Transcript: Imprint season 12 episode 8 | Nov 15, 2000

Tina Srebotnjak stands in a studio with pieces of art in red and orange hanging in the background.
She’s in her late thirties, with short chestnut hair and bangs. She’s wearing a red blazer over a white shirt.

She says GOOD EVENING I'M
TINA SREBOTNJAK.
WELCOME TO ANOTHER EDITION
OF “IMPRINT.”
TONIGHT...

A clip plays in which a man in his sixties announces a prize.

He says ON BEHALF OF OF THE JURY,
I'M PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THAT
DAVID ADAMS RICHARD...

(Cheering and applause)

Tina says WE CHECK OUT A
SEASON FULL OF WINNING BOOKS
AND WRITERS.

Another man on stage says THAT DOES MEAN I HAVE TO
GIVE EACH 25,000 dollars.

The first man says WE JUST DO THE JUDGING.

The audience laughs.

Tina says IRISH CANADIAN
WRITER EMMA DONOGHUE, A
CHARACTER NOT UNLIKE HER MOM
IN SLAMMERKIN.

In her interview, Emma says MY MOTHER READ THE NOVEL
ON DISK BECAUSE I LEFT IT
LYING AROUND.
SO IT WASN'T A CONSCIOUS
WISH TO KILL MY MOTHER, WHO
KNOWS AT THE UNCONSCIOUS LEVEL.

A clip shows two men in their fifties standing in a greenhouse.

Tina says AND A DIFFERENT
DRUMMER, A SMALL BOOK STORE
IN BURLINGTON, ONTARIO
ATTRACTS THE WHOSE'S WHO OF
CANADIAN WRITERS.

Theme music plays as the opening sequence rolls.
Fast clips show books and maps in hues of orange and red.

Back in the studio, Tina says THE GREY DAYS OF
NOVEMBER ARE A PERFECT TIME
FOR READING AND AS IT TURNS
OUT FOR GIVING OUT LITERARY
PRIZES.
THIS IS THE MONTH WE FIND
OUT WHO WON THE GILLER,
BOOKER AND GOVERNOR-GENERAL AWARDS.

Fast clips show men and women in formal attire receiving awards and giving acceptance speeches.

Tina continues TWO WAS BETTER THAN ONE AT
THE GILLER AS MICHAEL AN
DARJ AND DAVID ADAMS RICHARD
SHARED THE PRIZE.
MARGARET ATWOOD WENT TO
LONDON FOR THE BOOKER.
AND YESTERDAY MICHAEL AN DAJ
AGAIN, THIS TIME THE
GOVERNOR-GENERAL AWARD FOR
ENG LYNN LANGUAGE FICTION.
HERE TO TALK ABOUT THE
WINNERS AND LOSERS OUR
CULTURAL CRITIC BRONWYN
DRAINIE AND NOAH RICH
ALREADY.
SO BRONWYN, DID THE RIGHT
MAN, MICHAEL AN DAJ WIN THE
GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S AWARD.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Bronwyn Drainie. Cultural Critic."
Bronwyn is in her late forties, with short blond hair and bangs. She’s wearing a red shirt.

She says I WOULD HAVE TO SAY NO.
I WOULD HAVE GIVEN IT TO
RICHARDS, YOU KNOW THERE ARE
SOME NOVELISTS WHO ARE
PLOTTERS, RISMTEDS IS ONE OF
THEM HAD.
THERE ARE SOME WHO ARE
FLYERS, ONDAATJE IS ONE OF
THEM.
AND I GUESS I'M MORE OF A
PLOTTER MYSELF.
AND I LIKE -- I LIKE
NOVELISTS WHO STICK TO
CHARACTER AND PLOT AS THEIR
ESSENTIAL RAISON D'ETRE,
USING IMAGERY TO HIGHLIGHT
AND ENHANCE -- ENHANCE ALL
OF THAT.
BUT FOR ME ONDAATJE PUTS THE
LANGUAGE AND IMAGERY AT THE
CENTRE WHICH IS MORE OF A
POETIC SENSE I BELIEVE.

Tina says DID YOU LIKE O
FLAEL'S GHOST.

The caption changes to "Noah Richler. Literary Columnist."
Noah is in his forties, clean-shave, with short brown hair. He’s wearing a gray suit and a lilac shirt.

He says I HAVE TO DISAGREE.
FIRST OF ALL I THINK I
SHOULD POINT OUT IT IS A
PARTICULARLY GOOD YEAR, WE
ARE QUITE SPOILED FOR
CHOICE.
BUT I THINK THAT IN FACT
THIS WAS THE MOST
STRAIGHTFORWARD AND PLOTTED
OF MY MICHAEL ONDAATJE'S
BOOKS, ITS ENDING IS FABULOUS.

The book appears briefly. The cover features a blurred sepia-tone picture of a young woman.

Noah continues
I FOUND IT SO UPLIFTING AND
SO FINISHED THAT I THOUGHT
FOR THAT REASON ALONE T
REALLY SHOULD HAVE TAKEN IT.

Tina says THAT DOES HAPPEN IN
BOOKS A LOT.
WE TEND TO FORGIVE IT THEY
DO A SPECTACULAR FIRST THREE
QUARTERS AND THE ENDING
DOESN'T REALLY WORK AND WE
SAY BUT IT WAS SUCH A GREAT
READ.
LET'S TALK ABOUT THE
NONFICTION BECAUSE THE
GOVERNOR-GENERALS ARE IN
MANY CATEGORIES.
BUT THE NONFICTION BOOK WAS
NOTES FROM -- I KNOW YOU
BOTH LOVED THIS BOOK.

The book “The Hyena’s belly” appears briefly.

