Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Moose in decline | May 17, 2017

(music plays)

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a gray parka and a red and black striped scarf.

Nam says WELCOME TO
CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE THE LOCAL
IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
THE MOOSE POPULATION
IN ONTARIO HAS BEEN
DECLINING OVER
THE PAST DECADE.
JUST ASK PEOPLE WHO
FLOCK TO ALGONQUIN PARK
EVERY YEAR HOPING
TO SEE ONE.
IT'S BECOME MORE
AND MORE DIFFICULT
AS THE CLIMATE CHANGES.
WE VISIT THE PARK
TO FIND OUT MORE.

(music plays)

Images of the snow covered park appear.

The caption changes to "Steve Elms. Wildlife photographer."

Steve is in his late thirties and has a graying beard. He wears snow clothes.

He’s photographing animals.

He says IT'S AMAZING.
I MEAN, THE EXCITEMENT
ABOUT COMING UP HERE IS
THE FACT THAT YOU CAN
COME UP HERE TWENTY TIMES
AND SEE NOTHING, AND THEN
YOU COME UP ONE TRIP AND
SEE TWENTY THINGS, RIGHT?
SO YOU NEVER KNOW
WHAT YOU'RE GOING TO SEE
OR WHERE YOU'RE
GOING TO SEE IT.
AND I'VE BEEN COMING
HERE SINCE I WAS
PROBABLY FOUR YEARS
OLD WITH MY DAD.
WE STARTED DOING
INTERIOR CANOE TRIPS
IN THE FALL.
THAT WAS KIND OF
OUR BIG THING.
WE'D DO THAT
ONCE A YEAR.
THEN WE GOT INTO
THE SUMMER CAMPING,
THE FALL CAMPING,
THE SPRING CAMPING.
AND ABOUT TWENTY
YEARS AGO MY DAD AND I
GOT INTO THE
WINTER CAMPING.
SO WE'VE BEEN COMING UP
HERE FOR ABOUT TWENTY YEARS
IN THE WINTER, AND PROBABLY
FORTY YEARS OVERALL.

Fast clips show images of a moose.

Steve says WHEN YOU SEE SOMETHING
LIKE A MOOSE, FOR EXAMPLE,
THAT'S A BIG MAJESTIC
ANIMAL, YOU CAN'T HELP
BUT BE HUMBLED A LITTLE
BIT BY THE SHEER SIZE OF IT
FIRST OF ALL, AND THE
FACT THAT THEY'RE JUST
SO GRACEFUL.
THEY WALK THROUGH THE
FOREST AND THEY'RE CALM
AND JUST SUCH A
BEAUTIFUL ANIMAL.
SO WHEN YOU MAKE THAT
CONNECTION YOU ALMOST
FEEL LIKE IT'S JUST YOU AND
THE ANIMAL AT THAT TIME.
SO IT'S A NEAT
EXPERIENCE.

(music plays)

The caption changes to "David LeGros. Natural heritage education specialist, Algonquin Provincial Park."

David is in his late thirties, with short brown hair and a beard. He wears a black sweater over a white shirt and a pair of black trousers.

He says MOOSE BIOLOGISTS ARE
HAVING A HARD TIME
PINPOINTING EXACTLY
WHAT'S LEADING TO
MOOSE DECLINES
IN ONTARIO.
HOWEVER, IT'S THOUGHT
THAT THE CLIMATE CHANGE WILL
DIRECTLY AND INDIRECTLY
IMPACT MOOSE IN ONTARIO.

The caption changes to "Dianne Saxe. Environmental Commissioner of Ontario."

Dianne is in her late forties, with short wavy gray hair. She wears glasses, a black jacket and a gray turtleneck sweater.

