Transcript: Round Trip: Parry Sound - London | Sep 05, 1988

[airplane sounds]

On a black screen, yellow words float around. They read "Round Trip. Parry Sound-London."

A man on a radio says FIRST CHECKS AT MINIMUM --
ICE PROTECTION'S OFF.
WINDOW HEAT GOING ON.
RADIO MASTER ON.
ALL THE FLIGHT -- INSTRUMENT
SWITCH, CLICK NORMAL --

[beep]

(music plays)

The UK Parliament appears.

A Female Narrator says IN THE SPRING OF 1985,
CLARINETIST JAMES CAMPBELL
GAVE ONE OF HIS MANY
CONCERTS IN LONDON.
AN IDEA OCCURRED TO HIM THAT
ON HIS NEXT VISIT TO ENGLAND,
HE WOULD LIKE TO BRING OTHER
CANADIAN MUSICIANS TO PERFORM
WITH BRITISH ARTISTS
IN A CHAMBER SERIES.
HOWEVER, AS ARTISTIC DIRECTOR
OF THE FESTIVAL OF SOUND,
HE STILL HAD A BUSY SUMMER
AHEAD, INCLUDING PERFORMANCES
WITH BRITAIN'S ALLEGRI
STRING QUARTET.
BUT HIS IDEA OF A LONDON
CONCERT SERIES NEVER LEFT HIM,
AND HE WORKED HARD TO RAISE
FUNDS FOR THE VENTURE.

The caption changes to "James Cambell." James stands by a stair. He is in his thirties, with receding brown hair and clean-shaven. He’s wearing glasses, a blue sweater and a white shirt.

James says WHEN STARTING TO THINK ABOUT
ARTISTS, I BEGAN TO JOT DOWN
THE ODD NAME, AND AS IT TURNED
OUT IT WAS PEOPLE WHO I WAS
INVITING OR WHO WERE
COMING TO THE FESTIVAL,
THE SOUND IN THE SUMMER.
AND THIS IS ACTUALLY -- IT WAS
AT THIS POINT REALLY THAT I
THOUGHT, WELL, WHY DON'T WE
JUST TAKE THE FESTIVAL OF THE
SOUND TO LONDON, BECAUSE UNTIL
THAT POINT IT WAS JUST A
GENERAL IDEA OF A HANDS
ACROSS THE WATER IDEA.
SO I WENT TO MY BOARD AND, OF
COURSE, GOT THEIR BACKING.
SO WE LOOKED AND I THOUGHT,
WELL, MARK DUBOIS IS ALWAYS A
VERY POPULAR PERFORMER IN
CANADA, BUT HE HADN'T GOTTEN
AROUND TO DOING HIS
LONDON DEBUT YET.
I MEAN, HE JUST HADN'T -- HE'S
JUST TOO BUSY DOING OTHER
THINGS AND HE JUST
HADN'T SORT OF DONE IT.
SO I THOUGHT, WELL, THIS
WOULD BE A TERRIFIC VENUE
FOR HIM TO DO THAT.
SO I ASKED HIM, AND HE
WAS VERY HAPPY TO DO IT.
AND THEN DID WHAT I THOUGHT
WAS TAKING A BIT OF A CHANCE
AND SAID, WELL, WOULD YOU SING
BENJAMIN BRITTEN AND
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, WHICH OF
COURSE PEOPLE HERE IN ENGLAND
KNOW THOSE PIECES EXTREMELY WELL
AND THERE'S A TRADITION OF HOW
TENORS SING THOSE PIECES.
BUT I FELT MARK COULD DO IT.

Mark looks at a musical score. A blond woman sits at a piano. Mark is in his thirties, clean-shaven with brown hair. He’s wearing a blue and white sweater.

Mark says NOW, WHY WOULD I BE SINGING
THIS KIND OF MUSIC IN ENGLAND,
A GOOD CANADIAN BOY LIKE ME?
BECAUSE I WANT TO.
I FEEL THAT FOLK MUSIC IN
GENERAL SHOULD NOT BE LABELLED
INTO THE DIFFERENT AREAS THAT
IT HAPPENED TO BE BORN WITH.

The caption changes to "Mark DuBois."

