Transcript: Ep. 4 - Deep White | Mar 26, 2019


A clip shows a crew of divers photographing a shark in the ocean floor.

The narrator says IT'S DIFFICULT TO IMAGINE
SOME PEOPLE WANT TO SEE
BIG SHARKS IN THE WATER,
ESPECIALLY PHOTOGRAPHERS.
THESE ANIMALS ARE SOME
OF THE MOST ICONIC
PHOTO SUBJECTS IN THE SEA,
BUT HOW DO YOU GET
CLOSE TO THEM?
FOR DECADES IT'S BEEN
DONE WITH CHUMMING
ATTRACTING THE SHARKS WITH BAIT.
THE PRACTICE IS NOW BEING
QUESTIONED, EVEN BANNED,
IN MANY COUNTRIES, BECAUSE OF
A DRAMATIC INCREASE IN ATTACKS.
WHITE SHARKS MAIN FOOD SOURCES,
SEALS AND SEA LIONS,
ARE ON THE MOVE.
GLOBAL WARMING AND OTHER FACTORS
ARE DRIVING BOTH THEIR PREY
AND THE SHARKS
INTO NEW TERRITORY
AND SOMETIMES WE'RE
RIGHT IN THEIR PATHS.

A clip shows a man at the beach with a shark bite on the back of his leg.

The narrator says AT MEXICO'S GUADALUPE ISLAND,
DEEP WATER CAGES
PROVIDE A FISHEYE VIEW
OF GREAT WHITES.
AT DEPTH AND WITH MINIMAL
BAITING THE ANIMALS
DISPLAY A SURPRISINGLY
CALM AND CURIOUS NATURE.
THROUGH SATELLITE
AND ACOUSTIC TAGGING
RESEARCHER DR MAURICIO HOYOS
STUDIES GREAT WHITE
MIGRATION AND BEHAVIOUR.
TWO OTHER LARGE PELAGIC SHARKS
HAMMERHEADS AND OCEANIC
WHITETIPS ARE FACING GRAVE
DECLINES IN THEIR NUMBERS.
LIKE GREAT WHITES, THE FINS OF
THESE INCREASINGLY RARE SHARKS
ARE IN HIGH DEMAND
FOR SHARK FIN SOUP.
NEW INTERNATIONAL LAWS
NOW BAN COMMERCIAL TRADE
IN THESE SPECIES BUT WILL THE
MEASURES BE EFFECTIVE PROTECTION
FOR THESE ENDANGERED ANIMALS?

Music plays as the opening sequence rolls.

The title of the show appears against clips showing images of marine life. It reads "The Blue Realm."

The narrator says IN APRIL 2012,
A CHAMPION SOUTH AFRICAN SURFER
WAS KILLED BY A GREAT WHITE.
SHARK TOURISM OPERATORS
AND FILMMAKERS
WERE INITIALLY BLAMED.
BOTH GROUPS WERE CHUMMING IN THE
AREA AT THE TIME OF THE ATTACK.
THE BAITING OF SHARKS
IS POSSIBLY A FACTOR
IN SOME FATALITIES
BUT THERE ARE OTHER
ISSUES TO CONSIDER,
SUCH AS THE CHANGING MIGRATION
PATTERNS OF THEIR PREY SPECIES
AND THERE ARE MORE OF US
IN THE WATER THAN EVER.
THERE HAVE BEEN MORE DEADLY
WHITE SHARK ATTACKS
IN THE PAST TWO YEARS THAN IN
THE PAST TWO DECADES COMBINED.
WHAT'S GOING ON?

The name of the episode reads "Deep white."

A series of headlines appear that reads "Surfer killed by shark attack," "Boy loses arm in shark attack!," and "Horrific shark attack raises old fears."

The caption changes to "Doctor Chris Harvey-Clark. Marine Biologist."

Chris is in his forties, with short wavy brown hair. He wears glasses and a burnt orange shirt.

Chris says THE THING
ABOUT SHARK FATALITIES
IS THEY ARE SPECULATOR
AND THEY COMMAND THE MEDIA.
THEY ARE GOING TO LEAD
ON THE FRONT PAGE.
IF IT BLEEDS IT LEADS.
SO, WHAT'S GOING ON
IS THERE ARE MORE OF US.
THIS IS A BUSY PLANET.
WE PASSED SEVEN BILLION PEOPLE
AND A LOT OF US LIKE
TO BE IN THE WATER.
AND THE FACT IS THAT OTHER
MARINE MAMMALS LIKE TO BE
IN THE WATER IN MANY
OF THE SAME PLACES
AND THEY ARE PREY SPECIES
FOR LARGE SHARKS
PARTICULARLY WHITE SHARKS.
WE'RE RECREATING IN AREAS
WHERE THERE ARE BIG
PINNIPED POPULATIONS AND
PEOPLE ARE SURFING THERE,
PEOPLE ARE DIVING
AND SNORKELLING,
FREE DIVING, SWIMMING.
WE'RE LIVING IN THE NEOPRENE ERA
NOW AND WHEN YOU TAKE A PINK APE
AND CLAD THEM IN NEOPRENE
AND YOU PUT THEM IN THE WATER
AND THEY'RE FLOATING ON THE
SURFACE THEY LOOK AN AWFUL LOT
LIKE A SEAL FROM UNDERNEATH.
SO I THINK A LOT
OF WHAT WE'RE SEEING
IN SHARK ATTACK AND
WHITE SHARK ATTACK PARTICULARLY
IS MISTAKEN IDENTITY.

The narrator says DR. CHRIS HARVEY-CLARK IS A
SHARK RESEARCHER AND
THE DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL CARE
AT THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
HIS STUDIES WITH OTHER
LARGE COLD WATER ANIMALS
SUCH AS SIXGILL AND
GREENLAND SHARKS
SHOW THEY HAVE MANY SIMILARITIES
TO GREAT WHITES.
MOST SPECIES BEHAVIOUR,
EVEN OUR OWN,
IS PRIMARILY DRIVEN
BY THE URGE TO EAT.
IT'S ALL ABOUT THE FOOD.

Chris says PINNIPED POPULATIONS
ARE GROWING IN SOME AREAS AND
CERTAINLY CENTRAL CALIFORNIA,
SOME OF THE PACIFIC ISLANDS
AROUND AUSTRALIA,
AROUND NEW ZEALAND
POPULATIONS ARE PROTECTED
SO THEY'RE GROWING.
THEY'RE OUTSTRIPPING LOCAL FOOD
RESOURCES AND MOVING AROUND
AND WITH THEM MOVE
THE LARGE PREDATORS.
SO YOU MAY SEE WHITE SHARKS
OCCURRING IN PLACES THEY HAVEN'T
BEEN BEFORE AND OF COURSE
THESE ARE ALSO PLACES
WHERE PEOPLE ARE IN THE WATER,
THEY'RE SURFING,
THEY'RE SNORKELLING
AND INADVERTENTLY
BEING BUMPED AND ATTACKED
BY WHITE SHARKS.

The narrator says THE INCREASE
IN GREAT WHITE ATTACKS
IS CLEARLY MORE ABOUT
MORE OF US BEING IN THE WATER
NEAR THEIR PREY SPECIES AND
ALTHOUGH THE BAITING OF SHARKS
REMAINS A CONTENTIOUS ISSUE,
THE PRACTICE HELPS FUEL
A GROWING INDUSTRY,
SHARK TOURISM.

The caption changes to "Gordon Kipp. Captain."

Gordon is in his thirties, with short wavy graying hair and wears a blue polo T-shirt.

On a boat, Gordon says WE JUST DEPARTED
ENSENADA, BAJA CALIFORNIA NORTH
HEADING DOWN TO GUADALUPE NOW,
HEADING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST
185 NAUTICAL MILES.
BEAUTIFUL DAY TODAY,
HOPEFULLY IT STAYS THAT WAY,
NOT ALWAYS LIKE THIS.

