Transcript: Don Jones | Jul 07, 1994

(music plays)

The opening sequence shows a landscape with a lake in the foreground and a thick forest in the background while mist blurs the whole scene. A woman in her forties speaking fades in while the background is still visible.

The opening theme says TALK TO ME SO I CAN
HEAR YOUR VOICE
LIKE A LAKE SO
DEEP AND CLEAR
SOARING TO THE
TOPS OF THE TREES

The landscape fades into a wide view of a man rowing in a canoe. Then it fades into a view of a lake with clear waters and a green forest on the shore. A man in his forties with a moustache fades in while the background is still visible.

The song continues DANCING BY MY WINDOW
LIKE A WIND BLOWING
THROUGH MY DOOR

(music plays)

The image fades into the branches of trees being covered with falling snow. Then it fades into a car driving with its headlights on at sunset. Now lily pads appear on screen. Then a woman in her forties with long, brown hair fades in while the background changes into the view of a cabin in the snow-covered woods. The image changes into a view of a lake with the sun setting in the background. It then changes into a flyover of lakes and forests.

The song continues DISTANT VOICES
DISTANT VOICES
DISTANT VOICES
DISTANT VOICES...

(music plays)

A small creek flows downstream. Then a man in his upper-forties who wears aviator sunglasses fades in. The image changes into a yellow aquaplane flying seen from the ground. Finally, the opening sequence ends with the view of a lake with low hills in the background.

Don appears on screen talking. He is a man in his late forties with short brown hair and wears aviator sunglasses. He is wearing an open-necked white shirt.

He says WHAT WE
UNDERSTAND IS THAT
ALL OF OUR ANCESTORS

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Don Jones, Treaty and Claims Researcher."

Don continues AND MEDICINE PEOPLE
DID THEIR CEREMONIES
PROPERLY.
THEY TOOK
THEIR TIME.
THEY DID THEIR
SHAKING TENTS,
THEY DID THEIR
SWEAT LODGES,
THEY DID THEIR
CEREMONIES TO MAKE SURE
THEY'RE ENTERING INTO
SOMETHING THAT'S GOING TO
BENEFIT OUR PEOPLE
GENERATIONS TO COME.
AND AS YOU KNOW, MOST OF
OUR NATIVE PEOPLE THINK
GENERATIONS AHEAD, NOT
JUST THE GRANDCHILDREN,
BUT THE GREAT
GRANDCHILDREN FURTHER
AND FURTHER ON.
SO THEY TOOK THEIR TIME
TO SMOKE THEIR PIPES,
TO TALK TO ONE ANOTHER,
TO IRON OUT
ALL THE DIFFERENCES TO
MAKE SURE EVERYBODY
UNDERSTOOD WHAT IT MEANT.

The image fades into a view of a loon slowly swimming in a lake covered in mist.
A caption appears on screen. It reads "DISTANT VOICES."

(music plays)
The image of a woman in her forties appears. She has long, brown hair and wears pale yellow aboriginal clothes.

A caption reads "with Eva Solomon, CSJ."

The view fades into a morning landscape of a misty lake with a forest in the background.

A slide with text over a landscape background appears on screen and reads "Don Jones is a regional director of Treaty and Aboriginal Rights Research (TAAR) for the Treaty Three region. TARR is negotiating for what Don calls a fair share of the land and resources the treaty promised the original inhabitants of the area when it was signed. Born on Rainy Lake on the Nicickousemenecaning Reserve, Don spent a great deal of time on the trapline when he was a child with his parents, brothers and sisters. His work on land claims and the compensation TARR is requesting, is grounded in his childhood and a knowledge of the land that comes from his trapper’s perspective. He also remembers the teachings of the elders."

Don sits in the living room of a log cabin decorated with a candle and a painting in the background.

He says THE UNDERSTANDING, AND THE
TEACHINGS OF THE ELDERS
TELL US TREATY 3
WAS NEGOTIATED OVER
A PERIOD OF TIME.
AND THE GOVERNMENT
COULDN'T GET THE TREATY 3
PEOPLE TO SIGN, SO THEY
WENT FURTHER THAN WHERE
WE ARE NOW INTO WHAT
THEY CALL THE RED RIVER,
WINNIPEG AREA, AND
SIGNED TREATY 1 AND 2.
BUT THE TERMS OF THE TREATY
3 WERE A LOT STRONGER,
AND THE PEOPLE TOOK TIME
TO THINK ABOUT THEM.

