Transcript: Student Session 20 | Aug 24, 1998

(music plays)

The opening slate pops up with a countdown timer from 10 seconds and the title “TVO’s Virtual Classroom. Get connected.”
The “V” in “Virtual” is a tick, the “A” in “classroom” is an at sign with an extended loop that turns into a power cord with a plug at the end, and the first “O” in “classroom” is a spinning globe.

Lorraine appears on screen. She’s in her forties, with long light brown hair tied-up and bangs. She’s wearing a black blazer, a purple shirt and small earrings.

Lorraine says GOOD AFTERNOON, AND WELCOME
TO THE VIRTUAL CLASSROOM WITH
SESSION 20 OF
OUR MATH MYSTERY.
HELLO, STEWART.

Stewart stands by a table with cans and juice boxes sitting on it. He’s in his mid-forties, with a dark beard and wavy black hair. He’s wearing glasses and a T-shirt with Einstein’s face.

Stewart says HELLO, LORRAINE.
IT'S, AS ALWAYS,
FUN TO BE BACK.
AND I THINK WE'VE GOT A
LITTLE BIT OF MATHEMATICS
TO TAKE UP TODAY.

Lorraine says YES.
AND JUST BEFORE THAT, WE'LL
TALK TO YOU ABOUT YOUR AGENDA
TODAY, WHICH IS AS FOLLOWS:

The slate changes to “Agenda. 1: Exercises 1 and 2. Special Math Lesson: 3. Destination.”

Stewart says WHAT I'D REALLY LIKE TO DO IS
START WITH AN AREL QUESTION
BECAUSE I THINK WHAT I NEED TO
KNOW IS TO FIND OUT WHAT YOUR
CLASSES HAVE DISCOVERED ABOUT
THIS VERY FIRST QUESTION,
WHICH WAS, AS I
SAY, A BIG QUESTION.
I HOPE YOU DID IT
AS A WHOLE CLASS.
SO LET'S START WITH
THAT AREL QUESTION.

Lorraine says CERTAINLY.
IT IS:

A gray bar graph that reads “0 per cent” appears on screen under the title “Question number 1.” A caption reads “What is the minimum length of a boat to carry all the provisions for one prospector for the trip up the Yukon River? 1: 1.88 m long. 2: 4 m long. 3: 8 m long.”

Stewart says MAY I REMIND YOU THIS IS

The blue bar changes to “23,” then to “24” and finally to “25.” The green bar changes to “14.”
JUST A MINIMUM QUANTITY THAT,
IN FACT, IT'S INTENDED
TO BE A PRECISE ANSWER,
BUT IT'S TO GIVE SOME
SENSE OF APPROXIMATELY
WHAT THE ANSWER IS.

The bar graph changes to blue and reads “25, 50, 75 per cent.”

Lorraine says GREAT.
WELL, WE HAVE 75 PERCENT OF
YOU HAVE ANSWERED, AND WE SEE
HERE -- OH, INTERESTING.

Now, a three-bar graph appears. A green bar reads “0,” a purple bar reads “0” and a blue bar reads “3.”

Stewart says INTERESTING.
SAVE THAT THOUGHT
FOR A MOMENT OR TWO.
OKAY.
WHAT I'D LIKE TO DO NOW IS
INVITE PHONE CALLS, AND I'M
HOPING WE'VE GOT A WHOLE BUNCH
OF EAGER PEOPLE OUT THERE TO
PHONE US, AND LET US KNOW
WHAT THEY FOUND OUT ABOUT THE
VOLUME OF THE DIFFERENT KINDS
OF GOODS THAT HAD TO BE TAKEN
BY A PROSPECTOR.
SO I'D BE QUITE HAPPY TO START
WITH ABSOLUTELY ANYBODY.
I'M GOING TO START WITH FLOUR,
THEN GO ON TO OATMEAL, AND SO
ON, AND LET'S SEE IF WE
CAN GET SOME ESTIMATES.
HAVE WE GOT ANYBODY PHONING
IN ALL RIGHT, I HOPE?

Lorraine says YES, WE CERTAINLY DO.
WE HAVE SOMEONE
HERE FROM COLLEGE.
WE HAVE DAVID.

Stewart says THAT SOUNDS GREAT.

Lorraine says WE'RE CONNECTING WITH
HIM RIGHT AT THE MOMENT.
HELLO, DAVID.

David says HELLO?

Stewart speaks with a spectator via a telephone conversation.

Stewart says HI, DAVID.
NOW, WHAT I'M GOING TO ASK
YOU IS, DID YOU DO SOME
CALCULATIONS ON THE WEEKEND
FOR ONE OF THESE PRODUCTS?

David says I DID THE EGGS.

Stewart says OH, YOU DID THE EGGS.
I'VE FORGOTTEN ALL
ABOUT THE EGGS.
CAN YOU PUT THAT
AS NUMBER THREE?

Lorraine says CERTAINLY.

Stewart says WHAT DID YOU FIND
OUT WITH THE EGGS?
WHAT'S THE TOTAL VOLUME
FOR A THOUSAND DOZEN EGGS?

A blue sheet of paper appears with four columns. Two of the columns read “Object” and the others two read “CC volume.” Under the first column “Object,” a list reads “16: cornmeal. 17: rice. 18: candles. 19: b. powder. 20: soda. 21: salt. 22: mustard.” Under the other column “Object,” a list reads “23: apples. 24: apricots. 25: plums. 26: potatoes. 27: milk. 28: soap. 29: soup/veggies.”

David says WELL, I FOUND OUT THE MATH,
FIRST OF ALL, AND THEY WERE
750 GRAMS FOR A DOZEN.

Stewart says EXCELLENT.
SO 750 GRAMS FOR A DOZEN.
SO WHAT'S THE TOTAL MASS
FOR A THOUSAND DOZEN?

David says 750 KILOGRAMS.

Lorraine writes “30: eggs. 750 kg.”

Stewart says THAT'S A LOT,
ISN'T IT?
750 KILOGRAMS.
OKAY, WE'LL RECORD THAT.
DID YOU ACTUALLY WORK OUT
A VOLUME FOR THE EGGS?
ASSUMING THEY WERE IN EGG
CARTONS OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT?

David says NO.

Stewart says OKAY.
LET'S SEE IF WE CAN
WORK TOGETHER ON THAT.
AN EGG CARTON, I WOULD
SUGGEST, IS ABOUT
30 CENTIMETRES LONG.
WE'RE GOING TO GET A PIECE
OF PAPER HERE AND DO SOME
CALCULATIONS
WHILE WE'RE AT IT.
AN EGG CARTON, I WOULD SAY,
IS ABOUT 30 CENTIMETRES LONG.
I WOULD SUGGEST IT'S ABOUT 12
CENTIMETRES WIDE, AND I WOULD
SUGGEST IT'S PROBABLY
ABOUT 8 CENTIMETRES TALL.
NOW, WHAT WOULD YOU DO TO
CALCULATE THE TOTAL VOLUME?
DAVID, YOU STILL WITH ME?

David says YEAH.
LENGTH TIMES WIDTH
TIMES HEIGHT.

Stewart says EXCELLENT.
NOW, HAVE YOU GOT
A CALCULATOR HANDY?
CAN YOU DO THIS ONE FOR ME?

David says OKAY.
EACH ONE WILL BE 2,880
CENTIMETRES CUBED.

Stewart says NOW, I THINK WE'RE GOING TO
JUST TO MAKE OUR LIFE A LITTLE
BIT EASIER, LET'S CALL IT
3,000 CENTIMETRES CUBED.
AND SINCE WE HAVE A
THOUSAND DOZEN EGGS,
WHAT IS THE GRAND TOTAL?
WE'VE GOT TO MULTIPLY THAT
BY A THOUSAND, I GUESS.

David says 3 MILLION.
CENTIMETRES CUBED.

Stewart says WOW.
OKAY, SO WE'RE GOING
TO HAVE TO RECORD THAT.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH, DAVID.
WITH A LITTLE BIT OF LUCK WE
GOT A FEW MORE PHONE CALLS.
MAYBE WE CAN GET A FEW MORE
VALUES AND FILL IN THE CHART.
THANK YOU.

On a new blue sheet of paper, Lorraine writes the data Stewart gives and David’s answers.

Lorraine says GREAT, THANKS.
AND LET'S GO ON
NOW TO... ALYSSA.

Stewart says OKAY, ALYSSA.
HOPE SHE'S TUNED IN NOW.
PRETTY SOON.

Lorraine says HELLO?

Alyssa says HELLO?

Stewart says HI.

Alyssa says HI.

Stewart says DID YOU DO A MEASUREMENT
OVER THE WEEKEND?

Alyssa says NO.

Stewart says WE NEED SOME -- PEOPLE THAT
PHONE IN NOW, WE NEED PEOPLE
THAT HAVE ACTUALLY DONE
SOME MEASUREMENTS ON
ONE OF THESE PRODUCTS.
SO MAYBE WE COULD LOOK FOR
A DIFFERENT PHONE CALL.
THANK YOU FOR CALLING ANYWAY.

Lorraine says SURE.

Stewart says OTHERWISE WE'RE GOING TO HAVE
START MAKING SOME ESTIMATES.
AND THAT COULD BE DANGEROUS.

Lorraine says WE'RE WAITING FOR YOUR
CALLS, SO PRESS POUND NINE.