The narrator says HISTORICALLY,
THERE WERE JUST A HANDFUL
OF LOCATIONS WHERE YOU COULD
REGULARLY SEE GREAT WHITES
UP CLOSE, PRIMARILY
SOUTH AFRICA, AUSTRALIA
AND CALIFORNIA.
WHITE SHARKS THOUGH ARE RARELY
ENCOUNTERED IN THESE PLACES NOW
OR CONDITIONS ARE SO CHALLENGING
IT'S NEARLY IMPOSSIBLE
TO GET IN THE WATER WITH THEM.
MEXICO'S REMOTE GUADALUPE ISLAND
IS THEIR PREMIER DESTINATION
IN THE BOOMING BUSINESS
OF WHITE SHARK TOURISM.
AND IF YOU'RE PUTTING PEOPLE
IN THE WATER WITH GREAT WHITES
YOU NEED TO PROTECT THEM.

Gordon says THESE CAGES WE HAVE
ARE, ARE TOUGH CAGES.
I'D PUT THESE CAGES UP AGAINST
ANY SHARK ON THE PLANET
AND I HAVE NO DOUBT THAT
WE WOULD BE SAFE INSIDE THERE.
I AM PERSONALLY INSIDE
THE CAGES EVERYDAY TOO,
SO I WOULDN'T PUT OUR
GUESTS IN THESE CAGES
IF I DIDN'T THINK THEY'RE SAFE.
SO, THEY'RE EXTREMELY TOUGH,
YEAH.

The narrator says ALTHOUGH THE CAGES
ARE MADE OF ALUMINUM
THEY'RE STILL INCREDIBLY HEAVY
AND DANGEROUS TO MANEUVER.

Gordon says OKAY, WE'LL TAKE
THE SURFACE CAGE NEXT, GUYS.

The narrator says EVEN IN CALM SEAS
LIFTING THEM WITH
A HYDRAULIC CRANE
IS A DELICATE OPERATION.

Gordon says ALL RIGHT,
CLEAR THAT LINE, GUYS.

The crew get the cages ready at night.

Gordon says I BELIEVE THIS OUR THIRD SEASON
NOW WITH THESE SUBMERSIBLE CAGES
AND IT REALLY OFFERS A DIFFERENT
PERSPECTIVE TO SEE A SHARK
SWIMMING ABOVE YOU OR EVEN
APPROACHING THE CAGE FROM ABOVE.

A crew member says WATCH YOURSELF THERE, BOB,
IT SWINGS RIGHT AT YOU.

The narrator says AT FIRST LIGHT
IT'S TIME TO DEPLOY THE CAGES.

Another crew member says YOU'RE GOING TO PICK IT UP,
WE'RE GOING TO SWING IT
AND YOU'RE GOING TO
LOWER IT RIGHT HERE.

A third crew member says DO YOU WANT TO BOOM
DOWN A LITTLE BIT?

The narrator says IN ADDITION
TO THE TWO DEEP UNITS
THERE ARE TWO SURFACE CAGES.
IT'S A FULL CHARTER AND
THERE ARE LOTS OF GUESTS.
ALL FOUR CAGES WILL BE BUSY.

A man with a ponytail and a beard says THE POOL IS ALMOST OPEN.

The narrator says IT'S A BIG JOB
TO ENSURE CUSTOMERS
ARE WELL EQUIPPED AND SAFE.
THE DIVE DECK IS CLUTTERED
WITH DIVE GEAR AND SUPPORT CREW.

The crew hinge a ladder to a hook.

A crew member says OKAY, UP SLOW!

A man in a diving suit says LET'S DO IT.

The caption changes to "Jan Hoffman."

Jan is in her fifties and wears a diving suit.

She says I'VE BEEN DIVING
ALL OVER THE WORLD
AND I AM SO EXCITED
TO DO THIS DIVE.
I'VE DONE WRECKS, I'VE DONE
REEFS, I'VE DONE IT ALL.
NOW, I GET TO DO THE ULTIMATE
DIVING WITH THE
GREAT WHITE SHARK.
I AM SO EXCITED.

A crew member says THIS IS THE REGULATOR.

A guest going in a cage says WHAT'S THAT?

The crew member says YOU NEED THIS.

The guest says A REGULATOR, WHAT'S THAT?

The crew member says HOLY COW!
[LAUGHTER]

The narrator says GUESTS BREATHE AIR
THROUGH A REGULATOR,
MUCH LIKE SCUBA DIVERS,
BUT INSTEAD OF USING TANKS,
COMPRESSED GAS
IS SUPPLIED FROM THE SURFACE.
EACH DIVER NEEDS TO BE
HEAVILY WEIGHTED
TO STAY FIRMLY AT
THE BOTTOM OF THE CAGES.

The caption changes to "Bill Hoffman."

Bill is in his fifties, with long, slightly wavy gray hair in a ponytail and a goatee. He wears a diving suit.

Bill says I'VE DONE LOT OF DIVING
IN HAWAII, FRENCH POLYNESIA,
GREAT BARRIER REEF AND
ON THIS BOAT AT SOCORRO,
BUT GREAT WHITE SHARKS,
THIS IS A FIRST.

Gordon says ALL RIGHT, FOLKS,
TWO-PERSON CAGE IS READY
IF YOU WANT TO START LOADING UP,
FIRST DIVE OF THE TRIP.

Bill climbs in the cage and says ROCK AND ROLL.
OH, THIS IS NICE WATER.

A crew member says YOU WANT TO WATCH PUTTING YOUR
HAND RIGHT THERE BECAUSE IT'S
A PINCH POINT, OKAY.

Bill says OKAY, ALL RIGHT.

The crew member says BILL, THERE IS NOBODY
I WOULD RATHER TAKE DOWN.
[BILL LAUGHS]

The crew member says HERE'S YOUR REGULATOR.
WHEN YOU GET DOWN TO THE BOTTOM
OF THE CAGE, I'LL HAND YOU THE
CAMERA -
JUST STEP AWAY FROM
THE LADDER, MAKE ROOM FOR JAN.

Bill says OKAY.

Jim is in his late fifties, with short straight graying hair and wears a diving suit.

The caption changes to "Jim Kozmik. Cameraman."

Jim says I'VE BEEN AT THIS 46
YEARS DIVING OUT IN THE OCEAN
BUT I'VE NEVER EVER SEEN
OR DIVED OR EVEN FILMED
A GREAT WHITE.
SO, I'M READY TO GO
AND THIS IS REALLY
EXCITING FOR ME.

The narrator says AND WHITE SHARKS
ARE DREAM ANIMALS
FOR MOST PHOTOGRAPHERS.
EVEN THOUGH THE CREW
NO LONGER BAITS
WITH A CHUM SLICK
OR BLOODY FISH PARTS
THE SHARKS SHOW UP SOON AFTER
THE CAGES ARE DEPLOYED.
THE BIG ANIMAL
SEEM MORE RELAXED,
PERHAPS EVEN CURIOUS AT DEPTH.
THE COMBINATION OF DEEPER
CAGES AND LESS BAITING
SEEMS TO BE A GREAT SUCCESS.

