Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Urban heat island effect | Sep 29, 2016

(music plays)

The title of the shows appears. It reads "TVO Climate Watch- shorts."

A woman in her mid-thirties with long, curly brown hair appears on screen. She wears black rimmed glasses and a lavender blue shirt. She stands in a sidewalk.

A caption on screen reads "Nam Kiwanuka, Climate Watch Shorts host."

She says WELCOME TO CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS
WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
DID YOU KNOW THAT
TEMPERATURES IN CITIES
LIKE TORONTO AVERAGE
3 DEGREES HIGHER
THAN OUTLYING AREAS
THROUGHOUT THE YEAR?
WITH THE BUILD-UP OF
CARS, BUILDINGS, PEOPLE
IN BIG URBAN CENTRES, A
NEW TERM HAS BEEN COINED...
URBAN HEAT ISLAND.
TORONTO PUBLIC HEALTH
GIVES US A RUNDOWN
ON HOW THEY COPE
WITH THIS EFFECT.

(music plays)

A clip shows people crossing a pedestrian crossing.

A caption on screen reads "Urban heat island effect."

A new clip shows traffic in a city centre.

A slate appears. It reads, "The urban heat island effect makes dense cities significantly warmer than surrounding rural areas."
A new slate reads, "By 2100, Toronto will experience 65 days per year where the temperature exceeds 30C, in part because of this effect and climate change."

A woman in her mid-forties with blond hair in a bob sits in an office. She wears glasses and a blue shirt.

A caption reads, "Carol Mee, Healthy Public Policy manager, City of Toronto."

She says THOSE PEOPLE THAT ARE MOST
VULNERABLE ARE SENIORS,
CHILDREN, PEOPLE ON
CERTAIN MEDICATIONS
WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES.
THEY'RE ESPECIALLY AT RISK.
SO THEY NEED TO BE CHECKED
ON, THEY NEED TO BE
ENCOURAGED TO DRINK WATER,
GO TO COOL SPACES.
SO THAT'S ONE OF OUR
PRIMARY WAYS OF NOTIFYING
THE PUBLIC TO TAKE
CARE, THAT THEY NEED
TO TAKE CARE OF
THEMSELVES AND OTHERS.

A clip shows people walking in the city under a bright sun.

Carol continues WE ALSO ARE DEVELOPING
SOME EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES
AND HAVE DISTRIBUTED
THEM AROUND TO APARTMENT
BUILDINGS, ESPECIALLY
WITHOUT AIR CONDITIONING,
A REAL FOCUS ON THE RESIDENTS
THERE AND THE PROPERTY
MANAGERS TO REALLY MAKE
SURE THAT THE RESIDENTS
ARE AWARE THAT THEY'RE AT
SPECIAL RISK BECAUSE THOSE
BUILDINGS ARE GOING TO GET
VERY, VERY HOT INSIDE.
BECAUSE WITH URBAN HEAT ISLAND
THEY DON'T HAVE THAT ABILITY
TO COOL DOWN AT NIGHT.

A man in his mid-fifties with short white hair and moustache stands on a rooftop.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Alex Miller. President, Esn Canada."

He says SO A LOT OF THE URBAN
HEAT ISLAND AFFECT IS
THE ROOF GETS UP TO 60
DEGREES WITH THE SUN
BEATING ON IT BECAUSE
IT'S EITHER CONCRETE OR
IT'S TAR
PAPER, IT'S BLACK.
AND SO THAT HEAT
JUST BOILS OFF.

The camera moves around the rooftop showing grass and other plants and flowers covering the floor.

Alex continues SO THE VEGETATION PREVENTS
IT FROM GETTING HOT
BECAUSE IT HOLDS THAT
21 DEGREES, HOLDS IT,
AND USES THE MOISTURE FOR
THE ENERGY TO HOLD IT THERE.
SO THAT PREVENTS THE
HEAT ISLAND AFFECT.
GREEN ROOFS TRAP
STORM WATER.
SO THE RAINFALLS INSTEAD
OF GOING ONTO THE PAVEMENT
STRAIGHT INTO THE
STORM SEWER SYSTEM,
IT'S CAUGHT BY THE SOIL
AND THE VEGETATION
AND PREVENTS IT FROM GOING
INTO THE STORM SEWER SYSTEM.

(music plays)

A slate appears on screen. On the left side of the screen, it shows a map of Toronto with some red spots; a caption reads "Heat build-up in Toronto, 1985." On the right side of the screen, a caption reads "Health risks increase substantially when people experience prolonged exposure to heat without significant cooling intervals."

A new slate appears showing a new map of Toronto with more red spots, a caption reads "Heat build-up in Toronto 2005."

A clip shows a view of the city, its roads and buildings.
On the right side of the screen, a slate reads "In 2009, Toronto became the first city in North America to have a bylaw that requires green roofs on new buildings."

A new slate showing the CN Tower appears. It reads, "The city's Eco-Roof Incentive Program provides funding to retrofit existing roofs."

A woman in her mid-thirties with long dark brown hair stands in front of the Roy Thompson Hall. She wears a black sleeveless dress and a necklace.

A caption on screen reads "Annemarie Baynton, Program Manager, City of Toronto."

She says IT'S BEEN A
GREAT RESPONSE.
SINCE 2009 WE'VE RECEIVED
OVER 350 APPLICATIONS.
TO DATE WE HAVE ABOUT
215 PROJECTS COMPLETED.
WITH THE SUPPORT OF
OUR ECO ROOF FUNDING
WE'VE CREATED 450,000
SQUARE METRES OF ECO ROOF
SPACE IN THE CITY.
WHICH IS EQUIVALENT TO
ABOUT 75 CANADIAN
FOOTBALL FIELDS.

Alex says WE'RE AN ENVIRONMENTAL
COMPANY, AND SUSTAINABILITY IS
REALLY AT THE CORE
OF OUR MISSION.
SO WHEN WE SAW THIS
OPPORTUNITY FOR THE
GREEN ROOF, THIS BIG
SPACE HERE, WE JUST
JUMPED ON IT.
BECAUSE THE WAY TO
DEMONSTRATE HOW YOU
CAN GREEN OUR ENVIRONMENT
RELATIVELY INEXPENSIVELY,
SPREAD OVER 10 YEARS
THE COST IS VERY LITTLE
FOR THIS GREEN ROOF.
AND WE ALSO ENDED UP
WITH A LOT MORE SPACE.
THE SPACE IS USABLE NOW
WHERE IT WASN'T BEFORE.

(music plays)

An animated caption appears on screen. It reads "tvo.org/climate watch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Urban heat island effect