Mark continues JUST BECAUSE IT HAPPENS TO BE
A REALIZATION OF AN ENGLISH
FOLK SONG DOESN'T MEAN THAT
THERE ISN'T A GOOD VERSION
THAT COULD BE HAD IF A TORONTO
BOY WERE TO MAKE AN ATTEMPT
AT SINGING IT.
ALTHOUGH, ALL MY BACKGROUND
IS TRINITY COLLEGE LONDON,
I DON'T SING THESE IN THAT WAY.
AND HERE I AM, TAKING A VERY
ENGLISH THING TO A VERY
ENGLISH TOWN IN A VERY
ENGLISH HALL BUT WITH A VERY
TORONTONIAN CANADIAN
INTERPRETATION.
SO, WIGMORE HALL WHICH
IS KNOWN FOR RECITALS,
KNOWN FOR BRITAIN.
THE FIRST AND LAST THING YOU
SEE AS YOU GO ONTO THE HALL IS
A PICTURE OF BENJAMIN -- PETER
PEARS WHICH TOTALLY MAKES YOU
LOSE IT AS SOON AS YOU WALK
IN, AND THEN THERE'S ME,
STANDING UP THERE
TRYING TO SING.
BUT IT'S FUN.

The blond woman plays the piano.
The caption changes to "Britten. The Ploughboy."

Mark sings A FLAXEN-HEADED COWBOY,
AS SIMPLE AS MAY BE,
AND NEXT A MERRY PLOUGH BOY,
I WHISTLED O'ER THE LEA;
BUT NOW A SAUCY FOOTMAN,
I STRUT IN WORSTED LACE,
AND SOON I'LL BE A BUTLER,
AND WHEY MY JOLLY FACE.
WHEN STEWARD I'M PROMOTED I'LL
SNIP THE TRADESMEN'S BILL,
MY MASTER'S COFFERS EMPTY,
MY POCKETS FOR TO FILL
WHEN LOLLING IN MY CHARIOT
SO GREAT A MAN I'LL BE,
SO GREAT A MAN, SO GREAT A
MAN, SO GREAT A MAN I'LL BE,
YOU'LL FORGET THE LITTLE
PLOUGH BOY WHO WHISTLED
O'ER THE LEA
YOU'LL FORGET THE LITTLE
PLOUGH BOY WHO WHISTLED
O'ER THE LEA
I'LL BUY VOTES AT ELECTIONS,
AND WHEN I'VE MADE THE PELF,
I'LL STAND POLL FOR
THE PARLIAMENT,
AND THEN VOTE IN MYSELF
WHATEVER'S GOOD FOR ME,
SIR, I NEVER WILL OPPOSE:
WHEN ALL MY AYES ARE SOLD OFF,
WHY THEN I'LL SELL MY NOES
I'LL JOKE, HARANGUE
AND PARAGRAPH,
WITH SPEECHES
CHARM THE EARS,
AND WHEN I'M TIRED ON MY LEGS,
THEN I'LL SIT DOWN A PEER
IN COURT OR CITY HONOURED
SO GREAT A MAN I'LL BE,
SO GREAT A MAN, SO GREAT A
MAN, SO GREAT A MAN I'LL BE,
YOU'LL FORGET THE LITTLE
PLOUGH BOY WHO WHISTLED
O'ER THE LEA
YOU'LL FORGET THE LITTLE
PLOUGH BOY WHO WHISTLED
O'ER THE LEA.

[applause]

A concert hall reads "Wigmore Hall."

[general chatter]

After a concert is over, people talk on their way out.

A man wearing a suit says I THINK HE WAS A SUPER TENOR,
ABSOLUTELY, FIRST CLASS.

A man wearing glasses says WELL, SO FAR I THINK IT'S AN
ABSOLUTELY DELIGHTFUL CONCERT.
IT'S MARVELLOUS TO HEAR THE
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS AGAIN AFTER
SUCH -- AND SUCH A
SENSITIVE PERFORMANCE.

A young woman says IT'S REALLY NICE TO SEE
CANADIAN MUSICIANS OVER HERE,
She laughs and continues I THOUGHT, AND YOU KNOW, BOTH
OF US HAVE HEARD MARK BEFORE
IN CANADA, AND IT'S NICE TO
BE IN LONDON TO SEE IT ALL
HAPPENING HERE.

An old man says I HAVE A HOME IN TORONTO AND
SO I LISTEN -- I GO QUITE
OFTEN TO THE
SAINT LAWRENCE CENTRE.
IN FACT, I WAS THERE ONLY LAST
MONDAY TO HEAR ANTON KUERTI.
WELL, I LOVE MARK
DUBOIS SINGING.
VALERIE, OF COURSE, WE KNOW.
SHE'S A VERY EXCELLENT
PIANIST, AND JAMES CAMPBELL IS
ABOUT THE BEST
WE'VE GOT IN CANADA.
NO QUESTION ABOUT IT.
I THOUGHT HE SANG BEAUTIFULLY
TONIGHT, ESPECIALLY THE BRITTEN.
IT WAS ABSOLUTELY PERFECT.