A woman in her fifties with long, black hair, and sitting across from Don appears briefly on screen.

Don continues AND IN FACT, THE
GOVERNMENT VERSION
OF THE TREATY WAS
WRITTEN A YEAR
BEFORE THE NEGOTIATIONS.
SO THEY HAD TIME
TO CONSIDER.
BUT DURING THE
COURSE OF THE YEAR,
THERE WERE OTHER
PROMISES THAT WERE MADE
IN THE TREATY, AS WE
UNDERSTAND THEM.
BECAUSE THAT'S HOW WE
PROCEED WITH TREATY RIGHTS,
THE TREATY RIGHTS AS
WE UNDERSTAND THEM,
NOT THE WAY THE GOVERNMENT
UNDERSTANDS THEM.
SO WE PROCEED WITH
OUR UNDERSTANDING,
AND THE ELDERS THAT PASS
ON THE INFORMATION ABOUT
OUR TREATY IS THE WAY
WE UNDERSTAND THEM,
AND THAT'S THE
WAY IT IS.

(music plays)
A slide with text over map of The Numbered Treaties background appears on screen and reads "The first treaty land purchase in Ontario was from the Mississagas and Chippewas in 178, Treaty No. 381."

Now, Eva appears on screen. Eva is in her forties, has long brown hair, and wears a white turtleneck under a red blazer.

Eva says HOW DID THESE LAND
CLAIMS AND TREATY RIGHTS
THAT YOU'RE TALKING
ABOUT FIT INTO THE WHOLE
PICTURE, OR THE BROADER
PICTURE, IN CANADA?

Don says WHAT DO YOU MEAN,
THE BROADER PICTURE?

A map of The Numbered Treaties alternates with images of landscapes. Then Eva appears on screen.

Eva says I'M JUST TRYING
TO PUT IT INTO
A BROADER PERSPECTIVE.
THERE ARE LOTS OF OTHER
COMMUNITIES THAT ARE DOING
THAT, LIKE TEMAGAMI, AND
EVEN UP IN THE AREA NEAR
BEARDMORE, ON I THINK
IT'S BLACK STURGEON
RIVER,
WHERE THEY ARE STRUGGLING
FOR THE
STOPPING
OF A MINE - NOT A
MINE - A HYDRO DAM.
AND I'M JUST TRYING TO
PUT THEM ALL TOGETHER
INTO THE CONTEXT OF
THE WHOLE PICTURE
OF NATIVE PEOPLE
IN CANADA.

Don says I GUESS FROM
MY PERSPECTIVE,
IT'S GETTING THE DOMINANT
SOCIETY TO UNDERSTAND
THAT WE'RE A PEOPLE, TOO,
AND WE'RE A PEOPLE THAT
LIVE ON THIS LAND, AND
THAT WE HAD THINGS
LIKE SELF-GOVERNMENT WAY
BEFORE THE EUROPEANS CAME.

Three black-and-white pictures of aboriginal tribes show on screen.

Don continues AND SELF-GOVERNMENT IS
NOT WRITTEN IN THE TREATY
BECAUSE WE'VE
ALREADY HAD IT.
WE DIDN'T NEED TO
PUT IT IN THE TREATY,
IT WAS SOMETHING
THAT WE HAD.
SO SELF-GOVERNMENT
IS SOMETHING
THAT'S NOT NEGOTIABLE.
WE'VE ALWAYS HAD OUR
OWN JURISDICTIONS.
WE'VE HAD OUR
OWN LAWS.
MOST OF THEM
ARE UNWRITTEN.
THE LAWS, THERE ARE
DIFFERENT TYPES OF LAWS.
THERE ARE THE
SPIRITUAL LAWS,
AND THERE'S YOUR OTHER
LAWS REGARDING OFFENCES,
FOR INSTANCE, IF
SOMEBODY –

Eva says JUSTICE.

