Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Farming in a changing climate | Feb 02, 2017

(music plays)

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses and a gray parka.

Nam says WELCOME TO CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
FARMERS RELY ON
THE WEATHER
MORE THAN ANY
OTHER PROFESSION.
AT NIAGARA'S VINELAND
RESEARCH CENTRE,
SCIENTISTS ARE STUDYING
HOW ONTARIO'S FARMERS
CAN ADAPT TO THE
CHANGING CLIMATE.
HERE'S A LOOK AT WHAT
THEY'VE DISCOVERED.

The caption changes to "Vineland, Ontario."

The caption changes to "Michael Brownbridge. Research director horticulture production. Vineland Research and Innovation Centre."

Michael is in his sixties, clean-shaven and with short wavy white hair. He wears jeans and a white shirt.

Michael says HORTICULTURE IS
A DYNAMIC INDUSTRY.
IT'S EVOLVED AND IT
CONTINUES TO EVOLVE
IN RESPONSE TO A WHOLE
BUNCH OF EXTERNAL CHANGES
INCLUDING
DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES,
INCLUDING
CONSUMER CHANGES,
AND INCREASINGLY
IMPORTANTLY, IN RESPONSE
TO CLIMATE CHANGES.
SO WHAT WE GREW
50 YEARS AGO,
WHAT WE GROW
50 YEARS HENCE
ARE PROBABLY NOT GOING
TO BE THE SAME THING.

He walks in a greenhouse.

Michael says SO IT'S IMPORTANT WE
DO RESEARCH NOW
TO EQUIP OUR INDUSTRY,
OUR STAKEHOLDERS
IN THE HORTICULTURE
INDUSTRY TO BE ABLE
TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF
NEW OPPORTUNITIES
OR TO EVOLVE AS OLDER
CROPS BECOME LESS VIABLE
AND NEW CROPS
BECOME MORE VIABLE.

A clip shows a person working with plants in a greenhouse.

The caption changes to "Barry Smit. Professor emeritus of geography. University of Guelph."

Barry is in his fifties, with short straight receding gray hair. He wears glasses, blue trousers, a blue blazer and a pale blue shirt.

Clips show crops growing outdoors, in extreme weather conditions.

Barry says WITH CLIMATE
CHANGE THERE'LL BE
SOME OPPORTUNITIES
AND SOME CHALLENGES
FOR ONTARIO AGRICULTURE.
THE OBVIOUS ONE IS INCREASE
IN TEMPERATURE ON AVERAGE.
AND GENERALLY, AGRICULTURE
LIKES MORE HEAT,
ESPECIALLY IN ONTARIO.
MEANS WE'LL HAVE A
LONGER GROWING SEASON,
MEANS WE CAN PRODUCE
CROPS OR VARIETIES
THAT OTHERWISE WE WOULDN'T
BE ABLE TO PRODUCE.
BUT, WITH CLIMATE CHANGE,
WE ALSO GET CHANGES
IN MOISTURE.
AND DROUGHT IS
ACTUALLY A RISK
FOR A LOT OF
PRODUCERS IN ONTARIO
AND WITH CLIMATE CHANGE
WE'RE LIKELY TO GET,
IN SOME PLACES, MORE
TIMES OF DRY CONDITIONS
WHICH WILL BE
A PROBLEM.

The caption changes to "Jim Brandle. CEO. Vineland Research and Innovation Centre."

Jim is in his fifties, clean-shaven and with short straight white hair. He wears glasses, a striped shirt and a gray cardigan.