Gordon says OUR TWO SUBMERSIBLE
CAGES ARE A LITTLE DIFFERENT
FROM YOUR STANDARD SURFACE CAGES
THAT MOST PEOPLE
ARE FAMILIAR WITH.
WE LOWER THOSE DOWN,
DEPTH OF TEN METRES.
WE USE HYDRAULIC WINCHES,
TURN ON THE STEERING
AND WE HAVE A CREW MEMBER
THAT OPERATE EACH CAGE.
THEY'RE OPERATED
FROM THE SURFACE.
ONE CREW MEMBER
LOWERING THEM DOWN,
LOWERING THEM
BACK UP AGAIN ALSO.
THEY HAVE A LOT OF BACKUP
SYSTEMS IN CASE OF EMERGENCY,
IN CASE OF SOMETHING HAPPENS.
THEY'RE EQUIPPED WITH BALLAST
TANKS SO THAT IF WE DO NEED
TO BRING THE CAGE UP
BEFORE THE SCHEDULED TIME
THE DIVE MASTER CAN BLOW
THOSE BALLAST TANKS WITH AIR
AND THE CAGE WILL COME
AT A CONTROLLED RATE
UP TO THE SURFACE.
IF WE GET CUT OFF FROM
THE SURFACE SUPPLIED AIR
FOR SOME REASON
THEN WE HAVE BACK-UPS.
WE HAVE SCUBA TANKS DOWN
THERE THAT WE CAN USE
TO FILL THE TANKS AND
ALSO TO BREATHE OFF OF.
WELL, THE IDEA BEHIND THE
SUBMERSIBLE CAGE IS THAT
WE GET TO OBSERVE THE SHARKS IN
THEIR MORE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT
AS OPPOSE TO THE PAST SURFACE
CAGES, WHERE THE IDEA WAS
TO BE THROWING BUCKETS OF BLOOD,
THROWING CHUNKS OF TUNA
AND LURING THEM IN CLOSE
TO THE SURFACE CAGE.
AND THE BEHAVIOUR YOU SEE
FROM THE SURFACE CAGES
THAT BEHAVIOUR,
THE SHARK'S AGITATED,
EXCITING FROM THE CHUMMING.
WITH SUBMERSIBLE CAGES,
ON THE OTHER HAND, YOU'VE GOT A
CAGE FULL OF PEOPLE DOWN THERE.
YOU GOT LOTS OF HEARTBEATS, LOTS
OF ELECTROMAGNETIC ACTIVITY.
THE SHARKS ARE ATTRACTED TO THAT
BUT IN A DIFFERENT WAY
THAN THEY ARE TO THE BLOOD.
THEY'RE NOT SO EXCITED,
THEY'RE CURIOUS.
THEY COME, CRUISE
AROUND THE CAGES.
THEY'RE VERY DELIBERATE
IN THEIR MOTIONS,
MOVE VERY SLOWLY AND YOU
GET TO SEE THE WHITE SHARK
AS THEY TRULY ARE, AS OPPOSE
TO THE WHITE SHARK
THAT'S MOST OFTEN PORTRAYED
ON TV AND MOVIES LIKE JAWS.

The narrator says AFTER A COUPLE OF DIVES
THE SHARK START TO GET BOLDER.
THEY CIRCLE TIGHTER
AND TIGHTER TO THE CAGES.
FOR GUESTS, IT'S WHAT
THEY CAME FOR,
FOR A THRILLING
CLOSE-UP ENCOUNTER
WITH THE INFAMOUS GREAT WHITE.
THE SHARKS GET SO CLOSE YOU
COULD REACH OUT AND TOUCH THEM,
BUT THAT'S NOT A VERY GOOD IDEA.

Back on board, Jan says WOO-HOO!
AWESOMENESS!

The caption changes to "Tony Moskal."

Tony is in his fifties, with graying hair and a beard and he wears a diving suit.

Tony says OH, THAT WAS AWESOME.
THERE WERE THREE SHARKS
CIRCLING AROUND AND CIRCLING
VERY SLOWLY, SMOOTHLY,
BUT THEY COME IN CLOSER,
CLOSE PAST THROUGH YOU,
YOU COULD ALMOST REACH
THEM WITH YOUR HANDS,
I DIDN'T TRY THOUGH.

Gordon says IT'S MY FOURTH
SEASON OUT HERE DIVING
WITH THE WHITE SHARKS AND
I HAVE NEVER BEEN SICK OF IT.
I DON'T THINK I CAN SAY I'VE
EVER BEEN BORED DOWN THERE.
IN FACT EVERY TIME I'M
GETTING READY TO GO IN,
I AM EXCITED TO SEE THE
SHARKS AGAIN, YOU KNOW.
IT'S SOME OF MY FAVOURITE
DIVING TO DO.

The narrator says THE YOUNGEST
SHARK DIVER WAS 14 YEAR OLD
SAMANTHA MAURO.
THE CANADIAN TEENAGER
LOGGED MORE DIVES
THAN MOST OF THE GUESTS.

A crew member says REGULATOR.

Samantha says YUP.

She goes in a cage.

The narrator says EVEN THOUGH
THE WATER WAS A BIT CHILLY
IT WAS CHALLENGING TO DRAG MANY
OF THE GUESTS OUT OF THE CAGES.
THEY COULDN'T GET ENOUGH
OF THE ENIGMATIC ANIMALS.
AND DIVERS GOT A ONCE IN A
LIFETIME CLOSE-UP EXPERIENCE
WITH GREAT WHITES.

Gordon says NOWADAYS,
WE'RE NOT FEEDING SHARKS,
WE'RE NOT WRANGLING THE SHARKS
AND WE'RE NOT PUTTING
HEAVY SLICKS OF CHUM
IN THE WATER TO GET
THE SHARKS TO THE CAGES.
HOWEVER, OCCASIONALLY
WE DO PUT A HANG BAIT DOWN
JUST PUT A LITTLE SCENT IN THE
WATER TO BRING THE SHARKS IN.
IF WE WANT TO SHOW THE SHARKS
TO THESE PEOPLE
AND EDUCATE PEOPLE
ABOUT THE SHARKS,
THEN IT'S SOMETHING REALLY
THAT I FEEL THAT WE HAVE TO DO
TO BRING THE SHARKS TO US
AND KEEP THEM THERE.
THE CURRENT LAW IS THAT
YOU CAN'T USE ANY TUNA,
ANY SCENT IN THE WATER,
HOWEVER, THIS YEAR
JUST THIS SEASON THEY HAVE
DECIDED TO ALLOW YOU
TO APPLY FOR A PERMIT TO USE
A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF TUNA
TO ATTRACT THE SHARKS.

The narrator says THE SHARKS
REALLY DO COME IN CLOSE,
EVEN WITH MINIMAL BAITING.

The caption changes to "Samantha Mauro."

Samantha says OH MY GOSH,
THAT WAS AMAZING.
THERE ARE SO MANY
CLOSE-UP SHARKS.
IT'S PROBABLY LIKE
THREE OR FOUR.

A guest says CONGRATULATIONS, SAMBO,
GOOD BIG SHARK DIVE,
YOU MADE IT.
GOT ALL YOUR FINGERS?

Samantha says YEAH, ALL TEN.

The guest says OKAY, THAT'S ALL THAT COUNTS?

Jan says WOO-HOO!
OH MAN, THAT WAS UNBELIEVABLE.
THAT'S THE SECOND DIVE TODAY
AND IT WAS BETTER
THAN THE FIRST ONE.

Bill says MORE SHARKS,
BIGGER AND CLOSER.

Jan says THEY WERE HUGE,
HUGE, GORGEOUS ANIMALS.

Bill says WE SHOULD HAVE BROUGHT
OUR SHARK DENTAL FLOSS.

The narrator says THERE ARE SOME
PEOPLE WHO FEEL THAT
ANY FORM OF BAITING
SHOULD BE BANNED.
IT'S CLEAR THOUGH THAT
SHARKS WOULD LIKELY
NOT APPROACH CLOSELY
WITHOUT AN INCENTIVE.
A SIMPLE HANG BAIT IS USUALLY
ENOUGH TO DRAW THE GREAT WHITES
CLOSE TO THE CAGES.
THE SHARKS ARE INTENSELY
CURIOUS ANIMALS
AND EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE A BIT
CALMER WITH LESS BAITING
IT CAN STILL BE AN
UNNERVING EXPERIENCE.
MAURICIO HOYOS IS FASCINATED
WITH WHITE SHARKS.
AS A UNIVERSITY STUDENT
HE WANTED TO MAKE THE ANIMALS
THE FOCUS OF HIS DOCTORATE,
BUT THERE WERE SUPPOSEDLY
VERY FEW OF THE ANIMALS
IN MEXICAN WATERS.

