Transcript: Climate Watch Shorts: Wineries | Sep 18, 2016

(music plays)
Against a gray sky, an animated black globe spins. The title of the programs reads "TVO Climate Watch Shorts."

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Nam Kiwanuka. Climate Watch Shorts host."

Nam stands in the woods. She’s in her early forties with curly brown hair. She’s wearing glasses and a sleeveless blue dress.

Nam says WELCOME TO
CLIMATE
WATCH SHORTS,
WHERE WE EXAMINE THE LOCAL
IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE.
WINERIES GROWING GRAPES
IN WARMER CLIMATES FACE
A THREAT OF
RECORD-SETTING HEAT,
WHILE THOSE IN COLDER
AREAS ARE SEEING LONGER
AND HOTTER
GROWING SEASONS.
CLOSSON CHASE WINERY HAS
BEEN AT THE HEART OF
PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY
FOR MORE THAN 15 YEARS.
HERE'S WHAT
THEY'VE SEEN.

(soft music plays)
A barn reads "Closson Chase Vineyards."

A slate shows the picture of a vine plant. The slate reads "Closson Chase Vineyards is in Ontario’s northernmost appellation, Prince Edward County. From 200 to 2010, Prince Edward County experienced huge growth, going from one vineyard and 8 hectares of wine grapes to 13 vineyards encompassing more than 300 hectares."

Erin MacInnis stands in a wine cellar. She is in her thirties with long blond hair. She’s wearing a gray shirt.

Erin says BECAUSE
WE'RE ON THE CUSP OF BEING
THE COLDEST CLIMATE WHERE
YOU CAN PRODUCE WINE
AND GROW GRAPES,
THERE ARE OPPORTUNITIES
WITH CLIMATE CHANGE.

The caption changes to "Erin MacInnis. Retail manager, Closson Chase Vineyards."

Erin continues SO, WE COULD START GROWING
GRAPE VARIETIES THAT
WE WOULDN'T HAVE PREVIOUSLY
BEEN ABLE TO GROW.
ON THE FLIP SIDE OF THAT,
THE CHALLENGES THAT
WE FACE IS THAT PESTS
AND BACTERIA AND FUNGUS
THAT NEVER GREW HERE BEFORE
OR NEVER LIVED HERE BEFORE,
THEN THEY CAN BECOME
INVASIVE AND THEN
WE HAVE TO START
LOOKING AT WAYS THAT
WE CAN CONTROL THAT.

The slate changes to "Wildly fluctuating temperatures could mean extreme rainfall or drought in the summer and fall, both of which are challenging for wineries. Summer rainfall increased by 3.55mm per year on average from 1986 to 2011. More rain can be good, but invites rot and pests."

Natalie MacLean stands in a kitchen. She’s in her early forties with shoulder-length blond hair and bangs. She’s wearing a floral purple shirt.

Natalie says CLIMATE
CHANGE IS AFFECTING MANY
WINE REGIONS
AROUND THE WORLD.
THEY'RE EXPERIENCING
EXTREME EVENTS LIKE WE ARE,
BUT THEY MAY BE
DIFFERENT EVENTS.

(music plays)
Natalie pours herself a glass of wine.

The slate changes to "Natalie MacLean is a wine writer, speaker and judge. She is also an accredited sommelier and author of two books on wine."

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Natalie MacLean. Wine expert, author."

Natalie continues SO, IF YOU THINK
ABOUT CALIFORNIA,
WE'VE BEEN HEARING A LOT
ABOUT THE DROUGHT THAT
THEY'RE EXPERIENCING.
AND CERTAINLY, THE
VINEYARDS OF NAPA VALLEY
AND SONOMA ARE SUFFERING
BECAUSE OF THAT.
SO, THEY HAVE
WATER SHORTAGES,
AS THEY DO IN B.C.
AND IN NIAGARA AND
ONTARIO, WE DON'T TEND TO
HAVE THAT PROBLEM OF
THE WATER SHORTAGES.
BUT THEY'RE STILL ALSO
EXPERIENCING EXTREME
SUMMER HEAT IN NAPA.
THEY DON'T GET THE
EXTREME COLD WINTERS,
BUT THEY'RE JUST DEALING
WITH DIFFERENT FACTORS THAT
WILL ALSO, IN TURN, AFFECT
THEIR STYLES OF WINE.

