Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Snowmobiling in a changing climate | Feb 28, 2017

(music plays)

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a gray parka and a red and black striped scarf.

Nam says WELCOME TO
CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE
WE EXAMINE THE LOCAL
IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
SNOWMOBILING IS VITAL TO
TOURISM IN RURAL ONTARIO.
BUT THE TRAILS ARE BECOMING
INCREASINGLY UNPREDICTABLE.
SNOWMOBILE CLUBS ARE
STRUGGLING TO KEEP UP
WITH THE CHANGING CLIMATE.
WE HIT THE TRAIL
TO FIND OUT MORE.

(music plays)

Fast clips show images of rural Ontario.

The caption changes to "Micah Hewer. Postdoctoral fellow. University of Toronto Scarborough."

Micah is in his forties, clean-shaven and with short curly brown hair. He wears a gingham blue shirt.

Micah says HISTORICALLY WE HAD NEARLY
3 MONTHS OF RELIABLE
SNOW CONDITIONS
FOR SNOWMOBILING.
AND UNDER PROJECTED
CLIMATE CHANGE
THAT'S LIKELY TO
DIMINISH TO 30 DAYS.
IF WE CONTINUE TO
EXPERIENCE THE WARMING
THAT WE ARE EXPERIENCING
AND WE DON'T DEVELOP
SOME FORM OF ADAPTATION,
SOME WAY TO EITHER
PRODUCE ARTIFICIAL SNOW
IN SUCH A WAY THAT WE CAN
DISPERSE IT ACROSS
THESE VAST TRAILS,
SO IT WOULD NEED TO
BE SOME FORM OF MOBILE
EQUIPMENT THAT CAN
TRAVERSE THE TRAIL
AND PRODUCE THE SNOW.
AND EVEN IN THAT REGARD, YOU
STILL NEED COLD TEMPERATURES.
PRODUCING ARTIFICIAL SNOW
IS ALSO CLIMATE DEPENDENT.
AND SO IF THE CONDITIONS
ARE TOO WARM, YOU CAN'T DO IT.
SO IT'S CERTAINLY A SEVERE
CONCERN FOR THE FUTURE
SUSTAINABILITY OF THE
SNOWMOBILING INDUSTRY
IN ONTARIO.

The caption changes to "Elmo Lymburner. Volunteer. Haliburton County. Snowmobile Association."

Elmo is in his sixties, with short white hair and a moustache. He wears snow clothes and a blue and green cap hat.

Elmo says I'VE BEEN SNOWMOBILING
SINCE ABOUT 1970.
MY DAD HAD A DEALERSHIP
AT ONE TIME WITH SKI-DOOS
OR BOMBARDIER, AND
THAT'S HOW WE STARTED.
WELL, MOST OF THE WINTERS,
LIKE A FEW YEARS BACK,
WE GOT OUR COLD WEATHER
AND WE GOT OUR SNOW
AND IT STAYED.
BUT NOW, THE LAST TEN
YEARS, WE GET A BAD WINTER,
AND THEN WE GET A GOOD
WINTER AND THE TRAILS,
YOU JUST GET THEM SET
AND THEN OUR MAN SENDS
THE RAIN DOWN AND WE
HAVE TO START OVER AGAIN.
LAST YEAR I THINK WE
SET OUR TRAILS ABOUT
FOUR OR FIVE
TIMES ANYWAY.

Micah says SO IN REGARDS
TO GENERAL CLIMATE TRENDS
IN ONTARIO, USING THE
SOUTHERN ONTARIO CASE
EXAMPLE, LIKE
TORONTO, WE SEE THAT
TEMPERATURE ON AVERAGE
IN THE LAST 30 YEARS
HAS INCREASED BY ABOUT
1 DEGREE CELSIUS.
AND MORE IMPORTANT
THAN THAT IS THE
ANOMALOUSLY
WARM YEARS.
YEARS LIKE 1998, 2002,
2006, 2012, ON AVERAGE
WHERE THE BASELINE
IS NEGATIVE 4.
AND THOSE ANOMALOUSLY WARM
YEARS WERE CLOSER TO ZERO.
AND WHEN YOU GET CLOSE
TO ZERO, THEN YOU HAVE
SNOW MELTING, YOU HAVE
RAIN COMING INSTEAD OF SNOW
FOR PRECIPITATION, AND
THAT WREAKS HAVOC ON
WINTER RECREATION.
AND INDUSTRIES LIKE
SNOWMOBILING AND CROSS-COUNTRY
SKIING SEASON HAS BASICALLY
JUST BECOME NON-EXISTENT.

The caption changes to "Paul Gaudin. President. Haliburton County Snowmobile Association."

Paul is in his late forties, with straight light brown hair and a goatee. He wears jeans, a black sweater and a black jacket.

Paul says I LIKE TO SAY THAT WE
ARE WINTER TOURISM
IN HALIBURTON COUNTY.
AND THAT IS OUR MOTTO
IS GROOMING FOR TOURISM.
WE CAN SEE SEVERAL
THOUSAND SLEDS
ON A BUSY SATURDAY
OR SUNDAY.
THERE'S TRAILS THAT
ARE ABANDONED RAIL BEDS
THAT ARE INTERCONNECTED,
THERE'S BUSH TRAILS
THAT ARE WAY BACK
IN THE BUSH
THAT YOU GET TO SEE
WILDLIFE THAT YOU WOULD
NEVER SEE NORMALLY
DRIVING DOWN A ROAD.
AND YOU HAVE THE FREEDOM
TO GO WHERE YOU WANT TO GO,
AND FOR THE MOST PART
YOU'RE NOT SITTING IN TRAFFIC
LIKE IN A CAR.
IT'S JUST A
DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE.

Clips show men shovelling and ploughing snow.

Micah says SO WHEN WE THINK
ABOUT INDUSTRIES,
YES, THE ALPINE SKI
INDUSTRY IS THREATENED
BY CLIMATE CHANGE, AND
THE SNOWMOBILING INDUSTRY IS
THREATENED BY
CLIMATE CHANGE,
BUT WE CAN ALSO THINK
ABOUT THE COMMUNITIES
THAT DEPEND ON THAT
INDUSTRY FOR THEIR LIVELIHOOD.
IF SNOWMOBILING IS
CENTRAL TO THEIR
RECREATIONAL PURSUITS
AS A COMMUNITY, THEN
WHEN THAT ACTIVITY
WHICH HAS IMPACTS THAT
ARE ASSOCIATED WITH
THE LOSS OF THAT INDUSTRY,
IT'S NOT ALWAYS JUST
THE ECONOMICS WHERE THE
GOVERNMENT IS LOSING
REVENUES BECAUSE
MEMBERSHIPS FALL,
AND INDUSTRY IS LOSING
PROFITS BECAUSE EQUIPMENT
ISN'T SELLING.
CERTAINLY THERE ARE ALSO
PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND
PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACTS
THAT WILL OCCUR AS
THESE COMMUNITIES HAVE
TO ALTER THEIR ACTIVITIES.

(music plays)

A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Snowmobiling in a changing climate