Transcript: Julie Lewis: Contractor | Mar 30, 2000

(Theme song plays )

Fast clips show female pilots, police officers, reporters, scientists, firefighters, artists, construction workers, and other women at work. A title appears on screen: Women’s work.
A man with gray hair is using a hammer. He wears a blue shirt, jean trousers, and boots.

[hammering]

Julie is in her late twenties comes out of a car. He wears a green sweater, jean trousers, and a brown bag.

Julie says THIS IS A HOUSE THAT
ORIGINALLY HAD A STOREFRONT
ON ITS FIRST FLOOR, AND THAT
STOREFRONT HAD BEEN USED AS A
RENTAL SPACE FOR YEARS AND
WHEN THE TENANT MOVED OUT THE
FAMILY WHO OWNS THE HOUSE
WANTED TO TAKE OVER THIS SPACE
AND MAKE IT A LIVING ROOM.
HEY!

The man with gray hair says MORNING, JULES.

Julie stands by the door and points upward.

Julie says MORNING.
I HAVE A QUESTION FOR YOU
ABOUT THAT BRICK MOLD.
SO THE FIRST STAGE WAS RIPPING
OUT THE GLASS STOREFRONT
THAT WAS HERE AND BUILDING IN
A REAL WALL, AND WE'RE IN THE
PROCESS NOW OF GETTING IT
BRICKED IN TO MATCH THE REST
OF THE HOUSE.
AND THEN, WE'LL MOVE INSIDE
AND TURN THIS SPACE INTO
A NICE LIVING ROOM.
I'M A RENOVATIONS CONTRACTOR
SO IT'S REALLY A LITTLE BIT
OF EVERYTHING.

[hammering]

Julie walks into the house.

A caption reads “Julie Lewis. Contractor.”

Split screen show Julie speaking on the right side and a Julie working with cables on the left side.

Then Julie uses a screw driver.

Julie says THERE'S CARPENTRY, THERE'S
PLUMBING, THERE'S ELECTRICAL,
YOU HAVE TO DO A LITTLE BIT OF
IT ALL BECAUSE YOU NEVER QUITE
KNOW WHAT YOU'RE GOING TO FIND
WHEN YOU WALK INTO A JOB.

Julie uses a measuring tape.

(Banging sounds)

Julie says IT'S LIKE I THOUGHT, THE
DUCTING IS BUILT ON THE
OUTSIDE OF THIS WALL.
SO THAT'S GOOD.
HOWEVER, THIS WALL IS
ONLY SIX INCHES DEEP,
AND THE DUCTING
IS MORE THAN THAT.

Split screens show Julie putting on a belt and looking for tools in a toolbox.

Julie says SO, IT'S NOT GOING TO BE A
MATTER OF JUST BE ABLE TO
TUCK IT BACK IN THIS WALL.
IT TOOK ME A WHILE TO REALIZE
THIS IS WHAT I WANTED TO DO
EVEN THOUGH I'VE
ALWAYS LOVED DOING IT.
I KNEW NO WOMEN WHO WERE DOING
IT SO IT JUST NEVER OCCURRED
TO ME TO THINK OF
MYSELF IN THAT ROLE.
ALSO, BECAUSE I WAS ON MORE
OF AN ACADEMIC PATH, AND IT
SEEMED TO BE A TRADE AS
OPPOSED TO A PROFESSION.
SO THERE WERE TWO OBSTACLES
FOR ME -- SORT OF A SEXIST
HURDLE AND, I GUESS, A CLASS
HURDLE, AND SO I'M QUITE GLAD
TO HAVE GOTTEN OVER
BOTH OF THOSE.

(music plays)

A college appears on screen with a quote that reads “The number of self-employed women has nearly tripled in the last two decades.”

A paper on screen reads “Jules and Tools.”

Julie says I REALIZED THAT THE BEST WAY
FOR ME TO GET WORK WAS TO
START MY OWN COMPANY.
MY BUSINESS IS
JULES and TOOLS.
HAVING MY OWN COMPANY, MY
OWN BUSINESS IT'S SCARY.
IT'S SCARY FOR SURE.
THERE'S NO SAFETY NET.
IF I DON'T GET THE WORK
THEN I'M OUT OF WORK.

Julie begins to type on a laptop.

Julie says THERE'S NO BENEFIT PLANS,
THERE'S NO UNEMPLOYMENT
INSURANCE TO FALL BACK ON.
IT'S JUST ME AND THE QUALITY
OF MY WORK AND MY
ABILITY TO HUSTLE WORK.

Julie speaks on the phone and says
HI THERE, I'D LIKE TO CHECK ON
A BRICK ORDER THAT I PLACED
LAST WEEK.

Then she goes back to the house where she was working. She carries bubble wrap.

A truck is unloading material.

Julie says YOU HAVE TO BE SELF-MOTIVATED,
FOR SURE, BECAUSE THERE'S NOT
GOING TO BE ANYONE GETTING YOU
UP IN THE MORNING AND SENDING
YOU OFF TO YOUR
OWN JOBS ORGANIZED.
YOU HAVE TO BE ORGANIZED BOTH
WITH YOUR OWN TIME AND EVERYBODY
ELSE'S BECAUSE SUCH A BIG PART
OF THE JOB IS TRYING TO GET
EVERYBODY ELSE
ON YOUR SCHEDULE.
IT'S SCARY, BUT WHEN IT
WORKS IT'S VERY SATISFYING.

A caption reads “Emma. Student.”

