHS
130 KILOS IS A CHALLENGE.
AND A GROPER'S KICK CAN DO
SERIOUS DAMAGE.
SO THIS FELLOW HAS TO BE
SEDATED.

A clip plays of a large fish swimming in a tank. It has a brown-white sking tone and two yellow eyes on either side of its face.

Lyle Squire says WE'RE NOT
TRYING TO KNOCK HIM OUT.
WE'RE TRYING TO TAKE THAT EDGE
OFF HIM AND JUST MAKE HIM VERY
LETHARGIC AND SLEEPY TO MAKE
HANDLING HIM A LOT EASIER.

Lyle releases the sedative into the tank.

Narrator says THEY HAVE JUST
MINUTES TO MOVE HIM BEFORE HE
WAKES UP.

Lyle and his team move quickly to remove the groper from the tank.

Lyle Squire grabs the groper and says IT'S PRETTY
SLIPPERY IN HERE.

Narrator says OTHERWISE, HE CAN
THRASH AROUND AND HURT THEM,
OR INJURE HIMSELF.

Narrator says A PRIME SPECIMEN
OF A PROTECTED SPECIES COULD
BE LOST.

Lyle and his team remove the groper from the tank and get it ready for transfer.

Lyle Squire says YUP, THAT'S
GOT HIM.
OKAY.

Narrator says LYLE FEARS HE MAY
SEE MORE SPECIES WHOSE NUMBERS
ARE IN DECLINE.
AND THE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
ALONG THE QUEENSLAND COAST
COULD BE MAKING IT WORSE.

Aerial views of the Queensland coastline flash across the screen.

Lyle Squire says IT'S OF QUITE A
BIT OF CONCERN TO ME, LOOKING
AT THE AMOUNT OF INCREASED
SHIPPING THAT WE'RE GOING TO
HAVE UP AND DOWN THE COAST
AND THE CALL FOR INCREASED
DREDGING.
WHAT SORT OF IMPACT IS THAT
GOING TO HAVE ON OUR
ENVIRONMENT?

Narrator says IN ADDITION TO
THE 35 PROPOSED NEW
DEVELOPMENTS, ESTABLISHED
PORTS ARE GROWING.
AUSTRALIA'S FOURTH LARGEST
PORT, GLADSTONE, IS UNDERGOING
ONE OF THE BIGGEST EXPANSIONS
IN ITS HISTORY.
THE DREDGING PROJECT UNDERWAY
THERE IS THE LARGEST EVER
BETWEEN THE MAINLAND AND THE
GREAT BARRIER REEF.
AND IT'S HAPPENING INSIDE THE
WORLD HERITAGE PROTECTED AREA.

Lyle Squire says DREDGING
CREATES A LARGE AMOUNT OF
SEDIMENT IN THE WATER COLUMN.
IT CAN HAVE MASSIVE IMPACTS ON
THOSE COMMUNITIES IN THE
IMMEDIATE SURROUNDS AND
REASONABLE DISTANCE AWAY FROM
THE DREDGING.

Narrator says LYLE'S NOT THE
ONLY ONE TO NOTICE NEGATIVE
EFFECTS.

A protestor on a rocky shore says STOP THE DREDGING.
STOP THE DREDGING.

Narrator says PROTESTORS BEGAN
TO TAKE EXTREME MEASURES AFTER
AN UNPRECEDENTED INCREASE IN
SICK AND DEAD FISH.

Clips play of dead and bloodied fish.

A volunteer holds up a fish with blood on its scales.

He says THAT ONE'S BAD.

Narrator says THE PORT AND
LOCAL HEALTH AUTHORITIES SAY
THEY HAVE FOUND NO LINK
BETWEEN THE DREDGING AND THE
SICK FISH.
BUT THERE'S ANOTHER
SIDE-EFFECT.
DREDGING DESTROYS COASTAL SEA
GRASS BEDS, A CHIEF FOOD FOR
A BARRIER REEF ICON...
THE SEA TURTLE.

An image of a sea turtle flashes on the screen followed by Jennie Gilbert looking over a sea turtle in a tank. She is in his fifties with shoulder length, light, blonde hair. She is wearing a light-blue polo with a sea turtle insignia.

Jennie Gilbert says COME ON,
SWEETHEART.

Narrator says JENNIE GILBERT
RUNS A REHABILITATION CENTRE
THAT TAKES IN SICK AND INJURED
TURTLES AND HELPS THEM GET
BACK TO LIFE ON THE REEF.

A caption reads "Jennie Gilbert. Cairns Turtle Rehabilitation Centre."

Jennie Gilbert says THESE
TURTLES REALLY ARE COMING
UNDER A LOT OF PRESSURES.
THEY'VE GOT DEVELOPMENT, THEY'VE
GOT RUN-OFF INTO THE WATER.
DREDGING, OBVIOUSLY, IS A BIG
PROBLEM FOR THEM.
ALSO, THE INCREASE IN SHIPPING.

A clip plays of white van driving up to the rehabilitation centre. Jennie and her co-workers remove a turtle from the back of the van.

Narrator says THE CENTRE HAS
NURSED NEARLY 200 TURTLES IN
THE 12 YEARS SINCE IT HAS BEEN
OPENED.
THEY USED TO TREAT ABOUT 20
A YEAR.

Jennie Gilbert says WE'VE HAD
MASSIVE INCREASES IN TURTLES.
WE'RE SEEING BETWEEN 50 AND
60, A BAD YEAR.

Jennie directs her co-workers and says JUST PUT THE TOWEL ON THERE.
ON YOU GO, SWEETHEART.
SO WAS SHE FOUND FLOATING, OR
DID YOU FIND HER ON THE BEACH?

She performs an examination on the docile sea turtle.

