Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: The larva lab | May 12, 2017

(music plays)

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a green jacket and a mottled black and white turtleneck sweater.

She says WELCOME TO
CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
AT A SMALL LAB IN
SAULT STE. MARIE,
SCIENTISTS ARE BREEDING
INVASIVE FOREST PESTS
TO HELP UNDERSTAND
NEW THREATS FACING
NORTH AMERICAN TREES.
WE VISIT THE LAB
TO FIND OUT MORE.

(music plays)

Clips show people in a lab working with different insects.

John says WHEN A LOT OF
PEOPLE THINK OF INSECTS,
THEY THINK OF THE SCARIEST,
MOST DANGEROUS CREATURES
ON EARTH.
THEY'RE REVOLTED BY THEM,
THEY'RE TERRIFIED BY THEM.
IF SOMETHING LANDS ON
THEIR BACK, THAT FIRST
INSTINCT IS 'GET IT OFF.'

Amanda says BUT INSECTS
CAN DO ANYTHING.
THEY HAVE BEEN AROUND
FOR OVER 400 MILLION YEARS.
THEY ARE SURVIVORS.
AND THEY'RE SPECTACULAR.
THEY LOOK GORGEOUS.

John says INSECTS ARE
THE MOST MISUNDERSTOOD.

Amanda says WE PRODUCE MILLIONS
OF INSECTS EVERY YEAR.
PEOPLE JUST
HAVE NO IDEA.
THEY'RE JUST...
I DON'T UNDERSTAND.
SO THEN YOU HAVE TO
EXPLAIN, BY GROWING BUGS
WE CAN UNDERSTAND THEM.
AND IF WE CAN UNDERSTAND
THEM, THEN WE CAN HELP
MANAGE THEM.

The caption changes to "The Larva Lab. Growing insects for a changing climate."

(music plays)

The caption changes to "John Dedes. Insect production factory supervisor, Great Lakes Forestry Centre."

John is in his fifties, with short straight gray hair and a moustache. He wears blue trousers and a white lab coat.

John says I REMEMBER
SITTING IN A FOREST ONE TIME
AND THERE WAS THIS
BUTTERFLY FLYING AROUND.
AND I JUST STUCK MY
FINGER OUT LIKE THIS.
AND I JUST SAT
THERE AND WAITED.
AND, SURE ENOUGH,
THAT BUTTERFLY LANDED
ON MY FINGER.
AND I THOUGHT WAS
ONE OF THE COOLEST
EXPERIENCES
OF MY LIFE.
IT JUST SO HAPPENED
THAT WE HAVE ONE OF THE
GREATEST INSECT RESEARCH
FACILITIES IN THE
ENTIRE WORLD HERE
IN SAULT SAINTE MARIE.
IT FEELS LIKE YOU'RE
GOING THROUGH A LABYRINTH.
BUT YOU OPEN UP THE
LABORATORY DOOR,
AND YOU GO INSIDE AND THEN
A WHOLE NEW WORLD OPENS.
THERE HASN'T BEEN A
DAY THAT HAS GONE BY
WHERE I HAVEN'T LEARNED
SOMETHING NEW AT WORK.

John brings a piece of tree trunk into an office.

Amanda says WOO!

John says HE WASN'T
FOOLING AROUND.

Amanda says WOW!
CAN WE KEEP IT?

John says WELL, HE SAID
WE CAN KEEP IT
ONCE HE RETIRES.

Amanda says OKAY, THAT'S
AWESOME.

John says HE'S GOT A WHOLE
TREE'S WORTH.
LOOK AT ALL THE
EXIT HOLES
ON THE TOP OF
THIS THING.

The caption changes to "Amanda Roe. Research scientist, insect production and quarantine."

Amanda is in her thirties, with long wavy blond hair and she wears glasses, jeans, a black blouse with blue flowers and a black cardigan.

Amanda says INSECTS ARE
GOING TO BE INFLUENCED BY
THE CLIMATE THAT'S
AROUND THEM.
BY GROWING INSECTS,
BY HAVING INSECTS
TO PERFORM EXPERIMENTS
ON, IT ALLOWS US
TO INFORM MODELS
SO WE CAN ESTABLISH
A SENSE OF THESE
DIFFERENT POTENTIAL OUTCOMES
WE CAN PLAN DIFFERENT
MANAGEMENT RESPONSES
FOR EACH OF
THOSE OUTCOMES.