Bronwyn says FOR SURE.
I THOUGHT IT WAS WONDERFUL.
AND OF COURSE WHAT IS SO
EXCITING ABOUT A BOOK LIKE
THIS WAS IT CAME OFF A SLUSH
PILE.
IT WAS HANDED INTO THE
PUBLISHER, PENGUIN, WITH
SLIGHTLY NO FANFARE, NO
AGENT TALKING IT IT UP.
AND NOBODY KNOW WHO THE
AUTHOR WAS.
A READER JUST PICKED IT UP
AND SAY WOW! THIS IS GREAT.
WE HAVE TO PUBLISH THIS.
IT IS WONDERFUL TO SEE IT
GIVEN AN AWARD.
IT IS ALSO A TERRIBLY
HARROWING BOOK BUT IT IS
MARVELOUS BECAUSE HE MANAGES
TO COMBINE REAL HUMOUR AND A
KIND OF CRAZY LOOK AT A
TERRIBLE, TERRIBLE PLACE,
ETHIOPIA.

Noah says I DIDN'T KNOW THIS PERSON.
I OPENED IT UP AND REALLY
FROM THE FIRST FEW PAGES YOU
UNDERSTAND THERE IS AN
AUTHOR IN GREAT COMMAND.
WHAT WAS STRIKING IN THE
FIRST SECTION WHICH DEALS
WITH THE AUTHOR'S CHILDHOOD
IS THAT --

Tina says WHEN THE LIST COMES OUT
THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S LIST
SORT OF A CANADIAN THING AS
WELL THERE IS MUCH NASHING
OF TEETH ABOUT WHO WAS LEFT
OFF AND WHAT A LOUSY LIST IT
IS.
BUT I DIDN'T HEAR MUCH OF
THAT.
SO DID WE GET IT RIGHT.

Bronwyn says THE ONE PIECE OF BAD
TIMING WAS FOR ALICER McLEOD
WHO DIDN'T GET INCLUDED ON
THE LIST LAST YEAR FOR HIS
BOOK AND BY THE TIME IT CAME
AROUND FOR THIS YEAR, HE IS
NOT ON THE LIST AGAIN AND
YOU SORT OF FEEFL THAT MAYBE
HE HAD GONE A BIT LUKEWARM
SOMEHOW IN TERM ITS OF, YOU
KNOW, THE CHOICES THAT THE
JURY WAS MAKING.
AND THAT IS A SHAME BECAUSE
IT WAS CERTAINLY A BOOK THAT
DESERVED TO BE AT LEAST ON
SHORT LISTS IF NOT WINNING
AWARDS.

Tina says BUT HE IS ON A SHORT LIST
FOR THE IMPACT AWARD WHICH I
THINK IS A HUGE --

Bronwyn says HE HAS WON THE TRILLIUM
HERE IN ONTARIO.

Tina says LET'S MOVE TO THE
BROKER, BRONWYN WE KNOW YOU
DIDN'T LOVE IT BY MARGARET
ATWOOD BUT SHE DID GO TO
LONDON.

The book “The blind assassin” appears briefly.

Bronwyn says FOR SURE.
THE SAD THING IS WHEN YOU
LOOK BACK OVER THE THREE
OTHER BOOKERS THAT SHE HAS
BEEN UP FOR, THEY WERE OFF
WONDERFUL BOOKS HAND MAID'S
TALE, CATS EYE AND ALLIA
GREAT.
SHE WINS IT FOR A NOT VERY
GOOD ONE SO IT STARTS TO
LOOK LIKE JUST A LIFETIME
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD.
AND IT IS A SHAME BECAUSE
SHE IS A VERY GOOD WRITER
AND DESERVED BETTER.

Tina says YOU SAID IN “THE
NATIONAL POST” THAT THE
ANNOUNCEMENT OF HER HAVING
WON THE BOOKER CARRIED SOME
DISAPPOINTMENT.

Noah says I SHOULD POINT OUT THAT I
DON'T WANT TO BEGRUDGE
ANYBODY ACTUALLY WINNING
ANYTHING BUT I AGREE.
I THINK A BAD COIS WAS MADE
AND THAT ACTUALLY THE BOOKER
IS A PRIZE IN DECLINE FOR
SOME YEAR.

Tina says WHY.

Noah says PART OF THE REASON FOR
THAT IS THAT THEY HAVE BEEN
STRUGGLING ABOUT WHETHER OR
NOT THEY SHOULD BE THE
POPULAR PRIZE.
AND CHOOSING BAD JURIES.
THEY HAVE -- THEIR JURY THIS
YEAR BREAKFAST TELEVISION
PRESENTERS, NO KNOWN IN NO
CIRCLES FOR READING ACUMEN
AND WHAT HAPPENS THEN IS I
THINK YOU GET A BAD LIST.
WE COULD TALK ENDLESSLY
ABOUT WHAT IS NOT ON THE
BOOKER LIST.
SO IT SLIGHTLY GIVES ME
SLIGHT DISPLEASURE THAT SHE
WON IN NOT A VERY GOOD
FIELD.
I FEEL SORRY FOR THE BOOKS
THAT AREN'T THERE.

Tina says LET'S TALK ABOUT
THE GILLERS.
OF COURSE WE WERE ALL THERE,
I THINK, TWO WINNERS.
IT WAS QUITE AN EVENT.
WHAT DID YOU THINK ABOUT
DIVIDING THE PRIZE.