Stewart says WHAT I'M GOING TO TALK ABOUT
JUST FOR A MOMENT OR TWO,
OBVIOUSLY, A NUMBER OF THESE
CAN BE LUMPED TOGETHER BECAUSE

Looking at the goods on the table, Stewart continues THEY ARE GOING TO
BE SIMILAR IN SIZE.
FOR INSTANCE, FLOUR, GRANULATED
SUGAR, ALL THESE THINGS ARE
BASICALLY THE SAME
KIND OF PRODUCTS.
SALT WOULD COME INTO THAT
CATEGORY, AND SO ON.
SO WHAT WE MAY DO IS WE MIGHT
START MAKING SOME ESTIMATES
BASED ON THE FLOUR PACKAGE.
OKAY, WE GOT A CALL COMING IN?
THAT'S GOOD.
SO WE CAN GET A VALUE
OR VALUES, I HOPE.
MAYBE MORE THAN ONE.

Lorraine says SAMUEL, HELLO.

Samuel says HI.

Stewart says HI, SAMUEL.
DID YOU DO A MEASUREMENT
ON THE WEEKEND?

Samuel says I DID THE BAG OF SALT.

Stewart says OKAY, THAT'S A GOOD ONE.
NOW, HOW MANY KILOGRAMS
OF SALT DID WE NEED?
7, I THINK, RIGHT?
SO HOW MUCH VOLUME WOULD 7
KILOGRAMS OF SALT TAKE UP?

Samuel says I FOUND ONE BAG OF SALT, A
2-KILOGRAM BAG WAS 10 BY 5
BY 30 CENTIMETRES.

Stewart says SO 10 TIMES FIVE,
TIMES 30 IS WHAT?

Samuel says 150.

Stewart says IT'S 1,500, RIGHT?

Samuel says 1500.

Stewart says RIGHT.
IS THAT CORRECT?

Lorraine writes and says 10 TIMES 5 TIMES 50?

A female voice says TIMES 30.

Lorraine says TIMES 30.

Stewart says I KNEW THERE WAS
SOMETHING WRONG THERE.
OKAY, SO 1500.
AND THAT WAS FOR 2 KILOGRAMS?
THAT WAS FOR 2 KILOGRAMS?

Samuel says 2 KILOGRAMS, YEAH.

Stewart says SO WE HAVE TO MULTIPLY THAT
BY 3.5 BECAUSE, IN FACT,
WE HAD 7 KILOGRAMS.
HAVE YOU GOT A
CALCULATOR THERE?
CAN YOU HELP US
OUT WITH THAT?

Samuel says 5,250.

Stewart says OKAY, GOOD.
SO I THINK WE'LL FILL
THAT IN IN OUR NEXT SPOT.
5,250 CENTIMETRES CUBED.
DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHERS
WHILE YOU'RE AT IT?

Samuel says NO, THAT'S THE
ONLY ONE I DID.

Stewart says THAT WAS YOUR ASSIGNMENT.
FANTASTIC.
PERHAPS WE'VE GOT
ANOTHER PHONE CALL.

On the four-column paper, Lorraine adds “5250 cm cubed” next to the word “salt.”

Lorraine says YES.
AND I BELIEVE WE HAVE DAVID.

Stewart says DAVID'S BACK.

David says HELLO.

Lorraine says HI.

Stewart says HELLO.

Lorraine says DO YOU HAVE ANOTHER
ONE HERE FOR US?

Stewart says WHAT PRODUCT DID YOU MEASURE?

David says I THOUGHT I HAD THE FLOUR.

Stewart says THE FLOUR?

David says NO, THE COFFEE, ACTUALLY.

Stewart says THE COFFEE IS FINE.
SO 11 KILOGRAMS.
DID YOU GET A TOTAL
VOLUME FOR THAT?

David says FOR ONE KILOGRAM IT'S --

Lorraine grabs another blue paper with four columns. Two of the columns read “Object” and the others two read “CC volume.” Under the first column “Object,” a list reads “1: flour. 2: oatmeal. 3: beans. 4: sugar. 5: bacon. 6: yeast. 7: pepper.” Under the other column “Object,” a list reads “8: ginger. 9: peaches. 10: fish. 11: onions. 12: tea. 13: coffee. 14: matches. 15 butter.”

Stewart says SO IT'S A TIN.
SO 5 CENTIMETRES,
IS THAT A DIAMETER?
OR IS THAT ACTUALLY
A RADIUS?
IT SOUNDS LIKE A
RADIUS TO ME.

David says RADIUS.

Stewart says OKAY, RADIUS.
SO WHAT WE HAVE TO DO
IS WE HAVE TO DO A
LITTLE CALCULATION.
THAT'S A CYLINDER, ISN'T IT?
WHAT IS THE CALCULATION FOR
THE VOLUME OF A CYLINDER,
DO YOU REMEMBER?

David says 5 TIMES 3.14 TIMES
5 TIMES 30.

Lorraine writes David’s calculation.

Stewart says EXCELLENT.
SO CAN YOU GIVE ME
A NUMBER ON THAT?
THERE'S ANOTHER FIVE THERE.
CAN YOU SQUARE THE
FIVE, LORRAINE?

David says FIVE SQUARED.
IT'S 2,355
CENTIMETRES CUBED.

Stewart says NOW DO ME A FAVOUR.
THAT'S ONLY ONE
KILOGRAM, RIGHT?
LET'S MULTIPLY THAT BY 11.

David says EXCUSE ME?

Stewart says THERE ARE 11 KILOGRAMS, SO
MULTIPLY THAT NUMBER BY 11.
SUPER.
SO LET'S RECORD THAT
ONE AS WELL, LORRAINE.
HAVE YOU GOT ANOTHER
ONE BY ANY CHANCE?

Next to the word “coffee,” Lorraine adds “25,905 cm cubed.”

David says NO, SORRY.

Stewart says YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE.
I'M GLAD YOU'VE GOT THAT ONE.

David says OKAY.

Stewart says ANYMORE CALLS COMING IN?

Lorraine says NOT JUST YET.

Stewart says OKAY.
YOU KNOW, WE'RE BEGINNING
TO GET SOME SENSE.
IF YOU GO BACK TO
THAT SALT VALUE.
HOW MUCH SALT WAS THERE?

Lorraine says 5,250 CENTIMETRES CUBED.

Stewart says FOR 7 KILOGRAMS.
AND SALT WILL PACK
VERY MUCH LIKE FLOUR.
SO IF WE TAKE 180 AND DIVIDE
BY SEVEN BECAUSE THAT'S HOW
MANY MORE TIMES FLOUR,
WE'VE GOT MUCH MORE FLOUR.
SO IF WE TOOK 180 AND DIVIDED
BY 7, THAT'S ABOUT 25 OR SO.
AND WE TOOK THE VALUE FOR THE
SALT AND MULTIPLIED BY 25.
SO WHAT WAS THE
VALUE FOR THE SALT?
I'M GOING TO DO A LITTLE
BIT OF QUICK ESTIMATION
IN MY HEAD HERE.

Lorraine says JUST TO LET YOU KNOW, DAVID'S
ON THE PHONE AGAIN, SO I'M
SURE HE CAN SHARE WITH
US MAYBE ANOTHER ITEM.

Stewart says OKAY.
MAYBE DAVID'S GOT
ANOTHER FIGURE FOR US.

Lorraine says HELLO, DAVID.

David says I FIGURED -- I
REMEMBERED THE PEPPER.

Lorraine says OKAY, GOOD.

David says IT WAS A 100-GRAM CONTAINER.
IT WAS 5 CENTIMETRES TALL, AND
IT HAD 1 CENTIMETRE DIAMETER.
IT WAS A CYLINDER.

Stewart says OKAY, WHAT'S THE CALCULATION
AGAIN FOR THE VOLUME OF
A CYLINDER?
I THINK THAT'S THE RADIUS.
WHEN YOU SAY THE CYLINDER,
DOES THE CYLINDER HAVE RADIUS
1 CENTIMETRES, OR DIAMETER?

David says OH, THAT WAS A RADIUS.

Stewart says THAT'S A RADIUS.
THAT'S RIGHT.
NOW, YOU SAID 100 GRAMS.
HOW MANY GRAMS OF PEPPER
DID WE ACTUALLY NEED?

David says POINT FIVE.

Stewart says THAT'S KILOGRAMS, SO THAT
WOULD BE 500 GRAMS, RIGHT?
SO FIVE TIMES WHATEVER
THIS FIGURE IS.
I THINK HE SAID
IT WAS 15.7 OR SO.

David says 78.5

Stewart says 78.5 IS THE GRAND TOTAL.
SO PEPPER IS NOT TAKING UP
VERY MUCH SPACE, IS IT?
NOT A REAL PROBLEM
WITH PEPPER.
I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM
SOMEBODY GIVING ME THE FLOUR
FIGURE BECAUSE IT'S
THE BIGGEST AMOUNT.

Next to the word “pepper,” Lorraine adds “78.5 cm cubed.”

Lorraine says OKAY, GREAT.
AND WE NOTE WE'RE LOOKING
FOR CALLS FROM FLAMBOROUGH
IF THEY COULD HELP US OUT.

Stewart says I WOULD LOVE TO GET FIGURES
ON FLOUR PERHAPS, OR SUGAR.

Lorraine says ACTUALLY, WE'VE
GOT QUITE A FEW.

