Transcript: The Goal Is Personal Best | May 18, 1988

The title of the show appears on screen. It reads "People Patterns."

People in wheelchairs queue up to have lunch in a park.

Steve says ABSOLUTELY, THE MOST
PLEASURABLE THING
IS DEALING WITH THE
ATHLETES.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "1987 Canadian Foresters Games for the Physically Disabled. Part 2."

Steve continues UH, THEIR...OUTLOOK ON LIFE
IS REFRESHING.
WE SHOULD LOOK AT THAT.
WE SHOULD TRY
TO ADAPT THAT OURSELVES.

The title changes to "The Goal is Personal Best."

A man wearing a plaid shirt says YOU SWITCHED THAT URINE
SO THEY DON'T CATCH THAT DYNAMO?

A group of men laugh.

Joan Reed-Olsen stands outdoors. She’s in her sixties, with short brown hair. She’s wearing glasses and a white and red striped shirt.

Joan says
Joan says "CATCH THE EXCITEMENT,"
A GREAT SLOGAN FOR THE
1987
CANADIAN FORESTERS GAMES
FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISABLED

-
ATHLETES FROM EVERY PROVINCE
MEETING TO TEST SKILLS,
SHARE EXPERIENCES
AND SET NEW RECORDS.
I'M JOAN REED-OLSEN
IN BRANTFORD, ONTARIO.

[laughing and talking]

A young man says CAN I HAVE A HAMBURGER, PLEASE?

A blond woman laughs and says HAMBURGER?
ALL RIGHTY.

A poster reads "The Optimist Club of Brant-Lyn welcomes you."

Steve says
GETTING TO KNOW THEM
OVER 10 YEARS
WITH THE GAMES IS REWARDING.
MANY ARE MY FRIENDS.
I CONSIDER THEM THAT.
WE CONTACT EACH OTHER
SOMETIMES.
IT'S GREAT SEEING THEM
BACK IN BRANTFORD.

Talking to a middle-aged woman, a young woman says HE WAS IN NEW YORK.

The middle-aged woman says HE WAS
TRYING...

A male athlete with brown hair says THE HOT DOGS ARE GOOD.

A male athlete with blond hair says YES, THEY ARE.

The caption changes to "Steve Brown. Games Chairman." Steve is in his late forties, with a moustache and brown hair. He’s wearing glasses, a cap and a white shirt.

Steve says PEOPLE SHOULD LOOK
AT THEM AS ATHLETES BECAUSE
THAT'S
REALLY
WHAT THEY ARE.
WE'VE WORKED HARD
TO GET EVERYTHING IN PLACE.
IT WON'T BE PERFECT.
WE WILL DO OUR BEST.
SO WILL THE ATHLETES.

People in wheelchairs leave a bus through a ramp.

Hugh says WATCH YOUR HEAD
COMIN' THROUGH THERE.

The caption changes to "Hugh Foy. Transportation." Hugh is in his fifties, clean-shaven with receding brown hair. He’s wearing glasses and a white polo-shirt.

Hugh says
I REMEMBER IN '75
IN CAMBRIDGE,
WE HAD SEVEN
AMPS
COMPETING.
EVERY MORNING, WE DISCUSSED
THE RUNNING OF THESE EVENTS.
WE DIDN'T HAVE ENOUGH
FOR GOOD COMPETITION.
THE COMPETITION'S INCREASED.
WE'RE HOPING FOR CROWDS
IN BRANTFORD.
ANYBODY, BUS DRIVERS,
ANYBODY THAT'S INVOLVED...
I HAVE AIR CADETS WORKING
ON THE BUSES.
THEY VOLUNTEERED A FEW HOURS.
I HAVE THEM THERE AT 7:30 A.M.
THEY'RE HERE UNTIL 11 P.M.
THEY GET CAUGHT UP,
SEE HOW GREAT THESE PEOPLE ARE
AND HOW THEY CAN...
THESE PEOPLE ARE ATHLETES FIRST
AND DISABLED SECOND.

The caption changes to "Anne Merklinger, Executive Director. Canadian Federation of Sport Organization for the Disabled." Anne stands outdoors. She’s in her early thirties, with short wavy brown hair. She’s wearing a white and blue jacket.