Bronwyn says WELL, I WAS VERY SORRY TO
SEE IT GO TO TWO, YOU KNOW,
THE RICHEST BOOK AND --
RICHARDS BOOK AND ONDAATJE
BOOK.
I THINK INDICATES THE JURY
ISN'T DOING THEIR JOB.
THEY ARE THERE TO DO A
WINNER.
TO SAY WE CAN'T CHOOSE
BETWEEN THESE TWO, THEY ARE
SOMEHOW EQUAL, THERE IS A
TIE HERE, IT CREATES THIS
FALL ASY THAT WORKS OF ART
CAN BE MEASURED THE WAY A
HORSE RACE CAN BE MEASURED
OR A FOOT RACE.
CAN CAN'T BE.
SO IT SEEMS TO ME THERE ARE
CERTAIN BASIC RULES THAT YOU
SIGN ON TO WHEN YOU GO ON TO
A JURY.
AN ART JURY AND THE BASIC
RULE IS WE ARE HERE TO
CHOOSE A WINNER, FOLKS.
AND THEY SHOULD HAVE CHOSEN
ONE.
I THINK IT IS A SHAME.
I ALSO THINK THAT YOU KNOW,
THIS CAVALIER OH, JACK RABIN
O VERY MUCH IS SO
GENEROUSING HANDS OVER
ANOTHER 25,000 dollar CHEQUE TO
THE SECOND WINNER, HE WAS
ALMOST FORCED INTO THAT
SITUATION.
BECAUSE THERE IS THIS
MYTHOLOGY OF HIS GREAT
GENERAL ROSSITY AROUND THIS
AWARD.
HE WOULD HAVE LOOKED STINGY
IF HE HADN'T DONE IT.
BUT IT WASN'T REALLY HIS
CHOICE.

Noah says STINGY IS WHAT THE BOOKER
WAS WHEN THEY SPLIT IT DOWN
THE MIDDLE AND ONDAATJE WON.

Bronwyn says I DON'T REMEMBER PEOPLE
SAYING THE BOOKER PEOPLE ARE
BEING STINGY.

Noah says HE WAS VERY GENEROUS BUT
THEY WILL BE EATING BREAD
AND WATER IF THEY DO IT
AGAIN NEXT YEAR.
THE PROBLEM IS IF YOU HAVE
TWO WINNERS WELL WHY NOT
FRED SIMPSON FOR THE TRADE
ALSO.

Bronwyn says WHY NOT ALL SIX.

Tina says WHAT ABOUT THIS
IDEA THAT WE HAVE TOO MANY
LITERARY AWARDS OR -- THAT
IS ONE THING THAT WE HAVE
TOO MANY, OR THE OTHER IS
THAT IT IS ALL TORONTO --
LIKE I SAID ALL THREE OF US
WERE THERE BREAKG BREADING
TO T IS BIG ESTABLISHMENT,
AUTHORS WHAT ABOUT THE
INDEPENDENT PRESSES,
GEOGRAPHIC DIVERSITY, DO WE
DO ENOUGH FOR THAT.

Bronwyn says LOOK, I THINK THE MORE
THE MERRIER ON THE WHOLE
WITH LITERARY AWARDS.
THEY ARE THERE TO CREATE A
BUZZ AND AN EXCITEMENT
AROUND LITERATURE.
THINK TO WHAT IT WAS LIKE 30
YEARS AGO IN THIS COUNTRY.
IN THE MID '70s WE HAD THE
GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S BEING
GIVEN OUT IN SILENCE UP AT
RIDEAU HALL EVERY YEAR AND
THE OCCASIONAL DOCUMENTARY
PRODUCER PICKING UP AN
OSCAR.
YOU KNOW, DOWN IN HOLLYWOOD
FROM THE NFB.
AND THAT WAS LITERALLY THE
ONLY PRIZE GLYPHING THAT WAS
DONE IN A CULTURAL SENSE IN
THIS COUNTRY AT ALL.
AND NOW WE HAVE REALLY QUITE
AN EXCITING SCENE.
AND I THINK IT IS JUST FINE.
IN TERMS OF TORONTO CENTRIC,
MAYBE YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO
SAY ABOUT THAT.
DOESN'T BOTHER ME.
I LIVE IN TORONTO.

Noah says I THINK THE
GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S AWARD
FOUNDED BY JOHN BUCKNER IN
THE '30s IS A PATRONIZING
AWARD.
ITS JOB IS TO ENCOURAGE
TALENT IN WHAT WAS REGARDED
THEN AS STILL A BIT OF A
BACK WATER.
AND I THINK IT IS FABULOUS
THAT IT IS BEING GIVEN
COMPETITION BY PRIZES WHOSE
MISSION IS MERELY TO CHOOSE
THE BEST.
I DON'T AGREE THAT IT IS TOO
TORONTO CENTRIC.
YOU CAN BREAK IT DOWN AND
SEE TREMENDOUS
REPRESENTATION FROM ALL OVER
THE COUNTRY.
THERE WILL ALWAYS BE MORE
FROM ONTARIO OR TORONTO
BECAUSE THAT IS WHERE MOST
OF THE PEOPLE ARE.

Tina says WERE THERE ANY
BOOKS THAT FOR YOU WERE LEFT
OFF ANY OF THE PRIZE LISTS
THAT -- YOU MENTIONED
ALLISTER McLEOD BUT ANY THAT
YOU THOUGHT WERE AN
OVERSIGHT.

Bronwyn says ON THE BOOKER I WOULD
HAVE SAID WHITE EAST TEETH
BY AN EXCITING YOUNG ROCKET
OF A WRITER WHO IS COMING
OUT IN ENGLAND IT IS A SHAME
HER BOOK WASN'T AT LEAST
LISTED ON THE SHORT LIST.

Noah says AND IF I -- THOSE WERE
AND ANN ENWRIGHT'S READ WHAT
DOW LIKE, A NEW IRISH WRITER
WERE VISIBLY THRILL.
I NEVER SAW SO MANY PEOPLE
BUY A BOOK SO IMMEDIATELY.
AND HELEN HUMPHREY
AFTERIMAGE I THOUGHT WAS A
DELICATE AND FINELY --
RATHER BEAUTIFUL WRITTEN
BOOK WITH A GREAT SUBJECT.

Tina says OKAY, THANKS VERY
MUCH FOR COMING IN.

Both guests say THANK YOU.

Now an animated book resting on a bowling alley reveals a clip from a bookstore, followed by a picture of the cover of “Slammerkin” by Emma Donoghue.