A woman says NO.
SHE WAS JUST FLOATING IN THE
WATER DOWN IN PALM COVE.
AND WE WENT OUT THERE, AND SHE
DIDN'T DIVE UNDER.

Narrator says IT'S ONE OF THE
MOST COMMON ISSUES FOR TURTLES
ON THE REEF.
FLOATERS SYNDROME.
AND IF NOT TREATED, IT CAN BE
DEADLY.

Jennie Gilbert says BECAUSE OF
THE LOSS OF THEIR HABITAT AND
THEIR FEEDING GROUNDS, THESE
ANIMALS ARE STARVING, AND
LITERALLY FLOATING TO THE
SURFACE.
IT CAN BE CAUSED BY AN
OVERLOAD OF PARASITES, WHICH
CAUSES A BLOCKAGE IN THEIR GUT.
THEY CAN ALSO HAVE AN
INGESTION OF MARINE DEBRIS.
THIS, OF COURSE, AGAIN BLOCKS
THEIR GUT, AND THEY GET AIR
BUILD-UP AND THEY FLOAT TO THE
SURFACE.
THEY CAN'T DIVE DOWN AND EAT,
AND THEY STARVE TO DEATH.

Narrator says THE NEW ARRIVAL
BRINGS THE NUMBER NOW AT THE
CENTRE TO MORE THAN 20.

Jennie Gilbert examines the turtle and says SHE'S GOT A
BIT OF AN INJURY HERE WHICH
COULD BE CAUSED BY ANYTHING.
WE ALSO GET A FEW BIRD STRIKES
IN, AND WE ALSO GET OTHER
INJURIES THAT OCCUR FROM
PROBABLY NETTING.

Narrator says AND THERE'S ONE
OTHER THING JENNIE CHECKS FOR.

Jennie Gilbert says SO SAM,
WHAT I'M DOING IS I'M LOOKING
AROUND HER EYES TO SEE IF
SHE'S GOT ANY FIBROPAPILLOMA
BECAUSE THAT'S A VIRUS THESE
TURTLES ARE PICKING UP AT THE
MOMENT.
FIBROPAPILLOMA IS VIRTUALLY
TURTLE HERPES.
BUT UNLIKE US THAT IT SHOWS IN
SORES, THESE HAVE GOT LIKE
LARGE, CAULIFLOWER WARTS ALL
OVER THEM.
IT CAN CAUSE THEM TO ACTUALLY
GO BLIND.
IT CAN CAUSE THEM TO STOP
SWIMMING BECAUSE THEY GET SUCH
LARGE TUMOURS ON THEM.

A clip plays of a turtle swimming in a tank with coral-like formations around its shell.

She continues
THERE'S A LOT OF THEORIES IT'S
CAUSED BY STRESS.
A LOT OF STRESS IS PUT ON
THESE ANIMALS FROM LOWERED
WATER QUALITY, FROM LOSS OF
FOOD SOURCES, FROM LOSS OF
HABITAT.

Jennie turns over the sea turtle and says SORRY, SWEETHEART.
QUICKLY HAVE A LOOK UNDERNEATH.
NO, ONLY A COUPLE OF
BARNACLES.
NO FIBROPAPILLOMA, SO SHE'S
PRETTY GOOD.

Narrator says THE GOOD NEWS IS
THAT JENNY SUCCESSFULLY TREATS
AND RELEASES 85 PERCENT OF THE
TURTLES THAT SHE SEES.

Jennie Gilbert gently places the sea turtle into a tank and says THERE YOU
GO.
I KNOW, SWEETHEART.
TURTLES ARE PRETTY RESILIENT.
AND OVER THE YEARS, THEY'VE
REALLY OVERCOME A LOT OF
DEVASTATION IN THEIR
ENVIRONMENT.
JUST OVER HERE.
OKAY, JUST GENTLY DOWN IN THE
WATER.

Narrator says BUT THAT COULD BE
CHANGING.
AFTER THE RECENT SPATE OF
CYCLONES, DROUGHTS AND FLOODS,
NEARLY A THOUSAND TURTLES WERE
FOUND DEAD.
NOW WIDESPREAD COASTAL
DESTRUCTION IS LOOMING.

A clip plays of storm raging along the coast.

Jennie Gilbert says I THINK THE
MAN-MADE EVENTS ARE DEFINITELY
THE ONES TO WORRY ABOUT
BECAUSE THEY'RE INCREASING.
AND I DON'T KNOW WHERE IT
STOPS.
WE DON'T KNOW WHAT WILL HAPPEN
TO THEIR FEEDING GROUNDS.
THE POTENTIAL IS WE ARE GOING
TO LOSE A LOT MORE OF THESE
ANIMALS.
SO WE CAN ONLY HOPE THEY DO
BOUNCE BACK.
TIME WILL TELL.

The sea turtle she examined is now swimming merrily along a small tank.

Jennie says SO YOU CAN SEE SHE'S FLOATING
JUST STRAIGHT LEVEL.

Narrator says THANKFULLY, THE
NEW ARRIVAL IS SHOWING SIGNS
OF LIFE.
JENNIE WILL KEEP HER UNTIL
SHE IS DIVING AND FEEDING
NORMALLY.

Jennie Gilbert says SO HER
CHANCES OF SUCCESS AND SURVIVAL
ARE REALLY GOOD.
THANK YOU FOR BRINGING HER IN.
OTHERWISE SHE WOULDN'T HAVE
HAD ANY CHANCE AT ALL.
SHE'S GOT A GOOD CHANCE.

Narrator says BACK AT
CAIRNSMARINE, LYLE HAS ONE
MORE AMBASSADOR TO PREP FOR
SHIPPING.