Anne says DISABLED SPORTS, STRUCTURALLY,
IN THE LAST FEW YEARS
TOOK GIGANTIC LEAPS FORWARD.
INITIALLY, THEY WERE FIVE OR SIX
INDEPENDENT ORGANIZATIONS.
NOW THEY'RE ONE TEAM.
WE WORK TOGETHER
ON PROJECTS LIKE THIS ONE
AND THE
OLYMPICS
FOR THE DISABLED
AND MAJOR EVENTS.
WE'RE WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC
IN INCREASING OUR PROFILE,
THE PROFILE OF DISABLED SPORT.
WE MUST DO THAT AS A TEAM.

A Male Starter says
ON YOUR MARK!

[starter's gun]

Athletes start running.

A woman shouts GO, ONTARIO!

A Male Announcer says
CLEAR THE TRACK HERE.
WE NEED THE ENTIRE TRACK
EXCEPT FOR LANE EIGHT.
MOVE TO LANE EIGHT
FOR PRACTISING WHEELCHAIRS.

Steve says
THE BUILD-UP
DURING THE WEEK OF THE EVENTS
HAS JUST BEEN PHENOMENAL.
WHEN THE ATHLETES CAME,
THEY WERE WONDERING
WHAT WOULD UNFOLD,
HOW GOOD THE OFFICIATING WAS,
HOW WELL THEY WOULD BE FED.
EVERY ONE OF THEM
HAS BEEN SATISFIED
WITH ALL THAT.
WE'VE HEARD COMMENTS.
THEY WERE VERY COMPLIMENTARY
ABOUT THE OFFICIATING.
THESE WORLD-CLASS ATHLETES SAY
IT'S ABOUT THE BEST OFFICIATING
THEY'VE SEEN
IN CANADA
FOR THE DISABLED GAMES.
WE'RE PROUD BECAUSE THE GAMES
ARE FOR ATHLETES.
WE DO EVERYTHING POSSIBLE
TO MAKE THAT WORK.
WHEN THEY GET
GOOD
OFFICIATING,
THEY GET BETTER.

[crowd cheering]
[applause]

The runners finish the race.

A woman yells GO, GO, GO!
ALL RIGHT, TEAM!

A man says GOOD RUN, BUDDY!
HOW DID IT GO?

A male runner says YEAH, BY TWO STRIDES.
Shaking hands with two other runners, he continues GOOD WORK, GUYS.
GOOD WORK, KEITH.
WAY TO GO.
WAY TO WORK, BUDDY.
WAY TO BE, PHIL.
GOOD STUFF, GUYS.
GOOD STUFF, KEITH.
GREAT RUN.
SMART RACE, BUDDY.

A male runner wearing a yellow T-shirt says WHERE'S KEITH?

The male runner says KEITH'S OVER HERE.
OH, I'M SORRY.

[talking]

The male runner wearing a yellow T-shirt says CONGRATULATIONS,
YOU GOT ME.

Keith says DID I?

The male runner wearing a yellow T-shirt says IN THAT
HUNDRED, YEAH.
CONGRATULATIONS
ON THE HUNDRED,
TOO.

The caption changes to "Alan Dean, Manager. Canadian Amputee Sports Association." Alan stands in a court. He is in his fifties, with greyish hair and clean-shaven. He’s wearing a blue sport jacket.

Alan says THE
CANADIAN AMPUTEE
SPORTS ASSOCIATION
WAS STARTED 10 YEARS AGO.
WE HAVE MORE OR LESS
GROWN QUITE SMALL.
WE'RE PART OF
THE LARGE DISABLED SPORTS
COMMUNITY IN CANADA.
WE WORK WITH THE WHEELCHAIR
AND THE BLIND
AND THE
CP
ORGANIZATIONS
TO LOOK AT THE PURSUIT
OF EXCELLENCE FOR OUR ATHLETES
AND COMPETE AT THE 1988
OLYMPICS
IN SEOUL, KOREA.
OUR ATHLETES
DO
TRAIN VERY HARD.
THIS MEET IS ONE OF THE
SELECTION PROCESSES FOR '88.
I'M HAPPY WITH WHAT I'VE SEEN.

A man in his forties throws a javelin. He sits in a wheelchair and has both of his legs amputated.