[CONVERSATION IN SPANISH]

Mauricio meets with another man at the pier.

The caption changes to "Doctor Mauricio Hoyos. Shark researcher."

Mauricio is in his thirties, with very short curly brown hair and wears gray cargo shorts and a blue T-shirt.

Mauricio says I SPOKE WITH
MY ADVISOR AND I TOLD HIM
I WOULD LOVE TO STUDY THE
WHITE SHARK, BUT HE TOLD ME,
"MAURICIO, WE DON'T HAVE
A LOT OF WHITE SHARKS
IN MEXICAN WATERS."
THAT WAS IN 2000
AND TWO YEARS AFTER THAT
WE FOUND OUT THAT WE HAVE
THE BEST PLACE TO SEE
WHITE SHARKS IN THE WORLD.
AND THAT'S WHY I HAVE BEEN IN
GUADALUPE ISLAND FOR NINE YEARS
AND I WOULD DO ANYTHING
TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THEM
AND TO PROTECT THEM.

The narrator says THERE ARE NO
PERMANENT RESEARCH FACILITIES
ON THE ISLAND, SO MAURICIO TEAMS
UP WITH VARIOUS TOUR BOATS
AS A SHIP NATURALIST.
HE'S ESPECIALLY FOND
OF WORKING WITH CHILDREN
AND INTRODUCING THEM
TO THESE AMAZING SHARKS.

Mauricio says WHEN I WAS A KID
I REMEMBER THAT WE WENT
TO THE UNITED STATES AND
MY FATHER GAVE ME 20 DOLLARS
AND HE TOLD ME, "OKAY,
THIS ALL THE MONEY
THAT I'M GOING TO GIVE YOU.
YOU HAVE TO BUY
A LOT OF TOYS OR
WHATEVER YOU WANT
AND THERE WAS THIS SMALL SHARK
AND IT WAS 20 DOLLARS.
I BOUGHT IT BECAUSE
I REALLY WANT IT
AND MY FATHER WAS REALLY UPSET
BECAUSE HE TOLD ME,
"HEY, THAT'S ALL YOUR MONEY
YOU HAVE TO...YOU CAN BUY
A LOT OF DIFFERENT TOYS."
"NO, NO, I WANT THAT TOY,"
AND I STILL HAVE IT BECAUSE
SINCE I WAS A LITTLE KID
I LOVE SHARKS.
WHEN I SAW THE FIRST SHARK,
IT WAS LIKE THE DREAM
OF MY LIFE CAME TRUE,
IT WAS AMAZING.
IT WAS A HUGE FEMALE,
MAYBE FOUR METRES LONG.
AND SINCE THEN I HAVE BEEN
WORKING HERE ON THIS ISLAND
EVERY, EVERY AUTUMN.
GUADALUPE IT'S A VERY SPECIAL
PLACE BECAUSE IT'S AN ISLAND
IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE
AND IT IS INFLUENCED
BY THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM
THAT IT HAS A LOT
OF COLD WATER,
A LOT OF NUTRIENTS.

The narrator says GUADALUPE'S SHARK
NUMBERS APPEAR TO BE GROWING.
MORE NEW SHARKS MEANS
THE POPULATION IS THRIVING.

Mauricio says THERE WAS A STUDY
AND THEY WANTED TO KNOW
THE NUMBER OF SHARKS THAT
WE HAVE YEAR AFTER YEAR
AND I THINK THAT IT IS
UP TO 130 SHARKS,
BUT EVERY YEAR
I HAVE SEEN NEW SHARKS.
MOST OF THEM ARE JUVENILES
AND THAT'S VERY IMPORTANT
FOR GUADALUPE ISLAND.

The narrator says OLDER ESTABLISHED
SHARKS SOMETIMES DON'T
RETURN TO THE ISLAND.
THEY MAY MIGRATE SOMEWHERE
ELSE OR DIE OFF.
SEEING NEW JUVENILES
INDICATES THESE ANIMALS
ARE BEING BORN AT GUADALUPE
OR SOMEWHERE NEARBY
WHICH IS AN ENCOURAGING SIGN.

Mauricio says WE HAVE FOUND THAT
THE MALES ARRIVE TO THE ISLAND
IN JULY AND FEMALES
IN SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER.
THEY DEPART THE ISLAND
IN FEBRUARY, MOST OF THEM,
BUT ALSO WE HAVE FOUND THAT SOME
OF THEM REMAIN ON THE ISLAND
FOR UP TO TEN MONTHS IN THE CASE
OF THE JUVENILES, FOR EXAMPLE.

A clip shows seals barking.

Mauricio says IN GUADALUPE WE
HAVE THREE DIFFERENT SPECIES
OF PINNIPEDS, THE NORTHERN
FUR SEAL, THE GUADALUPE FUR SEAL
AND THE CALIFORNIA SEA LION
AND THAT'S ONE OF THE PREFERRED
PREY SOURCES OF THE WHITE SHARKS
BECAUSE THEY HAVE A LOT OF FAT
AND FAT HAS TWICE CALORIC
VALUE THAN PROTEINS.
SO, I HAVE SEEN THAT IN DECEMBER
WHEN THE NORTHERN FUR SEALS
ARE COMING TO THE ISLAND
TO GIVE BIRTH AND TO MATE,
THE SHARKS KNOW THAT AND
THEY ARE WAITING FOR THEM.
BUT I HAVE SEEN WHEN
THEY FEED ON NORTHERN FUR SEAL
AND THEY FINISH IT ALL.
I WAS THERE IN DECEMBER
AND IT ATTACKED A FEMALE.
SHE WAS MAYBE 800 KILOGRAMS
AND THE SHARK,
IT WAS A BIG FEMALE,
MORE THAN FIVE METRES
AND SHE KILLED THAT SEAL
AND SHE ATE EVERYTHING IN FRONT
OF ME IN LESS THAN 25 MINUTES.

The narrator says FOR A PREY ANIMAL
THAT'S IN CONSTANT PERIL,
THE SEALS HERE DON'T SEEM
TO BE TOO CONCERNED,
AS LONG AS THEY
CAN SEE THE SHARKS.
AND IF IT GETS A BIT
TOO SCARY FOR THE SEALS
THEY SOMETIMES EVEN CLIMB
ON THE BACK OF TOUR BOATS
FOR PROTECTION.
TO GAIN A BETTER UNDERSTANDING
OF THE SHARKS LOCAL MOVEMENTS
AND THEIR LONG DISTANCE
MIGRATIONS, MAURICIO HOYOS
USES HIGH-TECH TOOLS
SUCH AS SATELLITE TAGS
AND ACOUSTIC TRANSMITTERS.
THE DEVICES REVEAL THE SHARK'S
DEPTHS, MIGRATORY PATTERNS,
LOCATIONS AND WATER
TEMPERATURES.
BUT EVEN WITH ADVANCED
TECHNOLOGY THERE IS STILL
A LOT WE DON'T KNOW ABOUT
THESE ENIGMATIC ANIMALS.

Mauricio says IN ORDER TO KNOW THE
LOCAL MOVEMENTS OF THE SHARKS
WE ARE USING ULTRASONIC
TELEMETRY.
WE HAVE TO SET ULTRASONIC
TRANSMITTER IN A SHARK
AND THAT TRANSMITTER
IS GOING TO EMIT A PULSE
THAT WE CAN DETECT
IN TWO DEVICES.
ONE, THAT IS A PORTABLE RECEIVER
THAT WE HAVE IN THE BOAT,
SO AS SOON AS I TAG THE SHARK,
I HAVE TO FOLLOW
THAT SHARK FOR 24 HOURS.

On a boat, Mauricio tries to tag the shark with a spear-like device and says HEY, JORGE, SHARK.
BRING IT, BRING IT.
PUT IT RIGHT HERE, RIGHT HERE.
OKAY, EXCELLENT.