Don says COMMITTED MURDER, OR
SOMEBODY DID OTHER ACTS.
AND IT'S THE ELDERS AND
SPIRITUAL PEOPLE
THAT KNEW THE LAWS, AND KNEW
HOW TO PASS A SENTENCE,
FOR INSTANCE, A JUDGMENT
ON AN INDIVIDUAL.
AND SOMETIMES IT WAS
BANISHMENT FROM
THE COMMUNITY, OR BEING
SHUNNED IS, I GUESS,
IS WORSE THAN BEING PUT
IN JAIL BACK THEN BECAUSE
PEOPLE DON'T TALK
TO YOU, PEOPLE
DON'T ASSOCIATE
WITH YOU.
YOU'RE LIKE A LONER IN
YOUR OWN COMMUNITY.
AND IF THEY SEE YOU
WALKING DOWN THE ROAD,
THEY'LL GO THE OTHER WAY,
AND NOT TALKING WITH YOU,
NOT COMMUNICATES
WITH YOU.

A man with long, frizzy, dark hair and wearing a white shirt and grey trousers walks away from a cabin in slow motion. Then, Don appears on screen again.

Don continues SO FROM THAT PERSPECTIVE,
THOSE KIND OF THINGS
WERE ALWAYS THERE.
AND WE HAD OUR OWN
CONSERVATION LAWS ABOUT
HOW TO FISH, HOW TO HUNT,
THAT YOU DON'T DESTROY
JUST FOR THE SAKE OF
KILLING AN ANIMAL,
THERE WAS A
PURPOSE TO IT.
THAT YOU SOMETIMES SHARED
WITH ALL THE COMMUNITY.

A black-and-white picture shows a large group of aboriginal people and then other pictures depict individuals hunting.

Don continues A MOOSE WOULD BE SHARED
WITH ALL YOUR
EXTENDED
FAMILY, NOT
JUST YOURSELF.
SO WHEN NON-NATIVE PEOPLE
SEE FIVE DEER HANGING
IN YOUR LAWN OR SOMETHING,
THEY'LL AUTOMATICALLY
THINK THIS GUY'S GREEDY,
AND IS WASTING ANIMALS,
NOT KNOWING HE MAY
HAVE A GRANDFATHER
OR
GRANDPARENT THAT LIKES TO
HAVE THIS TYPE OF MEAL.

Eva says AND IS NO LONGER
ABLE TO GET OUT AND HUNT.

Don says YEAH, NO LONGER
ABLE TO GET OUT AND
HUNT FOR HIMSELF.
SO THE YOUNGER PEOPLE,
THE MORE ABLE ONES,
THE WARRIORS, ARE THE
TRAPPERS AND HUNTERS
THAT GO OUT AND GET IT
FOR EVERYBODY ELSE.

The screen shows Don again.

He continues AND FEED YOUR FRIENDS.
AND SHARING, IF
THE RICE HARVEST
IS REALLY WELL THAT YEAR,
YOU SHARED WITH THE OTHER
PEOPLE, YOUR FRIENDS, OR
EVEN A DIFFERENT RESERVE
OR DIFFERENT COMMUNITY
BECAUSE WE'RE ALL RELATED
IN ONE WAY OR THE OTHER.
SO YOU GIVE, AND THEY GIVE
SOMETHING BACK TO YOU.
SO IT'S A SHARING
TYPE OF SOCIETY,
FROM MY PERSPECTIVE
ANYWAYS,
THAT'S THE WAY INDIANS
OUGHT TO STAY,
OUGHT TO BE.

(music plays)

The screen shows moose grazing, flowers and lakes. Then an aboriginal child laughing and then, a snowmobile driving into a snowy village.

Eva says ONE OF THE GOALS OF
THE NATIVE COMMUNITY
HAS BEEN TO EDUCATE EVERYONE
ABOUT OUR LIFE AND CULTURE.
WHAT MANY DO NOT KNOW IS
THE SORT OF POLITICAL
STRUCTURE THAT UNDERLIES
THE FIRST NATIONS
OF THIS COUNTRY.
DON IS ONE OF ABOUT 40
STAFF WORKING TOGETHER
FOR THE GRAND COUNCIL
TREATY NO. 3 ORGANIZATION.
THEIR WORK IS SLIGHTLY
MORE COMPLICATED THAN
OTHER TREATY GROUPS
BECAUSE THEY MUST DEAL WITH
TWO PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENTS ON VARIOUS ISSUES,
ONTARIO AND MANITOBA.

Don appears on screen again.