[general chatter]

The Female Narrator says THE FIRST WIGMORE
HALL CONCERT OVER AND A
STUNNING SUCCESS.
NOW TIME FOR MUSICIANS
TO SHARE DINNER WITH
FAMILY AND FRIENDS.
HOW DOES MARK DUBOIS, ONE OF
THE STARS OF THE EVENING,
FEEL AFTER A PERFORMANCE?

At a restaurant, Mark says WELL, I THINK I'M MORE
UPTIGHT WHEN IT'S OVER.
WORRYING ABOUT WHETHER I'D
DONE IT RIGHT, THAN WHEN
I'M ACTUALLY DOING IT.
I THINK ONCE YOU'RE ON THE
STAGE AND THE PEOPLE ARE THERE
AND YOU HEAR THE MUSIC,
IT'S TIME TO LET ALL THAT
PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AND ALL
THE YEARS OF DOING IT JUST
TAKE OVER, AND I THINK YOU
HAVE TO HAVE THE CONFIDENCE
TO SORT OF FALL BACK
ON THAT PART OF IT.
BUT ONCE YOU WALK OFF STAGE,
IT'S ONLY YOU AGAIN AND YOU
HAVE TO THINK, WELL, NOW, DID
I DO THAT RIGHT, OR WAS THAT
NOTE EXACTLY WHERE I WANTED,
AND CHANCES ARE, MOST OF US
ARE VERY CRITICAL OF OURSELVES.
AND I FIND THAT I'M USUALLY
SITTING THERE
CRITICIZING MYSELF.
I EVEN GO THROUGH THE SCORE
AND SAY NOW, I SHOULD HAVE
SUNG THAT DIFFERENTLY, OR
I SHOULD HAVE DONE THIS.
IT'S -- I'M MORE SCARED
WHEN I'M OFF STAGE THAN
WHEN I'M ON STAGE.

A group of people have dinner at a restaurant.

The caption changes to "Diana Jervis- Read Cultural Representative. Ministry of Culture and Communications Ontario House, London." Diana stands in an office. She’s in her early forties, with shoulder-length blond hair. She’s wearing a black and blue jacket and a brooch.

Diana says WELL, JAMES CAME
TO US QUITE A WHILE
AGO WITH THE IDEA OF COMING
TO LONDON AND TRYING TO DO
SOMETHING AT THE WIGMORE HALL,
AND WE THOUGHT IT WAS A GREAT
IDEA, AND ALSO THE RIGHT TIME.
JAMES HAS BUILT A SUBSTANTIAL
CAREER IN CANADA AND HAS BEEN
TO BRITAIN MANY TIMES.
AND WE THOUGHT THAT THE TIME
IS RIGHT TO REALLY CAPITALIZE
ON IT AND TRY TO MAKE
A BIG SPLASH IN LONDON.
SO HIS IDEA OF HAVING A SERIES
WAS A GOOD ONE AND BRINGING IN
A NUMBER OF ONTARIO AND
OTHER ARTISTS FROM DIFFERENT
PROVINCES, AS WELL AS
INCLUDING AN ENGLISH GROUP, AN
ENGLISH SOLOIST, AND MAKING A
REAL FESTIVAL AT THE WIGMORE
HALL WHICH IS THE BEST VENUE
FOR THAT KIND OF THING.
AND WE HAVE WORKED FOR OVER
A YEAR NOW WITH MANAGERS AND
AGENTS IN CANADA AND THEIR
COUNTERPARTS IN LONDON TO
ORGANIZE IT AND GET LOTS OF
PUBLICITY, AND WE KICKED THE
THING OFF A WEEK AGO WITH A
BIG PRESS LUNCH WHICH WAS
A BIG SUCCESS.
AND THE FIRST CONCERT, AS
YOU KNOW, HAS ALSO BEEN
A GREAT SUCCESS.

Flags flap in a large classical building.

Curtis sits in an office. He’s in his fifties, with a moustache and gray hair. He’s wearing a dark blue suit, a white shirt and a blue tie.

Curtis says WE HAVE A MUSIC
RECITAL SERIES.
YOUNG CANADIAN ARTISTS, EITHER
RESIDENT IN THE UNITED KINGDOM
OR WILLING TO COME OVER FOR
A RECITAL WILL BE PRESENTED
HERE, ONE TO TWO
RECITALS PER MONTH.

The caption changes to "Curtis Barlow, Director Canada House Cultural Centre London."