A Male Referee says GOOD THROW.
LET'S SEE WHAT ANGLE
WE HAVE GOT HERE.
OK, 17.46.

A young woman sitting in a wheelchair with amputated legs throws a javelin.

The Male Referee says NOW, LET'S KEEP IT THERE.
PULL IT TIGHT, JULIA.
OK...
OK.
IT'S 7...9...2.
7.92.

Cheryl is in her twenties. She has brown hair tied-up. She’s wearing white shorts and a blue and white sleeveless sport shirt.

Cheryl throws the javelin and says UGH!

The Male Referee says OK, GOOD THROW, CHERYL.
AH!
HERE WE ARE.
WHAT DO WE HAVE?
18......7......6...
18.76.

The caption changes to "Ken Lake." Ken stands in a sport field. He’s in his fifties, clean-shaven with curly white hair. He’s wearing a yellow jacket.

Ken says I'M WITH THE
ONTARIO
TRACK AND FIELD ASSOCIATION
FOR THE ABLE-BODIED.
I INTERPRET THEIR RULES
AND REGULATIONS,
MAKING SURE THAT THEY EQUAL
ABLE-BODIED PEOPLE
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
THEIR RULES AND REGULATIONS
ARE NOW SUCH
THAT THE COMPETITION
IS AT THE SAME LEVEL,
BOTH OLYMPICALLY AND NATIONALLY,
ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD.
AS FAR AS WHAT IT DOES
FOR THE REST OF US,
REMEMBER THAT 15 YEARS AGO
YOU WOULDN'T SEE
ANY
OF THESE PEOPLE PARTICIPATING.
MANY OF THEM
NOW HOLD REGULAR JOBS
AND ARE WELL EDUCATED.
THE SYSTEM CERTAINLY
HAS CHANGED GREATLY.

A boy does a high jump. He’s wearing an orthopedic leg.

A man says GOOD TRY, 105.
WE WILL HAUL YOU OUT.

The boy says I GOT TO DO
SOMETHING.

The man says THERE YOU GO.

A young woman with an amputated arm does a high jump.

[talking ]
[laughing]

A man with a moustache helps the boy put on a jacket.

The with a moustache says YOU WERE A LITTLE STUCK
IN THE JACKET, THERE.

The caption changes to "Jane Querin, Chairman. Games Marketing Committee." Jane is in her thirties, with short blond hair. She’s wearing red square earrings and a white shirt.

Jane says THE ATHLETES
HERE IN BRANTFORD
HAVE COMPETED AND WON
AT THE PROVINCIAL LEVEL.
THEY ARE BEST IN THEIR PROVINCE.
THEY'RE ON A PROVINCIAL TEAM
TO REPRESENT THEIR PROVINCE
IN THE
CANADIAN GAMES.

[whistle blowing]

A Male Starter says TAKE YOUR MARKS.

[starter's gun]

Male swimmers jump to a pool.

[cheering]

A man in the stands yells COME ON, DAVE!
GO, DAVE!
COME ON, DAVE!
LET'S GO, DAVEY!
COME ON, DAVE!
COME ON, DAVE!
LET'S GO, DAVE!
COME ON, STEVEN!
COME ON, DAVE!
COME ON, DAVE!
LET'S GO, DAVE!
GO, DAVE, GO!
GO, DAVEY!
GO, DAVEY!
WAY TO GO, DAVE!

[applause]

A Male Announcer says
JIM'S GOLD MEDAL
IS IN CATAGORY B-1
WITH A TIME
OF 2 MINUTES, 32.65 SECONDS.

Jim receives a medal. He’s in his twenties, with brown hair and clean-shaven, He’s wearing blue sport jacket.

[applause]

A Female Announcer says
THIS GOLD MEDAL
WILL BE
PRESENTED TO
HAROLD GRACE
OF SASKATCHEWAN.

[applause]

The caption changes to "Anthony Clegg. Coach." Anthony is in his forties, with brown hair and clean-shaven. He’s wearing a red polo-shirt.