Don says THE ORGANIZATION I'M
RESPONSIBLE TO IS CALLED
THE GRAND COUNCIL TREATY
NO. 3 IN '72, I THINK.
AND THE STRUCTURE, THE
CHIEFS OF THE 25 FIRST NATIONS
ARE THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS.
THEY ELECT A GRAND
CHIEF EVERY TWO YEARS,
AND THE AREAS FOR TRIBAL
AREAS ARE FORT FRANCES,
DRYDEN AND KENORA.
AND FORT FRANCES HAS
TEN FIRST NATIONS,
KENORA HAS TEN, AND
DRYDEN HAS FIVE.
AND EACH OF THOSE AREAS
ELECT A TRIBAL CHIEF,
WHICH IS SIMILAR TO A
VICE-PRESIDENT
IN A CORPORATION.
THEN WE HAVE AN EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR OF TREATY 3
WHO IS THE GENERAL BOSS
OF THE PROGRAMS.
AND TREATY IN ABORIGINAL
RIGHTS RESEARCH
IS ONE PROGRAM UNDER
THE UMBRELLA
OF GRAND COUNCIL
TREATY NO. 3.
THERE IS ALSO
A JUSTICE.
THERE IS ALSO HEALTH,
SOCIAL SERVICES,
TRIPARTITE, AND THERE IS
ALSO A REORGANIZATION PART
WHICH GENERALLY LOOKS AT
REORGANIZING THE WHOLE
CORPORATION TO BETTER
FIT THE NEEDS OF TODAY,
AND HAVING THE PEOPLE IN
THE AREA HAVE A VOICE
IN WHAT HAPPENS WITH
THE ORGANIZATION.

Eva says WHEN YOU SPEAK
OF TRIPARTITE,
ARE YOU SPEAKING
IN TERMS OF,
IT'S BASICALLY THREE
PARTIES, IN A SENSE.
ARE YOU TALKING IN
TERMS OF THE FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT, THE
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
AND THE BAND COUNCILS?

Don says YES.
THAT'S TRIPARTITE.

Eva says AND WHEN YOU SPEAK OF
GRAND COUNCIL TREATY NO. 3,
WHAT DOES THAT MEAN IN
TERMS OF GEOGRAPHIC AREA?

Don says WELL, OUR TERRITORY
IS 55,000 SQUARE MILES.
AND IT COVERS THE
SOUTHERLY WESTERN PORTION
COVERS PART OF MANITOBA,
NEAR THE WHITESHELL AREA.
AND GOES ON THE
CANADIAN-U.S. BORDER
INTO QUETICO, AS FAR
AS SHABAQUA THIS WAY,
AND AS FAR AS
SIOUX LOOKOUT, RED LAKE
IN THE NORTHERN AREA.
SO THAT'S 55,000 SQUARE
MILES OF OUR TERRITORY.

A map of The Numbered Treaties appears, followed by several landscapes showing lakes and forests. Then Don appears again.

Don continues AND GENERALLY, THE
CHIEFS HAVE SAID THIS
IS OUR TERRITORY, AND
THIS IS WHERE WE SHOULD
PRACTICE OUR RIGHTS
IN THAT TERRITORY.
HUNTING, FISHING,
TRAPPING,
THAT'S OUR TERRITORY,
THAT'S WHERE WE GET
OUR LIVELIHOOD FROM, OUR
MEAT FROM, OUR SHELTER FROM.

Eva says WHY DOES IT
GO INTO MANITOBA?

Don says I THINK THOSE
BOUNDARIES WERE THERE
BEFORE MANITOBA-

Eva says EXISTED.

Don says BEFORE ONTARIO EXISTED,
AND THAT WAS OUR TERRITORY.
LIKE I SAID, ONE
TIME, WHERE WE ARE,
WE'RE ALL MANITOBA,
AT ONE TIME WHEN
THE MANITOBA GOVERNMENT FOUGHT
WITH THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT
THAT THE BOUNDARY
SHOULD BE HERE.

Eva says YEAH.

Don says THEY DIDN'T ASK
US WHERE THE BOUNDARY
SHOULD BE.
SO THEY PUT
PART OF OUR –

Eva says PEOPLE IN
ONE PLACE.

Don says IN MANITOBA,
YEAH.

Eva says BASICALLY, THOSE
TERRITORIES WERE GOVERNED
BY THE WATER ROUTES.

Don says YEAH, BACK
THEN THE HIGHWAYS
WERE THE WATER ROUTES.

