Transcript: People of Ontario: Bert and Joe - Horticulture | Apr 30, 1990

(music plays)

A clip shows big rigs fully loaded with trunks moving along a long road next to a thick forest.

A caption reads “People of Ontario.”

The caption changes to “Bert Sitch. Hymers, Ontario.” He’s in his seventies. He’s bald and clean-shaven. He wears glasses, a patterned white cardigan with details in brown. Matching brown trousers and a dark green shirt.

Bert says
EVERY TIME WE CUT A TREE
DOWN IN THIS COUNTRY,
WE SHOULD'VE PLANTED TWO.
AND REFORESTATION DIDN'T
START 'TIL YEARS TOO LATE.
AND WE'VE GOT THOUSANDS
OF ACRES IN THIS NORTH
COUNTRY NOW OF - I DON'T
THINK I SHOULD USE THE
WORD ON TV, BUT MAYBE
YOU CAN CUT IT,
I CALL IT CRAP FOREST.
IT'S GOOD FOR NOTHING.
IT'S BRUSH, STUNTED
BIRCH, TAG ALDERS,
HAZEL BRUSH, ABSOLUTELY
GOOD FOR NOTHING.
WHEREAS IT SHOULD'VE BEEN
PRODUCING PINE AND SPRUCE
AND JOE WILL TELL
YOU THAT, I'M SURE.
THEY'RE TALKING ABOUT
REFORESTATION NOW.
BUT THEY'RE STILL NOT
DOING ENOUGH ABOUT IT.
WHAT THEY'RE DOING NOW,
THEY SHOULD'VE BEEN DOING
50 YEARS AGO.
SO, I'M NOT HAPPY ABOUT
IT, BUT THEY ARE DOING
SOMETHING NOW.
AT LEAST WE'RE
GETTING STARTED.
WE HAVE PLANTED SOMEWHERE
BETWEEN 12 AND 14,000 PINE
AND SPRUCE ON THE PROPERTY.
AND THE LARGEST ONES
ARE - WELL, NOT AS LARGE
AS THAT TREE THERE -
BUT THE LARGEST ONES
ARE ABOUT 30 FEET
HIGH NOW.

As he speaks, a clip shows tall pines on screen.

Bert continues
ANY KNOWLEDGE THAT I HAVE
IS FREE FOR THE ASKING,
PROVIDING THAT PERSON
SHOWS REAL INTEREST
AND IS NOT JUST OUT
TO START CONVERSATION.
I'VE STILL GOT
A LOT TO LEARN.
I LEARN EVERY DAY
SOMETHING NEW.
BUT THERE ARE MANY SPECIES
OF TREES AND VARIETIES
THAT YOU HAVE A LIST OF
THAT MY WIFE AND I HAVE
IN OUR LITTLE ARBORETUM HERE
THAT ARE NOT NATIVES
HERE, BUT THEY COME FROM
OTHER PARTS OF CANADA.
AND THEY WITHSTAND
OUR WINTERS.
I HAVE LODGEPOLE PINE,
I HAVE DOUGLAS FIR.
OH, BEECH AND THESE ARE
NOT NATIVE TO HERE
BUT THEY WILL STAND HERE.
SO, I WOULD LIKE TO
SEE DIFFERENT SPECIES
INTRODUCED AND I THINK
THE MINISTRY OF NATURAL
RESOURCES ARE THE ONES
THAT SHOULD BE DOING THIS
IN DIFFERENT LOCATIONS ALL
THROUGH THE NORTH COUNTRY.

New images show long roads getting lost in the forest with trucks and cars passing by.
Bert continues
BECAUSE WE'VE GOT A
DIFFERENT CLIMATE HERE
TO WHAT YOU'VE HAVE IN
KAPUSKASING, RIGHT?
AND A DIFFERENT
CLIMATE HERE THAN WHAT
YOU HAVE IN TIMMINS.
AND A DIFFERENT CLIMATE
HERE THAN YOU HAVE
AT FORT FRANCES,
THAT CLOSE.
AND DEFINITELY DIFFERENT
TO WHAT YOU HAVE AT SUDBURY.
SO THERE ARE MANY, WHAT
I CALL, MICRO-CLIMATES.
AND I THINK THERE SHOULD
BE TEST STATIONS
IN EACH ONE OF THOSE.
AND TESTING, AFTER ALL, IS
EXPERIMENTING; THAT'S MY LIFE.
IF I HAD TO DO IT
ALL OVER AGAIN AND
SOMEBODY WOULD SUPPLY
ME WITH ENOUGH MONEY
TO LIVE ON, I WOULD LIKE TO
BREED NEW VARIETIES
AND TEST NEW VARIETIES.
I THINK THAT'S
JUST WONDERFUL
WORKING WITH PLANTS.

(music plays)

The end credits roll.

Editor, Jim Crewe.

Producer and director, Inge Johnson.

A production of TV Ontario.

Copyright. The Ontario Authority. 1990.

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