Anthony says AT A NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
LIKE THIS, ANY COACH --
WHETHER IT'S OUR SWIM COACH
OR THE OTHER TRACK COACH --
WE CAN'T DO TECHNICAL COACHING
BECAUSE THEY'VE WORKED
TWO OR THREE PRACTICES A WEEK
FOR SIX OR SEVEN MONTHS.
WE USE WHAT WE CONSIDER
A "HEAD" COACHING.
SO WE COACH FROM HERE UP.
THERE'S MORE SPORT PSYCHOLOGY
THAN ANY TECHNICAL COACHING.

The Male Starter says
TAKE YOUR MARK!
[starter's gun]

Another swimming competition begins.

The audience say GO!
COME ON!

[crowd cheering]

Joan says
IN THIS RACE, BLIND,
WHEELCHAIR AND AMPUTEE ATHLETES
SWIM THE SAME DISTANCE
BUT IN DIFFERENT CATEGORIES.
THE GOAL'S TO COMPETE AGAINST
THE ATHLETE'S PERSONAL RECORD.
SHARING THE RACE
WITH OTHER COMPETITORS
IS PSYCHOLOGICALLY BENEFICIAL
TO ATHLETES
AND, ULTIMATELY,
TO PERFORMANCES.

People scream GO, GO!
LET'S GO!
GO!
LET'S GO!
GO! GO!

[applause]

The Male Announcer says
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN......THE THIRD WORLD RECORD
OF THE AFTERNOON.

[cheering]

A woman says DIONNE,
HOW DID IT FEEL?

Dionne leaves the swimming pool and goes back to her wheelchair. She’s in her twenties, with dark hair. She’s wearing a dark blue swimming suit.

Dionne says OK.

The woman says YOUR TIME
WAS GOOD
WITH
TWO MINUTES,
UNOFFICIALLY
ON THE BOARD.
VERY GOOD.

Dionne says THAT'S GREAT,
THANK YOU.

The caption changes to "Bob Elliott. Canadian Foresters." Bob is in his fifties, with gray hair and clean-shaven. He’s wearing a white cap and a matching polo-shirt.

Bob says WE WERE APPROACHED
A YEAR AGO YESTERDAY
BY STEVE BROWN,
THE CHAIRMAN
OF THE CURRENT GAMES,
AND ASKED FOR SUPPORT
FOR LOCAL GAMES.
IN CONVERSATIONS,
IT SORT OF DEVELOPED TO THE FACT
THAT WE REALLY WORKED
INTO AN EXCELLENT VEHICLE
FOR US TO USE NATIONALLY.
WE ARE A NATIONAL
FRATERNAL ORGANIZATION,
ALTHOUGH WE ARE
INTO FINANCIAL SERVICES,
PRODUCTS AND THINGS LIKE THAT.
WE HAVE COURTS, VOLUNTEERS
AND MEMBERS ACROSS CANADA.
IT SEEMED LIKE A PERFECT VEHICLE
BECAUSE OUR MEMBERS ARE INVOLVED
IN CHARITABLE EVENTS
AND DISABLED PEOPLE
RIGHT ACROSS CANADA.
IT SEEMED PERFECT FOR US.
STEVE WAS VERY PERSUASIVE.
IT WORKED OUT PERFECTLY.
WE'RE INVOLVED
WITH THIS SET OF GAMES
FINANCIALLY FOR 37,500
DOLLARS AND WITH THE NEXT SET
FOR 75,000 DOLLARS
AND IN 1991 FOR 75,000 DOLLARS.
WE HAVE AN OPTION TO CONTINUE
FOR THE 1993 AND 1995 GAMES.
WE WILL PROBABLY
USE THAT OPTION UP.

Dean plays tennis sitting in a wheelchair. He’s in his forties, with a blond beard and short hair. He’s wearing a white sweater and a blue cap.

After the game, Dean says
TENNIS IS NEW.
THIS IS ITS FIRST YEAR
AT THE GAMES.
WE HELD AN EXHIBITION
AT THE '85
CANADIAN GAMES
AND IT WENT OVER WELL.
THE SPORT'S REALLY DEVELOPING.
IT'S BIG IN THE STATES
AND WESTERN CANADA.
THE CHANGE IN THE RULES
IS YOU GET TWO BOUNCES.
MANY GUYS WILL PLAY
WITH THEIR FRIEND
WHO'S STANDING.

The caption changes to "Dean Mellway, Executive Director Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association."