A small waterfall appears followed by a black-and-white picture of aboriginal man standing next to canoes.

YOU TRAVELLED BY CANOE
TO GET WHERE YOU ARE,
AND THE HIGHWAYS
WERE THE WATER.
NOW THE HIGHWAYS ARE THE
ONES GOING THROUGH ON LAND.
BACK THEN, THAT WAS
THE MODE OF TRAVEL.

Eva appears back on screen.

Eva says WHAT KIND OF THINGS
ARE YOU ACTUALLY DOING?
ARE YOU RESEARCHING FOR
ONE SPECIFIC COMMUNITY,
OR ARE YOU LOOKING AT
OTHER BROADER PICTURES?

Don says THE WORK THAT WE
DO, WE'RE FUNDED BY
THE GOVERNMENT, THE
INDIAN AFFAIRS,
AND WE PROVIDE A SERVICE
TO THE 25 FIRST NATIONS
IN TREATY 3 WHEN
THEY REQUESTED IT.
AND THERE'S A POLICY
FROM THE GOVERNMENT
THAT TELLS YOU WHAT YOU SHOULD
BE SPENDING THE MONEY ON.
WE GET A CONTRIBUTION
AGREEMENT.
AND HOW FAR YOU CAN
GO TO ADVANCE A CLAIM.
SO WE PROVIDE THE
BACKGROUND MATERIAL,
WE RESEARCH THE CLAIM,
THE FIRST NATIONS
IDENTIFIES WHAT THEY
WANT TO RESEARCH,
AND THEY SUBMIT A BCR, A
BAND COUNCIL RESOLUTION
TO US, AND THEY EITHER
GIVE US ONE YEAR
TO DO THE WORK, OR SIX
MONTHS, OR WHATEVER.
AND THEN WE GIVE
THEM THE REPORT,
WHAT WE'VE
UNCOVERED SO FAR.
AND A LOT OF WORK IS BEING
DONE WHILE THE REPORT
IS BEING PREPARED.
AND THE NATURE OF THE
POLICY IS A LEGAL OPINION
HAS TO BE
PROVIDED AS WELL,
BECAUSE YOU'RE CLAIMING
SOMETHING AGAINST
THE GOVERNMENT, WHICH IS
GENERALLY THE FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT, AND SOMETIMES
IT'S THE PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT, THE
ONTARIO GOVERNMENT.
SO THE CLAIMANTS
THEMSELVES,
THE FIRST NATION SUBMIT
THE CLAIM TO OTTAWA,
OR TO ONTARIO, IF IT
INVOLVES ONTARIO,
AND THEY GET A REPORT
BACK FROM CANADA,
SAYING THE FACTS
OF THE CLAIM,
BUT SOMETIMES
THIS TAKES YEARS.
LOGICALLY, FROM
OUR POINT OF VIEW,
IT SHOULD ONLY TAKE TWO
YEARS, BUT BEING OTTAWA,
IT TAKES EVEN JUST
TO GET A RESPONSE,
SOMETIMES TAKES
SIX YEARS,
AND SOMETIMES
TAKES EIGHT YEARS
JUST TO GET A RESPONSE
FROM THAT CLAIM.
SO DURING THAT
PERIOD OF TIME,
THERE WOULD PROBABLY
BE A CHANGEOVER
IN ADMINISTRATION AT THE
BAND LEVEL SOMETIMES,
AND YOUR CHIEF
AND COUNCIL –

Eva says AT GOVERNMENT
LEVEL, AS WELL.

Don says THE GOVERNMENT
LEVEL AS WELL, TOO.
SO THIS WHOLE PROCESS,
YOU'RE CAUGHT IN ALMOST
SOMETIMES A CATCH
22 SITUATION, WHERE –

Eva says IT'S NEVER
GOING ANYWHERE.

Don says NEVER GOING
ANYWHERE.
SO THE GOVERNMENT HAS
A POLICY THESE
ARE THE CERTAIN WAYS YOU'VE
GOT TO RESEARCH A CLAIM,
AND KEEPS A TIGHT STRING
ON HOW YOU SHOULD DO IT.
BUT WE ALSO DO GENERAL
ISSUES LIKE FISHING
FOR ALL FIRST NATIONS,
MINERALS, OR TRAPPING,
AND HUNTING, AND
WILD RICE GATHERING.
THOSE ALL PERTAIN TO THE
WHOLE FIRST NATIONS
OF TREATY 3.
SO THOSE ARE GENERAL
CLAIMS THAT AFFECT EVERYBODY.
BUT THERE ARE SPECIFIC
CLAIMS THAT EITHER
BE RAILROAD, OR TIMBER
TRESPASSING, OR DAM,
FLOODING OF TRAP
LINES, OR GARDENS.