(music plays)

Mauricio says WE'RE SETTING ALL THE WATER
RECEIVERS IN SEVERAL
DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE ISLAND
AND THESE RECEIVERS
CAN GET ALL THE INFORMATION
AND STORES THAT INFORMATION
FOR UP TO ONE YEAR.

The narrator says THE WHITE SHARKS AT
GUADALUPE SPEND OVER HALF A YEAR
AWAY FROM THE ISLAND IN OPEN
WATER BETWEEN CALIFORNIA
AND HAWAII BUT WHAT THEY'RE
DOING WAY OUT THERE
REMAINS A MYSTERY.
A FEW OF THE ANIMALS
HAVE BEEN SATELLITE TRACKED
TO A REMOTE LOCATION IN
THE MIDDLE OF THE PACIFIC,
DUBBED THE GREAT WHITE CAFÉ.
IT'S THOUGHT THAT
THOUSANDS OF THE SHARKS
CONGREGATE EACH YEAR
AT THE MYSTERIOUS SPOT.
NO ONE IS EVEN SURE WHETHER
THEY'RE MATING, CHASING TUNA
OR EVEN GIVING BIRTH OUT THERE.
FOR SUCH A REMARKABLY
WELL-KNOWN CREATURE
WE ACTUALLY KNOW
VERY LITTLE ABOUT THEM
BUT MAURICIO HOYOS IS DETERMINED
TO FIND OUT MORE.

On a boat, Mauricio says YEAH, THE SHARK IS NOT HERE.
MAYBE WE CAN GO A LITTLE
BIT TO THE NORTH.

A crew member says OKAY.

The narrator says GUADALUPE IS A
PROTECTED BIOSPHERE OF MEXICO,
YET WITH MINIMAL
FUNDING OR MONITORING
THE SHARKS ARE UNDER CONSTANT
THREAT FROM POACHERS.
AND THERE IS GROWING POLITICAL
PRESSURE TO RESTRICT
THE ACTIVITIES
OF TOURISM OPERATORS.
BAITING AND CHUMMING
OF WHITE SHARKS REMAINS
A CONTENTIOUS ISSUE.

Mauricio gets in a diving suit and climbs in a cage.

He says IF THE TOURISM
OPERATORS ARE NOT ALLOWED
TO ATTRACT THE SHARKS THEY
WON'T GO TO THE ISLAND AGAIN.
THERE'S A BIG PROBLEM
WITH POACHERS.
THE MEXICAN NAVY
IS DOING A GREAT JOB
BUT THEY CANNOT BE THERE
ALL THE TIME.
SO THESE KINDS OF BOATS
ARE EXTRA SET OF EYES
TAKING CARE OF THE SHARKS.
SO, I THINK THAT WE HAVE
TO FIND A GOOD WAY
THAT IS GOOD FOR THE SHARKS AND
GOOD FOR THE TOURISM OPERATORS.
I MEAN NOT JUST BAN THE BAITING
BUT LET'S DO A STUDY TO FIND
WHAT WOULD BE THE BEST WAY TO
ATTRACT THE SHARKS WITHOUT
INTERFERING WITH THE NATURAL
BEHAVIOUR OF THE ANIMALS.

The narrator says STILLS PHOTOGRAPHER
DAVID FLEETHAM IS JUST ONE
OF A HANDFUL OF IMAGE-MAKERS
THAT EARN THEIR LIVING
TAKING PICTURES
OF MARINE ANIMALS.
AND ONE OF HIS FAVOURITE
SUBJECTS IS SHARKS.
FOR MOST AMATEURS
AND PROFESSIONALS
GETTING THE PERFECT SHARK
PICTURE CAN BE AN OBSESSION.
HIS ICONIC IMAGE OF A
SANDBAR SHARK WAS THE FIRST
AND ONLY UNDERWATER PHOTO
EVER USED ON THE COVER
OF FAMED LIFE MAGAZINE.
GREAT WHITES THOUGH ARE THE
HOLY GRAIL OF SHARK PHOTOS.

The caption changes to "David Fleetham. Photographer."

David is in his forties, with short receding light brown hair and a shadow of a beard. He wears a green polo T-shirt.

He says THE FIRST TIME THAT I
PHOTOGRAPHED A SHARK UNDERWATER
WAS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
IT TOOK SEVERAL TRIPS BUT
EVENTUALLY AT ABOUT 130 FEET
I HAD THIS 12, MAYBE
14 FOOT LONG SIXGILL SHARK,
HUGE GIRTHY SHARK
GO SWIMMING BY ME WITH
REALLY LITTLE INTEREST
SHOWN IN ME WHATSOEVER.
I WAS HOOKED AFTER THAT
ON SHOOTING SHARKS.
AND THEN THE NEXT
SHARK ON THE LIST
WAS OF COURSE A GREAT WHITE.
THE GREAT WHITES THAT ARE
AROUND GUADALUPE ISLAND,
THAT SPOT IS JUST REALLY
DEVELOPED INTO WHAT'S
GOT TO BE THE BEST
PLACE IN THE WORLD
TO PHOTOGRAPH GREAT WHITES
UNDERWATER.

The caption changes to "Andy Murch. Photographer."

Andy is in his forties, clean-shaven and with short wavy graying hair. He wears a black T-shirt with a white print on the front.

Andy says WHITE SHARKS ARE THE
QUINTESSENTIAL MARINE PREDATOR.
IF ANYONE WHO ASSOCIATES
DANGER UNDERWATER,
THEY THINK OF THIS MASSIVE WHITE
ZEPPELIN-LOOKING SHARK,
BRISTLING WITH TEETH
COMING STRAIGHT TOWARDS THEM
WITH JAWS MUSIC PLAYING
AND INEVITABLY ANY IMAGE THAT
YOU TAKE OF A WHITE SHARK
PEOPLE ARE GOING TO ENJOY
LOOKING AT IT.

The narrator says PHOTOGRAPHER
ANDY MURCH IS SO ENAMOURED
WITH SHARKS THEY'RE THE
ONLY SPECIES HE FILMS.
HIS DATABASE OF SHARK IMAGES
IS PERHAPS THE MOST
COMPREHENSIVE IN THE WORLD.

Andy says I STARTED AS A DIVER
BEFORE I BECAME A PHOTOGRAPHER.
AFTER I REALLY FELL IN LOVE
WITH THE OCEAN AND WITH SHARKS
I DECIDED THAT I WANTED TO
RECORD AS MANY OF THE ANIMALS
THAT I HAD SEEN UNDERWATER
AS I COULD.
SO, I STARTED TO BUILD
THIS PORTFOLIO OF SHARK
AND RAY IMAGES, WHICH WAS WHAT
I WAS MOSTLY INTERESTED IN
AND AFTER A WHILE THAT
DATABASE GREW BIG ENOUGH
THAT I WAS ABLE TO ACTUALLY
START SELLING THE PICTURES
AND BECOME A PROFESSIONAL
PHOTOGRAPHER.
I DON'T THINK
THAT MY INTEREST IN SHARKS
COMES FROM THE FACT THAT THEY'RE
SCARY OR THEY GOT BIG TEETH
OR ANYTHING LIKE THAT, IT'S
REALLY MORE OF A FASCINATION
WITH HOW MAJESTIC THEY ARE,
HOW BEAUTIFUL THEY ARE,
HOW GRACEFUL WHEN THEY SWIM
THROUGH THE WATER.
THERE ARE ABSOLUTELY STUNNING
ANIMALS AND IF YOU CATCH THEM
WITH JUST THE RIGHT LIGHT
AND ON A NICE CLEAR DAY,
IT'S AN ABSOLUTELY MAGICAL
THING TO SEE UNDERWATER.
SHARKS HAVE A PRESENCE,
ESPECIALLY IF YOU CAN MAKE
EYE CONTACT WITH A SHARK,
IT'S VERY, VERY ENGAGING.
AND I THINK THAT THAT
SAME FEELING THAT YOU GET
WHEN YOU'RE UNDERWATER
TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OF THEM
OR SHOOTING VIDEO,
WHEN THAT IMAGE IS PRESENTED
TO SOMEBODY ABOVE THE SURFACE,
WHEN THEY SEE THAT
I THINK THAT IT'S VERY
CAPTIVATING FOR THEM TOO.
IF YOU CAN CAPTURE THAT MOMENT
WHERE A SHARK TURNS TOWARDS YOU
AND IT'S LOOKING AT THE CAMERA,
WHEN THE PERSON ABOVE WATER
SEES THAT, THEY'RE SUCKED
INTO THAT IMAGE.
IT'S A BIT OF A FANTASY
BUT MY ULTIMATE GOAL
IS TO TRY TO PHOTOGRAPH EVERY
SPECIES OF SHARK OUT THERE
AND I AM NOT JUST DOING THIS
BECAUSE IT WOULD BE A FUN THING
TO DO OR BECAUSE I HAVE OCD,
I THINK THAT GETTING IMAGES
OF ALL OF THESE SHARKS
WILL BE VERY USEFUL FOR
CONSERVATION PURPOSES
IN THE FUTURE AND
THAT'S CRITICAL TO ME
THAT WE HAVE THOSE IMAGES
SO THAT IF ANYBODY STARTS
SOME KIND OF CONSERVATION
INITIATIVE FOR A PARTICULAR
SPECIES I AM ABLE TO SUPPLY
AN IMAGE SO THAT PEOPLE
CAN REALLY APPRECIATE THE ANIMAL
THAT WE'RE TRYING TO PROTECT.