Curtis continues I'M VERY INTERESTED IN
CANADIAN ARTISTS PERFORMING
OR BEING PRESENTED IN VENUES
OUTSIDE OF CANADA HOUSE, AS
WELL, BECAUSE I FEEL THAT
THAT WILL OFFER AS MUCH,
IF NOT MORE, VISIBILITY IN
THE UNITED KINGDOM ITSELF.
JAMES CAMPBELL IS A
GOOD EXAMPLE OF THAT.
JAMES, ON HIS OWN INITIATIVE,
BROUGHT THE FESTIVAL OF SOUND
OVER TO LONDON FOR A THREE
PERFORMANCE SEASON,
AS IT WERE, AT
THE WIGMORE HALL.
WE ASSISTED FINANCIALLY WITH
THE PROMOTIONAL ASPECTS OF THAT.
WE'VE ALSO ASSISTED WITH THE
PROMOTION ITSELF THROUGH OUR
OWN MAILINGS, TRYING TO
ORGANIZE INTERVIEWS, TRYING TO
FACILITATE TO MAKE SURE THAT
THE CORRECT PEOPLE GET TO SEE
JAMES, SO THAT THE CRITICS
COME SO THAT IT'S REVIEWED,
AS IT HAS BEEN.

Three men play violin. Sophie and a man sit next to them holding cellos.

A man says NATURALLY, THE ALLEGRI QUARTET
WOULD FORM THE BASIS OF THE
STRING QUARTET BASIS TO THE
SERIES BECAUSE THEY HAVE BEEN
OVER TO THE FESTIVAL OF SOUND
AND I HAVE BEEN WORKING WITH
THEM FOR THE LAST
FIVE OR SIX YEARS.
SOPHIE ROLLAND STUDIES IN
LONDON AND HAS BEEN FOR THE
LAST COUPLE OF YEARS.

Sophie counts in French and starts playing the cello. She’s in her twenties, with brown hair tied-up. She’s wearing a white blouse and a long blue skirt.

Sophie says PLAYING WITH THE QUARTET,
AN ESTABLISHED QUARTET, IS A
COMPLETELY DIFFERENT MATTER.
FOR ME, I CAME DOWN.
YOU KNOW, THEY'VE BEEN PLAYING
TOGETHER FOR SUCH A LONG TIME.
THEY'VE BEEN -- THEY
ARE USED TO EACH OTHER.
THE FIRST REHEARSAL, YOU KNOW,
I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO DIE,
AND THEY PUT ME AT EASE RIGHT
AWAY AND THE RELATION BECAME
SO THERE IS A HUMAN
POINT OF VIEW RIGHT AWAY.
AND THEN THERE IS, OF COURSE,
THE MUSICAL POINT OF VIEW.
BUT I FIND THAT WITH THE
ALLEGRI, THE TWO WERE WONDERFUL.
THE HUMAN POINT OF VIEW,
THEY ARE VERY WONDERFUL MAN,
EXTREMELY WARM.
THEY'RE ALL VERY SYMPATHIQUE
PEOPLE, AND MUSICALLY
THEY ARE GREAT ARTISTS.
SO I REALLY... IT
WAS A PRIVILEGE.
AND I HAD A GREAT TIME.
IT WAS WONDERFUL.

A man says SOPHIE IS A MARVELLOUS
CELLIST AND A SOLOIST, AND WE
WERE A LITTLE BIT ANXIOUS
POSSIBLY THAT IT MIGHT BE A
VEHICLE FOR A SOLOIST, BUT SHE
IN THE REHEARSALS GRADUALLY
BEGAN TO FEEL MORE AND MORE
FOR WHAT WE WERE TRYING TO DO.
AND I THINK WE TRIED TO MEET
HER A LITTLE BIT AND WE MADE A
VERY INTERESTING PERFORMANCE
OUT OF IT, I FEEL.
I HOPE SHE ENJOYED IT.
WE DID.

A male violinist says YOU WOULD MOVE WHENEVER YOU
THINK NECESSARY AND WITH AS
MUCH -- I THINK THE SAME IN
THE BEGINNING OF THE PIECE.

Sophie says A LITTLE LIGHTER ON THE
SECOND BEAT, DO YOU MIND?

The male violinist says I SHOULDN'T AT ALL, NO.
WHEN YOU PLAY --

Sophie plays the cello.

Sophie says VIENNESE SORT OF.

They all play.

Sophie hums.

Sophie says SO IS IT ONE MEASURE, SHOULD
I DO IT ONE MEASURE EARLIER?
I THINK --

The male violinist says TWO, THREE.

