Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Living off the grid | Jan 13, 2017

(music plays)

Against a gray sky, an animated black globe spins. The title of the programs reads "TVO Climate Watch Shorts."

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam stands in an open field with dry grass. She’s in her early forties with curly brown hair. She’s wearing glasses and a faux-fur hood black coat.

She says WELCOME TO
CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
BLAKENEY MALO AND
JACKSON FRANCHETTO
GENERATE THEIR OWN POWER
AND GROW THEIR OWN FOOD
AT A FARM IN
ROCKINGHAM, ONTARIO.
THEIR LIFESTYLE IS AN EXTREME
EXAMPLE OF CONSERVATION.
WE TRAVELLED TO THEIR
FARM TO FIND OUT
WHAT IT TAKES TO LIVE
OFF THE GRID COMPLETELY.

(gentle music plays)
The caption changes to "Rockingham, Ontario."

Blakeney Malo sits on a bed. She is in her early thirties with blond hair in a bun. She wears a reddish sweater and black trousers.

The caption changes to "Blakeney Malo. Seed and Stone Farmstead."

Blakeney says MY HUSBAND,
JACKSON, AND I
BOUGHT OUR FARM
TWO YEARS AGO.
JACKSON AND I MET AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA,
WHICH I THINK IS
A PLACE WE BOTH
SORT OF STARTED
TO REALLY APPRECIATE
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF
CLIMATE CHANGE,
AND REALLY STARTED TO SEE
HOW WE PLAYED A ROLE IN IT;
HOW EACH INDIVIDUAL
PERSON PLAYS A ROLE.
WHEN WE CAME TO THE FARM,
THERE WERE HYDRO POLES
COMING UP TO THE HOUSE.
BUT IT DIDN'T TAKE US
LONG TO DECIDE THAT
WE WERE GOING TO CHOOSE
AN ALTERNATIVE ROUTE.
SO, WE ACTUALLY
TOOK THE POLES OUT,
GOT SOLAR PANELS AND
HAVE NOT LOOKED BACK.

At night, Jackson stands by a wooden shed lighting a wood stove.

The caption changes to "Tom Rand. Senior adviser, MaRS Cleantech Venture Group." Tom sits in an office. He is in his mid-forties, with a short stubble beard and wavy gray hair. He wears black-rimmed glasses, blue jacket, striped white shirt and gray trousers.

Tom says I THINK IT'S
IMPORTANT FOR EVERYBODY
IN A MODERN ECONOMY TO BE
AWARE OF THEIR FOOTPRINT.
WE FACE DEEP SYSTEMIC
RISKS ON CLIMATE,
FOR EXAMPLE, SO OUR USE OF
ENERGY IS VERY IMPORTANT.
AND IN ONTARIO, GOING OFF
GRID HAS SOME BENEFITS
AND SOME NOT SO
OBVIOUS BENEFITS.
THE GRID IN ONTARIO, FOR
EXAMPLE, IS VERY CLEAN.
IF YOU'RE WORRIED ABOUT
CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS,
BEING OFF THE
ELECTRICAL GRID
DOESN'T DO MUCH.
BUT GETTING OFF THE
GRID IN THE SENSE
OF THE FOOD SUPPLY,
THE FOSSIL FUEL GRID,
THERE ARE MANY GRIDS
THAT WE'RE INVOLVED IN.
I THINK IT MAKES YOU AWARE
OF THE ENERGY IMPLICATIONS
OF EACH OF THOSE
CHOICES.

Jackson cleans a horse’s hooves.

The caption changes to "Jackson Franchetto. See and Stone Farmstead." Jackson is in his thirties, with a goatee and black hair. He wears a green jacket over red trousers.

Jackson says BEING NOT HOOKED
UP TO HYDRO
OR HOOKED UP TO
NATURAL GAS,
OR HAVING PLUMBING
AND A SEWAGE SYSTEM,
WE EITHER CARRY
EVERYTHING INTO OUR HOUSE
OR WE CARRY IT OUT.
WE CARRY IN OUR WOOD AND
WE CARRY OUT THE ASHES.
OUR GARBAGE DOESN'T
GET PICKED UP
AT THE BOTTOM
OF THE DRIVEWAY,
SO WE HAVE TO TAKE IT
TO THE DUMP OURSELVES.
AND WE GET TO
SEE THE DUMP.
AND I THINK ALL OF THOSE
THINGS ARE REALLY GOOD
FOR PEOPLE TO JUST SEE
WHAT THEY'RE ACTUALLY USING
AND CONSUMING AND
WHAT THEY'RE ACTUALLY
GETTING RID OF
AND DISCARDING.

Jackson uses a horse to plough a field.

Tom says I THINK IT'S VERY
EASY IN MODERN URBAN LIFE
TO COMPLETELY DISSOCIATE
OURSELVES FROM THE MORAL
AND ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS
OF WHAT WE DO,
WHETHER IT'S THE FOOD WE
EAT OR THE ENERGY WE USE.
AND CERTAINLY, GOING OFF THE
GRID FORCES ONE TO FACE
IN VERY OBVIOUS WAYS WHAT
KINDS OF ENERGY WE USE,
WHY DO WE USE IT,
WHAT FOOD DO WE EAT.
SO I THINK IT'S A REALLY
INTERESTING WAY
TO BRING TO THE FORE THE
IMPLICATIONS OF THE DECISIONS
WE MAKE AND TO MAKE
OURSELVES VERY CONSCIOUS
OF OUR FOOTPRINT AND
THE IMPLICATIONS
OF OUR LIFESTYLES.

Blakeney cuts plants in a greenhouse and collects water with two watering cans by a pond.

Blakeney says A LOT OF OUR DAY
IS SPENT WITH OUR HANDS
IN THE SOIL OR
SHOVELLING THE SNOW.
DEPENDING ON THE SEASON,
WE'RE ALWAYS OUTSIDE.
AND WHATEVER IS HAPPENING
WITH THE WEATHER
KIND OF DICTATES WHAT
HAPPENS WITH OUR FARM
AND IN TURN, OUR FOOD
STORAGE, OUR LIVELIHOOD.
THAT RELATIONSHIP HAS KIND
OF BECOME OUR WHOLE WORLD.

Jackson says IT'S KIND OF COOL
HOW OUR HOUSE IS WAY UP HERE
ON TOP OF THE HILL
AND THERE'S NO WIRES
COMING IN AND
OUT OF IT.
AND AT THE END OF THE DAY,
YOU CAN STILL FLICK A SWITCH
AND THAT ELECTRICITY IS
BEING GENERATED ON THE ROOF
OF OUR GARAGE BY THE
SAME SOURCE OF ENERGY
THAT GROWS OUR FOOD.

Jackson feeds pigs with apples.

Jackson continues WITH FARMING I THINK
IT'S PROBABLY A LOT
LIKE EVERY OTHER JOB;
YOU HAVE YOUR GOOD DAYS
AND YOUR BAD DAYS.
BUT AT THE END OF THE DAY,
YOU THROW A COUPLE LOGS
ON THE FIRE, COOK UP SOME
FOOD THAT YOU GREW YOURSELF
AND FOR ME, THAT'S
WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT.

A rainbow appears in the sky.

(music plays)

A final slate reads "TVO.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Living off the grid