Lyle Squire says WHENEVER WE
HAVE TO LODGE THESE ANIMALS TO
THE AIRPORT, WE'RE FACED WITH
VERY STRICT CUT-OFF TIMES.
SO WE'RE JUST COMING UP TO
8:30 NOW, AND THAT'S OUR
CUT-OFF TIME TO GET THESE
CONTAINERS OVER TO THE FREIGHT
AGENT'S READY FOR LODGING.

Narrator says TIME IS GETTING
TIGHT FOR THE GROPER.
HE'S BEEN LIFTED OUT OF HIS
HOME TANK AND INTO ANOTHER FOR
TRANSPORT.
BUT THE SEDATION IS WEARING
OFF.

Lyle Squire says HE'S STARTING
TO WAKE UP.
THE FISH IS NOW COMING OUT
OF SEDATION.

Lyle and his team move a blue tarp across the field.

Narrator says AND THERE IS
STILL ONE MORE CRUCIAL STEP TO
GO.

A crane lifts the groper in its blue tarp.

Lyle Squire says WE'LL LIFT
THIS UP AS HIGH AS WE CAN.

Narrator says GETTING HIM INTO
THE SHIPPING CONTAINER.

The crane places the groper into the tank. It comes out of sedation and swims around its new container.

Lyle Squire says IT'S GILLING
VERY NICELY.
IT LOOKS REALLY COMFORTABLE.
I COULD NOT ASK FOR THIS
TO HAVE GONE BETTER.
WE'VE GOT TO NOW SET ABOUT
TRYING TO SEAL THIS CONTAINER
UP AND GET IT LODGED.

Narrator says DESPITE THE
STRUGGLES OF SPECIES LIKE THE
GROPER, LYLE IS HOPEFUL ABOUT
THE FUTURE.

Clips play of workers cutting and drilling pieces of wood. They fit these pieces alongside the tank and wrap it with plastic.

Lyle Squire says I AM A FIRM
BELIEVER IN REEF RESILIENCE,
PROVIDED WE HAVE A HEALTHY
ECOSYSTEM THAT CAN BOUNCE BACK
FROM THESE TYPES OF IMPACTS.
I'VE SEEN SITES WITH
REASONABLE CORAL COVERAGE
BECOME SILTED OVER WITH TIME,
AS A RESULT FROM WHAT I
BELIEVE TO HAVE BEEN DREDGING.
AS THE DREDGING HAS DISSIPATED
OVER TIME, THOSE AREAS HAVE
REBOUNDED AND, YOU KNOW,
THERE IS GREAT CORAL COVER
THERE AGAIN.

Narrator says IN THE MEANTIME,
LYLE'S FISH ARE HELPING TO
RAISE AWARENESS OF THE DANGERS
THE REEF IS FACING.

Lyle Squire says WE'RE EXPECTING
THIS FISH TO BE VISITED BY OVER
3 MILLION PEOPLE PER YEAR.
THIS FISH IS REALLY AN
AMBASSADOR FOR HIS SPECIES AT
THE FRONT LINE OF OCEAN
CONSERVATION.

Narrator says THE CRATES HAVE TO
BE PREPARED FOR SHIPPING SO
THE ANIMALS HAVE ENOUGH OXYGEN
AND THE CONTAINERS DON'T LEAK.

Lyle Squire says PUBLIC AQUARIUMS
HAVE A GREAT CAPACITY TO CHANGE
THE WAY PEOPLE VIEW
CONSERVATION.
AT THE END OF THE DAY, PEOPLE
ARE ONLY GOING TO CONSERVE
WHAT THEY LOVE, AND THEY ONLY
LOVE WHAT THEY KNOW.

Narrator says FINALLY, THE
GROPER, TOO, IS SEALED AWAY.

A tractor drives off with the groper in its sealed container.

Lyle Squire says WE ARE
STARTING TO REALLY CUT THINGS
FINE NOW.
WE REALLY NEED TO GET THIS
TRUCK WRAPPED UP.
CONCLUDE THIS PROCESS, AND GET
IT TO THE AIRPORT AS QUICKLY
AS WE CAN.
SO THE TRUCK'S NOW ON ITS WAY
TO THE AIRPORT, AND HOPEFULLY
FROM THERE, THE NEXT STOP WILL
BE SINGAPORE.

Fast clips play of different species of maritime animals swimming in glass tanks.

Lyle continues
PROTECTING THE GREAT BARRIER
REEF IS NOT JUST UP TO THOSE
PEOPLE LIVING IN THE IMMEDIATE
SURROUNDS.
THIS IS A GLOBAL ISSUE, AND IT
IS GOING TO REQUIRE A GLOBAL
EFFORT.
WE'RE VERY HOPEFUL THAT THE
ANIMALS THAT WE PROVIDE TO
PUBLIC WILL REALLY HELP
ENGENDER AN EMPATHY WITH THE
COMMUNITIES OF THE WORLD TO
WANT TO ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING
ABOUT CONSERVING THESE
ENVIRONMENTS.

Aerial views play of the Great Barrier Reef.

Narrator says PRESSURE IS
ALREADY INCREASING FROM
OUTSIDE AUSTRALIA.
UNESCO HAS CALLED FOR AN
IN-DEPTH STUDY ON THE EFFECTS
OF INCREASED SHIPPING AND PORT
DEVELOPMENT, OR IT WILL
RECONSIDER THE REEF'S WORLD
HERITAGE DESIGNATION.

David Wachenfeld says THE
AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT AND
QUEENSLAND GOVERNMENT HAVE
RECOGNIZED THOSE CONCERNS.
WE'RE FOCUSSING TO A LONG-TERM
STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT OF
COASTAL DEVELOPMENT, ESPECIALLY
PORTS.
SO WE ARE RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE
OF THAT STRATEGIC ASSESSMENT
NOW, LOOKING AT BETTER WAYS TO
BALANCE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
AND PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT
OF THE GREAT BARRIER REEF FOR
THE FUTURE.