John says WE'VE BEEN STUDYING
INSECTS ALL OVER
THE WORLD LATELY.
PAPUA NEW GUINEA.
HE WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF
NOWHERE, IN THE JUNGLE.
SO FED-EX COULDN'T
FIND HIM.
[laughing]

Amanda says SOME OF THE
WORK THAT I'M WORKING ON
RIGHT NOW IS LOOKING
SPECIFICALLY AT HOW
SPRUCE BUDWORM WILL CHANGE
UNDER A CHANGING CLIMATE.
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU GROW
IT AT HIGHER TEMPERATURES?
DOES IT GROW BETTER OR WORSE
AT HIGHER TEMPERATURES?
WHAT HAPPENS IF
YOU GROW IT UNDER
HIGHER CARBON
DIOXIDE LEVELS?
IS IT GOING TO DO
BETTER OR WORSE?

Clips show Amanda and John working at the lab.

John says SPRUCE BUDWORM
DECIMATED MILLIONS OF
HECTARES OF FOREST
IN CANADA.
AND IT CYCLES ABOUT
EVERY THIRTY YEARS.
IT'S ABOUT TO
HAPPEN AGAIN.

Amanda says THE CLIMATE HAS CHANGED
EVEN FROM THEN TO NOW,
AND THERE'S A LOT
OF UNCERTAINTY,
WHICH IS WHY HAVING THIS
RESOURCE IS SO IMPORTANT.

The caption changes to "Krista Ryall. Forest ecological entomologist, Great Lakes Forestry Centre."

Krista is in her late thirties, with long straight brown hair in a part side. She wears glasses and a white lab coat.

She says THIS IS THE
EMERALD ASH BORER.
THE ADULT
BEETLES HERE.
THIS IS AN
INVASIVE SPECIES
ORIGINALLY
FROM CHINA.
AND HAS KILLED PROBABLY TENS
OF MILLIONS OF ASH TREES.
THE PROGRAM THAT WE'RE
WORKING ON NOW,
WE LOOK FOR NATURAL
ENEMIES IN ITS NATIVE RANGE.
SO U.S. RESEARCHERS
HAD ORIGINALLY DONE THAT
AND HAD IMPORTED
THESE TYPES OF WASPS.
THESE WASPS, THIS
SPECIES, SHE ONLY
WANTS TO ATTACK LARVA
OF EMERALD ASH BORER
UNDER THE BARK.
I WOULD SAY IT'S
ONE OF MANY TOOLS.

(music plays)

John says WE WERE INUNDATED
WITH REQUESTS FOR THE PUBLIC
AND FOR TOURS.
IT BECAME INCREASINGLY
MORE DIFFICULT
TO ALLOW THESE
PEOPLE TO COME IN.
I THOUGHT WHY DON'T
YOU JUST GO FOR IT?
WHY DON'T YOU OPEN UP
A FULL-SCALE INSECTARIUM
IN SAULT SAINTE MARIE?
I'VE KIND OF EVOLVED,
LIKE THE BUGS,
AND IT'S KIND OF
HAPPENED TO ME.
WHAT CAN WE
LEARN FROM THEM?
I MEAN, SO MUCH.
HOW THEY COMMUNICATE, HOW
THEY PERCEIVE THE WORLD.
PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO
REALIZE THAT MORE AND MORE.
AND, TO ME, THAT'S
A GOOD SIGN.
IT'S A SIGN OF
HOPE FOR HUMANITY.
WHEN THE BUGS ARRIVE,
IT'S LIKE BEING
IN THE CANDY STORE.
HAVE YOU PUT ONE ON
YOUR FACE BEFORE?

A researcher says I'VE NOT PUT
ONE
ON
MY FACE.

John says I THINK YOU
SHOULD TRY.
[laughing]
THERE YOU GO.

(music plays)

The caption changes to "Music by Stefan Banjevic."

A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: The larva lab