Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Preparing for the storms to come | Apr 04, 2017

(music plays)

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a denim shirt and a black jacket.

Nam says WELCOME TO CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS,
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
THANKS TO THE
WARMING CLIMATE,
IT DOESN'T JUST RAIN
ANYMORE, IT POURS!
SHORTER, MORE INTENSE
STORMS OVERWHELM
SEWER SYSTEMS AND WATER
TREATMENT PLANTS.
HERE'S A LOOK AT HOW THEY'VE
ADAPTED TO THE WEATHER.

(music plays)

The caption changes to "Lou Di Gironimo. General Manager, Toronto Water."

Lou is in his late forties, bald and with a gray goatee. He wears glasses, a white shirt and a gray sweater.

He says MANAGING
STORMWATER IS NOT
A NEW ISSUE, BUT WE'RE
SEEING NEW CHALLENGES.
FOR THE CITY, AT
THE HIGHEST LEVEL,
THERE'S REALLY TWO BIG
ISSUES THAT WE'VE BEEN
LOOKING AT FOR
QUITE SOME TIME.
ONE IS QUANTITY: HOW MUCH
RAINFALL COMES DOWN
AND WHEN DOES
IT COME DOWN.
AND THE OTHER
COMPONENT IS QUALITY.
ONCE IT DOES LAND
IN AN URBAN AREA,
AND THEN WORKS ITS WAY TO
OUR CREEKS AND RIVERS,
THE QUALITY OF THAT
RAINWATER IS DEGRADED
BY OUR URBAN
ENVIRONMENT.

The caption changes to "Graham Harding. Director, water infrastructure management, Toronto Water."

Graham is in his fifties, clean-shaven and wears glasses, a safety helmet and a yellow vest.

He says WE'RE
IN WEST-END TORONTO.
WE'RE ON A
CONSTRUCTION SITE.
WE'RE REPLACING
STORMWATER SEWERS.
WE'RE TAKING OUT OLD
ONES WHICH ARE ABOUT
675mm in DIAMETER
AND REPLACING THEM
WITH 1500mm DIAMETER.
SO THE NEW PIPES GOING IN
ARE OVER DOUBLE THE SIZE
OF THE ORIGINAL PIPES.
OVER THE LAST FEW
YEARS, THERE'S BEEN
INCREASED INTENSITY AND
DURATION OF STORMS
THAT HAVE BEEN
EXPERIENCED.
SO WHAT WE USED TO SEE
AS WHAT IS CALLED
THE ONE IN 100-YEAR STORM,
WE'RE NOW SEEING
THAT MUCH MORE
FREQUENTLY
IN TWO TO FIVE
YEARS.
SO, AS A RESULT, THE
OLD INFRASTRUCTURE
THAT EXISTED IN THE CITY
IS NO LONGER CAPABLE
OF DEALING WITH ALL
THE STORMWATER
THAT IS GOING
THROUGH.
SO, THIS IS PART OF THE
PROGRAM TO INCREASE
THE STORMWATER SYSTEM
WITHIN THE CITY.
WE'RE STANDING HERE ON
THE EDGE OF BLACK CREEK.
AND ALL THE STORMWATER
INFRASTRUCTURE
THAT WE SAW BEING INSTALLED
UP ON THE STREETS ABOVE,
CONNECT TOGETHER
AND ACTUALLY EXIT
INTO THE STREET
RIGHT HERE.
THIS IS WHAT'S
CALLED AN OUTFALL.
THIS IS WHERE ALL
THE WATER EXITS
BACK INTO
BLACK CREEK.
THERE'S A VERY DIRECT
CONNECTION BETWEEN
THE STORMWATER THAT'S
FLOWING DOWN THE STREET
OFF OF YOUR PROPERTIES
AND MOVING BACK
INTO THE NATURAL
WATER COURSES.

The caption changes to "Krystyn Tully. Co-founder and vice-president of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper."

Krystyn is in her late thirties, with long straight light brown hair with bangs and she wears a black blouse.