Narrator says AUSTRALIA HAS
ALREADY TAKEN STEPS TO KEEP
SHIPS FROM STRIKING THE REEF.
ON THE BRIDGE OF THE HANJIN
PORT WALCOTT, ALISTAIR HERON
IS NOW JUST A KILOMETRE OUT.

Alistair is shown aboard is ship navigating the waters of the Great Barrier Reef.

Alistair Heron says REEF VTS,
REEF VTS, HANJIN PORT WALCOTT
ON CHANNEL 14.

Narrator says FOR THE WHOLE OF
ITS PASSAGE THROUGH THE REEF
AND INTO PORT, HIS SHIP IS
BEING MONITORED BY A CONTROL
CENTRE ON SHORE, KNOWN AS REEF
VESSEL TRAFFIC SERVICES.

Mike Maxwell says HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT, THIS IS REEF VTS,
REEF VTS.
GO AHEAD, SIR.

Alistair Heron says PILOT HERON
BOARDED THE HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT AT BLOSSOM BANK
BOARDING GROUND.

Narrator says THE HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT IS JUST ONE SHIP THAT
MIKE MAXWELL HAS TO TRACK.
HE WATCHES UP TO 50 AT ANY
ONE TIME.

Sitting at the controls, Mike Maxwell says SIR, QUESTION.
COULD YOU PLEASE CONFIRM THE
DRAFTS FORWARD AND AFT.

Alistair Heron says HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT IS IN BALLAST.
FORWARD DRAFT 7.65 METRES.

Narrator says THE JOB IS
DEMANDING.
LIKE AN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER,
MIKE'S FULL ATTENTION MUST BE
CONSTANT.

Mike Maxwell looks at multiple maps on different screens in front of him.

Mike says IF THEY MESS
UP, THEN THEY CAN MESS UP BIG
TIME.
WE'RE CONSTANTLY FLICKING FROM
SHIP TO SHIP TRYING TO KEEP A
GOOD SITUATIONAL AWARENESS OF
WHERE EVERYONE IS.
THERE'S A LOT OF THINGS THAT
CAN HAPPEN IN THAT COASTLINE
IN THE PERIOD OF A 12-HOUR OR
24-HOUR WATCH.

Narrator says IT ONLY TAKES
MINUTES FOR A NORMAL DAY TO
TURN TO DISASTER.

Mike Maxwell says THE CLOSER
YOU GET TO THE COASTLINE, THE
MORE NAVIGATION HAZARDS THERE
ARE.
YOU ARE DEALING WITH 200-METRE
PLUS SHIPS THAT WEIGH
THOUSANDS OF TONS.
THEY COULD BE DOING 15 KNOTS.
THEY ARE IN ENCLOSED WATERS
WITH NOT A LOT OF ROOM TO
MANOEUVRE.
AND IF THEY HAVE A SITUATION
THAT GOES WRONG, IT CAN GO
WRONG REALLY, REALLY QUICKLY.
AND YOU'VE ONLY GOT THAT VERY
SMALL WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY TO
GET THEIR ATTENTION.
IT CAN BE VERY STRESSFUL AT
TIMES.

Narrator says SHIPPING OVER THE
REEF IS SLATED TO DOUBLE IN
THE NEXT TEN YEARS, PUTTING AN
EVEN GREATER LOAD ON THESE
OFFICERS.

Mike Maxwell says WE NEED TO
DOUBLE OUR STAFFING.
WE NEED TO DOUBLE OUR
FACILITIES.
WE NEED TO DOUBLE ALL THOSE
SORTS OF AREAS.
WHAT YOU DON'T WANT IS YOU
DON'T WANT A HUGE SPIKE IN
SHIPPING WITHOUT THE RESPONSE
TO THAT SPIKE.
BECAUSE THAT'S WHEN YOU WILL
INCREASE THE DANGERS.

A caption reads "Mike Maxwell. Ship Traffic Control Centre."

Narrator says PRESSURE TO MAKE
SURE THAT HAPPENS IS NOT JUST
COMING FROM LARGE
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
LIKE UNESCO.
IT'S COMING FROM ANOTHER,
AND UNEXPECTED SOURCE.
THE TOURIST.

Clips play of tourists walking around a peer.

Narrator continues
TOURISTS OUT TO SNORKEL AND
DIVE ON THE GREAT BARRIER REEF
BRING 5 BILLION A YEAR TO
AUSTRALIA.
FEWER VISITORS WOULD MEAN A
MAJOR NEGATIVE IMPACT.
NOT JUST ON THE ECONOMY, BUT
ALSO ON WORLDWIDE AWARENESS OF
THE ISSUES FACING THE REEF.

David Wachenfeld says I'VE
NEVER KNOWN ANYBODY WHO WAS
NOT BLOWN AWAY BY AN
EXPERIENCE ON THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF.
WHEN PEOPLE COME HERE, THEY
SEE WHAT IT'S LIKE.
THEY UNDERSTAND HOW HUGE IT IS,
HOW BEAUTIFUL IT IS.
THOSE PEOPLE GO AWAY WITH A
SENSE OF WHAT A VALUABLE
ENVIRONMENT AND PRECIOUS
ENVIRONMENT IT IS.
AND THAT REALLY BUILDS A SORT
OF GLOBAL DESIRE TO PROTECT
IT, WHICH I THINK IS CRITICAL.

Narrator says ALAN WALLISH IS A
TOUR OPERATOR WHO KNOWS
FIRSTHAND THE IMPORTANCE OF
TOURISM IN QUEENSLAND.