(violin music plays)
The slate changes to "The total tonnage of grapes harvested from California’s Napa Valley fell by 29 per cent in 2015, a year when the state saw widespread drought and wildfires. www.napagrowers.org."

Erin says 2014, WE HAD A
RECORD YEAR.
AND WE HAD 2100 CASES OF
OUR CHARDONNAY PRODUCED,
WHICH IS UNREAL.
SO, WE HAD A GREAT
GROWING SUMMER THAT YEAR.
NOW, IN 2015, ON MAY 23RD,
WE WENT DOWN TO
MINUS FIVE DEGREES.
AND WE LOST MOST OF THE
CROP ON THE SOUTH FIELD.
AND NOW, OUR VINEYARD
CHARDONNAY FOR THE
2015 VINTAGE IS GOING
TO BE 350 CASES.

Natalie says WARMER DOESN'T MEAN A
LONGER GROWING SEASON,
BECAUSE WHAT YOU MIGHT
BE EXPERIENCING IS JUST A
REALLY EXTREMELY
HOT SUMMER.
WHAT GRAPES NEED IS A LONG,
EVEN GROWING SEASON OF
MANY DAYS OF SUNSHINE, OF
EVEN TEMPERATURES THAT
SUIT THAT PARTICULAR
GRAPE OR VARIETAL.
JUST BECAUSE THE
TEMPERATURES ARE GOING UP
OR IT'S A REALLY HOT
SUMMER DOESN'T MEAN YOU'RE
GOING TO GET SUPER
RIPE GRAPES.
YOU NEED THAT LONG, EVEN
RIPENING PROCESS THAT GETS
NOT JUST THE SUGAR
IN THE GRAPE,
THE PURE RIPENESS, BUT
WHAT WE CALL THE PHENOLICS,
THE COMPLEXITY, THE
FLAVOURS THAT ARE IN
THE GRAPE SKINS AND
THAT SORT OF THING.
IT'S A BALANCING
ACT, LITERALLY,
AND THESE WEATHER PATTERNS
JUST PLAY HAVOC WITH IT.

Erin says IT'S
SO UNPREDICTABLE.
YOU REALLY JUST HAVE TO
GET OUT THERE AND FEEL IT
FOR YOURSELF AND CHECK
THE GRAPES MANUALLY,
CHECK THE VINES MANUALLY,
TO SEE HOW THEY'RE DOING.
BECAUSE OTHERWISE, YOU'RE
RELYING ON INFORMATION
THAT MAY NOT
BE ACCURATE.

Fast clips show a vineyard.

[wind blowing]
The slate changes to show the picture of a wind turbine. It reads "Nearly 90 per cent of the frosts that occur in the late spring or early fall cab be prevented by the use of wind machines. These machines, as well as small fires lit among the vines, can help extend the growing season."

Erin says WE HAVE TO RELY
ON EACH OTHER,
THE WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION
OF PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY.
WE HAVE A COMMUNITY OF
PEOPLE THAT WE NETWORK
AND WE SHARE IDEAS ON
HOW TO PREVENT DAMAGE TO
THE VINEYARDS AND THE
VINES AND THE GRAPES AND
HOW TO ENHANCE OUR GROWTH
AND OUR PRODUCTION.
I MEAN, AT THE
END OF THE DAY,
MOTHER NATURE IS GOING TO
GIVE US WHAT SHE GIVES US.
AND WE HAVE TO KNOW HOW
TO ADAPT TO THAT AND
TO PRODUCE THE BEST QUALITY
WINES BASED ON THE GRAPES
THAT WE CAN GROW.

(music plays)

A final slate reads "TVO.org/climatewatch."

Watch: Climate Watch Shorts: Wineries