Stewart says JUST TO GIVE US SOME SENSE.
WE'RE OBVIOUSLY NOT GOING
TO GET EVERY ONE OF THESE
FIGURES, BUT WE'VE GOT
TO GET SOME SENSE OF
THE TOTAL VOLUME.
THEN WE'LL TRY TO WORK
OUT ABOUT HOW MUCH SPACE
IT WILL TAKE UP.
SO HAVE WE GOT
SOMEBODY CALLING IN?

Lorraine says YES, ONE MOMENT.

Stewart says OH, GREAT.

Stewart says SO SOMEBODY FROM
FLAMBOROUGH, I HEAR.
GREAT.

Lorraine says REBECCA OR ASHLEY
FROM FLAMBOROUGH.

Stewart says OKAY.

Lorraine says WE'LL FILL UP THE
SPACES HERE FOR VOLUME.

Stewart says IF WE COULD GET FLOUR.
THAT'S THE ONE I REALLY WANT
BECAUSE IT'S SO MUCH BIGGER
THAN SOME OF THESE OTHERS.
BACON WOULD HAVE BEEN
INTERESTING, AS WELL.
BUT WE CAN PRETTY MUCH
MAKE SOME ESTIMATES THEN.

Lorraine says HI.
IS THIS REBECCA OR ASHLEY?

Chris says HELLO?

Lorraine says HI, OOPS.
NEITHER ONE, I THINK.
WHO IS ON THE PHONE?

Chris says CHRIS.

Stewart says HI, CHRIS.

Lorraine says DID YOU FIGURE OUT ONE OF
THE VOLUMES FOR THESE ITEMS?

Chris says I HAVE NO IDEA.

Stewart says YOU DON'T KNOW.

Lorraine says YOU DON'T KNOW.
OKAY, WELL, MAYBE, STEWART,
YOU CAN MENTION HERE HOW?

Stewart says WELL, LET'S TAKE
FLOUR AS AN EXAMPLE.
THIS IS A 2.5 KILOGRAM BAG.
AND MAYBE WE CAN ALL
BE FIGURING THIS OUT
AT THE SAME TIME.
IT'S 2.5 KILOGRAMS.
THE APPROXIMATE HEIGHT OF
THIS IS ABOUT, I WOULD SAY,
30 CENTIMETRES.
THE DEPTH OF THIS IS ABOUT --
REMEMBER, I'M ESTIMATING --
12 CENTIMETRES.
AND GOING ACROSS HERE IS
PROBABLY 15 CENTIMETRES.
NOW, TWO THINGS WE HAVE
TO KEEP IN MIND HERE.
ONE IS THE VOLUME OF THIS
BAG IN CUBIC CENTIMETRES,
WHICH IS PRETTY
EASY TO CALCULATE.
BUT WE NEED TO KNOW
HOW MANY BAGS OF FLOUR.
SO IF THIS IS 2.5 KILOGRAMS,
AND WE HAVE 180 KILOGRAMS,
WHAT DO YOU DO?
IT'S STRAIGHTFORWARD ENOUGH,
BUT IT'S IMPORTANT TO GET
USED TO DOING ALL THESE STEPS
EVERY TIME BECAUSE WHEN
YOU ANSWER THIS OVERALL
QUESTION, WE NEED SOME ACCURACY,
ANYWAY, I HOPE.
SO HAVE WE GOT
ANYBODY PHONING IN?

Lorraine says NOT YET.

Stewart says OKAY, WELL, I'M GOING TO
BALLPARK SOME FIGURES HERE
IN MY HEAD.

Lorraine says OKAY.

Stewart says SO LET'S SEE.
I WOULD SAY THERE ARE ABOUT
70 OF THESE IN 180 KILOGRAMS.
AND WHAT WERE THE
FIGURES I HAD?

Lorraine says 30 CENTIMETERS
BY 12 BY 15.

Lorraine writes “30 times 12 times 15 equals 5,400.”

Stewart says WE DO.
GOOD.
SOUNDS LIKE WE MIGHT
HAVE A CALL COMING IN.

Lorraine says AND WE HAVE DAVID.
HELLO?

David says HELLO?

Stewart says HI.
DAVID, YOU'RE BACK?

David says YEAH.

Stewart says SUPER.
YOU'RE HELPING US OUT TODAY.
NOW, DO YOU WANT TO HELP
US WITH THIS CALCULATION?
HAVE YOU DONE IT ALREADY?

David says I HAD A DIFFERENT
ONE, ACTUALLY.

Stewart says OKAY, I'LL TELL YOU WHAT.
LET'S DO YOUR DIFFERENT ONE.
WHAT ONE IS IT?

David says SUGAR.

Stewart says HEY, THAT'S A GOOD ONE.
OKAY, GIVE US THE
FIGURES ON SUGAR.

David says OKAY, IT WAS A 4-KILOGRAM
BAG, AND IT WAS...

Lorraine writes “Sugar. 4 kg. 20cm times 20cm times 10cm equals.”

Stewart says SO THAT ONE'S PRETTY
STRAIGHT FORWARD.
NOW HOW MUCH SUGAR
DID WE NEED?
46 KILOGRAMS?

David says 46.

Stewart says RIGHT.
OKAY, SO WHAT DO WE DO TO
CALCULATE THE GRAND TOTAL OF
THE VOLUME FOR THIS ONE?

David says 92,000.

Stewart says LET'S SEE.
WE'LL CHECK THAT OUT.
SO I THINK YOU'RE DOUBLE,
IF I'M NOT MISTAKEN.

David says IT'S 46,000.

Lorraine writes “4000cm cubed times 11.5 equals 46,000cm cubed.”

Stewart says RIGHT ON.
EXCELLENT.

Lorraine says GOOD FOR YOU, DAVID.
ALL RIGHT.

Stewart says I'M GOING TO SAUNTER ON BACK
TO THE DESK HERE, AND I THINK
WHAT WE'RE GOING TO DO IS GET
DOWN AND DIRTY AND DO SOME
QUICK ESTIMATION HERE JUST
TO COMPLETE THE QUESTION.

Lorraine goes back to one of the four-column papers and adds “46,000cm cubed” next to the word “sugar.”

Stewart continues WE COULD GO ON FOR A LONG
TIME ON THIS QUESTION.
THERE ARE, AFTER ALL,
29 DIFFERENT ITEMS.
THIS IS ONE OF THE REASONS
I SUGGESTED THAT IT
MIGHT NOT BE A BAD IDEA TO
DO THIS AS A CLASS PROJECT.

Stewart sits next to Lorraine.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

Stewart says SO WHAT I'M GOING TO DO,
I LEFT MY LIST OVER THERE.
WELL, IF I RECALL CORRECTLY,
THIS WAS 180 KILOGRAMS.
WE CAN GET A LITTLE BIT OF
HELP FROM THE STUDENTS,
BUT IT'S NOT
REALLY A PROBLEM.
THIS WAS 23 KILOGRAMS.
OR 46, I SHOULD SAY.
SO THIS IS ABOUT
FOUR TIMES BIGGER.
SO WHAT I'M GOING TO DO
IS I'M GOING TO DO SOME
ROUGH ESTIMATES.
THIS IS FOUR TIMES BIGGER,
SO YOU GET 200,000
CENTIMETRES CUBED.

He adds those figures to the four-column sheet of paper.

He continues OKAY, LET'S START TAKING A
LOOK AT A GRAND TOTAL HERE.
IT'S AMAZING HOW THESE
THINGS COME BACK TO YOU.
ANYWAY, THE NUMBER OF BEANS
HERE IS PROBABLY SIMILAR TO
THE ONE BELOW IT BECAUSE
IT'S ALSO 46 KILOGRAMS.
OATMEAL IS GOING
TO BE ABOUT HALF.
ALL I'M DOING IS TRYING TO
GET A REASONABLE ESTIMATE.
I'M NOT GOING TO DO
EVERY ONE OF THEM.
I'M ONLY INTERESTED REALLY
IN THE ONES THAT ARE A LOT
OF KILOGRAMS.
BACON IS ANOTHER ONE.
IT'S ABOUT DOUBLE.
SO I'M GOING TO PUT
92,000 CENTIMETRES CUBED.
AND IF WE START COMBINING
A NUMBER OF THESE.
YEAST IS SMALL,
THIS IS SMALL.
IF YOU TAKE THESE, THIS IS
ABOUT THE SAME AS BEANS
PLUS A HALF.
SO I'M GOING TO GIVE THIS ABOUT
69,000 CENTIMETRES CUBED.

Stewart draws a bracket next to the words “peaches, fish, onions” and writes “69,000cm cubed.”

Stewart continues
WE'LL SKIP OVER
TO THE NEXT PAGE.
CORNMEAL AND RICE AND CANDLES
AND SO ON IS ABOUT THE
EQUIVALENT OF SUGAR.
SO I'M GOING TO GIVE THAT
46,000 MORE CENTIMETRES CUBED.
MUSTARD IS SMALL.
APPLES AND APRICOTS AND
EVAPORATED POTATOES IS ABOUT
THE SAME AGAIN AS THE SUGAR.
SO I'M JUST USING THE WEIGHTS.
AND THE REST IS PRETTY...
WELL, THERE'S ANOTHER
10 OR 11 KILOGRAMS.
I THINK A FAIR ESTIMATE
FOR THIS WOULD BE 20,000
CENTIMETRES CUBED.
LET'S TAKE A LOOK
AT THE GRAND TOTAL.
WE'VE GOT LOTS OF
STUFF HAPPENING HERE.