Sophie says YEAH, SO BECAUSE I
STILL HAVE PROMP POMP.

The male violinist says WE TEND TO COME DOWN.

Sophie says OKAY, BECAUSE I HAVE NOTHING
WRITTEN AND I'M USED TO...

The five of them play.

The caption changes to "Schubert. Quintet in C major D.956."

The male violinist says SORRY, YOU COULDN'T
PLAY A BIT MORE SIMPLY.

The male cellist says YES, I COULD.
WHAT'S THE DYNAMIC?

The male violinist says I SIMPLY CAN'T HEAR IT.

The male cellist says SO DIFFERENT.

The male violinist says WELL, YES, BUT THE
BALANCE ISN'T QUITE RIGHT.
I'M AFRAID WE'RE GOING
TO ASK YOU TO PLAY SOFT.
[laughing]

(music plays)

The male violinist says MUSTN'T PLAY TOO LOUD.

Sophie says OKAY.

James says JOHN YORK, THE PIANIST, HAS
BEEN MY SIDEKICK FOR ABOUT
17 YEARS, AND WE'VE BEEN PLAYING
ALL OVER THE PLACE IN CANADA
AND IN EUROPE TOGETHER.
SO HE, OF COURSE, WOULD BE
A NATURAL FOR THE SERIES.

In a house, James plays the clarinet next to John, who plays the piano. John is in his thirties, with a beard and shaggy brown hair. He’s wearing glasses and a white pullover.

The caption changes to "Schubert. Introduction to The Shepherd on the Rock."

James says YOU'VE PROBABLY SEEN MORE
OF CANADA THAN MOST CANADIANS.
YOU'VE BEEN IN EVERY PROVINCE.

John says I'VE BEEN IN EVERY PROVINCE
AND RIGHT UP NORTH IN MANY OF
THE -- DO YOU REMEMBER THAT
TIME WE RIGHT UP THE THOMPSON
IN MANITOBA?

James says OH, GOSH.

John says YEAH, THAT WAS GOOD FUN
AND THE PLANE GOT STOPPED.
WE COULDN'T TAKE OFF, AND WE
HAD TO STAY OVERNIGHT AGAIN
AND TAKE OFF THE NEXT
DAY OR SOMETHING?

James says THAT WAS THE BEGINNING OF
A RATHER LONG TOUR, TOO,
WASN'T IT?

John says YES.

James says WASN'T THAT THE 50 CONCERTS
IN 50 DAY TOUR THAT WE DID
FOR JEUNESSE?

John says EXACTLY THAT, YES.

James says EVERYWHERE IN CANADA.

John says EVERYWHERE.
WE PLAYED IN -- RIGHT, I
REMEMBER THAT TERRIFIC TRIP WE
DID FOR A CONCERT IN NORTHERN
QUEBEC SOMEWHERE, BAIE-COMEAU
OR SOMEWHERE LIKE THAT.
WE DROVE TO MONTREAL AIRPORT,
LEFT THE ONE CAR THERE.
FLEW TO TORONTO.
TOOK ANOTHER CAR FROM THERE AND
DROVE ALL THE WAY TO COCHRANE.

James says OH, AND THEN YOU PHONED UP
THE PERSON WHO WAS ORGANIZING
THE CONCERT AND YOU SAID,
HELLO, THIS IS JOHN YORK.
WE'RE HERE FOR THE
CONCERT, AND HE SAYS,
OH, OKAY, I'LL ARRANGE ONE.
[laughing]
WE'D DONE TWO DAYS TRAVELLING.

The Female Narrator says A CONCERT AT THE GERMAN
SCHOOL WAS SPONSORED BY THE
RICHMOND CONCERT SOCIETY, ONE
OF HUNDREDS OF MUSIC CLUBS
IN BRITAIN.

A black and white drawing shows high-class 18th century people playing the violin. A caption reads "Richmond Concert Society."

The caption changes to "John York."

John says THE MUSIC CLUB SCENE IN THIS
COUNTRY IS A VERY STRONG,
VERY OLD NETWORK OF ESTABLISHED
SERIES OF CONCERTS THAT HAPPEN
IN PRETTY WELL EVERY TOWN.
SOME OF THE CLUBS ARE VERY
RICH, AND THEY HAVE A BIG
SERIES OF FAMOUS PEOPLE.
OTHER CLUBS ARE VERY SMALL AND
ONLY TAKE MAYBE ONE CELEBRITY
CONCERT AND FOUR OR FIVE
CONCERTS OF YOUNG UP AND COMING
PEOPLE OR COMPETITION WINNERS
OR SOMETHING LIKE THAT TO GET
THEM ON THE CHEAP --
A BIT CHEAPER.
BUT THEY'RE A VERY VALUABLE
ROUND THAT ONE GOES THROUGH
EVERY YEAR.
YOU DON'T PLAY AT THE SAME
CLUBS EVERY YEAR BUT YOU APPLY
TO ALL THE MUSIC CLUBS AND
THEY ALL TAKE YOU SOME YEARS.