Emma is around thirteen years old. She has short blond hair.

Emma says I THINK TO BECOME A CARPENTER
WOULD BE FUN WORKING WITH YOUR
HANDS, AND I LIKE THE
SMELL OF SAWDUST.

Julie stands outside of a garage and looks at it. Then she walks inside of it with the owner.

Julie says MY BEST MOMENT I THINK WOULD
BE A JOB I DID, I BUILT A
TWO-CAR GARAGE 20 BY 20.
BIG.
I THINK WHAT I LIKED SO MUCH
ABOUT THAT JOB WAS THAT IT WAS
SO MUCH CARPENTRY JUST LIKE
I'D ALWAYS IMAGINED CARPENTRY
TO BE SINCE I
WAS A LITTLE KID.
AT THIS JOB, FROM START TO
FINISH, I WAS USING WOOD AND
BUILDING A BUILDING.
SOME PART OF ME THINKS
THAT'S WHAT BUILDERS DO,
THAT'S WHAT CARPENTERS DO --
THEY BUILD BUILDINGS.
SO THIS WAS MY FIRST BUILDING.
THEY KEEP SAYING IT'S THE
ABSOLUTE BEST GARAGE IN TOWN
AND THEY KEEP ASKING US WHO
OUR CONTRACT PERSON IS.
IT'S SO SATISFYING TO HAVE
SOMETHING SO REAL THAT YOU CAN
POINT TO AND SAY
“I BUILT THAT.”

Emily says BEING A CARPENTER IS A VERY
HANDS-ON JOB, AND SO IF YOU'VE
GOT A LITTLE CREATIVITY THEN
IT'S GOOD BECAUSE YOU CAN
BUILD THINGS AND YOU CAN PLAN
WHERE THEY ARE AND YOU CAN
PAINT AND STUFF LIKE THAT AND
HAVE A FINISHED PRODUCT WHICH
EVERYONE CAN SEE.

Clips show Julie using a screwdriver on the ceiling, then she uses measuring tape, and does other duties.

Julie says ONE OF THE GREAT THINGS ABOUT
THIS JOB IS THAT IT IS SUCH A
GREAT MIX OF HANDS-ON MANUAL
STUFF AND MENTAL STUFF.
THERE'S A LOT OF CREATIVITY
NECESSARY TO DESIGN WHAT
YOU'RE GOING TO BUILD IN THE
FIRST PLACE AND A LOT OF
PROBLEM SOLVING ALONG THE WAY.
MY BACKGROUND IN MATH AND
SCIENCE HAS GIVEN ME A REAL
ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO THINGS,
A REAL ANALYTICAL APPROACH TO
PROBLEM SOLVING.
IT'S A WAY OF THINKING THAT
WORKS REALLY WELL FOR THIS
PROFESSION AND JUST FIGURING
OUT HOW THINGS HAVE TO BE DONE.

A caption on screen reads “Hillary. Student.”

Hillary is around ten years old with light brown hair.

Hillary says IF MATH WERE A FOOD I WOULD
THINK IT WOULD BE CHOCOLATE
BECAUSE I LOVE MATH.

Julie stands outdoors near a tree. A co-worker walks towards her.

Julie says IT'S REALLY GREAT BEING
A WOMAN WORKING IN A
TRADITIONALLY MALE FIELD.
LOOKS GOOD.
IT'S BEEN VERY MUCH A SELLING
POINT FOR ME, I THINK.
AS A MARKETING TOOL IT REALLY
MAKES ME STAND OUT IN THE CROWD.

A colourful drawing of a DNA strand has a quote that reads “As of 1996, 4 percent of carpenters in Canada were women.

Julie uses a cutter near a window.

Julie says I FEEL A NEED TO EDUCATE
PEOPLE ABOUT THE ABILITIES OF
WOMEN IN TRADES, BUT I FIND THE
BEST WAY TO DO THAT IS JUST
TO PUT MY HEAD DOWN
AND DO THE WORK.
I'VE LEARNED THAT I REALLY
CAN DO WHATEVER I WANT.
I ALWAYS HEARD THAT GROWING
UP, BUT NOW HERE I AM DOING
EXACTLY WHAT I'VE REALLY
ALWAYS WANTED TO DO AND NEVER
REALLY THOUGHT I COULD DO,
AND NOW I'M DOING IT
AND I'M DOING IT WELL.

A woman with Brown hair smiles.

Theme music plays as credits roll.

Camera, Nic Popescu and Tom Ford.

Field Audio, Paul Nicholson.

Post Audio, Andi Charal.

Editors, Craig Gellner, Julian Lannaman, Michael Morningstar, Steven B. Pinchuk, James Poll.

A Young boy laughs.

Chyron, Empyreal Palmer.

Graphics, Andre Avalos.

Artwork, Stephanie Brissette. Hillary Chan, Briana Kortje.

A blond woman smiles.

Research, Lynn Bowdrey, Women in Motion.

A lady with Brown hair smiles.

Thanks to Rose Asunders- Wilson, Terry Buckley, City of Toronto, Fire Academy. Jeanne McWright, Etobicoke School of the Arts. Principals and Students of Deer Park, Fallingbrook and Ursula Franklin Schools.

Jen smiles.

Special thanks to Jen Miller.

Production Co-Ordinator Lauri Emery.

Production Manager Suzanne Lacey.

Creative Head Jan Donio.

A Production of TVO Ontario.

Watch: Julie Lewis: Contractor