Tina says LATTER, A DIFFERENT
DRUMMER, A SMALL BURLINGTON
BOOK STORE SCORES BIG WITH
WRITERS AND BOOK LOVERS.
AND UP NEXT, SLAMMERKIN, A
NEW NOVEL FROM WRITER EMMA
DONOGHUE.
SHE SOUNDS AS IRISH AS THEY
COME.
BUT EVER SINCE EMMA DONOGHUE
MOVED TO LONDON, ONTARIO WE
HAVE BEEN CLAIMING HER AS
OUR OWN.
SHE HAS WRITTEN SEVERAL
SUCCESSFUL NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES AND RADIO PLAYS.
HER LATEST BOOK SLAMMERKIN
HAS A HISTORICAL TWIST.
IT'S BASED ON A TRUE STORY.
IN 1764 A YOUNG SERVANT GIRL
NAMED MARY SAUNDERS WAS
HANGED FOR THE GRISLY MURDER
OF HER EMPLOYER.
THE TITLE SLAMMERKIN HAS TWO
MEANS.
A LOOSE WOMAN AND A LOOSE
FITTING GOWN OF THE PERIOD.
BOTH ARE CRUCIAL DETAILS IN
THE STORY OF MARY SAUNDERS.

A clip plays of Tina’s interview to Emma Donoghue.
They both sit at a table in a small restaurant.
Emma is in her late thirties, with auburn hair in a short bob. She’s wearing a black jacket over a flowery black dress.

Tina says NOW THIS IS A TRUE STORY
OR AT LEAST BASE ON A TRUE
STORY.
WHO WAS MARY SAUNDERS.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Emma Donoghue. Slammerkin."

Emma says WELL, WE KNOW SO LITTLE
ABOUT THE REAL MARY
SAUNDERS.
WE KNOW THAT SHE WAS A
SERVANT GIRL IN THE
EMPLOYMENT OF A MS. JONES IN
THE WELSH BORDERS IN THE
1760s.
AND WE KNOW THAT SHE PICKED
UP A CLEVER ONE DAY AND
DISPATCHED HER EMPLOYER,
MS. JONES AND WE KNOW SHE
WAS 16 OR 17.
AND A COUPLE OF NEWSPAPER
INTERVIEWED SURVIVED IN
WHICH -- IN ONE OF THEM SHE
SAID SHE DID IT FOR MONEY.
IN ANOTHER SHE SAID SHE DID
IT FOR THE FINE CLOTHES.
IT WAS THAT DETAIL THAT
CAUGHT MY ATTENTION.
I THOUGHT KILLING FOR
CLOTHES SOUNDS A BIT
DEMENTED AND BUT REALLY
CLOTHES WERE LIKE A
WOMAN'S -- THEY WERE
ABSOLUTELY CRUCIAL AS A WAY
UP THE SOCIAL LADDER, AS THE
MARK OF WHETHER YOU WERE A
PERSON OF STATE US OR NOT.

Tina says WELL, CLOTHES ARE A
HUGE THEME THROUGHOUT THIS
BOOK.
IT SEEMS TO ME THAT THE
OBJECTS OF DESIRE IN THIS
BOOK HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH
SEX.
THEY ARE ALL ABOUT MATERIAL
AND TEXTURE AND CUT AND
COLOUR.
NOW WHAT IS IF ABOUT THAT
THAT APPEALS TO YOU SO MUCH.

Emma says I THINK I HAVE A LITTLE
BIT OF A FABRIC FETISH MYSELF.
YOU KNOW, I MAKE A LOT OF
BAD LOOKING SILK CUSHONS AND
I'M A SUCKER FOR SECOND TIME
VELVET CLOTHES ON QUEEN'S
STREET, THAT KIND OF THING.
SO I THINK I'M SORT OF
PROJECTED THAT ON TO A
CHARACTER IN A PERIOD WHEN
ALL THAT WAS REALLY MORE
SUBSTANTIAL, IT WAS MORE OF
A LIFE CHANGING PASSION.
IN THE CASE OF MARY SAUNDERS,
I REALLY WANTED HER WORK TO
BE IMPORTANT.
AND I DECIDED TO MAKE HER A
SEAMSTRESS SO THAT WHEN SHE
KILLS FOR FINE CLOTHES SHE
DOESN'T JUST WANT THEM BUT
IS INNATELY INVOLVED IN
MAKING THEM AND SEES RICH,
LAZY FAT WOMAN THAT GET TO
WEAR CLOTHES SHE SNOWS SHE
WOULD LOOK SO MUCH BETTER
IN.
IT SHE IS THE GRUBBY, HARD
WORKED ONE.
AND CREATING THESE BEAUTIFUL
OBJECTS THAT THE RICH GET TO
WEAR.

Tina says DID YOU HAVE TO
RESIST THE TEMPTATION TO
MAKE MARY MORE LIKABLE.
BECAUSE IN MANY WAYS SHE IS
QUITE A PIECE OF WORK.
SHE IS NOT YOUR CLASSIC
VULNERABLE GIRL.

Emma says YOU KNOW, I COULDN'T SEEM
TO MAKE HER ANY OTHER WAY.
BUT I DID STOP TO BE AFRAID
AT VARIOUS POINTS.
I THOUGHT NO ONE WILL LIKE
THIS PERSON.
BUT THEN A LINE FROM JANE
AUSTIN USED TO RING IN MY
EAR.
SHE FAMOUSLY SAID ABOUT HER
NOVEL EMMA WHICH I'M NAMED
FOR.
SHE SAID I'M CREATING A HERO
WIN WHO NO ONE BUT MYSELF
WILL LIKE.
AND SHE WAS AWARE THAT
INSTEAD OF THE CHARMING
ELIZABETH BENNETT OF PRIDE
AND PREJUDICE, SHE WAS
CREATING A RATHER ARROGANT
GIRL.
AND IN MY CASE I HAVE
CREATED, QUITE A DARK,
STORMY AND SULLEN CHARACTER.
BUT SHE WAS THE ONLY
CHARACTER WHO MADE SENSE IN
THIS STORY TO ME.
SO I THINK IT WAS WORTH
TAKING THE RISK BECAUSE YOU
COULD SO EASILY THROW IN TO
SENTIMENTS WITH A STORY OF A
DOWN TRODEN, WORTHY, YOU
KNOW, POOR GIRL.
I THINK IT IS REALLY
IMPORTANT TO SORT OF STICK
WITH THE TRUTH OF THE STORY.