A drawing of a canoer pops up. Then the image changes to a running train before going back to show Eva.

Eva says DON, WHAT IS IT
THAT YOU'RE REALLY
TRYING TO OBTAIN?
OR WHAT'S THE KIND OF
COMPENSATION YOU'RE
ASKING FOR IN THE WORK
THAT YOU'RE DOING?
BECAUSE I THINK THAT
VERY OFTEN A LOT
OF THE NON-NATIVE SOCIETY
FEEL LIKE YOU'RE TAKING
THEIR LAND, OR THEY'RE
GOING TO LOSE.

Don says WELL, I GUESS WHAT
WE'RE AFTER, REALLY,
IS THE TREATY WAS
SIGNED TO SHARE,
TO SHARE THE LAND.
AND OVER THE LAST
HUNDRED OR SO YEARS,
THE TREATY AS WE
UNDERSTAND IT,
HAS BEEN BROKEN
BY THE GOVERNMENT.
AND WE JUST WANT OUR
FAIR SHARE OF EITHER
IT'S RESOURCES OR
WHETHER IT'S LAND,
OR WHETHER IT'S BOTH
LAND AND RESOURCES,
JUST TO HAVE OUR
OWN FAIR SHARE.
MOST PEOPLE KNOW,
UNEMPLOYMENT ON RESERVES
IS QUITE HIGH, AND
SOMETIMES THE SITUATIONS
ARE REALLY DESPERATE.
YOU GET POOR HOUSING,
YOU GET LACK OF JOBS,
PEOPLE ARE ON WELFARE,
THERE'S DRUG ABUSE,
THERE'S ALCOHOL ABUSE.
SO THOSE ARE THE
KIND OF THINGS
THAT GENERALLY
ARE
HAPPENING.

The screen shows modest houses off a snowy road and then several landscapes of lakes, mountains and birds flying.

(music plays)

Eva says DON SAYS HIS INDIAN
NAME IS THUNDER BIRD,
AND THAT HIS GUARDIAN
IS THE EAGLE.
HE ALSO SAYS HIS STRENGTH
COMES FROM HIS WIFE,
HIS FAMILY, AND THE
KNOWLEDGE OF HIS CULTURE.
HIS RESPECT FOR ELDERS,
WOMEN, AND CHILDREN,
ALSO EXTENDS TO THE
AIR, THE TREES, WATER,
AND THE CREATURES
OF THE GROUND.
YOU OBVIOUSLY HAVE BEEN
ABLE TO FIND A WAY IN
YOUR OWN SELF TO PUT
TOGETHER A KIND OF BALANCE
AND PEACE, OR
CONTENTMENT THAT'S THERE.
IT'S EVIDENCE
ALL OVER YOU.
AND I JUST WONDERED WHAT
ARE YOUR SUPPORT SYSTEMS
TO MAINTAIN THAT?
HOW DO YOU KEEP THAT?

Don says I GET MY STRENGTH
FROM MY FAMILY.
MY WIFE, SHE'S AN
ADDICTIONS' COUNSELLOR.
I GET A LOT OF
INFORMATION,
AND A LOT OF STRENGTH
AND HELP FROM HER.
I ALSO HAVE, TO KEEP
ME ON A STRAIGHT PATH,
A SOBER PATH, TOO.
I LIKE TO STAY ON THAT.
I ALSO HAVE, TOO, AS
I MENTIONED EARLIER,
MY KNOWLEDGE OF OUR
CULTURE AND OUR WAYS
AND TO PRACTICE THEM
AS MUCH AS I KNOW,
AND TO ATTEND POW WOWS,
TO RESPECT YOUR ELDERS,
TO RESPECT WOMEN, TO
RESPECT CHILDREN,
TO RESPECT EVERYTHING,
GENERALLY.

Fast clips show a red fox wandering, butterflies, birds, and aerial views of lakes.