Lorraine says I'LL TAKE ALL MY PAGES OFF.

Stewart says MY PARTNER'S GOT LOTS
OF STUFF GOING HERE.

Lorraine says HELLO, NADEPA.

Nadepa says HELLO.

Lorraine says HI.
DID YOU WANT TO SHARE
SOMETHING WITH US?

Nadepa says I WAS JUST GOING TO SAY
THE VOLUME OF YEAST.

Stewart says THE VOLUME OF YEAST.

Nadepa says YES.

Stewart says WHAT DID YOU CALCULATE?

Nadepa says HEIGHT WAS 1 INCH, WHICH
WAS 2.54 CENTIMETRES.

Stewart says RIGHT.

Nadepa says IN HEIGHT.
AND RADIUS IS
1 CENTIMETRE.
IT WAS YEAST YOU
WERE DOING, RIGHT?
HOW MUCH DID THAT WEIGH?
HOW MUCH WAS THAT PACKAGE?

Nadepa says I THINK IT WAS 250 GRAMS.
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

Stewart writes Nadepa’s figures.

Stewart says THAT'S PROBABLY
A GOOD ANSWER.
NOW, WE NEED TO KNOW HOW MUCH
YEAST WE NEEDED IN TOTAL.

Nadepa says VOLUME OF 250 GRAMS WAS 7.97.

Stewart says LET'S ROUND THAT TO 8
CENTIMETRES CUBED, OKAY?

Nadepa says OKAY.

Stewart says WE NEED, BELIEVE IT OR NOT,
HOW MANY KILOGRAMS OF YEAST?
16 KILOGRAMS!

Nadepa says 16 KILOGRAMS OF YEAST CAKES.

Stewart says THAT'S RIGHT.
SO IF YOU HAVE 250 GRAMS IS 8
CENTIMETRES CUBED, WHAT DO I
DO TO CALCULATE THE TOTAL
VOLUME FOR 16 KILOGRAMS?

Nadepa says 250 TIMES FOUR TIMES 16.

Stewart says NO.

Nadepa says WHAT?

Stewart says NO, NO BECAUSE
THAT'S GIVING ME MASS.
YOU ALMOST SAID IT.
IT'S 16 TIMES FOUR,
TIMES EIGHT, RIGHT?
BECAUSE THAT'S YOUR
VOLUME, NOT YOUR MASS.
I'M NOT TOO WORRIED
ABOUT THE MASS, OKAY?
SO 32 TIMES 16, WHAT DOES THAT
COME OUT TO APPROXIMATELY?

Nadepa says JUST A SECOND, PLEASE.

Stewart says THAT'S OKAY.
YOU GO RIGHT AHEAD.

Nadepa says 512.

Stewart says 512 CUBIC CENTIMETRES.
I'M GOING TO RECORD
THAT ON OUR LIST.
EXCELLENT.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH, NADEPA.

Stewart says OKAY, I THINK WHAT WE'RE
GOING TO DO IS I'M GOING TO WRAP
THIS UP BECAUSE WE'VE GOT TO
GET TO ONE OR TWO OF THE OTHER
QUESTIONS, I HOPE.
AND WE DO HAVE TO
GET TO THE LOCATION.
SO WHAT I'M DOING RIGHT NOW IS
QUICKLY WRITING DOWN ALL THE
FIGURES WE HAVE ESTIMATED
UP TO THIS POINT.
I'LL INCLUDE THE 512.
I'LL JUST MAKE IT 500.
THEN THIS SMALL ONE IS 80.
THEN OVER ON THIS
SIDE WE HAVE 69,000.
SO YOU CAN SEE THE SMALL
THINGS PROBABLY DON'T MATTER
TOO MUCH.
26,000 FOR OUR NEXT ONE.
THEN ON OUR LAST
PAGE, WE HAVE 46,000.
I'LL PUT SOMETHING UP HERE.
5,000.
THEN WE HAVE ANOTHER 46,000.
AM I RUNNING OFF THE PAGE?
I'M STILL THERE.
WE HAVE 20,000.
AND THE MOST IMPORTANT
ONE OF ALL IS THE EGGS.
AND THAT DOESN'T SURPRISE ME.
3 MILLION CUBIC CENTIMETRES.
SO I'M GOING TO DO
A QUICK ADD HERE.

Lorraine says VERY DELICATE SPACE,
AS WELL, FOR THOSE EGGS.

Stewart says OH, YOU WANT TO BET.
He does the add and continues I'M GOING TO ROUND THAT
UP TO 3 MILLION, 600,000.
NOW THE LAST THING I WANT TO
DO WITH THIS QUESTION IS JUST
TO TAKE A LOOK AT THIS RATIO.
REMEMBER WHAT WE'RE DOING IS
MAKING A RECTANGULAR PRISM.
AND IT HAS A RATIO
OF 3 TO 2 TO 5.
I MAY HAVE ORDERED IT IN
A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT WAY,
BUT THREE WIDE, TWO
HIGH, FIVE LONG.
AND IF YOU WERE TO TAKE THIS
AND TREAT IT AS A VOLUME,
THE VOLUME OF THIS WOULD
BE 30 CUBIC UNITS.
SO HAVE WE GOT A
QUESTION OR A PHONE CALL?

Lorraine says YES.
WE HAVE DAVID ON THE LINE.
HELLO.

Stewart says HI, DAVID.

David says HI.
I WAS ACTUALLY GOING
TO TELL THE ANSWER.

Lorraine says OH, GREAT.

Stewart says I'M ALL FOR THAT.
NOW, WHAT DID YOU
FIND FOR YOUR ANSWER?

David says WELL, I TOOK THE FINAL
ANSWER, THE 3 MILLION 600,000,
APPROXIMATELY, AND THEN
I DIVIDED THAT BY TEN.

Stewart says WHY DID YOU DIVIDE BY TEN?

David says BECAUSE THERE ARE TEN
PARTS IN THE VOLUME.

Stewart says OH, I SEE.
OKAY, I'M GOING TO
KEEP FOLLOWING YOU.
SO YOU DIVIDED BY TEN.

On a new piece of paper, Stewart adds David’s answers.

David THEN THAT'S 360,000.

Stewart says WHAT HAPPENS NOW?
WHAT DOES THAT TELL ME?

David says THAT TELLS YOU WHAT EACH ONE
OF THOSE MEANS IN THE RATIO.
SO EACH ONE NUMBER, IT'S TWO
IN HEIGHT, SO MULTIPLY THAT BY
TWO TO GET THE HEIGHT OF IT.

Stewart says NOW, IT'S DAVID, I'M JUST
RECALLING THE NAME HERE.
THAT'S A GOOD IDEA, BUT THE
PROBLEM IS THIS IS ABOUT VOLUME.
THIS FIGURE HERE IS VOLUME.
WHAT YOU WANT ARE LENGTH
MEASURES, OR LINEAR MEASURES.
SO I ACTUALLY CAN'T
DIVIDE BY TEN.
I HAVE TO DIVIDE BY 30.
THAT'S WHY I DID THIS.
NOW, YOU HAD A
REALLY GOOD IDEA.
BUT GOING FROM VOLUME TO
LINEAR, YOU CAN'T QUITE DO THAT.
OTHERWISE, WE'D
HAVE A HUGE BOAT.
I GUARANTEE TO YOU, WHEN YOU
CALCULATE IT, YOU'D HAVE A
HUGE BOAT.
SO WHAT WE'RE GOING
TO DO IS DIVIDE BY 30.
WHAT I GET NOW IS 120,000.

David says I ADDED THE THREE NUMBERS
INSTEAD OF MULTIPLYING.

Stewart says YOU ADDED INSTEAD
OF MULTIPLIED.
THAT'S RIGHT.
BUT I'M STILL IN A LITTLE
BIT OF TROUBLE HERE.
DAVID, DO YOU HAVE
A CALCULATOR THERE?

David says YES.

Stewart says IS IT A SCIENTIFIC
CALCULATOR?

David says YES.

Stewart says EXCELLENT.
DO YOU KNOW HOW TO FIND
A CUBED ROOT ON IT?

David says YES.

Stewart says FIND THE CUBE ROOT
OF 120,000, PLEASE.
EXCELLENT.
I'M GLAD TO HEAR STUDENTS
IN GRADE EIGHT ARE USING
SCIENTIFIC CALCULATORS.

Lorraine says I CAN SEE HOW THEY WOULD HAVE
THOUGHT OF ADDING AS WELL.

Stewart says BUT THE PROBLEM IS
IT'S VOLUME AND LINEAR.
SO YOU'RE WORKING ON THAT
CUBED ROOT FOR ME, RIGHT?

David says IT'S APPROXIMATELY 50.

Stewart says EXCELLENT.

50 TIMES 50 TIMES 50.
YES, THAT'S REALLY CLOSE.
NOW, WHAT THAT MEANS IS THIS
IS THE NUMBER YOU MULTIPLY
EACH ONE OF THESE BY.
SO I'M GOING TO
GO THE LAST STEP.
YOU'VE DONE A GREAT JOB TODAY.

Stewart draws a new rectangle on a blue sheet of paper.

Stewart continues THIS HAS REALLY HELPED US OUT.
SO I'M GOING TO MULTIPLY
EACH ONE OF THESE BY 50,
AND IT'LL GIVE
US CENTIMETRES.
NOW, THAT'S THE
SIZE OF THE PACKAGE.
LET'S GO BACK TO
THAT AREL QUESTION.

