Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Wildlife rescue | Jul 05, 2017

(music plays)

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a black sweater, a pastel pink blazer and a printed blue, white and pink scarf.

She says WELCOME TO CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
THE PROVINCE'S
WILDLIFE REHABILITATORS
WORK RELENTLESSLY
TO SAVE ANIMALS.
AMID A CHANGING CLIMATE
AND INCREASING DENSITY,
THEY'RE LOOKING
FOR MORE FREEDOM
TO DO THEIR WORK.
HERE'S A LOOK AT
WHAT THEY DO.

Clips show animals in nature.

Chantal says LETTING NATURE
TAKE ITS COURSE IS GREAT
IN SITUATIONS WHERE A COYOTE
TAKES A FAWN AS PREY.
THAT IS NATURE.
A TURTLE GETTING RUN
OVER ON THE ROAD;
THERE'S NOTHING
NATURAL ABOUT IT.
AS HUMANS WE CAUSE
THAT DISTRESS,
AND AS HUMANS WE ARE
MORALLY OBLIGATED
TO DO SOMETHING
ABOUT IT.

A sign on the side of a road reads "Turtles crossing. Please drive carefully."

Chantal says WE SHOULD LOOK FOR
LONG-TERM SOLUTIONS
WHERE WE'RE
DOING LESS HARM.

A caption reads "Wildlife Rescue. A mission to save nature from human impact."

The caption changes to "Mount Brydges, Ontario.:

The caption changes to "Brian Salt. Salthaven Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Centre."

Brian is in his sixties, balding and with a goatee. He wears gray trousers and a white T-shirt under an army green shirt.

Brian says PEOPLE HAVE
ASKED ME THAT BEFORE:
WHY DON'T YOU LET MOTHER
NATURE RUN ITS COURSE?
WE WOULD LOVE THAT.
BUT WE JUST KEEP
GETTING IN THE WAY
OF MOTHER NATURE,
BECAUSE WE KEEP
DOING THINGS THAT
ARE DETRIMENTAL
TO THE ENVIRONMENT AND
DETRIMENTAL TO THE ANIMALS
THAT LIVE THERE.
THOSE ANIMALS THEY
ACT AS A BAROMETER
IN THE ENVIRONMENT TO
WHAT'S HAPPENING OUT THERE.
WHAT HAPPENS TO THEM
IS GONNA HAPPEN TO US.
BUT IN THE INTERIM, THERE
WILL BE A LOT OF TURMOIL
IN THE ANIMAL WORLD
BECAUSE AS CLIMATE CHANGES
DISEASES CHANGE.
WE'RE NOT DELUSIONAL ABOUT
WHAT WE DO AT SALTHAVEN.
WE FULL WELL UNDERSTAND THAT
THERE'S MORE ANIMALS KILLED
ON ONTARIO HIGHWAYS
IN ONE NIGHT
THAN WE CAN REHABILITATE
IN A WHOLE YEAR
IN OUR LITTLE CLINIC.

He ask a volunteer at the centre says SO, IS HE
EATING OKAY?

The girl holds a chick and says OH, YEAH.

Brian says BUT STILL WE THINK IT
MAKES A DIFFERENCE.
IT MAKES A DIFFERENCE
TO THAT ONE ANIMAL
THAT WE WORK
WITH, FOR SURE.
[peeping]

A caption reads "Chantal Theijn. Hobbistee Wildlife Refuge."

Chantal is in her thirties, with long brown hair in a braid. She wears sunglasses, black cropped trousers and a black T-shirt with a print on the front.

She says WILDLIFE REHABILITATION
IS NOT ABOUT FIXING
THE POPULATION.
IF A TURTLE GETS
HIT ON THE ROAD,
THAT SPECIFIC ANIMAL IS
SUFFERING AT THAT POINT.
AS A WILDLIFE REHABILITATOR,
IT'S THEN MY JOB
TO REDUCE THAT SUFFERING.
WE REHAB SO MANY
DIFFERENT SPECIES,
BUT WE'RE CERTAINLY SEEING
INTERESTING PATTERNS.
A LARGE POPULATION OF
OUR AMERICAN ROBINS
NEVER MIGRATED THIS
YEAR; STAYED IN CANADA.
I CERTAINLY FORESEE AN INFLUX
OF DIFFERENT ANIMALS
THAT WE HAVE TO
ADAPT TO.