Fiona says HOPEFULLY YOU'RE
ASKED BACK AGAIN.

John says YES, HOPEFULLY YOU GET
ASKED BACK AGAIN MAYBE YEAR
OR THE YEAR AFTER.
AND THE TRUTH OF THE MATTER IS
THAT MOST MUSIC CLUBS WANT A
PIANO RECITAL AND A VIOLIN
RECITAL AND A VOICE RECITAL
EVERY YEAR FROM SOMEBODY OR
OTHER BECAUSE THAT'S THE MOST
POPULAR SORT OF -- AND STRING
QUARTETS IF THEY CAN AFFORD IT.
THEY'RE THE MOST
POPULAR CONCERTS.

The caption changes to "Fiona York." She’s in her early thirties, with short curly blond hair. She’s wearing a white shirt with pink stripes and a long red patterned skirt.

Fiona says THAT'S REALLY MUSIC LOVERS,
LOCAL PEOPLE WHO MAY BELONG TO
THE CLUB FOR PART OF THEIR
ENTERTAINMENT GENERALLY, AND
THEY'LL BUY SEASON TICKETS,
AND GENERAL PEOPLE WHO BUY
RECORDS AND LISTEN TO THE
RADIO 3 OR WHATEVER WHO MAY --
SOME OF THEM MAY KNOW A LOT
ABOUT MUSIC AND OTHERS MAY
JUST LIKE IT AND BE PREPARED
TO GO ALONG AND LISTEN TO
SOMETHING NEW.

Fiona and John sit next to two little boys playing on the ground.

John says AND OF COURSE THEY GET THEM
FOR A SUBSCRIPTION, A VERY LOW
SUBSCRIPTION, THEY'LL PROBABLY
GET FIVE CONCERTS FOR MAYBE
SIX POUNDS.
VERY CHEAP AND THIS IS ONE
OF THE BIG CRITICISMS OF THE
MUSIC CLUB SCENE THAT THEY
WILL PAY REDUCED FEES TO THE
ARTISTS BECAUSE THEY DON'T GET
ENOUGH MONEY IN ON THE DOOR.
BUT THEY ARE ALSO HEAVILY
SUPPORTED BY THE ARTS COUNCIL,
SO THAT'S HOW IT AFFORDS,
YOU KNOW, REGULAR CONCERTS
WITH BIG NAMES.

[telephone ringing]

The caption changes to "Valerie Tryon." Valerie is in her forties, with curly blond hair. She’s wearing earrings and a white blouse.

Valerie says WELL, I'VE PLAYED FOR THIS
SOCIETY FOR A LONG TIME SINCE
I BEGAN, AND THEY'RE A
VERY FRIENDLY AUDIENCE.
THEY WILL LOVE IT TONIGHT
AND ENJOY IT THOROUGHLY.
THE ALLEGRI, THEY PROBABLY
KNOW, AND JIM I THINK HAS
NEVER PLAYED AT RICHMOND
BEFORE, SO THEY'LL BE THRILLED
TO BITS TO HEAR HIM.
I HAVE TO PLAY A FEW SOLOS AS
WELL, RACHMANINOFF PRELUDES,
AND I AM ACTUALLY A PATRON
FOR WHICH I FEEL A LITTLE BIT
GUILTY BECAUSE I DON'T THINK I
DONATED VERY MUCH AT THE START.
Valerie laughs and continues
BUT IT'S A
FLOURISHING SOCIETY.

[general chatter]
People sit in a concert hall.

The caption changes to "Peter Carter. Leader Allegri String Quartet."

Peter sits on a stage. He’s in his fifties, clean-shaven with light brown hair. He’s wearing a black tuxedo.

Peter says ALWAYS WORTH READING THE
PROGRAM IN CASE THEY TELL YOU
SOMETHING THAT YOU DIDN'T KNOW
ABOUT THE MUSIC THAT YOU OUGHT
TO BE SHOWING TO THE AUDIENCE.
SO WHENEVER I HAVE TIME, I
READ THEM TO MAKE SURE THAT
I'M DOING IT THE RIGHT WAY.
YEAH.