Stewart writes 3 TIMES 50 EQUALS 150 CM.
2 TIMES 500 EQUALS 1000CM.
5 TIMES 50 EQUALS 250CM.

Lorraine says SURE.

Stewart says NOW, THE AREL QUESTION SAID:

Lorraine says WHAT IS THE MINIMUM LENGTH
OF A BOAT TO CARRY ALL THE
PROVISIONS FOR ONE PROSPECTOR?

The three-bar graph appears. The green bar reads “1,” the purple bar reads “1” and the blue bar reads “6.”

Stewart says THE PROVISIONS ARE
GOING TO TAKE 2.5 METRES.
NOW, WHICH ANSWER DO YOU THINK
IS THE APPROPRIATE ANSWER?
NUMBER 1, NUMBER 2
OR NUMBER 3?
CAN STUDENTS STILL
ANSWER NOW?

Lorraine says OH, I SEE.
YES.

Stewart says WHAT WOULD YOU THINK NOW?
YOU CAN JOIN IN AND ADD
SOME ANSWERS TO THIS.
'COS ONLY A FEW PEOPLE HAVE
ACTUALLY PHONED IN ALREADY.

Lorraine says AND IF WE BRING IT LIKE
THIS, SEE, IT'S GOING UP.

The slate with the blue bar graph reads “67 per cent.”

David says IT'S PROBABLY
NUMBER ONE THEN.

Stewart says NUMBER ONE IS TOO
SHORT, ISN'T IT?
DAVID, YOU'RE STILL
WITH ME OBVIOUSLY.
1.88 METRES, AND THIS
IS ALREADY 2.5 METRES.
SO IT'S EITHER GOT TO BE
NUMBER TWO OR NUMBER THREE.
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
DO YOU THINK YOU'D WANT TO BE
IN A BOAT WHEN YOU'VE GOT A
BIG CHUNK OF STUFF THAT'S 2.5
METRES LONG AND THE BOAT IS
4 METRES?
WOULD THAT BE OKAY?

David says IT WOULD PROBABLY
BE FOUR METRES LONG.

Stewart says I THINK SO, TOO.
YOU COULD DO IT IN A BOAT
THAT'S FOUR METRES LONG.
WHICH IS ACTUALLY A PRETTY
GOOD SIZED BOAT, IF YOU'RE
TALKING ABOUT A ROW BOAT OR
SOMETHING ALONG THAT LINE.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

The three-bar graph appears. The green bar reads “1,” the purple bar reads “3” and the blue bar reads “6.”

Stewart says SO IT'S NOT A SMALL BOAT BY
ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION.

Lorraine says EXCELLENT.

The green bar changes to “2,” the purple bar reads “3” and the blue bar changes to “5.”

Stewart says YOU GUYS DID A
REALLY FINE JOB.
THIS IS NOT AN EASY QUESTION.
AND IT'S ALMOST MORE OF A
CLASS PROJECT THAN IT IS
AN INDIVIDUAL QUESTION.
BUT YOU KNOW,
IT'S QUITE A JOB.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

Stewart says I'M GOING TO TAKE A COUPLE
OF MINUTES TO TALK ABOUT THE
POPULATION BOOM, AND THEN
JUST A COUPLE MOMENTS TO TALK
ABOUT THE OTHER ITEM, WHICH
WAS THE GAME OF CHANCE.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

Stewart continues WITH THE POPULATION BOOM, ONE
OF THE THINGS I ASKED YOU TO
DO WAS TO GRAPH.
IF YOU REMEMBER, I HAD
DATES ALONG THE BOTTOM:

Stewart grabs a new blue sheet of paper that shows a grid. On the horizontal side, he writes “1871, 81,91,01,11,21,31.”

Stewart continues AND I HAD POPULATION
DENSITIES GOING UP HERE.

On the vertical side of the grid he writes “1,2,3,4,5.”

Stewart continues THE ONLY ONE I REALLY WANT TO
TALK ABOUT IS ACTUALLY THE
YUKON ITSELF.
WHAT YOU FIND WITH THE
POPULATION DENSITIES IS
THEY ARE QUITE LOW ACTUALLY.
BUT WHAT YOU FIND IS FOR THE
FIRST TWO YEARS YOU HAVE
NO MEASUREMENTS, BUT
THEN YOU HAVE .02
BUT THEN YOU GET A
MOST UNUSUAL THING.
ACTUALLY, IT'S THIS
YEAR THAT IT HAPPENS.
IT BOUNCES UP, AND THEN
GOES DOWN LIKE THIS.
SO EVEN THOUGH THIS IS NOT TO
SCALE, WHAT YOUR GRAPH SHOULD
LOOK LIKE IS IT BOUNCES UP
AND THEN IT DROPS DOWN
RATHER DRAMATICALLY.

A close-up shot of the grid features Stewart drawing points and then joining them with a line.

Stewart continues AND ONE OF THE THINGS I ASKED
FOR IS NOT ONLY TO DO THAT
GRAPH, ALONG WITH
THE OTHER ONES.
NOW, IN TERMS OF DOING THE
OTHER ONES, QUEBEC, MANITOBA,
BRITISH COLUMBIA AND SO ON, IF
YOU TAKE A LOOK AT MANITOBA,
IT'S STEADILY GOING UP SO IT
WOULD SORT OF LOOK LIKE THIS.

He draws a perpendicular line.

Stewart continues AGAIN, IT'S NOT TO SCALE.
IF YOU TAKE A LOOK
AT QUEBEC, LIKEWISE.
IT'S BIGGER FIGURES, AND
IT'S STEADILY GOING UP.

He adds a parallel line to the perpendicular one.

Stewart continues IF YOU TAKE A LOOK AT THE
OTHER ONE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
IT'S SMALLER NUMBERS, IT'S
SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN BUT,
AGAIN, IT'S STEADILY
GOING UP.
NOW, THAT'S WHAT YOU WOULD
NORMALLY EXPECT IN TERMS OF
A POPULATION --
UP TO A POINT.
AND I THINK YOU MIGHT HAVE
DISCUSSED THIS ON TUESDAY,
THAT THERE SOMETIMES
IS A LIMIT.
WHAT'S GOING ON HERE
IN TERMS OF THE YUKON?
WHY THIS PEAK?
CAN YOU EXPLAIN IT?
HAVE WE GOT ANY PHONE CALLS?

Lorraine says WE'RE WORKING ON IT.
SO PRESS POUND NINE TO
SHARE WITH US WHY THE PEAK.
SOMEONE WITH A LOVELY
NAME LIKE STEWART FROM
COLLEGE AVENUE.

Stewart says HEY, THAT'S GREAT.
ALWAYS LIKE TALKING
TO A NAMESAKE.

Lorraine says HELLO?
I THINK THE LAST NAME
IS STEWART MAYBE.

J.D. says HELLO.

Lorraine says ARE YOU STEWART OR J.D.?

J.D. says J.D.

Stewart says THAT'S STILL OKAY.
YOU SPELL STEWART CORRECTLY
ANYWAY, I'M GLAD TO SEE THAT.
ANYWAY, WHAT DOES THIS LITTLE
PEAK IN THE YUKON MEAN TO YOU?

J.D. says IT PROBABLY WENT UP
FROM THE GOLD RUSH.

Stewart says YEAH, EXACTLY.
SOMETIMES IN HISTORY, WHAT YOU
GET IS AN EVENT THAT HAS A
DRAMATIC IMPACT
ON A POPULATION.
THIS IS AN EXAMPLE OF
WHERE A POPULATION GOES
UP DRAMATICALLY.
UNFORTUNATELY, THERE ARE
EXAMPLES WHERE THE OPPOSITE
HAS OCCURRED.
I CAN SPEAK OF RWANDA,
PERHAPS, WHERE THE POPULATION
MAY HAVE BEEN RISING FOR A
CERTAIN NUMBER OF YEARS, THEN
YOU HAVE A DROP BECAUSE OF
THE SERIOUS MASSACRE THAT
HAPPENED THERE A
NUMBER OF YEARS AGO.
THIS IS ONE OF THE GREAT
USES OF MATHEMATICS.
TAKE A LOOK AT A GRAPH OVER A
PERIOD OF TIME, AND WHAT THE
GRAPH TENDS TO DO IS TO
ACCENTUATE CERTAIN ASPECTS OF
WHAT'S GOING ON IN REALITY.
AND I THINK, IF THERE'S A
LESSON TO BE HAD HERE,
IT'S THE POWER OF A
VISUAL REPRESENTATION.

Lorraine says YES.
AND WE TALKED ABOUT THAT WITH
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND BECAUSE
ITS POPULATION, IT DIMINISHED.

Stewart says IT DECLINES, RIGHT.

Lorraine says DUE TO THE SIZE OF THE LAND.

Stewart says AT THIS POINT -- OH,
WE'VE GOT A CALL?
HEY, WE'LL TAKE A CALL.
I'M HAPPY TO DO THAT.

Lorraine says IT'S NADEPA FROM
COLLEGE AVENUE.

Stewart says HI, NADEPA.

Nadepa says HELLO.

Stewart says IS IT NADEPA OR...?

Lorraine says YES, IT IS.

Stewart says QUESTION OR COMMENT?

Nadepa says I WAS JUST WONDERING WHAT
THIS HAS TO DO WITH FINDING
WHERE WE'RE GOING NEXT.