Alan Wallish says MY JOB IS TO
TAKE PEOPLE TO THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF.
IT'S WHAT I'VE WANTED
TO DO ALL MY LIFE.
AND I'VE BEEN DOING IT NOW FOR
23 YEARS.
IT'S A WONDERFUL WAY TO LIVE
YOUR LIFE.

He is in his forties, clean-shaven, with thin, brown hair combed backward. He is wearing glasses, and a red-and-black shirt. A caption reads "Alan Wallish. Tour Operator."

Narrator says ABOARD HIS BOAT
TODAY, 21 NOVICE DIVERS AND
SNORKELLERS.

A clip shows a ship full of tourists.

A crew member says MORNING, GUYS.
JUST GOING TO RUN THROUGH SOME
SAFETY AND TRAVEL TIPS FOR
YOU.
HOW ARE WE ALL GOING THIS
MORNING?

The tourists says GOOD.
[applause]

Narrator says THEY'RE A LITTLE
NERVOUS.
THEY'RE ALSO EXPECTING TO SEE
SOMETHING SPECIAL.

Alan Wallish looks at a map and says MICHAELMAS
CAY WOULD BE A GOOD ONE.

Narrator says WALLISH HOPES TO
SHOW THEM EVERYTHING THE REEF
HAS TO OFFER, JUST A TWO-HOUR
RIDE FROM THE MAINLAND.

Alan Wallish says WHAT WE
STRIVE TO DO IS TO ACTUALLY
GIVE THEM AN EXPERIENCE ON
THE REEF.
SO THEY ACTUALLY ENGAGE WITH
THE REEF.
WE WANT PEOPLE IN THE WATER.
WE WANT THEM SEEING THE FISH,
WE WANT THEM SEEING THE CORAL.

Alan looks at the tourists aboard the ship and holds up a diagram.

Alan Wallish says ANYBODY HERE
HASN'T SEEN THESE?
SO ACTUALLY LEAVE THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF KNOWING A LOT
MORE ABOUT IT THAN WHAT THEY
DID WHEN THEY ARRIVED.
THEY ARE ALL GENERALLY A RED
OR ORANGE COLOUR WITH SOME
STRIPES.

Narrator says A KEY LESSON IS
HOW TO SPOT SIGNS OF THE
DAMAGE CAUSED BY CLIMATE
CHANGE.

Alan Wallish says WHEN THE
WATER TEMPERATURE GETS TOO
HOT, IT DOESN'T WANT TO FEED
ANYMORE, SO IT EXPELS ITSELF
FROM THE SKELETON THAT IT IS
LIVING IN.
AND THAT CORAL IS DEAD.
OUR THING IS TO MAKE SURE OUR
PASSENGERS ARE BEING EDUCATED
ABOUT WHAT IT IS THAT MAKES
THE REEF HEALTHY.
WHAT IT IS THAT CAN DAMAGE THE
REEF.

Narrator says INTRODUCTION
OVER, THE NEWBIES ARE SET FREE
TO EXPLORE.

The ship docks next to the shore and the tourists slowly disembark.

A crew member calls out LADIES AND GENTLEMEN,
WELCOME TO THE BEAUTIFUL
MICHAELMAS CAY WORLD HERITAGE
LISTED AREA.

Another crew member calls out OKAY, EVERYBODY, FOLLOW ME
TO THIS SIDE OF THE BEACH.

A tourist says WHITE SAND, CLEAR WATER...
IT'S BEAUTIFUL.

Clips play of tourists snorkeling below the water’s surface.

Narrator says MICHAELMAS CAY IS
KNOWN FOR ITS CONCENTRATION OF
BIRD LIFE, TURTLES, AND GIANT
CLAMS.
A MICROCOSM OF THE GREAT
BARRIER REEF AS A WHOLE.

A clip plays of a fuzzy brown clam snapping its shell shut.

Alan Wallish says MY FIRST TIME
ON THE REEF WAS NO DIFFERENT
THAN ANYBODY ELSE'S.
AND I WENT IN THE WATER, AND
WITHIN FIVE MINUTES, I THOUGHT
IT WAS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL
THING I'D EVER SEEN IN MY
LIFE.
THAT FIRST EXPERIENCE ON THE
REEF IS SUCH AN IMPORTANT
EXPERIENCE FOR PEOPLE.
THEY JUMP IN THE WATER,
THEY'LL SEE 50 DIFFERENT FISH.
THEY'LL SWIM SEVERAL METRES,
THEY'LL SEE TEN DIFFERENT
KINDS OF CORAL.
THEY'LL SEE A STINGRAY, THEN
THEY'LL SEE A SMALL SHARK.
THERE IS A SUDDEN REALIZATION
THAT THIS IS NATURE, AND YOU
ARE ACTUALLY STARING IT IN THE
FACE.

Narrator says IN JUST A FEW
HOURS, THE NEW DIVERS DISCOVER
WHAT HAS PUT THE GREAT BARRIER
REEF ON THE BUCKET LIST FOR
MILLIONS.
YOU DON'T NEED TO BE AN EXPERT
HERE TO ENJOY WHAT THE REEF
HAS TO OFFER.

Clips play of the tourists snorkeling and walking along the crystalline shore.

A female tourist says OH, MY GOD.
UNDESCRIBABLE.
IT'S AMAZING.

A male tourist says THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST
BEAUTIFUL PLACES IN THE WORLD.
WHENEVER I COME BACK HERE TO
AUSTRALIA, I WILL DO IT AGAIN
AND AGAIN.

The female tourist looks at the water and says I WANT TO GO BACK IN.

Back on the main deck, the tourists shake hands with the crew members.