The narrator says AND ONE SHARK
SPECIES ANDY HAS TAKEN
MANY PHOTOS OF,
THE OCEANIC WHITETIP,
DEFINITELY NEEDS ALL
THE HELP IT CAN GET.

The caption changes to "Cat Island. Bahamas."

The narrator says TO DIVE WITH AND PHOTOGRAPH
THE ILLUSIVE OCEANIC WHITETIP,
SHARK ADVOCATE STUART COVE
AND HIS CREW TRAVEL
TO THE WATERS OF CAT ISLAND
IN THE CENTRAL BAHAMAS.
LIKE GREAT WHITES,
OCEANIC WHITETIPS NEED
A LITTLE INCENTIVE
TO APPROACH THE DIVE BOAT.

A man on a boat chops fish as bait for the whitetips.

Stuart says YOU GOT IT, MAN.

A crew member says THIS IS THE BIT NO ONE SEES
AND NO ONE WANTS TO DO.
I DON'T MIND IT.
THIS IS WHAT OUR LITTLE
DARLINGS LIKE TO EAT,
SO GOT TO GIVE IT TO THEM.

Stuart is in his fifties, with short, slightly wavy gray hair and wears white shirts.

Stuart says COME HERE, LITTLE POPPY.
[WHISTLES]

Stuart says SO, THIS IS OUR
OCEANIC WHITETIP,
THE FIRST ONE TO SHOW UP.
GOT A BEAUTIFUL DAY.

The narrator says STUART IS PERHAPS
TEMPTING FATE A BIT
BUT HE'S GOT LOTS OF EXPERIENCE
WITH THESE SHARKS.

Stuart I THINK WE CAN GO IN.
IT WON'T TAKE LONG
FOR HIS FRIENDS TO COME.

The narrator says BAITING AND CHUMMING
IS A CONTROVERSIAL PRACTICE
WITH ALL SHARKS
BUT THE FACT REMAINS
THAT THE ONLY WAY TO ENTICE
THE ANIMALS IS WITH BAIT.

A crew member says WHAT ARE YOU DOING?

Stuart says I'M JUST HAVING SOME FUN.

The narrator says STUART COVE'S BUSINESS REVOLVES
AROUND SHARK TOURISM
AND IF YOU'RE PAYING TO SEE
AN ANIMAL IN THE WILD, YOU WANT
TO GET AS CLOSE AS POSSIBLE.
WRANGLING SHARKS WITH A BAITED
LINE IS ONE SURE-FIRE WAY
TO EXCITE THE SHARKS.
OCEANIC WHITETIPS DO HAVE
A BIT OF A REPUTATION.
THEY'VE BEEN IMPLICATED
IN NUMEROUS SHARK ATTACK
FATALITIES, ESPECIALLY
WITH SHIPWRECK SURVIVORS
IN THE OPEN OCEAN.
BUT THEY HAVE A LOT
MORE TO FEAR FROM US.
WHEN THESE INCREASINGLY RARE
SHARKS ARE ENCOUNTERED
THEY'RE VERY SMALL.
THE FEW OCEANICS THAT REMAIN
ARE A FRACTION OF THE SIZE
OF THEIR HISTORIC COUNTERPARTS.

Andy says OCEANIC WHITETIP SHARKS
HAVE PRETTY MUCH BECOME
THE POSTER SHARK FOR
SHARK CONVERSATION NOW.
THEIR NUMBERS WERE DEPLETED
SO MUCH IN THE GULF OF MEXICO
AND IT WAS RECORDED THAT THERE
WAS ONLY TWO PERCENT LEFT
OF THE INITIAL POPULATION.
SO BECAUSE OF THIS THEY BECAME
EFFECTIVELY THE MASCOT
FOR SHARK CONSERVATION.
AND THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT
BECAUSE WE NEED THOSE SPECIES
THAT WE CAN ILLUSTRATE
HOW BAD IT'S GOT.
OCEANIC WHITETIP SHARKS
ARE OPEN OCEAN PREDATORS
SO UNLIKE MOST SHARKS THAT
HANG OUT ON DIFFERENT REEFS
THEY RARELY COME IN CONTACT
WITH LAND WHATSOEVER.
THEY'RE OUT CHASING TUNA OR
VARIOUS OTHER MIGRATING SPECIES
IN THE VERY, VERY DEEP OCEAN,
FAR, FAR FROM LAND
AND BECAUSE OF THIS
THEY'VE COME IN CONTACT
WITH UNREGULATED FINNING
IN MANY PARTS OF THE WORLD
WHERE THERE IS NO MONITORING.
THERE IS NO WAY TO PROTECT THEM
BECAUSE PAST INTERNATIONAL
LIMITS FISHERMEN CAN DO MORE
OR LESS ANYTHING THEY WANT.

Chris says OCEANIC WHITETIP SHARK,
THIS IS A BEAUTIFUL SHARK
CARCHARHINUS LONGIMANUS,
LONGIMANUS BEING THE LONG
BEAUTIFUL PECTORAL FINS
THESE SHARKS HAVE.
A REALLY INTERESTING SHARK
BECAUSE WHEN YOU SEE THEM
UNDERWATER, YOU USUALLY OFTEN
DON'T SEE THE SHARK,
YOU SEE LITTLE WHITE FLASHING
SHADOWS OFF IN THE DISTANCE
AND THESE SHADOWS IT'S THOUGHT
ARE ACTUALLY MIMICKING
THE MOVEMENT OF
PREY FISH SPECIES.
THEY LOOK A LITTLE BIT
LIKE A FAR OFF GLIMPSE
OF SOME SILVERY FISH
OFF IN THE DISTANCE
AND IT'S THOUGHT THAT THIS
MAY ACTUALLY PROVIDE
OTHER PREY SPECIES THAT
THESE WHITETIPS ARE TAKING
WITH A LITTLE BIT OF ASSURANCE,
OH, IT'S JUST A SCHOOL OF FISH
OUT THERE AND THEN BAM,
OCEANIC COMES IN AND HITS YOU.
WHAT'S HAPPENED TO OCEANIC
WHITETIPS IS THAT
WE'VE SEEN A CENTURY
OF INDUSTRIAL FISHING
IN THE ATLANTIC AND PARTICULARLY
LONG LINE FISHING
AND IT'S TAKEN THEM OUT.
THEIR POPULATION HAS DECLINED
98 PERCENT OR 99 PERCENT.
THEY WERE ONCE THE MOST PROLIFIC
SHARK IN THE ATLANTIC,
EVEN MORE SO THAN THE BLUE SHARK
WHICH IS ASTOUNDING
BECAUSE OF THE BIOMASS OF BLUES.