Tina says NOW THERE IS AN
INTERESTING MORAL ISSUE THAT
I THINK YOU RAISED IN THE
BOOK.
AND THAT IS MARY COMMITS A
HIDEOUS CRIME.
SHE, AS YOU SAY, TAKES A
CLEVER TO HER EMPLOYER.
BUT AN EMPLOYER WHO FOR THE
MOST PART HAD TRIED HER VERY
BEST TO BE A DECENT EMPLOYER,
HAD TRIED TO BEFRIEND HER.
AND MARY CONTEMPLATES AT THE
END OF THE BOOK HOW THIS
COULD HAVE HAPPENED.
ONE OF THE THINGS SHE SAID
STRUCK ME WHICH WAS UP UNTIL
THEN SHE THOUGHT MURDER WAS
SOMETHING THAT PEOPLE WHO
LOATHE ONE ANOTHER DID TO
ONE ANOTHER.
BUT SHE REALIZED MURDER
COULD HAPPEN AS EASILY AS
SICKNESS OR WEATHER OR LOVE.
DO YOU THINK THAT IS TRUE.

Emma says I THINK I ENDED WITH THE
WORD LOVE THERE IS THAT FROM
THE STATISTICS I LOOKED AT
IN TERMS OF MURDER NOWADAYS,
MURDER HAPPENS ALONGSIDE
LOVE.
PEOPLE MURDER THOSE THEY
LOVE OR HAVE LOVED.
I MEAN, THE PERSON WHOSE
MOST LIKELY TO KILL YOU IS
NOT THE ARCHETYPAL MAN IN
THE DARK ALLY.
IT IS A LOVED ONE, IT IS A
LOVED ONE IN THE PRESENCE OF
ALCOHOL AND WHEN THINGS HAVE
GONE HORRIBLY WRONG.
AND ON IMPULSE, THAT IS THE
TYPICAL MURDER.
SO I WANTED TO REFLECT THAT
I WANTED THE MURDER TO BE
REALISTIC EMOTIONALLY AS
WELL AS IN TERMS OF BLOOD
SPLATTERING.
YOU KNOW, AT A PSYCHOLOGICAL
LEVEL I THINK THAT STORY
COULD HAPPEN ANY TIME.
AND I USED MY OWN MOTHER TO
SORT -- AS THE BASIS OF THE
CHARACTER OF MS. JONES.
SOME OF THE WAYS OF SPEAKING
AND BUSYNESS BECAUSE MY
MOTHER HAD EIGHT CHILDREN.
I NEVER THOUGHT MY MOTHER
WOULD KNOW THIS BECAUSE THE
CHARACTER LOOKS VERY
DIFFERENT.
ONLY HAS ONE CHILD, I NEVER
THOUGHT MY MOTHER WOULD
NOTICE.
IT WAS JUST A HELPFUL MODEL
TO ME.
BUT MY MOTHER READ THE NOVEL
ON DISK BECAUSE I LEFT A
DISK LYING AROUND.
AND SHE RANG UP AND SAID I
AM I THE WON THAT GETS
KILLED WITH A CLEVER.
ALTHOUGH I'M NOT OF A
CONSCIOUS WISH TO KILL MY
MOTHER, WHO KNOWS AT THE
UNCONSCIOUS LEVEL.

Tina says WE SHOULD JUST SAY
HOW MUCH WE LIKED THE WOMAN
BEFORE SHE WAS DONE IN.
A WONDERFUL CHARACTER.

Emma says IT IS BETTER TO ACT THESE
THINGS OUT ON THE PAGE.

Tina says NOW I WOULD LIKE TO
TALK TO YOU A BIT ABOUT
IDENTITY.
WE CAN TELL YOU ARE IRISH
FROM YOUR BEAUTIFUL ACCENT.

Emma says NO FAKING THAT.

Tina says BUT YOU LOOK HERE,
A LOT OF -- LIVE HERE IN
CANADA A LOT OF TIMES.

Emma says BASED IN CANADA SINCE 1998.

Tina says SO NOW I DON'T KNOW
HOW TO PHRASE THIS EXACTLY.
BUT HOW DO YOU -- HOW
IMPORTANT IS IT TO YOUR
WRITING THAT YOU ARE IRISH.

Emma says FOR MY FIRST TWO NOVELS
ANYWAY THEY ARE SORT OF
ODDABLY IRISH.
MAIN CHARACTERS SPEAK LIKE I DO.
AND MY FIRST BOOK WAS A BOOK
OF FAIRY TALES AND I DON'T
KNOW COULD YOU HAVE TOLD
FROM THEM THAT I WAS IRISH.
IN A WAY THAT HELPS ME TAKE
A BREAK FROM A VERY
CONTEMPORARY CHATTY IRISH
STYLE.
AND THIS GIVEN IT WAS SET IN
WALES I DON'T KNOW THAT YOU
WOULD KNOW THAT I'M IRISH.
BECAUSE I HAVE HAD A CLEAR
IDENTITY OF IRISH BUT I
THINK IS CRUCIAL TO TAKE
RISKS BECAUSE OTHERWISE YOU
END UP IN A RUT.
AND REPEATING YOURSELF AND
CHURNING OUT ANOTHER NOVEL
OF THE SAME TYPE.
SO I SUPPOSE I DELIBERATELY
DISTANCED MYSELF FROM MY OWN
CENTURY, PLACE AND MY USUAL
PREOCCUPATIONS IN THIS
NOVEL.

Tina says THE OTHER TAG THAT
YOU GET IF I CAN CALL IT
THAT IS THAT YOU ARE A
LESBIAN WRITER.
AND AGAIN I WONDER DOES THAT
AFFECT YOUR WRITING AT ALL.
DO YOU SEE ANY -- CERTAINLY
IN A BOOK LIKE THIS, IF YOU
DIDN'T KNOW YOU WERE RES
LEAN -- LESBIAN, DO YOU FIND
THAT MAKES IT SWAY INTO WHAT
YOU WRITE OR THE TOPICS YOU
CHOOSE.