Alan Wallish says THE REEF IS
OUR BACKYARD.
AND IT'S IMPORTANT TO US THAT
BY THE END OF THE DAY, OUR
PASSENGERS HAVE HAD A GREAT
EXPERIENCE IN THAT BACKYARD
WITH US.

Narrator says AND HOPEFULLY
HAVE A DESIRE TO RETURN AND
SEE IT INTO A HEALTHY FUTURE.

Alan Wallish says IT'S REALLY
ABOUT TRYING TO GET PEOPLE TO
TAKE A SENSE OF OWNERSHIP WITH
THE REEF, SO THAT NO MATTER
WHERE THEY ARE IN THE WORLD,
WHEN THEY HEAR ABOUT IT, WHEN
THEY READ ABOUT IT, WHEN THEY
SEE ABOUT IT, THEY GO, YES,
I'VE SEEN THAT, I CAN PUT THAT
INTO PERSPECTIVE.

Narrator says TOURISM COULD BE
THE VOICE OF THE REEF.
ONE POSSIBLE KEY TO MOBILIZING
SUPPORT FOR ITS SURVIVAL.
AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH COULD
BE ANOTHER.
THE KEY TO FINDING OUT HOW TO
SAVE IT.

A clip plays of David Williamson and his crew members underneath the water marking items on a clipboard and measuring the breadth of coral formations.

FOR THREE WEEKS, DAVID
WILLIAMSON AND HIS TEAM HAVE
BEEN SWIMMING ALONG AN
UNDERWATER GRID COUNTING THE
FISH THEY SEE.
IT'S TO FIND OUT IF FISHING
RESTRICTIONS HELP BOOST
POPULATIONS AND KEEP CORAL
HEALTHY.
THEY'VE BEEN COMING HERE FOR
YEARS.
SO THEIR DATA IS ALSO SHOWING
HOW THE REEF IS FARING IN THE
FACE OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE
INDUSTRIAL PORTS JUST 120
KILOMETRES AWAY.

David Williamson says I REMEMBER
THIS SITE.
THIS SITE'S BEEN NICE FOR A
WHILE.
REEF LOOKS HEALTHY.
FISH LOOK HEALTHY.
SO YEAH, IT'S PRETTY GOOD.

Narrator says THEY HEAD BACK TO
THEIR MAIN RESEARCH BOAT TO
CRUNCH THE DATA.

A clip plays of David and a co-worker seated in front of an Excel spreadsheet.

David Williamson says ALL RIGHT.
WE'LL START OFF WITH LUTJANUS
ARGENTIMACULATUS.
150 IN ONE.
145 AND 165 IN THREE.
135 IN TRANSECT 2.

Narrator says IT'S GOOD NEWS.
THE FISH NUMBERS ARE NOT DOWN,
THEY'RE UP.
AN INDICATION THAT THE REEF IS
RESILIENT EVEN AFTER A DECADE
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

David Williamson says VISIBILITY
WAS GOOD.
LOTS OF HERBIVORES, SO THEY
ARE KEEPING ALL THE ALGAE ON
THE REEF UNDER CONTROL.
AND WE HAD SOME REALLY QUITE
RARE SPECIES AND, IN FACT,
SOME WE HADN'T SEEN PREVIOUSLY
ON THIS TRIP.
WE CAN'T DENY THAT BY SETTING
ASIDE ONE-THIRD OF THE REEF
INTO AREAS WHERE WE CAN'T TAKE
FISH OUT, THAT WE ARE CREATING
VALUABLE POPULATIONS OF
EXPLOITED SPECIES WITHIN THOSE
AREAS.
THERE'S NO SURPRISES.
YOU STOP FISHING THINGS IN A
CERTAIN AREA, THEY TEND TO
BUILD UP.

A caption reads "David Williamson. Marine Biologist."

Narrator says THE AREA ALSO HAS
YET TO SHOW IMPACTS FROM
AUSTRALIA'S COAL AND GAS BOOM,
NOW NEARLY A DECADE OLD.
BUT WILLIAMSON IS WORRIED.

David Williamson says THE
CHRONIC DISTURBANCE, CHRONIC
IMPACT FROM MAINTENANCE
DREDGING, SHIPPING MOVEMENTS,
IS POTENTIALLY GOING TO
COMPLETELY CHANGE AREAS, AND
IT HAS.
THERE IS A LONG HISTORY OF
THAT.
AND THOSE EFFECTS CAN
POTENTIALLY STRETCH OFFSHORE.

Narrator says SAVING THE
OCEAN'S REEFS IS ESSENTIAL TO
SAVING FISH WORLDWIDE.
THE TEAM'S RESEARCH IS
HIGHLIGHTING THE ROLE THAT
THEY PLAY AS POPULATORS FOR
ALL THE OCEANS.

David Williamson says THEY ARE
ACTUALLY PROVIDING AN
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT BREEDING
POPULATION.
AND THAT POPULATION CAN THEN
SUPPLY BABIES INTO THE
SURROUNDING AREAS.

Fast clips play of colourful fish and crustaceans swimming around the coral.

THE OCEAN IS A VERY CONNECTED
PLACE.
CURRENTS CONSTANTLY ON THE
MOVE.
THE SEA IS NEVER STILL.
FISH AND CORALS AND JUST ABOUT
EVERYTHING ELSE THAT LIVES IN
SEA USES THAT TO SPREAD THEIR
BABIES AROUND.
DESPITE THAT, LESS THAN
1 PERCENT OF THE OCEAN IS STILL
CURRENTLY PROTECTED.
SO I THINK WE NEED TO DO MORE.
WE NEED TO GET SMARTER.
AND WE NEED TO GET PAST SOME
OF THE HURDLES THAT HUMANITY
IS FACING.