Dean continues IT'S A GOOD GAME.
TWO BOUNCES FOR THE GUY
IN THE CHAIR.
THERE WILL BE MORE PLAYING
IN FUTURE, MORE COMPETITORS.
EVERYONE CAN GET EXPOSED TO IT.
MANY PEOPLE
HAVEN'T TRIED IT YET.
IT'S NICE TO BE COMPETING
AND SEE A NEW SPORT DEVELOP.
TENNIS IS SOMETHING TO WATCH
'CAUSE IT'S EXCITING.
MORE COMPETITORS
WILL GET INVOLVED IN IT.

After a doubles tennis match, Dean says NICE SERVE,
RICK.
WE SHOULD TRY THIS AGAIN
SOMETIME.
[laughing]

Jane says
IN TERMS
OF A COMMUNITY GETTING INVOLVED
IN HOSTING A SET OF GAMES,
IT CAN BE UNIFYING
FOR A COMMUNITY.
IT'S THE SUM OF THE PARTS
THAT MAKE IT A SUCCESS.
IT'S THE CITIZENS' HOSPITALITY
AS WELL AS INDIVIDUAL DONATIONS,
CORPORATE DONATIONS,
COMMUNITY GROUPS HOSTING EVENTS.
IT'S THE SUM OF THESE.
IT'S VERY UNIFYING.

Steve says THE NUMBERS OF VOLUNTEERS
REQUIRED ARE VERY BIG.
THERE'S SO MUCH TO BE DONE.
THEY ALL TAKE MANPOWER
OR WOMANPOWER.
I BELIEVE
THAT WE'VE HAD PROBABLY
OVER 700 PEOPLE TOTAL
CONNECTED AND READY TO GO
ON THE THING AND, BOY,
IT'S WORKING OUT SUPER.
THEY'RE VERY EAGER.

A clip shows people preparing weights, controlling time near a swimming pool and taking measures in a field.

A man on a field says ...WE WERE A SECOND APART BEFORE
SO IT SHOWS YOU THE...

Josh lies on his back lifting weight. He’s in his thirties, with a beard and shaggy blond hair. He’s wearing blue jeans and a sleeveless orange shirt.

A man in the audience says GO, JOSH!

[cheering]

A Male Commentator says
WELL DONE.

[applause]

The Male Commentator continues THE REFEREES AGREE.
AND HE HAS ONE MINUTE
TO GIVE US
HIS THIRD AND FINAL ATTEMPT.

Josh gets to his wheelchair and then comes back.

[clap]

[crowd cheering and whistling]

The Male Commentator says
A GOOD EFFORT THERE.
WELL DONE.
THE REFEREES AGREE.
WELL DONE.

[crowd cheering]

[panting]
A weightlifter gets ready. He’s in his thirties, with blond hair. He has an amputated leg.

The Male Weightlifter says UGH! UGH!

A Male Trainer says LOCK IT!

The Male Commentator says
NICE EFFORT.
NICE BENCHING.

[applause]

[clap]

It’s Paul’s turn. He lies on the bench and lifts weight.

The Male Commentator says
HE'S IN
THE MEDAL STANDINGS, ANYWAY.

[applause]

The caption changes to "Paul Lane." Paul is in his forties, with a moustache and short black hair. He’s wearing a white cowboy hat, a blue sport jacket and a medal.

Paul says WELL, I TRAIN THREE DAYS A WEEK
AT
VARIETY VILLAGE
AND...
THEY HAVE TRACK.
THEY HAVE FIELD EVENTS AT--
THEY HAVE INDOOR EQUIPMENTS
THAT WE USE TO TRAIN
IN WINTER-TIME,
INSTEAD OF BEING OUTSIDE.
AND THEY HAVE BENCHES
AND FREE WEIGHTS
AND, YOU KNOW, UNIVERSAL.
MOST OF THE INSTRUCTORS
WILL HELP YOU SET UP A PROGRAMME
SO THAT YOU CAN BETTER YOURSELF.

Jane gives a medal to Josh. He grabs her as if he was going to kiss her.

People laugh. Jane kisses him.

[camera shutter clicking]

The Male Announcer says
LEAVE IT
TO THOSE FRENCHMEN, EH?
CONGRATULATIONS.
[applause]

Jane continues to kiss and give medals to the rest of the athletes.