Emma says WELL, I SUPPOSE THERE IS
A PARALLEL IN THAT SOME OF
MY WORK HAS BEEN VISIBLY OR
ODDABLY LESBIAN JUST AS SOME
HAS BEEN IRISH.
AND I WOULD SAY SIMILARLY,
YOU KNOW T IS WHO I AM BUT
IT DOESN'T -- I MAY BE A
LESBIAN WRITER AND AN IRISH
WRITER BUT NOT EVERY BOOK IS
GOING TO BE AN IRISH BACK OR
LESBIAN BOOK.
SO IT BUS EFFECT ME IN ABOUT
SIMILAR MEASUREX SEPTEMBER
THERE IS MUCH MORE FUSS MADE
OF THE LESBIAN PART.
IRISH IS MORE
WELL-ESTABLISHED AS A LABEL.
LESS CONTROVERSIAL.

Tina says WELL, AND TOO MANY
PEOPLE FAR LESS THREATENING.
IT MEANS YOU ARE LYRICAL,
CAN HOLD A DRINK.

Emma says BUT YET, AS AN IRISH
WOMAN WHO DOESN'T DRINK
ALCOHOL, I'M ALREADY
DEVIATING FROM THAT
IDENTITY.
AND PERHAPS AS A LESBIAN
NOVELIST PUBLISHING A BOOK
WITH NO LESBIANISM, I MAY
BE.
NEVER MIND THE LABEL OF
LESBIAN WRITER BUT IS JUST
WHO I HAPPEN TO BE.
BUT I THINK IT IS VERY
DANGEROUS FOR YOUR BOOKS TO
START FALLING INTO A
PATTERN.
YOU KNOW, ESPECIALLY WHEN
ARE YOU STILL QUITE YOUNG.
AND I THINK IT IS IMPORTANT
TO TAKE THOSE RISKS AND MARK
OUT NEW TERRITORIES EARLY
ON.
I ALWAYS WANTED TO STORE OF
ESTABLISH A PATTERN OF
ECLECTIC WRITING EARLY ON AS
THE PROMISCUITY OF THE PEN.
BECAUSE THEN IT IS EASIER TO
TRY THEM AGAIN.

Tina says YOU MENTIONED THAT
YOU HAD A VERY HAPPY
CHILDHOOD AND YOU OBVIOUSLY
ARE SUCH A HAPPY, HAPPY
PERSON.
AND I LOVED IN READING ABOUT
YOU THAT EVEN IN COMING OUT
WHICH FOR MANY PEOPLE WAS A
TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCE SEEMED
TO ARE -- FOR YOU TO JUST
BEEN SO NATURAL AND GREAT
AND EVERYBODY WAS SO
ACCEPTING.
IS THAT TRUE.

Emma says IT WAS A BIG
RELIEF AFTER MY FEARS.
IF YOU INTERVIEWED ME AS 15
IT WOULD HAVE BEEN A
DIFFERENT MATTER.
I WOULD HAVE SAID OH, NO, MY
SCHOOL WILL KICK ME OUT IF
THEY FIND OUT AND MY PARENTS
WILL BE SHATTERED.
AND SO PERHAPS WHEN I
ACTUALLY GOT TO THE POINT OF
TELLING PEOPLE LATER ON IT
WAS AN ANTI-CLIMAX.
SO YOU KNOW, THERE WERE A
FEW INSTANCES OF RELATIVES
BEING DISCONCERTED BY MY
CHOICE I REMEMBER ONE
RELATIVE SAID AND SHE IS A --
TOO.
I WOULDN'T SAY EVERYONE WAS
IMMEDIATELY UNDERSTANDING
ABOUT IT.
I FIND CANADA BY CONTRAST OR
AT LEAST ONTARIO
EXTRAORDINARILY LIBERAL.
I FIND MOST PEOPLE, IF YOU
IN THE HAIRDRESSER AND YOU
SAY MY PARTNER, SHE, THE
HAIRDRESSER WILL NOT STAND
AND SEIZE THERE WITH THE
SCISSORS.
AT LEAST ON THE PURPOSE
PEOPLE RESPOND IN A WAY THAT
IS VERY USED TO SEXUAL
DIVERSITY JUST AS THEY ARE
VERY USED TO ETHNIC
DIVERSITY.
SO I FIND THAT A BIG PLUS
ABOUT LIVING IN CANADA.

Tina says WE ARE A COUNTRY OF
IMMIGRANTS AND WE TAKE ALL COPPERS.

Emma says USED TO A MIXED BAG.

Tina says WHAT I LOVE ABOUT
ONE OF THE MANY THINGS I
LOVE ABOUT CANADA, OBVIOUSLY
A GREAT COUNTRY BUT I LOVE
OUR ENDEARING WAY OF
GRABBING PEOPLE AND MAKING
THEM OUR OWN.
OF COURSE YOU REALIZE WE
THINK OF YOU AS ALMOST A
CANADIAN WRITER.
YOU ARE OBVIOUSLY IRISH BUT
CANADIANS HAVE THIS THING,
WHENEVER WE HAVE PEOPLE COME
TO OUR COUNTRY TO LIVE HERE
AND WE JUST SAY OH YES, YES,
THEY ARE CANADIAN.

Emma says I LOVE THAT.
BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO LIVE IN
IRELAND FOR 20 YEARS BEFORE
ANYONE WOULD CALL YOU AN
IRISH REQUIRE AND THAN IT
WOULD BE A CANADIAN IRISH
WRITER.
YEAH, IN IRELAND THERE IS A
EXTRAIST VIEW OF IDENTITY.
YOU HAVE TO HAVE A NAME LIKE
DONOGHUE AND TRANSPARENT
WHITE FACE.
AT LEAST AN IDEA OF WHAT AN
IRISH PEOPLE CAN LOOK LIKE
WHEREAS CANADIANS CAN BE
ALMOST ANYTHING.
THAT IS DELIGHTFUL.
IT MAKES IT VERY WELCOMING
AS A LANDED IMMIGRANT.