The caption changes to "Keith Lovell. Allegri String Quartet."

Keith plays the violin. He’s in his forties, with brown hair. He’s wearing a black tuxedo.

The caption changes to "Bruno Schrecker. Allegri String Quartet." Bruno holds a cello. He’s in his fifties, clean-shaven with receding gray hair. He’s wearing glasses and a black tuxedo.

Bruno says THIS IS IN EVERY NERVOUS
STRING PLAYER HABIT,
PUTTING RESIN ON THE BOW.
PUTTING RESIN ON THE BOW WHEN
IT DOESN'T ACTUALLY NEED IT.
YOU ALWAYS DO IT
BEFORE A CONCERT.

The caption changes to "David Roth. Allegri String Quartet." David is in his fifties, with a white beard and receding hair. He’s wearing a black tuxedo.

David says BEAUTIFUL.
WHEN ARE WE GOING TO
PARRY SOUND AGAIN?

David plays the violin.

James adds a piece to the clarinet and says IT WOULDN'T WORK.
MAKE SURE I GET
THE RIGHT PARTS.

Bruno says SUCCESSFUL.
CAN'T SEE.

[general chatter]

The musicians bow.

[applause]

A man says VALERIE TRYON IS A NATURAL
BECAUSE SHE IS VERY FAMOUS IN
ENGLAND IN THE '60s PLAYING
WITH ALL THE ORCHESTRAS,
AND NOW SHE'S WELL
KNOWN IN CANADA.

Valerie says WHEN I LEFT ENGLAND, I
WAS NEVER AN ACCOMPANIST.
I DIDN'T DO VERY MUCH CHAMBER
MUSIC, NOT BECAUSE I
DIDN'T WANT TO, BUT BECAUSE
THE OPPORTUNITY DIDN'T SEEM
TO ARISE.
BUT SINCE I'VE BEEN IN CANADA,
I'VE DONE A LOT OF CHAMBER
MUSIC AND ACCOMPANYING,
AND I LOVE IT.
I REALLY ENJOY IT.
I LIKE -- IT'S RATHER LONELY
BEING A SOLOIST, AND THE PEOPLE
I MIX WITH IN CANADA
ARE SO DELIGHTFUL.
I HAVE JUST A WONDERFUL TIME.
SO THIS KIND OF CONCERT
IS NICE AND EASY FOR ME.
THERE'S NO TENSION ABOUT IT
AND I FEEL I'M BEING A HELP,
WHICH IS A BIT LESS EGOTISTIC
THAN BEING THE STAR OF THE SHOW.

The caption changes to "Prokofiev. Overture on Hebrew Themes Op. 34."

Wearing a long blue dress, Valerie plays the piano on stage next to the violinists and cellists.

(classical music plays)

[applause]

An old woman says OH, I THINK WE'RE AWFUL LUCKY
IN RICHMOND TO HAVE SUCH A
PLACE TO COME TO REALLY.
WE'VE GOT LOTS OF CHURCHES
HERE BUT, OF COURSE,
THIS IS SO MODERN.
ONE HAS TO ADAPT TO IT REALLY.
BECAUSE MUSICIANS OF THIS
CALIBRE, WELL, THEY'RE WORTH
LISTENING TO
ANYWHERE, AREN'T THEY?
SO WE THINK OUR GALA EVENING
IS ABSOLUTELY SPLENDID.

A middle-aged woman says I'VE RECENTLY BECOME A MEMBER
OF THE RICHMOND CONCERT
SOCIETY SO IT'S VERY MUCH A
NEW THING FOR ME, BUT I'M
VERY IMPRESSED INDEED,
ENJOYING IT VERY MUCH.

An old man wearing a suit says THIS YEAR IS THE 25th
ANNIVERSARY OF THE RICHMOND
MUSIC SOCIETY.
IT'S BEEN VERY WELL
ESTABLISHED IN THE AREA AND, OF
COURSE, IT'S VERY WELL SUPPORTED
BY, WELL, I SUPPOSE ONE COULD
SAY BY THE INTELLECTUAL
ELEMENT OF THE TOWN.
BUT THEY HAVE SOME SIMPLY
WONDERFUL CONCERTS AND OF
COURSE IT'S EXTREMELY
GOOD VALUE AS WELL.

