Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Polar bears on the brink | Dec 22, 2016

A black spinning globe appears next to the caption "TVO Climate Change Shorts."

A caption reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam has curly brown hair and wears glasses, a denim shirt and a black quilted jacket.

She says WELCOME TO CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
POLAR BEARS IN
ONTARIO'S NORTH
SUSTAIN THEMSELVES
BY HUNTING SEALS
ON THE ICE IN
HUDSON DAY.
BUT CLIMATE CHANGE
MEANS THAT ICE
IS AVAILABLE
FOR LESS TIME,
DEPRIVING THE
POLAR BEARS
OF ESSENTIAL
NUTRITION.
WE TRAVELLED TO POLAR
BEAR PROVINCIAL PARK
TO SEE THE EFFECTS OF
CLIMATE CHANGE FIRSTHAND.

An aerial view shows Polar Bear Provincial Park.

Pam Chookomoolin says THE LAND
IS SO VAST THAT WE LIVE ON.
WE JUST DON'T STAY IN
TOWN; WE'RE EVERYWHERE.
WE HAVE ALL KINDS
OF ANIMALS.
A GREAT BIG POLAR
BEAR WE SEE.
[laughs]

The caption changes to "Sammie Hunter. Wilderness guide."

Sammie is in his late forties, with short black hair and wears glasses, a striped polo, a patterned dark jacket and a necklace.

Sammie says I
THINK THE POLAR BEARS
ARE VERY, VERY - THEY'RE
LIKE A MAJESTIC ANIMAL.
I LIKE TO GO OUT
THERE AND SIT
AND WATCH THEM
WALK AROUND.
I THINK IT'S SOMETHING
FOR EVERYBODY TO SEE.
EVERYBODY DOESN'T HAVE
A CHANCE TO SEE ONE.
BECAUSE IF THIS GLOBAL
WARMING REALLY AFFECTS
THE POLAR BEARS,
SCIENTISTS ARE SAYING
THERE MAY NOT BE
ANY IN THE FUTURE.
SOME PEOPLE DON'T
REALLY LIKE BEARS
BECAUSE THEY
DESTROY EVERYTHING.
I THINK OTHER THAN
THAT, THEY'RE LIKE
A BAROMETER FOR US,
BUT WHO KNOWS?
BUT I WOULD REALLY LOVE
TO SEE THEM ADAPT.

The caption changes to "Maria Franke. Curator of mammals, Toronto Zoo."

Maria is in her forties, with long blond hair in a bun with bangs. She wears a black jacket.

She says SO THE BIGGEST
THREATS TO POLAR BEARS
IS CLIMATE CHANGE.
CLIMATE CHANGE IS
PLAYING A REALLY BIG PART
PRIMARILY BY THE
LOSS OF SEA ICE
AND THE DURATION THAT
THE SEA ICE IS THERE
IN THE SUMMER MONTHS.
AND THIS IS CRITICAL
FOR POLAR BEARS
BECAUSE THEIR
PRIMARY FOOD SOURCE
IN THE WILD IS RINGED
SEALS AND BEARDED SEALS.
SO THEY NEED TO
GET OUT ON THE ICE
AND BE ABLE TO
HUNT THEIR SEALS
TO MAINTAIN
GOOD BODY MASS.

Clips show images of the polar bears.

Maria says THE WESTERN HUDSON BAY
POPULATION
THEY'VE ACTUALLY SEEN A
22 PERCENT DECREASE.
SO, IT'S REALLY
PRETTY CRITICAL.
EXTIRPATION NO LONGER
IN THAT SUB POPULATION
EXISTS WITHIN 45 YEARS.
AND, REALLY, IT'S JUST
AROUND THE CORNER.

The caption changes to "Pam Chookomoolin. Freelance journalist, Weenisk First Nation."

Pam is in her forties and she wears a green jacket, a printed neckscarf and a headscarf.

Pam says WE SAY, YEAH, WE'VE GOT
POLAR BEARS UP THERE.
WE SEE THEM.
ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY
COME OUT IN THE FALL
WHEN THEY'RE
ON THE COAST.
A LOT OF PEOPLE GO OUT
THERE AND TAKE PICTURES.
THEY DON'T EVEN BOTHER
THEM TOO, YOU KNOW.
THEY RESPECT THE
ANIMAL AS WELL.
WE'RE USED TO
HAVING THEM AROUND.
IT'D BE WEIRD IF THEY
WERE NOT HERE AT ALL.
CAN'T EVEN THINK OF
THAT RIGHT NOW,
YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN?
THEY'RE EITHER
GONNA ADAPT
OR MAYBE THEY'LL
LEAVE ALTOGETHER.

(music plays)

A caption reads "tvo.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Polar bears on the brink