A clip plays of the sun setting as David and his co-workers relax on board a ship.

David Williamson says IN TERMS
OF MY ROLE IN ALL OF THAT, I'M
HAPPY THAT I'VE BEEN ABLE TO
MAKE SOME CONTRIBUTION, SO
FAR, TO THE FIELD.
I ENJOY WHAT I DO.
I'VE GOT THE BEST JOB IN THE
WORLD, YOU KNOW?
I LOVE IT.

The scene changes to Alistair’s ship.

Alistair Heron says 200.
GOOD, THANK YOU.

Narrator says ABOARD THE HANJIN
PORT WALCOTT, IT'S WHITE
KNUCKLE TIME, AS THE MASSIVE
SHIP ENTERS THE NARROW GAP IN
THE REEF ON ITS PATH TO PORT.

Alistair Heron says THE NEXT
COURSE TO STEER IS 187,
PLEASE.

A responder says 187.

Alistair Heron says YES, PLEASE.

Narrator says THE SHIP HAS
STATE-OF-THE-ART NAVIGATION
TECHNOLOGY.
HOWEVER, TODAY, THE WEATHER IS
CLEAR, SO ALISTAIR HAS THE
BENEFIT OF VISUAL NAVIGATION.

Alistair Heron says 203.
THANK YOU.

Narrator says BUT THE CURRENT
IS VERY STRONG, AND THE
WEATHER CAN TURN IN AN
INSTANT.

Alistair Heron says ONE OF THE
GREATEST CHALLENGES HERE IN
THE HYDROGRAPHERS PASSAGE IS
THE CHANGE OF WEATHER.
IT'S QUITE SURPRISING HOW
DIFFERENT THE WEATHER IS OUT
ON THE REEF HERE TO BACK ON
SHORE.

Narrator says WEATHER WAS NOT
A FACTOR IN THE GROUNDING OF
THE SHEN NENG 1 IN 2010.
THAT ACCIDENT WAS EVENTUALLY
BLAMED ON PILOT FATIGUE.

A clip plays of the immobile Shen Neng.

Back to Hanjin, Alistair Heron says REEF VTS,
REEF VTS, HANJIN PORT WALCOTT.

Mike Maxwell says THIS IS REEF
VTS.
GO AHEAD, SIR.

Narrator says ALISTAIR STAYS IN
CONSTANT CONTACT WITH MIKE
MAXWELL ON THE MAINLAND.

Alistair Heron says JUST FOR
YOUR INFORMATION, I HAVE NIL
DEFECTS, AND WE'LL BE USING
THE TRACT TO THE WEST OF THREE
ROCKS.

Mike Maxwell says THANK YOU, SIR.

Alistair Heron looks out of the captain’s deck and says AT THIS
POINT OF OUR PILOTAGE NOW,
WE'RE AT THE CLOSEST POINT TO
THE REEF ON EITHER SIDE OF THE
VESSEL.
WE CAN SEE NOW OVER ON THE
STARBOARD SIDE, JUST HOW CLOSE
THE REEF IS TO THIS VESSEL,
PARTICULARLY IF YOU ARE
PASSING ANOTHER SHIP HERE.
IT IS A VERY NARROW ENTRANCE.
AND COMBINED WITH THE STRONG
CURRENTS, REQUIRES QUITE A BIT
OF CONCENTRATION TO NAVIGATE
THROUGH HERE.
IT IS A MATTER OF CONSTANTLY
ADJUSTING THE SHIP'S HEADING
SO WE ACTUALLY LINE UP WITH
THE CENTRE OF THE CHANNEL.

He looks at a crew member and says OKAY MID SHIP THE WHEEL.

A crew member says ROGER MID SHIP.
ROGER MID SHIP, SIR.

Alistair Heron says MID SHIP,
THANK YOU.
195.
OKAY.

Juxtaposed images show Mike Maxwell and Alistair Heron talking to each other. Alistair looks out to the ocean as Max analyzes their position on a map in front of his screen.

Mike Maxwell says HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT, THIS IS REEF VTS.

Alistair Heron says REEF VTS,
HANJIN PORT WALCOTT.

Mike Maxwell says THE SHIN
SHUGARA, SHE IS OUTBOUND AT
THE MOMENT.
YOU WILL PASS HER, SIR, IN
APPROXIMATELY THREE HOURS.

Alistair Heron says THE NEXT
COURSE TO STEER IS 223,
PLEASE.
YES, PLEASE.
223.
THANK YOU.
RIGHT.
LET'S HAVE A LOOK AND SEE
WHERE WE ARE.
I CAN SEE THE LEADS ON THE
WHITE TIP REEF THERE.
I CAN SEE THE FOREFRONT LEAD,
AND THE REAR LEAD, AND I'M
LINING THOSE UP SO THE SHIP
IS ON THE CORRECT HEADING.

Narrator says IT'S THE FINAL
COURSE CHANGE THEY'VE HAD TO
COMPLETE TO NAVIGATE SAFELY
THROUGH THE GREAT BARRIER
REEF.

Alistair Heron points at a printed chart of the Great Barrier Reef.

He says YOU CAN SEE
FROM THE CHARTS, AND YOU CAN
SEE OUR PATH THROUGH AS WE'VE
ALTERED COURSE DOWN THROUGH
HERE, HEADING DOWN TOWARDS
MACKAY OVER HERE.

Narrator says THE PASSAGE OF
THE HANJIN PORT WALCOTT
THROUGH THE REEF BRINGS
ALISTAIR'S TOTAL NUMBER OF
SUCCESSFUL RUNS TO NEAR A
THOUSAND.

Alistair Heron says FROM HERE
ON IN, THE PASSAGE IS WIDE, SO
THE PILOTAGE THEN MORE BECOMES
LIKE COASTAL NAVIGATION.

