Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: The elders' perspective | Jan 21, 2017

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a denim shirt and a black quilted jacket.

Nam says WELCOME TO
CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
ELDERS OF INDIGENOUS
COMMUNITIES IN
ONTARIO'S NORTH HAVE
BEEN TALKING ABOUT
CLIMATE CHANGE
FOR DECADES.
BUT THE GOVERNMENT
HAS ONLY RECENTLY
STARTED TO LISTEN.
WE TRAVELLED TO THE
REMOTE WEENUSK FIRST NATION
TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT
WHAT THEY'RE SEEING.

Aerial views show images of wooded areas and sand banks.

A caption reads "Louis Bird. Omushkego elder."

Louis is in his sixties, with short white hair. He wears brown trousers, a black and gray jacket and a green cap hat.

Inside his tent, he sits around a bonfire and says SOMETHING IS DIFFERENT.
A LEAF, THE
TREES, THE GRASS.
SONGBIRDS ARE NOT MANY.
THEY ARE VERY
FEW LEFT NOW.
AND THE DUCK...
THERE'S HARDLY ANY.
IN SUMMERTIME WHEN THERE
IS NO CLOUD IN THE SKY
WHEN THE SUN IS OUT
THERE, IT'S REALLY HOT.
YOU CAN FEEL IT.
BUT WE NEVER
NOTICED THAT BEFORE.

The caption changes to "Mike Hunter. Omushkego elder."

Mike is in his seventies, with short white hair and wears glasses, a camouflage jacket and a beige cap hat.

He says IT'S AFFECTING THE WAY OUR
TRADITIONAL ACTIVITIES GO.
DROUGHT'S HAPPENED
FOR TWO SUMMERS NOW.
I USED TO HAVE A BED
ACROSS THE RIVER,
AND WE USED TO
HAVE WHITE FISH
RUNNING FOR ABOUT
A MONTH EVERY FALL.
NOW THIS SUMMER WE
DIDN'T GET HARDLY ANY.

The caption changes to "Sammie Hunter. Wilderness guide."

Sammie is in his late forties, with short black hair and wears glasses, a black jacket, black gloves and a camouflage cap hat.

On a boat, Sammie says SOMETHING'S CHANGING.
THE CLIMATE'S GETTING WARMER.
WE USED TO HAVE A DEEP
FREEZE BY THE FIRST WEEK
OF NOVEMBER.
WHEN I WAS IN MY EARLY
TEENS, YOU COULD TAKE
A SKIDOO AND EVERYTHING
WOULD BE FROZEN OVER...
EVEN THE RIVER.
THIS PAST YEAR IT FROZE
UP BETWEEN CHRISTMAS
AND NEW YEARS.
THAT'S LIKE A MONTH
AND A HALF DIFFERENCE.
SOMETHING'S HAPPENING.
I THINK FOR SCIENTISTS
TO GET THE TRUE PICTURE
OF WHAT'S HAPPENING UP
HERE, THEY HAVE TO BE HERE
EVERY YEAR OR MAYBE
EVEN LIVE HERE.

A clip shows a man feeding a fire and prepping a shotgun.

Sammie says THOSE KIND OF CHANGES, I
THINK, CHANGE THE ENVIRONMENT.
IT HAPPENS QUICK.
LIKE SOME PEOPLE SAY GETTING
AN ICE AGE DOESN'T HAPPEN
IN YEARS; IT CAN
HAPPEN OVERNIGHT.
BECAUSE WHAT I SEEN IN MY LIFE
SURE HAPPENED REALLY FAST.
ONE OF THE THINGS I WOULD
LIKE TO SAY TO THE
SCIENTISTS AND BIOLOGISTS
IS TO WORK WITH PEOPLE.
IF THEY BRING PEOPLE
FROM THE SOUTH WHO HAVE
NO KNOWLEDGE OF THE ANIMALS
OR EVEN THE VEGETATION
THAT WE SEE CHANGE THIS
WAY, SO THEY CAN COLLABORATE
AND TAKE NOTES AND
UNDERSTAND MORE OF WHAT
THE PEOPLE UNDERSTAND.
I THINK IT'S REALLY
IMPORTANT THAT THEY UNDERSTAND
WHAT WE HAVE SEEN.

(music plays)

A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: The elders' perspective