The caption changes to "William Barbour. Hobbistee Wildlife Refuge."

William is in his forties, clean-shaven and wears glasses, blue cargo shorts, a blue polo shirt and an explorer hat.

He says THE ONE ANALOGY SCALING
WILDLIFE REHABILITATION
UP TO CLIMATE CHANGE
IS REALLY THAT POINT
YOU NEED TO INTERVENE
AND DO WHAT YOU CAN
BEFORE THE
INDIVIDUAL IS DEAD.
AND IT'S THE SAME ON
LANDSCAPE LEVELS.
IT'S THE SAME ALL THE
WAY UP TO CLIMATES.
WHEN YOU GET TO THAT TURTLE
AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD,
THE FIRST THING YOU'RE
DECIDING IS CAN I HELP
THIS INDIVIDUAL
OR IS IT DEAD?
AND WITH ECOSYSTEMS
THERE'S TIPPING POINTS
THAT WE CROSS.
SO FOR RESTORATION
AND REHABILITATION
ON A LANDSCAPE SCALE, WE
NEED TO DO A BETTER JOB
AS A SOCIETY OF
RECOGNIZING WHERE HABITATS
ARE CHANGING, WHERE
ECOSYSTEMS ARE CHANGING.

Chantal says THERE IS NO FUNDING FOR
WILDLIFE REHABILITATION
PROVIDED BY THE
GOVERNMENT.
I PULLED MYSELF OUT
OF THE WORKFORCE
BECAUSE OUR WILDLIFE
REHAB FACILITY
HAD GROWN SO MUCH AND I NEEDED
TO BE THERE FULL TIME.
I WORK 18-HOUR DAYS BUT I
DON'T GET PAID A PENNY.

Brian says LET'S GO OUTSIDE.
WE GET FULL AT TIMES AND
WE JUST CAN'T HELP THEM.
WE HAVE TO TURN
ANIMALS AWAY.

The volunteer says SHE JUST CALLED A
BUNCH OF PLACES
AND THEY'RE
ALL FULL.

Brian says THERE'S NOTHING
WE CAN DO.
THERE'S MORE ANIMALS
THAT NEED HELP
THAN MOST PEOPLE
REALIZE.
THERE'S SOME ANIMALS
THAT COME IN,
THEY NEED TO BE
EUTHANIZED RIGHT AWAY.
THERE'S OTHERS
WE WORK WITH
FOR AN EXTRAORDINARY
PERIOD OF TIME.
BUT ALL DURING THAT
EFFORT, AS I SAY,
WE TRY TO KEEP THE
WILD IN WILDLIFE.
KEEP THE ANIMAL MENTALLY FIT
AS WELL AS PHYSICALLY FIT
WHEN THEY RELEASE AND
ARE HEALED AND FREE.

(music plays)

Chantal says EVERY ANIMAL
THAT GETS RELEASED IS GREAT.
IT'S FANTASTIC TO
SEE THEM GO.
TURTLES ARE SOMETIMES
A LITTLE BIT SLOWER,
SO WE MIGHT PICK THEM
UP AND PUT THEM
AT THE WATER'S EDGE.
AND USUALLY AS SOON AS
THEY SEE THE WATER,
YOU'D BE SURPRISED TO SEE
HOW FAST A TURTLE CAN MOVE.

Brian says THAT'S
OUR ULTIMATE GOAL
IS TO RELEASE THEM KNOWING
THAT THEY'RE CAPABLE NOW
OF TAKING CARE OF
THEM SELF AND YOUR HANDS
ARE PROBABLY
THE LAST ONES
THAT'LL EVER TOUCH
THAT ANIMAL.

A caption reads "Music by Stefan Banjevic."

The caption changes to "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Wildlife rescue