He picks up a telephone and says PORT FIVE THE WHEEL.
REEF VTS, THIS IS HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT CALLING ON CHANNEL 14.
ESTIMATED TIME OF PASSING...

Narrator says ALISTAIR RADIOS
THE GOOD NEWS TO MIKE AT THE
VESSEL MONITORING CENTRE.

Alistair Heron says WE'LL BE
DOWN IN THE PORT AREA AT
ABOUT 17:20.
ROMEO STANDING BY.

He looks out to the ocean and says PRETTY GOOD TODAY.
I COULDN'T WISH FOR A BETTER
PILOTAGE.
WE'VE HAD VERY GOOD
VISIBILITY AND A NICE NEW
SHIP.
GOOD SPEED.

Narrator says SMOOTH SAILING
FOR NOW.
BUT IN JUST A FEW DAYS, THE
HANJIN PORT WALCOTT WILL HAVE
TO MAKE THE SAME JOURNEY IN
THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.
THIS TIME, CARRYING UP TO
180,000 TONS OF COAL.
IT WILL SIT MUCH LOWER IN THE
WATER, INCREASING THE DAMAGE
TO THE REEF, IF THE WORST
HAPPENS.

Alistair Heron says REEF VTS,
REEF VTS, HANJIN PORT WALCOTT
ON CHANNEL 14.

Mike Maxwell says HANJIN PORT
WALCOTT, THIS IS REEF VTS.

Narrator says MIKE MAXWELL WILL
CONTINUE TO TRACK THE SHIP
UNTIL IT'S SAFELY INTO PORT.

Alistair Heron says GOOD
AFTERNOON, REEF VTS.
YOU CAN TAKE ME OFF DUTY NOW.
WE'RE WELL OUTSIDE THE CPL,
IN-BOUND FOR HIGH POINT.

Narrator says THE GREAT BARRIER
REEF IS UNIQUE, AND ALL OF US
HAVE A ROLE IN HELPING THIS
AMAZING WONDER OF NATURE TO
THRIVE.

A clip plays of several tankers floating along the Pacific.

David Williamson says CLIMATE
CHANGE IS THE NUMBER ONE
THING.
WE REALLY NEED TO GET ON TOP
OF OUR EMISSIONS AS A PLANET
AND TO START MAKING SOME
PROGRESS THERE.

Narrator says IRONICALLY, THE
COAL AND GAS NOW BEING SHIPPED
OUT OVER THE BARRIER REEF ONLY
ADDS TO GLOBAL WARMING.
THAT'S JUST ONE REASON WHY
PRESSURE IS INCREASING ON
AUSTRALIA TO TAKE ACTION.
THE GREAT BARRIER REEF HAS
LOST HALF ITS CORAL IN THE
PAST 27 YEARS.
IT COULD BE DOWN ANOTHER 50
PERCENT OVER THE NEXT DECADE.

Clips play of the thriving coral ecosystem.

David Wachenfeld says I THINK
THE CRITICAL THING HERE IS TO
MAKE SURE THAT WE WORK IN
PARTNERSHIP TO BALANCE THE
NEED FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND
DEVELOPMENT, WHILE MAKING SURE
WE PROTECT THE REEF ECOSYSTEM
FOR THE FUTURE.
AND I THINK THAT WE
CAN
STRIKE
THAT BALANCE.

Narrator says THERE IS REASON
FOR HOPE.
TODAY, MANY WHO WORK ON THE
GREAT BARRIER REEF, INCLUDING
REEF PILOTS LIKE ALISTAIR,
TOUR OPERATORS LIKE ALAN
WALLISH, AND PRIVATE
BUSINESSMEN LIKE LYLE SQUIRE,
HAVE UNDERGONE RIGOROUS
TRAINING IN HOW TO PROTECT IT,
JOINING GOVERNMENT WATCHDOGS
AND SCIENTISTS IN THE CAMPAIGN
TO KEEP IT HEALTHY.
ALL RECOGNIZE THAT ACTION IS
NEEDED GLOBALLY AND LOCALLY.

David Wachenfeld says THE REEF
IS TOO BIG AND TOO COMPLEX,
AND THE CHALLENGES IT FACES
ARE TOO GREAT FOR ANY ONE
INDIVIDUAL OR EVEN ANY ONE
ORGANIZATION TO PROTECT IT
SINGLE-HANDEDLY.
WE NEED EVERYBODY WHO USES THE
REEF, WHO VISITS THE REEF, TO
THINK ABOUT THE CONSEQUENCES
OF THEIR ACTIONS.
I BELIEVE THERE ARE THOUSANDS
OF PEOPLE, TENS OF THOUSANDS
OF PEOPLE WHO ARE SO
PASSIONATE ABOUT IT THAT THEY
WILL HELP US, THEY WILL PITCH
IN, THEY WILL LIFT THEIR GAME.
AND, COLLECTIVELY, WE WILL DO
A BETTER JOB, AND WE WILL KEEP
THE GREAT BARRIER REEF ONE OF
THE BEST PROTECTED AND
HEALTHIEST SYSTEMS IN THE
WORLD.

Narrator says IN THIS, THEY'VE
SUCCEEDED FOR NOW.
BUT WHETHER IT WILL PROVE
ENOUGH TO ULTIMATELY SAVE IT
IS STILL AN OPEN QUESTION.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Directors: Matthew Tomaszewski, Rob Taylor.

Series Producer: Clare Nolan.

Editor: Joel Tan.

The Narrator says Craig Sechler.

Produced by INFOCUS ASIA PTE LTD for NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CHANNELS.

Network International, LLC and NGC Network, US, LLC, Copyright 2013. All Rights Reserved.