Don continues THE ANIMALS, THE AIR,
THE TREES, THE WATER,
RIGHT DOWN TO
THE GRASSHOPPER,
OR THE CREATURES
ON THE GROUND,
CREATURES UP THERE.
AND KNOWING MY DODEM
I'M A LYNX -
KNOWING
MY INDIAN NAME.
I'M NAMED AFTER
THE THUNDERBIRD,
AND THE EAGLE IS MY
GUARDIAN, SO TO SPEAK.
I GREW UP IN
LARGER FAMILY.
THERE WAS
EIGHT OF US.
SO I'VE GOT THREE SISTERS
AND FOUR OTHER BROTHERS.
MY PARENTS RAISED US ON A
TRAP LINE WITH TRAPPING
AND GUIDING IN THE
SUMMER TO RAISE US.
MY FATHER WAS A CHIEF
FOR A LONG TIME ON OUR
RESERVE, TOO.

Eva says YOU WERE A FORMER
CHIEF, WERE YOU NOT?

Don says YEAH, I WAS CHIEF
OF OUR RESERVE
FOR FOUR TERMS.
AND I ALSO WAS A TRIBAL
CHIEF FOR TRANSES
FOR FIVE YEARS.
AND I KNOW THE
ORGANIZATION VERY WELL.
I'VE BEEN INVOLVED
AS A CHIEF.
NOW I'M A STAFF PERSON,
AND I CONTRIBUTE
FROM THAT AREA, HELPING
OUR LEADERS NOW
ON HOW THE ISSUES
ARE HAVE HAPPENED.
SO LIKE AN ADVISOR
TO THE GRAND CHIEF,
THE EXECUTIVE.

Eva says WERE THERE ANY
SIGNIFICANT TURNING POINTS
OR KEY EXPERIENCES IN
YOUR LIFE THAT BROUGHT
YOU INTO THIS?

Don says WELL, I
GUESS, FOR ME,
A SIGNIFICANT TURNING POINT
IS WHEN I QUIT DRINKING.
THAT WAS APPROXIMATELY TEN
YEARS AGO THAT I GAVE UP
DRINKING, AND THAT REALLY
IMPROVED MY AWARENESS
AND MY VISION AND
MY THOUGHTS,
AND MY WHOLE FAMILY
SITUATION, TOO,
WITH MY CHILDREN,
AND WIFE,
AND AT HOME, AT WORK.
SO THAT WAS A POSITIVE
TURNING POINT IN MY LIFE,
GIVING UP ALCOHOL,
WHILE I WAS ABUSING IT
FOR A LONG TIME.
SO THAT'S REALLY
SIGNIFICANT IN MY LIFE.

Eva says WHAT HAPPENED THAT
MADE YOU GIVE IT UP?

Don says I GOT SICK, I GUESS
SOME HEALTH PROBLEMS,
REALLY, CAME TO
THE FOREFRONT.
AND I GUESS I WAS SICK
OF ABUSING MYSELF,
TOO, AND SICK OF WAKING
UP SICK AND TIRED.

Eva says WAS THERE, I MEAN,
I GUESS I CAN SEE PEOPLE
FEELING THAT AND COMING
TO AN AWARENESS
AND SAYING, WELL, I'M
SICK AND TIRED,
BUT YOU'VE GONE A STEP
FURTHER IN THE WHOLE SENSE
OF CONTRIBUTING
SOMETHING MORE
TO THE SOCIETY,
AND IN SOME WAYS,
BEING A STRONG ROLE
MODEL FOR OTHERS.

Don says YEAH, I'VE TAKEN IT
UPON MYSELF TO LEARN
AS MUCH AS I CAN FROM
ALL KINDS OF PEOPLE,
BOTH NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE
IN ORDER TO BETTER
OUR OWN LIFE, AND TO
HELP YOUNGER PEOPLE,
AND TO TEACH OUR OWN
PEOPLE ABOUT OUR WAYS,
AND ALSO UNDERSTAND
THE OTHER WAYS,
IN THE GENERAL SOCIETY
WE HAVE TO LIVE IN.
I FEEL I GOT A GOOD
BALANCE AND A GOOD
KNOWLEDGE OF BOTH, SO I
CAN LIVE THE WAY I LIVE,
AND HELP OTHER PEOPLE.
IF THEY WANT GUIDANCE
IN THAT AREA,
I CAN EITHER SHOW THEM,
AND I CAN ALSO TELL THEM
THAT THIS WAY OF LIFE IS
PROBABLY BETTER THAN IF
THEY ASK FOR ADVICE,
ASK FOR HOW
THEY SHOULD DO THINGS.
POW WOWS AND
TRADITIONAL STUFF,
THOSE ARE ALL
IMPORTANT.

