Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Why ticks are moving north | Sep 18, 2016

A gray cloudy slate reads "TVO Climate watch; Shorts" Next to a logo of the globe.

Nam says WELCOME TO CLIMATE WATCH
SHORTS WHERE WE EXAMINE
THE LOCAL IMPACT
OF CLIMATE CHANGE.

Nam is in her thirties; she has short brown curly hair and wears glasses and a blue sleeveless blouse. A caption below her reads "Nam Kiwanuka, Climate watch shorts host."

She says SUMMER TICK SEASON USED TO
BE A PROBLEM IN THE SOUTH,
BUT IT'S GRADUALLY MOVING
UP NORTH AS THE CLIMATE
BECOMES WARMER.
OVER 80 PERCENT OF
THE POPULATION LIVING
IN EASTERN AND CENTRAL
CANADA COULD BE LIVING
IN RISK AREAS FOR
LYME DISEASE BY 2020.
WE SPOKE TO SOME
EXPERTS ABOUT WHAT
YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
TICKS AND CLIMATE CHANGE
IN ONTARIO.

A clip shows a man walking his black dog. A caption below them reads "Dunrobin Ontario."

The man is in his fifties; he has short hair and is clean-shaven.

He says HE'S A GREAT BIG
GOOFY NEWFIE.
RUPERT'S ACTUALLY
OUR SECOND NEWF.
WE HAD ONE
BEFORE, CAILLOU.
AND WE HAD CAILLOU FOR
ALMOST 11 YEARS MAYBE.
AND THROUGH THOSE 11
YEARS WE HAD REALLY,
REALLY NO EXPERIENCES
OF TICKS OUT HERE.

A caption below him reads "Barry Acton, Rupert’s owner."

He continues WHEN RUPERT CAME ALONG
WE NOTICED THAT THE TICKS
WERE GETTING
JUST A FEW MORE.
IT STARTED OUT AS JUST SORT
OF ONE OR TWO IN A YEAR.
WHICH IS COMMON.
THERE'S LOTS OF LONG GRASS,
THERE'S LOT OF TREES,
LOTS OF DEER RUNNING
AROUND HERE.
SO AS THE YEARS HAVE
PROGRESSED, WE'RE NOTICING
THAT WE'RE SEEING
A LOT MORE TICKS.

Andrew Peregrine wears a white doctor jacket and says THE PUBLIC HEALTH
AGENCY OF CANADA HAS
ESTIMATED SOMEWHERE BETWEEN
50 AND 175 MILLION TICKS
COME INTO CANADA EVERY
YEAR ON THE BACKS OF BIRDS.

A slate next to Andrew reads ANDREW PEREGRINE IS AN ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WHO SPECIALIZES IN PARASITOLOGY AT THE ONTARIO VETERINARY COLLEGE IN GUELPH.

Andrew stands in his lab and explains WHAT APPEARS TO HAVE HAPPENED
IS THAT THE NUMBERS OF TICKS
IN THE ENVIRONMENT IN
THE NORTHEASTERN PART
OF THE U.S. HAS BUILT
UP TO A CRITICAL MASS.
NOW THERE'S LARGER NUMBERS
OF TICKS COMING HERE,
AND THEY'VE BEEN
ABLE TO ESTABLISH.
SO BIRD MIGRATION'S
PARTLY A DRIVER.
CLIMATE CHANGE IS
CERTAINLY A DRIVER.
DEER POPULATION NUMBERS
AND THE INCREASE IN
DEER POPULATIONS IN SOME
AREAS ARE CERTAINLY A DRIVER
BECAUSE ADULT TICKS PREFER
TO FEED PARTICULARLY
ON WHITE-TAILED DEER.

A white slate shows the growth of Lyme disease on an Ontario map as a caption next to it reads "ONTARIO HAD 228 CONFIRMED AND PROBABLE CASES OF LYME DISEASE IN 2014. THAT WAS 10 TIMES THE NUMBER OF RECOGNIZED CASES IN 2002. Public health Ontario 2015."
The caption changes to "THE TICK POPULATION IS MOVING NORTH AT AN ESTIMATED 40 TO 45 KILOMETRES PER YEAR."

A picture of a round brown tick pops up on screen. A caption below it reads "Courtesy of Christine James."