Jim says SO, WHAT'S HAPPENING
IN ONTARIO
IS OUR POPULATION
GROWS EVERY YEAR.
SO WE HAVE MORE AND
MORE AND MORE PEOPLE,
AND SO WHATEVER
CROP WE USED TO LOSE
TO INSECTS AND PESTS,
WELL, WE CAN'T AFFORD
TO DO THAT ANYMORE.
WE NEED TO FIX THAT IN ORDER
TO GAIN MORE PRODUCTIVITIES.
SO IF YOU THINK ABOUT
THE WHOLE WORLD -
WE'RE GOING TO BE AT
9 BILLION PEOPLE IN 2050 -
WE NEED AT LEAST
70 PERCENT MORE FOOD
IN ORDER TO FEED
OURSELVES.
AND IT'S GOING
TO BE TECHNOLOGY
THAT'S GOING TO
ALLOW US TO DO THAT.
HOW CAN WE CREATE MORE
FOOD PER SQUARE METRE
USING THE SAME
INPUTS OR LESS?

The caption changes to "Rose Buitenhuis. Research scientist. Vineland Research and Innovation Centre."

Rose is in her thirties, with shoulder length straight light brown hair. She wears glasses, a blue top and a blue and gold necklace.

A fast clip shows Rose working in a lab.

Rose says BIOCONTROL IS USING A
PEST'S NATURAL ENEMIES:
COULD BE PREDATORS,
COULD BE PARASITOIDS,
COULD BE A PATHOGEN
THAT KILLS AN INSECT,
TO PREVENT THE
PESTS FROM REACHING
DAMAGING LEVELS.
THE ADVANTAGE OF MAKING
A PLANT MORE RESISTANT
AGAINST PESTS IS THAT
YOU HAVE TO USE LESS
PEST-CONTROL PRODUCTS.
AND IF YOU USE BIOCONTROL
IN COMBINATION
WITH A RESISTANT PLANT,
THAT'S THE PERFECT SITUATION.
ONE OF THE CONSEQUENCES
OF CLIMATE CHANGE
IS THAT NEW PESTS COME IN,
HAVEN'T BEEN HERE BEFORE.
MAYBE THE TEMPERATURE
WASN'T RIGHT
OR THE CONDITIONS
WEREN'T RIGHT.
SO, NEW PESTS ALSO MEAN
NEW PEST-CONTROL METHODS
ARE NECESSARY.
IN A LOT OF CASES,
BIOLOGICAL-CONTROL METHODS
ARE NEEDED BECAUSE YOU DON'T
WANT TO SPRAY A CHEMICAL
THAT'S INCOMPATIBLE WITH
THE ALREADY EXISTING
PEST-CONTROL PROGRAMS.

Michael says THE WEATHER EVENTS
THEMSELVES ARE CHANGING.
SO WE HAVE TO DEVELOP SYSTEMS
WHICH ARE, THEMSELVES,
ABLE TO ACCOMMODATE
THESE CHANGES.
AND I THINK INCREASINGLY
MORE CROPS ARE SET
TO COME UNDER SOME LEVEL
OF PROTECTED STRUCTURE,
BE IT A SOPHISTICATED
GREENHOUSE LIKE THE ONE
WE'VE GOT AT VINELAND.
BUT EVEN PULLING
PLANTS IN UNDER
PLASTIC COVERS,
FOR EXAMPLE.
HIGH TUNNEL PRODUCTION IS
INCREASINGLY IMPORTANT.
BECAUSE IF YOU GET
TOO MUCH RAIN,
IT'S GOING TO
AFFECT THE CROP.
IF YOU GET HAIL, IT'S
GOING TO AFFECT THE CROP.
SO YOU HAVE TO BE ABLE
TO PROTECT THAT CROP.
AND THAT THEN ALLOWS US
TO LOOK TO VARIETIES
THAT ARE SUITED TO
THOSE STRUCTURES,
BUT ALSO TO DIFFERENT WAYS
OF, SAY, MANAGING PESTS
AND DISEASES WITH INSIDE
THOSE STRUCTURES.
I THINK THERE'S A HUGE
OPPORTUNITY THERE.
SO WHAT ROLE CAN
VINELAND PLAY IN THAT?
IT'S TO HELP FIND THESE
NEW OPPORTUNITIES
TO CREATE THE INNOVATIONS
THAT TURN SOMETHING
FROM A GOOD IDEA INTO A
COMMERCIAL REALITY.

(music plays)

A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Farming in a changing climate