A black-and-white video of a pow wow appears. Then Don appears speaking again.

He continues THE DRUM, THE PIPE, YOUR
SPIRITUAL TEACHINGS,
YOUR NAME, YOUR
INDIAN NAME,
THE THING THAT
YOU HAVE.
THOSE ARE ALL
REALLY IMPORTANT,
AND CAN'T STRESS ENOUGH
THE KIND OF THINGS
YOU'RE DOING ARE
REALLY IMPORTANT.
POW WOWS, WE'RE TOLD BY
OUR ELDERS THERE'S DRUMS
FOR HEALING, THERE
ARE DRUMS FOR NAMING
CEREMONIES, THERE ARE
DRUMS FOR ALL KINDS
OF DIFFERENT THINGS,
WATER DRUMS.
I LEARN FROM
THOSE QUITE A BIT.
I MANAGE TO - I'M ALSO
LEARNING MY LANGUAGE
MORE AND MORE, TOO.
THERE'S AN OLD
TIME LANGUAGE,
THE OJIBWAY LANGUAGE THAT
I'M LEARNING, AS WELL.

Eva says WE TALKED A LITTLE
BIT ABOUT THE DIFFERENCES
IN THE NATIVE AND
NON-NATIVE SOCIETY
IN TERMS OF THE FEAR
THAT'S PRESENTED,
AND THE SENSE OF
LOSING SOMETHING
THAT THEY THOUGHT
WAS THEIRS.
AND I'M WONDERING
TWO THINGS.
ONE, HOW FUNDAMENTAL IS THAT
SORT OF CONFLICT OR CLASH?
IT'S NOT A CONFLICT
NECESSARILY,
BUT HOW THOSE TWO
COME FACE TO FACE?
AND THE OTHER IS, REALLY,
FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS,
AND WHAT YOU HAVE TO DO,
AND WHAT THE KIND OF THINGS
YOU'RE DOING HAS TO DO
WITH FUTURE GENERATIONS?

Don says I DON'T GENERALLY
VIEW IT AS A CLASH.
SOMETIMES IT IS IN
DIFFERENT SITUATIONS,
BUT YOU HAVE THE
WAYS THAT WE HAVE,
AND THEN YOU HAVE THE
DOMINANT SOCIETY
WITH THE WAYS
THEY HAVE.
AND THEN TAKING IN WHAT'S
POSITIVE FROM THEIR WAYS,
KEEPING YOUR WAYS, AND
PUTTING IT TOGETHER
AND THINKING ABOUT
IT FOR A WHILE,
HOW IT CAN HELP YOU LIVE
YOUR LIFE BETTER.
AND THEY ALWAYS SAY YOU
TAKE THE GOOD THINGS IN,
LEAVE THE BAD OUT, AND
GENERALLY YOU KNOW,
BEING BROUGHT UP THE
WAY YOU'RE BROUGHT UP,
YOU KNOW WHAT'S BAD,
YOU KNOW WHAT'S WRONG,
AND TAKING THE GOOD
THINGS FROM THAT SOCIETY,
AND FROM YOUR OWN
UNDERSTANDING OF YOUR
OWN SOCIETY, AND
PUTTING THEM TOGETHER,
AND HAVING IT COME OUT
AS THIS LITTLE PIECE
OF BALL, THIS IS
HOW YOU LIVE,
THIS IS HOW YOU DO IT.
OPEN IT UP A LITTLE
BIT AND SAY, OKAY.

Eva says SO THIS INTERACTION
REALLY MAKES YOU
A BETTER PERSON IN
THE LONG RUN?

Don says IN THE LONG
RUN, YEAH.

Music plays.

The show ends and the credits roll as fast clips show people walking on the street and then several landscapes of lakes, forests, and black-and-white pictures of aboriginal peoples.

Produced by Jim Hanley, Jim Hyder.

Coproduced and Written by Patricia Michael.

Directed by Daniel Robinson.

Associate Producer Elinor Barr.

Photographer by Peter Walker.

Edited by Patrick Malone.

Copyright 1994, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: Don Jones