She says NOT ALL OF THE SEWAGE
THAT PEOPLE FLUSH DOWN
THEIR TOILETS OR COMES FROM
THEIR WASHING MACHINES
OR COMES FROM BUSINESSES
IS ACTUALLY MAKING IT
TO A SEWAGE
TREATMENT PLANT.
PART OF THAT IS BECAUSE
OF THOSE COMBINED SEWERS
WHERE THEY'RE DESIGNED
TO OVERFLOW INTO
THE CLOSEST RIVER
OR INTO THE LAKE
IF THERE'S A
HEAVY STORM.
THEY'RE MOSTLY IN
DOWNTOWN TORONTO,
THE OLDER PARTS
OF THE CITY.
SO THE DON RIVER AND
THE HUMBER RIVER,
BLACK CREEK, WHICH IS A
TRIBUTARY TO THE HUMBER RIVER
IS VERY AFFECTED BY THESE
COMBINED SEWAGE OVERFLOWS.
AND THE PLACE THAT WATER
KEEPER WAS FOCUSING
ON THIS SUMMER WAS
THE INNER HARBOUR.
SO THERE ARE NINE LOCATIONS
WHERE COMBINED SEWAGE
FLOWS INTO THE
TORONTO HARBOUR.
AND AS THE DOWNTOWN
INTENSIFIES,
WE HAVE MORE AND
MORE BUILDINGS
THAT ARE BEING HOOKED
INTO THIS OLD SYSTEM.
AND AS A RESULT, IT SEEMS
AS THOUGH MORE SEWAGE
IS FINDING ITS WAY
INTO THE LAKE.

The caption changes to "Bill Snodgrass. Senior engineer, Toronto Water."

Bill is in his sixties, clean-shaven and balding. He wears a beige shirt, beige sweater, brown tie and a blue puffer jacket.

He says WHEN RAINWATER
HITS THE STREETS
AND RUNS OFF, IT PICKS
UP A LOT OF POLLUTANTS
WHICH A STORMWATER
MANAGEMENT POND IS INTENDED
TO HAVE STORMWATER
COME IN THROUGH IT AND SETTLE.
MOTHER NATURE WORKS ON IT,
REHABILITATING STORMWATER.
SO THAT BEFORE IT GETS
DISCHARGED IT IS CLEANSED
AND THEN DISCHARGED
INTO THE RIVER SYSTEM.
FINDING SITES WHERE WE CAN
BUILD STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
FACILITIES IS A MAJOR ISSUE
FOR THE CITY OF TORONTO,
BECAUSE IT'S A
MATURE CITY.
IT'S PRETTY MUCH
ALL DEVELOPED.
SO, WE'RE TRYING TO RETROFIT
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
FACILITIES TO CLEAN
UP POLLUTED
STORMWATER RUNOFF
IN TORONTO.

The caption changes to "Bill Shea. Director, district operations, Toronto Water."

Bill is in his forties, clean-shaven and with short brown hair. He wears glasses, jeans, a flannel shirt, a safety helmet and a harness.

Bill says TORONTO IS A LARGE
MUNICIPALITY THAT'S GROWING.
THE PAVEMENT IS
GROWING.
SO THE LESS AREAS THAT
WE HAVE IN THE CITY
THAT WATER CAN INFILTRATE,
THE GREATER THE PROBLEM
WITH RUNOFF OF
OUR RAINWATER.
SO, THERE'S A
LOT OF PAVEMENT,
THERE'S A LOT
OF ROOFTOPS,
THERE'S A LOT OF WATER
COLLECTING THAT'S THEN
FALLING ONTO OUR ROADS
AND THEN INTO OUR SEWERS.
THE WESTERN BEACHES
TUNNEL THAT WAS BUILT
AS A FACILITY TO COMBINE
SEWER OVERFLOWS.
COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW
IS A MIXTURE THAT
HAS BOTH SANITARY
AND STORM IN IT.
DURING A BIG STORM IF THAT
SEWER GETS OVERWHELMED
IT WILL OVERFLOW
INTO THE LAKE.
AND INSTEAD OF HAVING THIS
WATER GO INTO THE LAKE,
WHAT WE'VE DONE IS
BUILD THIS FACILITY
TO CAPTURE THAT WATER SO
THAT WE CAN TREAT IT
AT EITHER THE PLANT
OR ON SITE HERE
THROUGH UV AND
INTO THE LAKE.

(music plays)

Lou says IT'S ALL JUST
ONE WATER.
WE'RE NOT GETTING
ANYMORE NEW WATER
ON THIS PLANET SO WE
HAVE TO MANAGE IT.
STORMWATER IS A
COMPONENT OF MANAGING
OF OUR DRINKING
WATER SYSTEM.
IF WE DO A GOOD JOB ON
CLEANING UP WHAT WE HAVE
AS IT LEAVES OUR
ENVIRONMENT,
IT LEAVES BETTER
DRINKING WATER,
NOT JUST FOR OURSELVES,
BUT THE COMMUNITIES
THAT RELY ON LAKE
ONTARIO AND ALL THE WAY
DOWN THE ST. LAWRENCE.

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A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Preparing for the storms to come