A young man wearing a white T-shirt throws a bocce ball.

A man wearing a red and a blue jacket says NOT YOUR LINE.

The young man wearing a white T-shirt says DON'T TOUCH THAT!
AHH.

The man wearing a red and a blue jacket says YOU'RE A LITTLE HOT.

The caption changes to "Stan Klubi." Stan is in his sixties, with white hair and clean-shaven. He’s wearing a white cap and a matching jacket.

Stan says WE ORGANIZED IN THE PROVINCE.
THERE ARE FOUR PROVINCES NOW
WHO HAVE A PROGRAMME
OF SOME KIND GOING
DEALING WITH PHYSICALLY
IMPAIRED LAWN BOWLERS.
THEY ALL HAD
THEIR PROVINCIAL CHAMPIONSHIPS
OR TRIALS IN ORDER TO GET HERE.
IT'S A LOT OF INVOLVEMENT,
ADMINISTRATION WORK,
A LOT OF ORGANIZING,
NOT ONLY ON THE TECHNICAL SIDE,
BUT ALSO ADMINISTRATIVE
AND BACKGROUND.
MANY PEOPLE HERE
TOOK COURSES TO HELP
WITH THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED.
WITH A WHITE BALL
THAT YOU SEE AT ONE END,
PEOPLE TOOK COURSES
TO CONTROL THAT END
FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED.
IT'S A DIFFICULT THING
FOR A BLIND PERSON
TO BOWL A BALL
FROM WHERE THEY STAND
100 FEET OR SO
TO A BALL THEY CAN'T SEE.
IT'S LIKE GOING
INTO THE UNKNOWN.
BUT IT'S TECHNIQUE.

Bocce players play in an open field.

Stan continues IF THEY FOLLOW THE TECHNIQUE,
THEY HAVE A CHANCE.
WITH DIRECTORS AND COACHES,
WE BLINDFOLD THEM,
PLACE THEM ON THE MAT
IN THE POSITION
OF BLIND BOWLERS
AND WATCH THE CONFUSION.
THEY'RE COMPLETELY DISORIENTED.
SO IS EVERYBODY
WHEN THEY START THAT.

Dean says
WE'RE LOOKING FORWARD
TO THE
OLYMPICS
FOR THE DISABLED
IN 1988 IN SEOUL, KOREA,
RIGHT AFTER
THE REGULAR
OLYMPICS.
THE CANADIAN TEAM,
INCLUDING ATHLETES AND STAFF,
IS 350 STRONG.
WE'RE LOOKING
FOR STRONG PERFORMANCES
BY CANADA.
WE'RE AIMING TO BE
IN THE TOP THREE COUNTRIES.
WE CAN ACHIEVE THAT.

A woman in her fifties practises shot put.

Josh throws a discus.

A man says YES, SIR!
YES, SIR!

[starter's gun]
A marathon begins.

Joan says
BLIND ATHLETES
ENTER THE 10-K
IN THREE CATEGORIES
ACCORDING TO DEGREE
OF VISUAL IMPAIRMENT,
ALTHOUGH NO ATHLETE
HAS MORE THAN
10 percent USEFUL VISION.
IN CATEGORY B-3, THE ATHLETE
CAN COMPETE ALONE.
B-2 ATHLETES HAVE VERBAL
AND PHYSICAL CONTACT
WITH THE SEEING PARTNER.
THE B-1 ATHLETE MUST HAVE
ALMOST CONSTANT
PHYSICAL CONTACT WITH
A RUNNING MATE.

[applause]
[cheering]

People watching the marathon scream ALL RIGHT!
ALL RIGHT!
LET'S GO!
WAY TO GO!

Male runners shake hands.

A male runner with brown hair says YEAH.

A male runner in his thirties says GOOD WORK, GUY.

The male runner with brown hair says I DIDN'T CALL THE SAFETY VALVE.

A male runner says WHAT WAS
YOUR TIME?
A blond male runner says 37 1/2.

The Male Announcer says SET!

[starter's gun]

A woman yells GO, PAUL!
GO, PAUL!

Athletes in wheelchairs start to run.