Tina says WE ARE VERY GLAD
YOU CHOSE CANADA TO LIVE AT
LEAST PART OF THE TIME.
LOVELY MEETING YOU.

Emma says THANK YOU SO MUCH.

Back in the studio, Tina says
SLAMMERKIN BY EMMA DONOGHUE
IS PUBLISHED BY VIRAGO PRESS.
TODAY MARKS THE
30th ANNIVERSARY OF ONE OF
CANADA'S MOST CELEBRATED
BOOK STORES.
A DIFFERENT DRUMMER IN
BURLINGTON, ONTARIO HAS
SURVIVED WHERE OTHER
INDEPENDENT BOOK STORES HAVE NOT.
CHAPTERS OPENED UP THE
STREET A FEW YEARS BACK.
AND INDIGO SOON FOLLOWED.
BUT THAT BIG TIME
COMPETITION ONLY SPURN
SPURRED OWNER RICHARD
BACHMANN ON TO GREATER
HEIGHTS “IMPRINT” GERALD
L'ECUYER WENT FOR A VISIT.

A clip shows Gerald driving. He then stands in a small bookstore. He’s in his thirties, clean-shaven, with short blond hair.

He addresses the owner and says WE ARE HERE IN A SMALL
TOWN, BURLINGTON.
IT IS A QUIET TOWN, SUBURBAN
STREET, TREES.
WHY IS THERE ONE OF THE MOST
IMPORTANT BOOK STORES IN
SOUTHERN ONTARIO HERE.
HOW DID IT COME TO BE.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Richard Bachmann. Owner: A Different Drummer."
Richard is in his fifties, with receding gray hair and a full beard. He’s wearing round glasses.

He says WELL, I THINK EVERY TOWN
DESERVE ACE BOOK SHOP THIS
GOOD IT IS JUST MOST PLACES
DON'T HAVE THE GOOD FORTUNE.
WE'VE BROUGHT QUITE A LOT TO
THE COMMUNITY.
THE RESOURCE OF THE BOOK
SHOP, AND OF COURSE ALL THE
MANY AUTHORS WE'VE BROUGHT
IN FOR READING EVENTS.

Gerald says LIKE WHO.

Richard says WELL, I THINK EVERYONE AT
ONE TIME OR ANOTHER HAS BEEN
HERE, ROBERT SON DAVIES,
MARGARET ATWOOD, TIMOTHY
FINLEY.
ODDLY ENOUGH WOULD YOU THINK
THAT WITH ROBERTSON DAVIES
OR ALLISON ROE OR ANY OF THE
GREAT NAMES THAT WE HAVE HAD,
THAT THOSE WOULD BE OUR
ALL-TIME BEST SIGNS.
BUT THE BEST BOOK SIGNINGS
WE'VE EVER HAD IN THE STORE,
SOME YEARS BACK WE HAD KENT
DRYDEN AND THE LINE-UP WENT
OUT THE DOOR AND DOWN THE
BLOCK.
AND AGAIN, LAST FALL WE HAD
FRANK -- SENATOR FRANK MA
HALF LISH AND IT WENT DOWN --
DOWN THE BLOCK.

Now Gerald talks to another man.

He says YOU ARE A WRITER WHO
LIVES LOCALLY AND A LONGTIME
CUSTOMER OF A DIFFERENT
DRUMMER BOOK.
HERE IS YOUR BOOK, RIGHT AT
THE ENTRANCEWAY, LAST
RESORT.
HOW DOES IT FEEL WHEN YOU
WALK IN, SEE YOUR BOOK IN
THIS STORE.

A caption reads “Linwood Barclay. Writer.”
Linwood is in his late forties, clean-shaven, with short gray hair.

He says WELL, IT IS A PLEASURE TO
WALK IN AND SEE IT THERE.
I SOMETIMES WONDER IF
RICHARD HAS GOT -- GOT
SOMEBODY WATCHING THE
PARKING LOT WAITING FOR ME
TO SHOW UP AND RUN OUT AND
PUT OUT A -- PUT OUT A FEW
SO MY FEELINGS AREN'T HURT.
IT IS NICE TO SEE IT HERE
AND HAVE THE SUPPORT.

Gerald says YOU SEEM TO BE A PERSON
WHO IS VERY MUCH RESPONSIBLE
FOR THIS STORE, A BIG PART
OF THE SPIRIT OF IT.

Richard says WELL, I THINK ALL GOOD
BOOK SHOPS HAVE SOME KIND OF
PERSONALITY TO THEM.
AND INEVITABLY I DON'T WANT
IT TO BE OVERLY EGO TEST
CALL BUT IT COMES FROM THE
PEOPLE WHO WORK HERE, THE
PEOPLE WHO CARE ABOUT THE
BOOKS AND CHOOSE THE BOOKS.

Linwood says IT IS LIKE GOING TO A
TAILOR WHO KNOWS YOUR SIZE.
I CAN COME IN HERE AND
RICHARD WILL SEE ME AND SAY
OH, THE LATEST LAWRENCE
BLOCK IS IN OR THE LATEST
WHATEVER WRITER IT IS THAT I
HAPPEN TO BE HOT ON AT THE
TIME OR FAVOURITES THAT I
HAVE.
AND RICHARD CAN SAY LOOK, IT
IS IN.
OR THERE IS A CD DIAMOND
MYSTERIES FOR KIDS, THERE
WAS A TIME WHEN MY DAUGHTER
REALLY LOVED THOSE.
AND THE PHONE WOULD RING AT
HOME AND IT WOULD BE RICHARD
SAYING THE NEW STEFIE
DIAMOND IS OUT SO I COULD
COME PICK IT UP.