A clip shows a shark with a head shaped like a hammer head.

The narrator says ONE OF THE MOST
ENIGMATIC SHARKS
IS THE GREAT HAMMERHEAD.
THESE RARE CREATURES ARE
CERTAINLY AN UNUSUAL SHARK,
MASSIVE ANIMALS, THEIR
DISTINCTIVELY SHAPED HEAD
SEPARATES THEM FROM
MORE TYPICAL SPECIES
AND NO SHARKS HAVE MORE
DESIRABLE OR VALUABLE FINS.
ONE OF THE MOST CONSISTENT
PLACES TO FIND HAMMERHEADS
IS THE TINY ISLAND OF BIMINI
IN THE NORTHERN BAHAMAS.

The caption changes to "Stuart Cove."

Stuart says YOU KNOW GREAT
HAMMERHEAD YOU CAN SOMETIMES
HAVE A LUCKY OPPORTUNITY
TO SEE THEM BUT THIS HERE
IN SOUTH BIMINI IS GUARANTEED
HAMMERHEAD ACTION.
WE'RE LESS THAN A MILE OFFSHORE,
20 FEET OF WATER,
THE SHARKS COME VERY CLOSE
TO SOUTH BIMINI.
AND IT'S GREAT BECAUSE
IT'S ONLY A FIVE MINUTE
BOAT RIDE TO THE SITE.

The narrator says LIKE OCEANIC
WHITETIPS AND WHITE SHARKS,
HAMMERHEADS NEED A BIT OF
INCENTIVE TO APPROACH DIVERS.

A crew member says WE GRABBED A HUGE BAG
OF JUST SOME LOCAL BAHAMIAN FISH
GRUNTS, SCHOOLMASTERS,
LITTLE BAR JACKS
AND I'M JUST CUTTING IT
ALL UP INTO PIECES.
I AM GOING TO PUT IT IN
THE BUCKET WITH SOME OIL
AND SOME SALTWATER,
MASH IT ALL UP
AND THEN WHEN THE SHARKS COME
WE PUT IT IN WATER
AND IT'S AN ATTRACTION SENSE,
SO WE LIKE TO CALL IT
OUR SHARK SOUP.

The narrator says THE QUESTION
REMAINS THOUGH, DOES BAITING
ADVERSELY AFFECT THE NATURAL
BEHAVIOUR OF THE SHARKS?

The crew member says YUM, YUM.

The narrator says MOST LARGE SHARKS ARE ATTRACTED
TO HANDOUTS OF FOOD,
EVEN JUST THE SCENT OF
FISH BLOOD IN THE WATER
CAN USUALLY BRING THEM
INTO CLOSE CONTACT
BUT DOES IT MAKE THEM
MORE DANGEROUS?

Stuart says IT'S JUST AN AWESOME
EXPERIENCE TO SEE THESE
HUGE ANIMALS SWIMMING RIGHT
UP TO YOU AND AROUND YOU.
FANTASTIC.
THE WAY I FEEL ABOUT
THESE HAMMERHEADS,
I'VE DIVED WITH A LOT OF SPECIES
OF SHARKS HERE IN THE BAHAMAS,
BUT THIS GREAT HAMMERHEAD
IS PROBABLY THE HIGHLIGHT
OF ALL THE SHARKS.
THEY ARE HUGE, 15 FEET LONG,
WITH HEADS THREE FEET WIDE
AND SIX FOOT HIGH DORSAL FINS
AND THEY STAY WITH US
AND THEY SWIM RIGHT AROUND US
VERY CLOSELY.
WATER IS CRYSTAL CLEAR HERE
IN BIMINI AND ONLY ABOUT
20 FEET DEEP SO YOU CAN HAVE,
YOU KNOW AN HOUR PLUS DIVE.
THEY'RE GENTLE GIANTS.
I DON'T FEEL AT ALL
INTIMATED BY THE SHARKS,
VERY COMFORTABLE.
I DON'T FEEL
THEY WOULD BITE YOU.
THEY'RE NOT INTERESTED IN US.
AT ONE POINT I WAS HOLDING A
FISH AND IT CAME AFTER THE FISH.
I PUT IT BEHIND MY BACK,
IT WENT AROUND ME TO MY BACK,
I MOVED IT BACK TO THE FRONT
IT CAME AROUND TO THE FRONT.
WASN'T INTERESTED IN BITING ME,
WAS JUST INTERESTED IN THE FISH.

The narrator says EVEN THOUGH
HAMMERHEADS HAVE BEEN PROVEN
TO BE RELATIVELY SHY AND
NON-THREATENING ANIMALS
THERE IS STILL THAT NASTY
REPUTATION TO DEAL WITH.
OLD PERCEPTIONS DIE HARD.
INTRODUCING THEM TO
SCUBA DIVERS MIGHT HELP
TO CHANGE OUR VIEWS.

Stuart says THIS IS SUCH A UNIQUE
EXPERIENCE HERE IN SOUTH BIMINI
WITH THESE GREAT HAMMERHEADS.
I WOULD LIKE TO INTRODUCE
MORE AND MORE PEOPLE TO IT
PARTICULARLY PHOTOGRAPHERS.
IT'S SUCH A GREAT OPPORTUNITY
TO GET INCREDIBLE IMAGES
OF THESE HUGE SHARKS.

The narrator says PHOTOGRAPHERS ARE
DEFINITELY FOND OF HAMMERHEADS.
THEY ARE A VERY DISTINCT
AND UNUSUAL SPECIES.

Andy says DEPENDING WHO YOU TALK
TO THERE'S EVEN NINE OR TEN
SPECIES OF HAMMERHEAD SHARKS
IN THE WORLD NOW AND BY FAR
THE MOST ICONIC AND IMPRESSIVE
IS THE GREAT HAMMERHEAD,
WHICH CAN GROW TO EXTREMELY
LARGE PROPORTIONS
AND IS VERY, VERY ANGULAR.
IT HAS THIS HUGE LONG
WITCH'S HAT DORSAL FIN.
IT'S JUST A VERY SPIKY SHARK
WHEN YOU SEE IT IN IMAGES
AND I THINK THAT THAT'S VERY
CAPTIVATING FOR A LOT OF PEOPLE.

The narrator says IN THE BAHAMAS
AND MUCH OF THE CARIBBEAN,
HAMMERHEADS HAVE LONG BEEN
VIEWED AS MAN-EATERS.
ALTHOUGH THEY HAVE ATTACKED
HUMANS IN THE PAST,
IT'S BEEN DECADES SINCE
ONE OF THE ANIMALS
WAS INVOLVED IN A FATALITY.

Stuart says YOU NEED TO TURN
PEOPLE ONTO IT SO THEY CAN GET
THE WORD OUT THAT THESE
GREAT HAMMERHEADS AREN'T
THIS INDISCRIMINATE KILLER,
BECAUSE YOU THINK OF
A GREAT HAMMERHEAD AND
YOU THINK, "OH MY GOD,
I GOT TO GET OUT OF THE WATER,
THEY'RE GOING TO EAT ME."

The narrator says ONE OF THE HARDEST
GROUPS TO CONVINCE
THAT HAMMERHEADS POSE A MINIMAL
THREAT ARE FISHERMEN.