Chris says ONE OF THE BIGGEST CHANGES
IN WHEELCHAIR SPORTS
AND WHY THE PERFORMANCE
IS SO INCREDIBLE ON THE TRACK
IS BOTH AN ATTITUDE
OF ATHLETES AND
FROM A COACH
AND THE OFFICIALS' STANDPOINT.
BEFORE, OFFICIALS CAME
AND THEY WERE VERY YOUNG.
THEY MADE A MISTAKE.
"WHO CARES?"
BUT AS WE BECAME
MORE PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED,
THOSE TYPES OF MISTAKES
WERE NOT CONDONED ANY MORE.
WE WANTED, UH,
TOP OFFICIALS AT ALL MEETS.
ALONG THE SAME LINES,
AS OUR EQUIPMENT GOT BETTER,
COACHING GOT BETTER.
MORE COACHES
STARTED TO TREAT US
AS ABLE-BODIED ATHLETES
AND HAD US DOING THE SAME TYPE
OF ACTUAL TRAINING
THAT THE ABLE-BODIED GUYS DID.

The caption changes to "Chris Stoddart." Chris is in his thirties, with a moustache and brown hair. He’s wearing a white and red sport jacket.

Chris continues IN THE BEGINNING, PRE-1975, SAY,
WE WENT AROUND THE TRACK
AS MUCH AS WE WANTED
UNTIL WE GOT TIRED.
THAT'S BASICALLY ALL WE DID.
NOWADAYS, IT'S VERY SPECIALIZED.
IF YOU'RE A SPRINTER,
YOU'RE DOING REPEAT WORK
TO BUILD UP YOUR HAND SPEED.
IF YOU'RE DOING DISTANCE WORK --
10-Ks, MARATHONS --
YOU'RE DOING
RESISTANCE TRAINING.
BEFORE, THE ONLY PLACE
YOU COULD TRAIN WAS ON A TRACK.
THEY'VE INVENTED MACHINES
YOU PUT YOUR WHEELCHAIR ON.
YOU GAUGE RESISTANCE.
YOU CAN TRAIN INDOORS.
CANADIANS FOUND THAT
WE WERE BEHIND THE EIGHT BALL
IN APRIL OR MAY,
BECAUSE THE AMERICANS,
DOWN SOUTH,
TRAINED ALL WINTER
WITH GOOD WEATHER.
THEY HAD TWO MONTHS
OF FITNESS ON US.
WITH THE MACHINES,
WE CAN TRAIN INDOORS.
THEY HELP TREMENDOUSLY.

Chris does a circuit with orange cones in his wheelchair.

A man in the audience says GO, MAN.
COME ON!

[applause]
[crowd cheering]

Speaking to a group of athletes, an old woman says
JE VAIS VOUS VOIR.

Now, the old woman chats with a middle-aged female athlete.

The old woman says MY GOSH!

The middle-aged female athlete says I'M THE CANADIAN
MASTERS.

The old woman says IS THERE ANYTHING YOU DON'T DO?

The middle-aged female athlete says YES -- SEE.

The old woman laughs.

The middle-aged female athlete continues SMART THINKING.

The old woman says THAT'S NOT YOUR FAULT.

The middle-aged female athlete says NO.

They both laugh.

Steve says
THE EDUCATION OF THE PUBLIC
HAS BEEN PHENOMENAL.
WHEN THEY CAME TO BRANTFORD
TWO YEARS AFTER
THOSE
CANADIAN GAMES
THAT STARTED IT
IN '75, WE, UH...
IT WAS NEW TO US,
DEALING WITH WHEELCHAIR PEOPLE
AND AMPUTEES.
ONCE WE GOT
OVER THAT INITIAL STRAIN,
I GUESS IT WOULD BE,
WE GOT COMFORTABLE WITH IT.
OBVIOUSLY, WHEN YOU'RE
DOING SOMETHING
LIKE THIS, YOU NEED
MANY QUALIFIED PEOPLE.

A clip shows athletes playing all types of Olympic sports.

Steve concludes THE ATTITUDE
IS THAT WE ARE A TEAM.
WE SAY, "WHEN'S THE NEXT SET
OF GAMES?"

(music plays)

The end credits roll.

Special thanks to athletes, organizers and volunteers.

Producer/Director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 1987, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: The Goal Is Personal Best