A caption reads “Doug Tolman. Customer.”
Doug is in his late fifties, clean-shaven, with short salt and pepper hair.

He says HE ALSO OF COURSE IS AN
AN ACRONYM, SOMETHING OUT OF
ANOTHER ERA.
YOU WILL HAVE TO CHECK BUT
MY RECOLLECTION IS RICHARD
HAS NEVER OWNED A TELEVISION.
SO YOU WALK INTO THIS BOOK
STORE AND IN SOME WAYS IT IS
LIKE SOMETHING FROM OUT OF
TIME ZONE.
HERE WILL YOU FIND THREE OR
FOUR COPIES OF THIS OR THAT.
BUT HE HAS A TERRIFIC
VARIETY OF STUFF.

Clips show a music festival on the streets.

Outdoors, Richard says SOME OF WHAT GOES ON IN
THE BOOK TRADE TAKES ALL OF
YOUR ENERGY OF COURSE.
AND ONE OF THE THINGS THAT
GETS LOST IS SOME THE FUN.
REALLY BOOK SELLING SHOULD
BE FUN.
I REALLY THINK TODAY WE'RE
HAVING A LOT OF FUN WITH
THIS ANNIVERSARY PARTY.
BUT AS THINGS HAVE GOTTEN A
BIT GRIMMER IN THE BOOK
TRADE, WE LOSE TRACK OF
REALLY, YOU KNOW, WHAT IT IS
ABOUT.

A caption reads “Paul Quarrington. Writer.”
Paul is in his forties, with short brown hair and a goatee.

He says IT IS GREAT TO KNOW THAT IF
YOU ARE GOING TO GET A BOOK
PUBLISHED THEY COULD SAY
WELL, A BIG STORE HAS
ORDERED A LOT AND THAT IS
SUPPOSED TO BE QUITE, KIND
OF UPLIFTING NEWS.
BUT YOU KNOW, THEY ORDER A
LOT AND DON'T SELL A LOT AND
THEY SEND BACK A LOT.
BUT THEN YOU HEAR WELL, AT A
DIFFERENT DRUMMER THEY ARE
VERY EXCITED ABOUT THE BOOK.
THAT MEANS SOMETHING.
YOU GOT A CHANCE WITH THE
BOOK-LOVING AUDIENCE, PEOPLE
THAT REALLY LIKE FICTION.

A caption reads “David Kent. Random House of Canada.”
David is in his fifties, with short white hair and a goatee.

He stands next to Richard and says
RICHARD OWES US A LOT OF MONEY.
BUT I CAME OUT HERE TO MAKE
SURE THAT THINGS WERE STILL
GOOD.
NO, RICHARD IS ONE OF OUR
BEST BOOKSELLERS.
AND IT IS PEOPLE LIKE
RICHARD THAT KEEP OUR
BUSINESS GOING.
AND KEEP IT ALIVE.
I KNOW THAT JUST THE OTHER
NIGHT YOU HAD MICHAEL
ONDAATJE AND RUSSELL BANK
OUT HERE.

Later, at an event, Richard says WE DO A LOT OF SPECIAL
EVENTS BUT TONIGHT IS VERY,
VERY SPECIAL.
WE HAVE TWO AUTHORS WHO
REALLY -- RUSSELL BANKS AND
MICHAEL ONDAATJE.
AND WE RESPECT THEM IN THE
WAY THAT BOOKSELLERS CAN
BEST DO SO.
WE TELL OUR CUSTOMERS YEAR
IN AND YEAR OUT TO READ
THEIR BOOKS AND INDEED TO
BUY THEM.
THEY ARE WONDERFUL WRITERS.

A writer addresses an audience from a stage and reads
AT NIGHT RETURNING FROM
WORK, -- STAND IN SHALLOW
WATER, OUR TOES AMONG THE
PEDALS, ARMS FOLDED AS SHE
UNDRESSED THE DAY, REMOVING
LAYERS OF EVENTS AND
INCIDENTS SO THAT THEY WOULD
NO LONGER BE WITHIN HER.

Richard says BOOKS DON'T SOLVE
ANYTHING IN THE WORLD.
BOOKS DON'T MAKE THE WORLD A
DIFFERENT PLACE.
THEY ONLY MAKE IT POSSIBLE
TO LIVE IN THE WORLD AND TO
ME, BOOKS ARE THEIR --
THEY'RE PRINTED OBJECTS.
THEY ARE COMMERCIAL GOODS.
THEY ARE BOUGHT AND SOLD BUT
THERE IS SOMETHING ELSE
THERE.
AND THAT IS REALLY WHAT WE
ARE ABOUT IS THE SOMETHING
ELSE.

Back in the studio, Tina says
AND MICHED BACHMANN GETS
THE LAST WORD ON BOOK PRIZES
TONIGHT.
EACH YEAR DIFFERENT DRUMMER
HONOURS A CANADIAN WRITER
WHO HAS BEEN SNUBBED BY THE
MAINSTREAM PRIZE COMMITTEES
THIS YEAR GOES TO A
LITTLE -- ALICER McLEOD FOR
NO GREAT MISCHIEF IT DIDN'T
MAKE THE CANADIAN LIST AS WE
MENTIONED EARLIER IN THE
SHOW DESPITE QUALIFYING TWO
YEARS IN A ROW.
IN NONFICTION THE WIN
CERTIFICATE TOO CLOSE TO THE
FALLS, A MEMOIR BY CATHERINE
GILDENER.
LOTS AV WARD WINNING READING
TO REAP YOU GOING.
JOIN US WHEN “IMPRINT” TAKES
A FRENCH FLAVOUR.

Theme music plays as the end credits roll.

Special Thanks, Bravo! New Style Arts Channel, Sher-E Punjab Restaurant.

Imprint. C/O TVOntario. P.O. Box 200. Station Q, Toronto, Ontario. M4T 2T1.

Fax: 416-484-2780.

E-mail: imprint@tvo.org.

Website: www.tvo.org/imprint

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 2000, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: Imprint season 12 episode 8