She says WE KNOW THAT THERE ARE
MULTIPLE FACTORS THAT ARE
ADVERSELY AFFECTING MOOSE
WHICH INCLUDE LOSS OF HABITAT,
CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS
INTO ROADLESS AREAS,
TOO MUCH FIRE SUPPRESSION,
AS WELL AS HUNTING
AND CLIMATE CHANGE.
BUT CLIMATE CHANGE AFFECTS
MOOSE IN A NUMBER OF WAYS.
JUST GENERALLY MOOSE ARE
EXQUISITELY ADAPTED FOR COLD.
VERY POORLY
ADAPTED FOR HEAT.
AS THE SUMMERS GET WARMER,
THE WATER GETS WARMER,
IT CAN BE DIFFICULT
OR IMPOSSIBLE FOR MOOSE
TO COOL OFF IN THE SUMMER,
SO THEY MAY HAVE TO STOP
FEEDING, TO HIDE IN THE
WOODS TO TRY TO KEEP COOL,
AND LOSE WEIGHT WHEN
THEY NEED TO BE EATING.

David says THE WARMING CLIMATE CAN
MAKE IT EASIER FOR
OTHER SPECIES OF WILDLIFE,
SUCH AS WHITE-TAILED DEER
TO EXPAND NORTHWARDS.
WHILE THE WHITE-TAILED DEER
DO SORT OF COMPETE FOR
FOOD DIRECTLY WITH MOOSE,
THE WHITE-TAILED DEER CAN
ALSO INTRODUCE PATHOGENS,
TWO DIFFERENT PARASITES
INTO AREAS WHERE
PREVIOUSLY THEY
DIDN'T REALLY EXIST
AND THAT CAN IMPACT
THE MOOSE POPULATION.
IT'S A SMALL WORM THAT
LIVES IN THEIR BRAIN,
AND IT FEEDS ON PART
OF THEIR BRAIN AND
EVENTUALLY LEADS TO
BLINDNESS, DISORIENTATION
AND ULTIMATELY DEATH.

(music plays)

Steve walks in the snow and says LOOKS LIKE SOMETHING MIGHT
HAVE BEEN BEDDING DOWN HERE
AT NIGHT.
I SEE A LITTLE DEPRESSION
IN THE SNOW SO IT KIND OF
LOOKS LIKE MAYBE A MOOSE
OR SOMETHING WAS MAYBE
RESTING HERE FOR
A LITTLE BIT.
IT SADDENS ME,
OBVIOUSLY.

He sets up his camera on a bridge and says I MEAN, I THINK EVERYBODY
COMES TO ALGONQUIN PARK
WITH THE HOPES OF GETTING THAT
ICONIC MOOSE SHOT, RIGHT?
I MEAN, IT'S KIND OF
THE
ANIMAL TO PHOTOGRAPH
WHEN YOU COME UP HERE.
AND IT'S AN EXCITING
THING TO DO TO HAVE
A MOOSE EXPERIENCE AND TO
BE ABLE TO CAPTURE IT
IN A PHOTOGRAPH IS AMAZING.
SO THE THOUGHT OF
COMING UP HERE AND
THE MOOSE POPULATION
GETTING TO THE POINT
WHERE YOU DON'T SEE
ANY MOOSE WILL BE
TRAUMATIC TO ME BECAUSE
FOR YEARS IT'S BEEN KIND OF
THE DRAW COMING UP
HERE, YOU KNOW.
FOR EXAMPLE, MY WIFE
WILL SAY WHEN I GET BACK
'DID YOU SEE ANY MOOSE?'
OR MY MOM, 'DID
YOU SEE ANY MOOSE?'
AND ON TRIPS THAT
YOU DON'T SEE MOOSE,
THERE'S DISAPPOINTMENT
IN THE TRIP.
NOT THE SOLE PURPOSE OF
COMING UP ON THESE TRIPS,
BUT WHEN YOU ACTUALLY
GET TO SPEND SOME TIME
WITH THESE ANIMALS
THEY'RE SUCH A BEAUTIFUL
ANIMAL THAT IT'D BE
HEARTBREAKING TO COME UP HERE
AND KNOW THAT THEY'RE
NOT GOING TO BE HERE.
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(music plays)

A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Moose in decline