Lorraine says WE'RE GETTING THERE.

Stewart says HANG ON UNTIL
EXERCISE NUMBER TWO.
AND EXERCISE NUMBER TWO
BASICALLY IS WHERE
WE'RE GOING NEXT.

Nadepa says OKAY.

Lorraine says ALRIGHT, THANKS, NADEPA.

Stewart says THIS IS WHERE WE'RE GOING
RIGHT NOW, OR WHERE WE ARE,
I GUESS, IS A BETTER
WAY OF PUTTING IT.

Lorraine says AND YOU SEEM TO HAVE
SOME INTERESTING OBJECTS.

Stewart says HERE WE ARE BACK
TO THIS EXPERIMENT.

Two white bowls with marbles appear. One contains white striped marbles and the other has green ones.

Stewart continues DO YOU REMEMBER THE EXPERIMENT
WITH THE GAME OF CHANCE?
AND IF YOU DREW -- I THINK THE
WAY I SAID IT, IF YOU DREW A
WHITE ONE, IT'S
NOT A GOOD THING.
YOU'RE ON THE WOODPILE -- I
THINK I SAID IN THE COAL MINE,
SAME DIFFERENCE.
He holds a green marble and continues AND THIS YOU GET YOUR FREEDOM.
NOW, DID ANYBODY OUT THERE DO
THE EXPERIMENT TO FIND OUT
WHAT THE BEST WAY OF
ARRANGING THE MARBLES IS?
AND MAYBE EVEN EXPLAIN WHY IT
WOULD BE BETTER TO ARRANGE
THEM IN ONE WAY OR ANOTHER.
THESE TWO VESSELS ARE SUPPOSED
TO BE EXACTLY THE SAME SO YOU
CAN'T TELL THE
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THEM.

Lorraine says AND WE HAVE DAVID.
OUR HERO FOR THE DAY.

Stewart says I HAVE A FEELING THERE'S
A THEME TO TODAY'S SHOW.

Lorraine says THE DAVID SHOW.

Stewart says THAT'S OKAY.

Lorraine says HELLO.

Stewart says HI, DAVID, YOU'RE BACK?

David says YEAH.

Stewart says NOW, WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT
THIS PARTICULAR PROBLEM HERE?
DID YOU DO SOME WORK WITH IT?

David says YES, I DID.

Stewart says AND WHAT DID YOU FIND?

David says I FOUND THAT IF YOU PUT... IN
ONE OF THEM HAVE NINE OF THE
ONES THAT LET YOU GO FREE, AND
TEN OF THE ONES THAT MAKE YOU
GO TO JAIL.
AND IN THE OTHER
ONE, JUST HAVE ONE.
SO THAT WAY YOU'LL HAVE A 50
PERCENT CHANCE OF GETTING
FREE COMPLETELY, AND ALMOST
A 50 PERCENT CHANCE
IN THE OTHER ONE.

Stewart leaves one green marble in one bowl and puts the rest all together.

Stewart says FANTASTIC!

Lorraine says YAY, DAVID!

Stewart and Lorraine raise their arms to express excitement.

Stewart says DAVID, THAT'S RIGHT ON.
AND I'M JUST GOING TO SHOW YOU
A LITTLE TREE JUST TO SHOW
YOU JUST EXACTLY
WHAT YOU SAID TO US.
AND, IN FACT, THAT'S THE BEST
WAY OF GAINING YOUR FREEDOM.

Lorraine says THANK YOU, DAVID.

Stewart says HEY, WE'RE PLEASED.
YOU HAVE A 50 PERCENT CHANCE
OF PICKING ONE OR THE OTHER
OF THE TWO YOU CAN'T
DISTINGUISH BETWEEN
THE TWO OF THEM.
NOW, IN THE ONE, WE'LL CALL
THIS FREEDOM, AND WE'LL CALL
THIS THE WOOD LOT.

Stewart grabs a piece of paper and draws a vertical tree diagram.

Stewart continues IF THERE ARE ZERO MARBLES,
THERE'S ZERO CHANCE OF
ACTUALLY ACCOMPLISHING THAT.
BUT THERE'S A ONE IN ONE
CHANCE OF GETTING A GOOD ONE
IF YOU PUT A SINGLE WHITE
MARBLE IN LIKE THAT, RIGHT?
BUT OVER ON THIS OTHER ONE,
YOU HAVE 19 MARBLES LEFT.
SO WE'VE GOT FREEDOM, AND
WE'VE GOT THE WOOD LOT AGAIN.
SO THERE ARE NINE THAT WILL
GIVE YOU YOUR FREEDOM, NINE OF
THE CLEAR ONES, OUT OF 19
POSSIBILITIES, AND THE TEN
OTHER ONES THAT
ARE NOT SO GOOD.
THEY'LL SEND YOU
TO THE WOOD LOT.
HE SAID ALMOST 50 PERCENT, WHICH
IS A VERY GOOD WAY OF SAYING IT.
AND THE WAY YOU ACTUALLY
CALCULATE THE PROBABILITY OF
FREEDOM IS EVERYWHERE YOU SEE
THE WORD FREEDOM, THIS TREE,
THE WAY YOU OPERATE IT IS, YOU
MULTIPLY THIS BRANCH BY THIS
BRANCH, THE PROBABILITY ON IT.
ONE-HALF TIMES ONE.
PLUS THIS BRANCH TIMES THAT
BRANCH TIMES 9 OVER 19.
AND WHAT YOU GET IS ABOUT...
THIS WILL GIVE YOU .5
THIS WILL GIVE YOU, I
THINK IT WAS ABOUT .23.
SO FOR A TOTAL OF .73.
SO YOU HAVE A 73 PERCENT
CHANCE OF ACTUALLY GAINING
YOUR FREEDOM IF YOU PUT
THE MARBLES THAT WAY.
AND YOU KNOW, THAT'S A HECK
OF A LOT BETTER THAN 50-50.

Lorraine says THAT'S EXCELLENT.

Stewart says WE'VE GOT A CALL.
THAT'S GREAT.

Lorraine says IT'S PANG FROM
COLLEGE AVENUE.

Pang says DOES THIS MEAN
WE'RE GOING TO CAIRO?

Stewart says MAYBE, MAYBE.

Lorraine says THEY'RE ANXIOUS TO GET TO THE
NEXT DESTINATION, I THINK.

Stewart says I'VE GOT ONE SPECIAL LITTLE
MATH LESSON FOR YOU THAT
I WOULD LIKE TO GIVE
YOU FOR THE WEEKEND.
AND TO BE QUITE HONEST, SOONER
OR LATER, I UNDERSTAND WITH
THIS MYSTERY, SOMEBODY IS
GOING TO HAVE TO BE ARRESTED.
SOMEBODY'S GUILTY.
SO I THOUGHT IT
WOULD BE APPROPRIATE
TO CONSIDER HANDCUFFS.
AND THESE ARE MY HANDCUFFS.
AND WHAT I'M GOING TO SUGGEST
IS THAT YOU MAKE TWO PAIRS
OF HANDCUFFS ON THE
WEEKEND OUT OF SOME STRING
OR ROPE LIKE THIS.
AND I'LL SHOW YOU IN A
MOMENT HOW TO DO THIS.
AND TRY THIS LITTLE EXPERIMENT
THAT I'LL SHOW YOU
IN JUST A MOMENT.
THIS IS A FUN EXPERIMENT,
AND I WOULD REALLY, REALLY,
REALLY LIKE TO SEE WHAT YOU
COME UP WITH AS ANSWERS.
THE BEST WAY TO DO IT IS IF
YOU HAVE SOME ROPE LIKE THIS,
THIS IS NYLON ROPE, PROBABLY
QUARTER INCH THICK BECAUSE
THEY MEASURE THESE IN INCHES,
WHAT YOU DO IS TAKE ABOUT
THAT MUCH ROPE THERE AND
PUT A KNOT IN THE ROPE
RIGHT ABOUT THERE.
THIS SETS IT UP SO THE
HANDCUFF ITSELF WILL NOT GET
TOO TIGHT ON YOUR WRIST.
THEN TAKE THE END OF IT, LOOP
IT AROUND, AND THERE YOU HAVE
AN END JUST LIKE THAT.
I'LL DO THE SAME THING
ON THE OTHER END.
OF COURSE YOU HAVE
TO HAVE HANDCUFFS.
REMEMBER, YOU NEED TWO
PAIRS OF THESE IN ESSENCE.
REALLY FUN TO EXPERIMENT WITH
YOUR SIBLING, A CLASSMATE,
PERHAPS YOUR PARENTS, I
DON'T KNOW, BUT PERHAPS.
AND LIKE THAT.
I ACTUALLY MADE THAT ONE
PRETTY SMALL, SO I'M GOING TO
MAKE YOU WEAR THAT ONE.

Lorraine laughs and says OKAY.

Stewart continues HERE'S HOW YOU
DO THE EXPERIMENT.
HERE'S WHAT THE CHALLENGE IS.
LET'S SEE IF WE CAN
GET THIS ONE ONTO YOU.
OKAY, THERE YOU GO.
THAT'S NOT BAD.
YOU'VE GOT SMALL WRISTS.
NOW, WHAT YOU DO IS YOU
HANDCUFF SOMEBODY LIKE THAT,
AND THEN WHOMEVER ELSE YOU
ARE DOING THIS WITH GETS
HANDCUFFED SO WE
ARE CAUGHT UP.
THE CHALLENGE IS THIS:
CAN YOU GET OUT OF THESE
HANDCUFFS WITHOUT THE
HANDCUFFS FALLING
OFF YOUR WRISTS?
NOW, WHAT DO YOU
THINK, LORRAINE?
LET'S SEE, I NEED A
LITTLE BIT OF SPACE HERE.
IF YOU COULD JUST
MOVE OVER THERE.
MAYBE IF I PUT MY
FOOT THROUGH THERE.