Stuart says NOW, JUST YESTERDAY
WE ARE IN BIMINI HARBOUR
TRYING TO GET SOME CARCASSES
TO FEED THE SHARKS
AND THIS VERY NICE GENTLEMAN
KINDLY GAVE US HIS CARCASSES,
COULDN'T BELIEVE WE WERE DIVING
WITH THESE GREAT HAMMERHEADS
AND HE WAS BRAGGING ABOUT
HOW MANY GREAT HAMMERHEADS
HE'S KILLED OVER THE YEARS,
STRICTLY FOR TROPHIES.
HIS UNDERSTANDING WAS
THEY'RE TERRIBLE KILLERS
AND THEY NEEDED TO BE KILLED,
BUT WE'VE CHANGED HIS MIND.
HE WON'T BE KILLING ANYMORE
GREAT HAMMERHEAD SHARKS.
AND THE MORE PEOPLE
WE CAN BRING DOWN HERE
AND SHOW THEM HOW GENTLE
THESE GUYS ARE,
THE MORE THE WORD'S
GOING TO GET OUT
AND WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE
IN THIS ENDANGERED SPECIES.

The narrator says OPEN OCEAN WANDERERS
GREAT WHITES AND OTHER
LARGE PELAGIC SPECIES
ARE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED
OVER MUCH OF THEIR
HISTORIC RANGES.
WHITE SHARKS ARE NOW PROTECTED
IN MOST COUNTRIES,
OTHER SPECIES HOWEVER ARE NOT.
OCEANIC WHITETIP NUMBERS
HAVE DROPPED GLOBALLY
BY MORE THAN 90 PERCENT.
HAMMERHEADS ARE TARGETED
RELENTLESSLY.
IT DOESN'T HELP THAT THEIR
DORSAL AND PECTORAL FINS
ARE VERY LARGE AND VALUABLE.
BIG SHARKS HAVE BIG FINS
AND AS MOST SHARKS ARE
SCAVENGERS, THEY EASILY
FALL PREY TO BAITED
LONG LINE HOOKS.

Chris says WE HAVE A CENTURY NOW
OF MASSIVE INDUSTRIAL FISHING
THAT'S GONE ON IN THE OPEN SEAS
VIRTUALLY UNREGULATED
TO THE POINT WHERE MOST
OF THEIR POPULATIONS
ARE SEVERELY THREATENED,
THEY ARE 85-90 PERCENT GONE.
WE HAVE POUNDED
SHARKS MERCILESSLY.
THIS IS THE END OF THE END.
SO WE'VE HAD A CENTURY
OF BYCATCH, WE'VE HAD
DIRECTED FISHERIES
AND NOW WITH THE VALUE
OF THESE FINS ANYWHERE
FROM 80 TO 160 DOLLARS A KILO,
WE'RE NOW WITH THE LAST OF
THE BUFFALOS 150 YEARS AGO
IN THE OCEAN.
WE'RE NOW SEEING THE LAST OF
THESE MAGNIFICENT PELAGIC SHARKS
BEING TAKEN FOR THEIR FIN VALUE.

Clips show fishermen pulling a dead shark up on their boat.

The narrator says FOR DECADES CONSERVATION GROUPS
AND RESEARCHERS HAVE
BEEN RAISING THE ALARM
OVER THE WASTEFUL PRACTICE
OF SHARK FINNING.
WE'VE BEEN KILLING TENS
OF MILLIONS OF THE ANIMALS
WITHOUT CAREFUL CONSIDERATION
OF THEIR IMPORTANT ROLE
IN THE MARINE ECOSYSTEM.
IT FINALLY APPEARS THOUGH
THAT SOME OF US
MAY BE GETTING A MESSAGE.
CITES OR THE CONVENTION
ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE
IN ENDANGERED SPECIES
HAS JUST WON A MAJOR BATTLE
IN SHARK CONSERVATION.

Andy says THIS YEAR FIVE NEW
SHARK SPECIES WERE ADDED
TO THE CITES APPENDICES WHICH
IS FANTASTIC NEWS FOR SHARKS.
WE MANAGE TO GET THREE SPECIES
OF HAMMERHEADS, GREAT HAMMERS,
SMOOTH HAMMERS AND
SCALLOPED HAMMERS PROTECTED
AS WELL AS PORBEAGLE SHARKS
WHICH ARE RELATED
TO GREAT WHITES
AND OCEANIC WHITETIP.
THIS IS A VERY GOOD START
OF COURSE IT DOESN'T
PROTECT THEM COMPLETELY
BECAUSE ALL IT DOES
IS STOP INTERNATIONAL TRADE
BUT IT DOESN'T MEAN
THAT THOSE SHARKS CAN'T BE
FISHED OUT ON A DOMESTIC BASIS.

A male voice at a fish market shows a display of shark meat and says THIS IS ALL SHARK,
ANGEL, MAKO, CAZON
AND THESE OTHER SPECIES,
PROBABLY HAMMER,
THAT'S PROBABLY HAMMER.

Chris says FINALLY, SOMEBODY HAS
ACTUALLY SET THE BAR SOMEWHERE.
WE KNOW THE CITES PROCESS
HAS ITS FLAWS BUT AT LEAST
WE'VE GOT A STARTING POINT
FOR THE PROTECTION
OF OCEANIC PELAGIC SHARKS.
THE CELEBRATORY FOOD
OF A CULTURE IS A BIG DEAL.
YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT
NORTH AMERICAN CULTURE,
OUR CHRISTMAS TURKEY
IS A BIG DEAL.
MOST PEOPLE DON'T WANT TO GIVE
UP THEIR CHRISTMAS TURKEY.
IN ASIAN CULTURE THE CELEBRATORY
VALUE OF SHARK FIN SOUP
AT FOR INSTANCE WEDDING
BANQUETS IS HUGE.
THE FACT IS THERE IS A BIG
PRESTIGE FACTOR ASSOCIATED
WITH THE EATING OF THIS PRODUCT
AND THAT'S WHAT WE REALLY
HAVE TO SHIFT I THINK.

He points at a picture on a screen and says WE SAW THIS SHARK WITHIN
50 METRES OF THE SAME SITE
THREE YEARS RUNNING.
ABOUT 40 PERCENT
OF THE COUNTRIES WHICH ARE
TAKING SHARKS HAVE ABSOLUTELY
NO MANAGEMENT PLANS FOR ANY
OF THE SHARKS THEY TAKE.
THEY JUST TAKE AND TAKE.
THERE IS NO ALLOWABLE CATCH.
THERE IS NO LIMIT.
YOU JUST GO OUT AND FISH.

The narrator says EVEN THOUGH OCEANIC
WHITETIPS AND HAMMERHEADS
ARE NOW PROTECTED ON PAPER,
WILL THE NEW LAWS HAVE TEETH?

Chris says THE REAL PROBLEM
WITH CITES IS IT'S KIND OF
A COALITION OF THE WILLING,
SO IF YOU DECIDE TO OPT OUT
OF CITES THERE ARE ABSOLUTELY,
THERE ARE NO PENALTIES.
SO REALLY WHERE SHARK PROTECTION
IS CONCERNED IT THEN GOES ON
TO THE LARGER SCALE
OF HOW NATIONS INTERACT
AND THINGS LIKE TRADE
TREATIES AND SO ON.
WOULD ANYBODY IN THE WESTERN
WORLD FOR INSTANCE
STEP UP AT AN INTERNATIONAL
TRADE CONFERENCE AND SAY,
"WE'RE NOT GOING TO TRADE
WITH THIS COUNTRY
THAT'S OVEREXPLOITING SHARKS."
WOULD THAT HAPPEN?
PERHAPS IT SHOULD.

The narrator says THERE'S STILL
A LONG WAYS TO GO
TO BRING MANY SPECIES OF SHARKS
BACK FROM THE BRINK
OF EXTINCTION.
REGARDLESS OF THEIR
EFFECTIVENESS THE NEW CITES
RULES ARE A BIG FIRST STEP
IN SHARK CONSERVATION.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Narration, Robert Henderson.

Produced by Erin Skillen and Hilary Pryor.

Produced in association with Discovery World.

Copyright 2013, May Street Productions.

Watch: Ep. 4 - Deep White