He says LYME DISEASE IS
AN INFECTION THAT
BOTH PEOPLE, DOGS,
AND SOME OTHER ANIMALS
THAT'S ASSOCIATED WITH
INFECTION WITH A BACTERIA
THAT'S CALLED
BORRELIA BURGDOFERI.
SO IN PEOPLE, TYPICALLY,
THE FIRST INDICATION
YOU'VE BEEN BITTEN BY
AN INFECTED TICK IS
THE DEVELOPMENT OF A LARGE
RED CIRCULAR-TYPE RASH
ON THE SKIN.

A picture of a red patch on the skin surrounded by a larger red ring appears.

He says TYPICALLY AT LEAST 5
CENTIMETRES IN DIAMETER.
AND IT USUALLY DEVELOPS
ABOUT ONE TO TWO WEEKS
AFTER THE TICK'S
BITTEN YOU.
AND THEN IN THE NEXT
WEEK OR TWO, YOU CAN
EXPERIENCE FLU-LIKE SIGNS.
IN DOGS WE VERY RARELY
EVER SEE SKIN SIGNS.
AND IF DOGS DO BECOME SICK,
IT'S VERY MUCH A SHIFTING,
INTERMITTENT, VERY
SUBTLE LAMENESS.
SO THEY'RE LAME ON ONE
LEG FOR A FEW DAYS,
IT GETS BETTER.
A FEW DAYS LATER, THEY'RE
LAME ON ANOTHER LEG.

A clip shows Rupert panting.

His owner says RUPERT'S A LONG-HAIRED DOG
SO WHEN SOMETHING GETS IN
IT TAKES A WHILE FOR IT
TO BURROW ITSELF DOWN
INTO THE SKIN.
BUT IT ALSO MEANS IT'S A
LITTLE HARDER TO FIND.
SO OFTENTIMES, IF YOU
DON'T SEE IT RIGHT AWAY,
IT'S GOING TO GET
UNDERNEATH, AND THEN
12-14 HOURS LATER YOU'LL
FIND WHERE IT'S EMBEDDED.

A woman with straight blond hair in a bob works at a lab and looks at ticks through a microscope. A caption below the image reads "Christine James, Graduate student, University of Guelph."

She touches two flattened brown ticks at the back of a display case and says SO THESE ONES AT THE
BACK ARE THE DEER TICKS.
AND YOU CAN TELL
THEY'RE DEER TICKS
BECAUSE THIS DORSAL
SHIELD THAT'S RIGHT
BEHIND THEIR HEAD IS
ALL DARK AND ONE COLOUR.

Rupert’s owner stands next to him and says SIT.
SIT DOWN.
GOOD BOY.
GOOD BOY.

He runs his hand behind the ear area of Rupert’s head and says THEY'LL LIKE TO GET
IN UNDER THE FUR.
AND YOU COULD BE
FEELING A LITTLE KNOT
IN HIS UNDERFUR, OR
IT COULD BE A TICK.
YOU JUST DON'T KNOW.

He pats Rupert’s head and strokes the back of his ears as he says NOBODY MINDS
THIS, EH?
GET A LITTLE HEAD
MASSAGE OUT OF IT.

Andrew Peregrine says SO IF YOU FIND A TICK
ON YOU OR YOUR PET,
NUMBER ONE, IF
IT'S NOT ATTACHED,
JUST REMOVE
IT CAREFULLY.
AND WHEN YOU'RE DOING THIS,
IDEALLY, WEAR GLOVES
SO THAT YOU DON'T
SQUEEZE THE TICK.
BECAUSE THERE IS A
POTENTIAL DANGER
THAT IF THE TICK'S INFECTED
AND YOU SQUEEZE IT,
THE BACTERIA MAY GET
INTO YOU THROUGH CUTS
IN YOUR HAND.
THE RISK OF THAT IS VERY LOW,
BUT THERE IS A POTENTIAL RISK.
IF IT'S ATTACHED, AND
YOU'RE BRAVE ENOUGH,
THE RECOMMENDATION IS TO
GRAB HOLD OF THE MOUTH
PARTS AS NEAR TO THE SKIN
AS POSSIBLE WITH A PAIR
OF TWEEZERS AND SLOWLY
PULL BACKWARDS.
IF YOU DON'T
WANT TO DO THAT,
IF THE TICK'S ON YOU,
GO TO YOUR PHYSICIAN,
IF IT'S ON YOUR PET, GO
TO YOUR VETERINARIAN,
AND THEY'LL REMOVE
THE TICK FOR YOU.

A cloudy gray slate reads "TVO.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Why ticks are moving north