Chuckling, Lorraine says NOT QUITE.

Stewart asks YOU DON'T THINK SO?
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Lorraine replies I COULD ALWAYS
TRY PUTTING MINE?

Stewart says MAYBE I COULD GO OVER YOUR
HEAD AND DO THIS KIND OF --
I DON'T KNOW.

Lorraine says AWKWARD, OBVIOUSLY.

Stewart says YOU CAN SEE THIS IS A
LITTLE BIT OF A CHALLENGE.
AND BECAUSE WE'RE KIND
OF ALL WIRED UP HERE,
WE REALLY CAN'T DO IT.
BUT I SUSPECT SOME OF YOU ARE
GOING TO TRY THIS AT HOME
ON THE WEEKEND.
WE GOT A PHONE CALL?

Lorraine says WE DEFINITELY KNOW
THERE IS A SOLUTION.

Stewart says WE KNOW THERE IS A SOLUTION.

Lorraine says WE HAVE DAVID WHO MIGHT
HAVE SOME SUGGESTIONS.

Stewart says WELL, I DON'T
WANT AN ANSWER YET.

Lorraine says HELLO, DAVID.

David says HI.

Stewart says HI, DAVID.
QUESTION OR COMMENT?

David says ABOUT THE HANDCUFF THING, I
THINK IT'S ACTUALLY IMPOSSIBLE
TO DO BECAUSE THERE IS
A SOLID RING AROUND LIKE,
'COS IT'S LIKE PUTTING
TWO RINGS TOGETHER.
YOU CAN'T TAKE THEM APART
BECAUSE THEY'RE SOLID THERE,
THERE'S NO HOLES
TO GET THROUGH.

Stewart says YOU JUST SAID SOMETHING
REALLY IMPORTANT.
TO BE QUITE HONEST, I WANT YOU
TO PLAY WITH IT ON THE WEEKEND.
YOU MAY BE RIGHT.
ON MONDAY, WE'RE GOING TO
INVITE PEOPLE TO DESCRIBE
WHAT THEY'VE TRIED.
BUT I WILL DEFINITELY SHOW
YOU SOMETHING YOU MIGHT BE
INTERESTED IN.
ONE OF THE THINGS YOU SAID I
FIND REALLY, REALLY -- I WOULD
SAY REALLY, I
GUESS, INTUITIVE.
THERE ARE NO HOLES THERE.
NOW, I WANT YOU TO REMEMBER
THAT COMMENT, OKAY?
SO YOU THINK
ABOUT IT, DAVID.
GIVE IT A TRY.
HAVE SOME FUN WITH IT,
THEN WE CAN GO FROM THERE.

Lorraine says GREAT, WELL, THANK YOU DAVID.

Stewart says I THINK WE'RE JUST ABOUT
TO, SEEMS TO BE SOME REAL
INTEREST ABOUT WHERE
WE ARE GOING NEXT.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

Stewart says AND I'VE ACTUALLY HEARD ONE
PERSON SUGGEST SOMETHING.

Lorraine says THAT WAS PING.

Stewart says WHAT I'M GOING TO DO AT THIS
POINT IS I'M GOING TO BRING,
CAREFULLY, OH, THAT'S NOT BAD.
I'VE MORE OR LESS LINED IT UP.
THIS WHOLE PROBLEM WITH
EXERCISE NUMBER TWO, BASICALLY
SETS YOU UP TO LOOK AT A
LITTLE WEE TINY PART OF THE MAP.

Stewart grabs a map with a post-it on it.

Stewart continues BUT, IN FACT, IT COVERS
THIS ENTIRE AREA HERE.
AND, OF COURSE, THERE IS THE
POSSIBILITY THAT IT'S GOT TO
BE SOMEPLACE UNDER HERE.
SO WHAT I'VE DONE, AND I'M
GOING TO NOW REPLACE THAT
AND WE'LL ZOOM BACK ON THE
GRAPHICS CAMERA AS WE'RE
WORKING AWAY HERE.
THIS IS SORT OF A
SIMULATION OF THAT.

A blue sheet of paper with four post-its on it appears. It features a square in the middle. Captions read “(28,31), (31,31), (28,28), (31,28).”

Stewart continues ONE OF THE THINGS I'D LIKE YOU
TO THINK ABOUT ARE THE NAMES
OF THE MOST IMPORTANT CITIES
THAT ARE INSIDE THAT SQUARE.
NOW, I DON'T KNOW IF WE CAN
HANDLE A PHONE CALL RIGHT AT
THIS MOMENT OR NOT, BUT IT'D
BE KIND OF FUN IF WE COULD.
WHAT ARE SOME OF THE
IMPORTANT PLACES THAT ARE
INSIDE THAT SQUARE?
NOTICE I'VE COVERED UP SOME
THINGS SO THERE'S MORE THAN
ONE PLACE.
SO HAVE WE GOT
SOMEBODY PHONING IN?

Lorraine says WELL, LET'S TRY
STEWART -- OR, NO, J.D.

Stewart says HELLO, J.D.

J.D. says HELLO.

Lorraine says HI.

Stewart says WHAT ARE SOME OF THE PLACES
YOU MIGHT FIND UNDERNEATH
THESE LABELS I PUT ON THERE?

J.D. says GIZA, ALEXANDRIA,
AND CAIRO.

Stewart takes out the post-its to reveal the cities J.D. mentions and three dots inside the square.

Stewart says EXCELLENT.
NOW, WHERE DO YOU THINK
JEWELS IS TAKING US, AND WHY?
WHICH ONE OF THOSE PLACES?

J.D. says CAIRO BECAUSE IT'S 31 AND 28,
AND IT'S THE CLOSEST TO 30, 30.

Stewart says IT'S CLOSEST TO 30, 30, AND
IN FACT, CAIRO IS THIS DOT
RIGHT HERE, MEANING ALEXANDRIA
IS PROBABLY THE FARTHEST
FROM THAT LOCATION.
BUT I WOULD SAY IT'S A REAL
TOSS-UP BETWEEN THAT AND GIZA.
WE'VE BEEN DEALING WITH
THIS GUY FOR SOME TIME NOW.
WHAT DO YOU THINK JEWELS
IS MORE LIKELY TO DO?
WHAT'S AT GIZA THAT
MAKES IT SPECIAL?
DO YOU KNOW?

J.D. says YEAH, GIZA BECAUSE
OF THE PYRAMIDS.

Stewart says I THINK SO, TOO.
I THINK THAT'S EXACTLY
WHERE HE'S TAKING US NEXT.
EXCELLENT WORK.
EXCELLENT WORK.

Stewart circles the word “Giza.”

(Middle Eastern music plays)

Lorraine chuckles and says BACKGROUND MUSIC
IS APPROPRIATE.

Stewart appears wearing a cowboy hat, a checked shirt and yellow suspenders. He holds a wok.

Speaking with a fake accent, Stewart says WELL, I WAS PRETTY PHENOMENAL
ON STAGE LAST NIGHT, OR
TONIGHT, I SHOULD SAY,
WASN'T I, MISS DIAMOND TOOTH?

Lorraine wears a white blouse, a matching wig and a fake mole. She takes out a plastic floral arrangement from her wig.

Lorraine says YOU WEREN'T TOO BAD THERE,
CARMACKS, BUT I WOULDN'T GIVE
UP YOUR DAY JOB,
THAT'S FOR SURE, MISSTER C.
YOU KNOW, I'M THINKING OF
TAKING UP ACTING FULL-TIME.
IT FELT SO WONDERFUL TONIGHT
TO BE THE STAR OF THE SHOW.

Stewart says STAR?

Lorraine says YES, YES, YES.

Stewart says STAR?
YOU HAVE BUT THREE SHORT
LITTLE LINES, AND YOU CALL
YOURSELF A STAR?

Lorraine says WELL, IT MAY HAVE BEEN ONLY
THREE LINES, BUT IT WAS THE
WAY I DELIVERED THOSE LINES.
AND AT LEAST THEY
COULD UNDERSTAND ME.

Stewart says THEY LAUGHED AT MY JOKES.

Lorraine says WELL, THEY CERTAINLY
LAUGHED AT YOUR JOKES.
THEY LAUGHED
AT
YOU, AS WELL.
AND OH, YES, BY THE WAY, DID
YOU NOTICE RENE, ISAAC AND
SOPHIA IN THE AUDIENCE?

Stewart says AS A MATTER OF FACT I DID,
AND, YOU KNOW, I KNEW THEY
WOULD BE THERE BECAUSE
I WAS ON STAGE.
AND THEY WANTED TO SEE ME.

Lorraine says RIGHT.

Stewart says BUT BEFORE THE SHOW, I
ACTUALLY SPOKE TO THEM.
AND YOU KNOW WHAT?
THEY'VE GOT ANOTHER SUSPECT.

Lorraine says OH, REALLY?
WHO?

Stewart says WELL, MAYBE YOU CAN
TRY TO FIGURE IT OUT.
LET'S GO THROUGH THE SUSPECTS.

Lorraine says ALL RIGHTY.

Stewart says LET'S SEE.
THE FIRST ONE WAS
A FAMILY MEMBER.

Lorraine says RIGHT.
THAT WOULD BE SPIKE,
THE BIG BROTHER.

A picture shows a man in his forties. A caption reads “Spike a.k.a. ‘Big Brother.’.”

Stewart says THE SECOND WAS A CLASSMATE.

Lorraine says A CLASSMATE, OH, YES,
BEATRICE, THE COMPUTER NERD.
I'M NOT SURE ABOUT HER.

The picture changes to a blond little girl with a caption that reads “Beatrice. Computer nerd.”

Stewart says THE THIRD WAS THAT
SWEET LITTLE OLD LADY.

The picture changes to woman wearing a white wig with a caption that reads “Grammie a.k.a. ‘The Brampton Belle.’”

Lorraine says OF COURSE.
THE BRAMPTON BELLE, GRAMMIE.
SHE LOOKS MUCH TOO SWEET.

Stewart says DON'T FORGET THE
GEOGRAPHY TEACHER.

Lorraine says MISSUS PENELOPE.
SOMEHOW SHE JUST DOESN'T
LOOK LIKE A SUSPECT TO ME.

The picture changes to a blond woman holding newspapers with a caption that reads “Missus Penelope.”

Stewart says WELL, WE'RE DOWN TO
THE FIFTH SUSPECT.
THINK ABOUT THOSE EMAILS.
SOMETHING THAT'S COMMON
ABOUT ALL THOSE EMAILS.
SOMETHING THAT IS ATTACHED
TO EACH ONE OF THOSE EMAILS.
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Lorraine says WELL, THE EMAILS ALL TEND TO
HAVE CLUES THAT HELP US OUT
TO GET TO THE
NEXT DESTINATION.
AND NOW, AS WELL, THEY HAVE
MATH PROBLEMS TO HELP US OUT
TO GET TO THOSE DESTINATIONS.

Stewart says THAT'S IT, THE MATH PROBLEMS.
NOW YOU'RE GETTING IT.

Lorraine says SO YOU MEAN TO TELL ME THIS
PERSON, THE SUSPECT, IS HOT ON
MATHEMATICS, AND ALSO, WEREN'T
THEY THE ONES THAT HAD A
SUSPECT OR SOMETHING GO INTO A
SCHOOL LIBRARY, SO THERE MUST
BE A CONNECTION WITH THE
SCHOOL, DON'T YOU THINK?

Stewart says EXACTLY.
SO THE LAST SUSPECT IS THEIR
MATH TEACHER, MISS NEWTON.

Lorraine says I SEE.
THAT'S FABULOUS.
WELL, GOOD WORK ON THE PART
OF RENE, ISAAC AND SOPHIA.
WELL, I'M NOT TOO SURE WHO OUR
SUSPECT IS, BUT WE'LL SOON
HAVE TO FIND THE ANSWER
TO OUR MATH MYSTERY.

The picture changes to a woman with curly hair wearing glasses with a caption that reads “Missus Newton.”

Stewart says WELL, YOU KNOW, WE'RE
GOING TO NEED SOME HELP
FROM OUR STUDENTS.
FACT IS, WE SEEM TO HAVE A
CALL COMING IN RIGHT NOW
MAYBE THAT WILL
BEGIN THE PROCESS.

Lorraine says AHA.
AND I SEE HERE NADEPA.
MAYBE HE MIGHT HAVE SOME
SUGGESTIONS TO HELP US OUT.

Stewart says SURE.

Lorraine says HELLO, NADEPA.

Nadepa says HELLO.

Lorraine says HI.
DO YOU HAVE A COMMENT?
MAYBE YOU CAN GIVE US A HAND?

Nadepa says I THINK SO.
FOR THE CLUES OF WHAT WAS
FAMILIAR, I THINK MOST OF THE
PLACES THAT WE WENT
TO HAD AN R IN THEM.

Stewart says OH, HEY, I WANT TO
MAKE A NOTE OF THAT.
THE FACT IS NOW THAT YOU'RE
MENTIONING THE PLACES WE WENT
TO, I KNOW MY CREW INSIDE
WILL BE ALL UPSET WITH ME.
DO WE HAVE THAT OTHER LABEL
FOR GIZA ON THE TABLE SOMEWHERE?

Lorraine says YES, I DO.

Stewart says I SEE AN R IN
EACH ONE OF THEM.
FLORIDA, CAPE CANAVERAL,
JUMBOTRON, TORONTO, YEAH.
FLORENCE, GREECE.
NAGANO, JAPAN
DOESN'T HAVE ONE.
MACHU PICCHU DOESN'T HAVE ONE.
DAWSON CITY DOESN'T HAVE ONE.

Nadepa says MAYBE SOMETHING
LIKE A PATTERN.
LIKE WE SKIP SOMETHING, THEN
GO TO THE OTHER FOR THE R?

Stewart says IT'S POSSIBLE BECAUSE...

Nadepa says MACHU PICCHU IS IN PERU.

Stewart says OF COURSE.
I MISSED THAT.
YOU'RE RIGHT.

Lorraine says PERU, R.

Stewart says BUT NAGANO STILL
DOESN'T, AND DAWSON CITY.
DO WE HAVE THAT OTHER LABEL?

Lorraine says NO, I DON'T.

Stewart says IT MUST HAVE
FALLEN ON THE FLOOR.
GIZA, EGYPT.

Lorraine says WE CAN ADD THAT LATER ON.

Stewart says WELL, THANKS, NADEPA.

Stewart says MAKE A NOTE OF THAT
IN YOUR JOURNAL.

Lorraine says THAT'S EXACTLY WHAT WE'RE
WANTING IS TO GET SOME IDEAS
LIKE THAT.
SO IT MIGHT BE A GREAT IDEA
FOR YOU TO GO THROUGH YOUR
JOURNALS AND PUT THAT
KIND OF INFORMATION.
GO OVER IT DURING THE WEEKEND,
AND WE CAN TALK ABOUT IT
IN FURTHER DETAIL.
AND WE SHOULD MAYBE FINISH
OFF WITH OUR LAST CALL BEING
FROM DAVID.

Stewart says THAT REMINDS ME.
I THINK WE'VE GOT TO MENTION
SOMETHING FOR COLLEGE AVENUE.
DON'T THEY REPORT ON GIZA?

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.
AND THAT MIGHT BE GOOD
TO MENTION TO DAVID.
HELLO, DAVID.

David says HI.
I WAS JUST WONDERING IF WE
WERE GOING TO COVER QUESTION
TWO B?

Stewart says TWO B?
TO BE OR NOT TO BE.
WE'RE IN A GOOD MOOD.

Lorraine laughs and says DAVID, WHILE WE HAVE YOU ON
THE LINE, COULD YOU REMIND
YOUR CLASS THAT YOU ARE TO
FIND THE INFORMATION FOR --

Stewart says FOR GIZA AND THE PYRAMIDS
AND EGYPT IN GENERAL.

Lorraine says FOR MONDAY.

Stewart continues SO COLLEGE AVENUE IS DOING
THE REPORT ON MONDAY.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

Stewart says I DIDN'T DO THE
ANSWER FOR IT.
THE ONLY THING THAT YOU REALLY
NEED HERE, IN TERMS OF DOING
POPULATION DENSITY, IS TO
KNOW, FIRST OF ALL, WHAT THE
APPROXIMATE POPULATION
WAS IN THE YUKON.
AND WHAT WE DO
KNOW IS THIS:
IN 1901, THE POPULATION WAS
APPROXIMATELY 30,000 PEOPLE
IN THE YUKON.

Stewart writes “1901: 30,000.”

Stewart continues AND I BELIEVE THAT WHEN WE DID
THE INFORMATION ON MONDAY,
ONE OF THE THINGS
WE GOT WAS THE AREA.
AND I CAN'T
REMEMBER IT OFFHAND.

David says I JUST HAVE TO POINT
OUT ONE MORE THING.
THE SONG YOU WERE PLAYING
BEFORE YOU GUYS CAME ON WAS
AN ARABIC PRAYER.

Stewart says OH, YEAH?
IT COULD WELL HAVE BEEN.
I WAS JUST BEGINNING TO HEAR
THAT AS WE WERE RUSHING INTO
THE STUDIO AFTER DOING OUR
LITTLE PIECE ON THE THEATRE.
COULD WELL HAVE BEEN.

Lorraine says I GUESS IT WAS NADEPA
ON DAVID'S PHONE.
AND MAYBE TO WRAP UP, JUST TO
LET YOU KNOW TO GO OVER YOUR
JOURNAL, AND THOSE FROM
COLLEGE AVENUE, IF YOU COULD
GET THE INFORMATION
FOR MONDAY.

Showing them, Stewart says AND DON'T FORGET
THE HANDCUFFS.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.

Stewart says I THINK IT WOULD BE A
REALLY FUN EXPERIMENT TO DO
ON THE WEEKEND.

Lorraine says THAT'S RIGHT.
THANKS VERY MUCH.
YOU DID A GREAT
JOB THERE, DAVID.
BYE-BYE.

Stewart says THANKS A LOT.

The caption changes to “Please remember to log off! Pick up handset. Press number sign 7. Press 1 to confirm. Hang up handset. See you next time!”

Watch: Student Session 20