A young man says HERE, IT'S VERY CLOSED.
IT'S A SMALL FLOOR.
I THINK THE MUSICIANS -- WE
FEEL AS THOUGH THEY'RE PLAYING
TO US, AND I THINK AS THOUGH
THEY'RE PLAYING -- YOU KNOW,
THEY'RE PLAYING TO SOMEONE
WHO'S REALLY INTERESTED.
AND THAT MAKES A GREAT DEAL OF
DIFFERENCE, I THINK, TO THE
PROGRAM, AND IT MAKES A
DIFFERENCE TO THE ATMOSPHERE
OF THE PLACE WHICH IS WHAT THE
IMPORTANCE TO THE RICHMOND
CONCERT SOCIETY, I THINK.

The Female Narrator says SOPHIE ROLLAND LIVES IN
HAMPSTEAD IN A QUIET,
ATTRACTIVE NEIGHBOURHOOD
WITH A HISTORIC PAST.
THE HOUSE SHE SHARES WITH
OTHER YOUNG MUSICIANS OFFERS
PRIVATE QUARTERS, UNRESTRICTED
PRACTICE HOURS, AND A
FAMILY ATMOSPHERE.

A street sign reads "Rosslyn Hill N. W."

The caption changes to "Sophie Rolland."

Sophie says THIS HOUSE WAS BUILT IN 1742
AND HOUSES OF THIS PERIOD
HAVE NOT BEEN KEPT IN
CONDITION OF FAMILY HOUSES.
THIS ONE HAS BEEN TRANSFORMED
JUST A LITTLE BIT, JUST
PERFECTLY, YOU KNOW, AND
THE OWNER OF THIS HOUSE,
Dr. CHRISTOPHER EVANS,
HE'S A LOVER OF MUSIC.
HE LOVES IT VERY, VERY MUCH.
HE HAS -- GOD, I CAN'T
REMEMBER HOW MANY PIANOS,
SOMETHING LIKE FOUR OR FIVE
GRAND PIANOS IN THE HOUSE.
AND HIS WAY OF CONTRIBUTING
TO THE ARTS IS GIVING THE
CHANCE TO A YOUNG MUSICIAN TO
LIVE IN THIS WONDERFUL PLACE.
AND OVER THE YEARS HE'S HAD A
NUMBER -- NUMBER OF MUSICIANS,
SOME OF THEM HAVE BECOME
EXTREMELY FAMOUS.
PEOPLE LIKE LEE DEMYANKOVICH.
NEXT DOOR YOU HAVE
CRAIG SHEPPARD.
REALLY FANTASTIC PEOPLE AND
HE'S HELPED THEM OUT BY GIVING
THEM A WONDERFUL PLACE
TO LIVE AND TO GROW.

The caption changes to "Doctor Christopher Evans." Christopher sits on an armchair. He’s in his sixties, clean-shaven with receding hair. He’s wearing glasses. a light green jacket, a blue sweater and a white striped shirt-

Christopher says I ALWAYS VOWED WHEN I WAS A
YOUNG MAN THAT NOTHING WOULD
INDUCE ME TO LIVE IN
LONDON AT ANY TIME.
I SO HATED IT, AND I'VE
LIVED HERE NOW FOR 35 YEARS.
AND I JUST CAN'T IMAGINE
BEING ANYWHERE ELSE.
BUT THAT IS BECAUSE THIS HOUSE
HAS BECOME A SORT OF WORLD
IN ITSELF.
I DON'T REALLY FEEL
THAT I'M IN LONDON.
I CAN FORGET LONDON AND JUST
CARRY ON HERE, SELF-CONTAINED,
RATHER.

The caption changes to "Beethoven. Trio in B flat Op. 11."

Sophie, James and John play classical music in a living room.

Sophie says AS FAR AS JIM AND JOHN,
WE ACTUALLY PLAYED TOGETHER
BEFORE, AND WE PLAYED IN --
WITH JIM, I'VE PLAYED
QUITE A LOT, ACTUALLY.
WE WERE IN CHINA TOGETHER, AND
THEN WE'VE PLAYED IN DIFFERENT
FESTIVALS IN QUEBEC, AT
THE ORFORD FESTIVAL,
AND THEY ARE BOTH
EXTRAORDINARY MUSICIANS
AND IT'S WONDERFUL FOR ME
TO BE ABLE TO PLAY WITH
PEOPLE LIKE THAT.
IT'S REALLY A GREAT, GREAT
PRIVILEGE AND A LEARNING
EXPERIENCE ALL THE TIME,
AND NOT -- WHAT CAN BE MORE
FANTASTIC THAN LEARNING AND
HAVING FUN AT THE SAME TIME?

They continue playing.

John says DO YOU WANT MORE TIME
AFTER THAT TOP F LIKE THIS...
DO YOU WANT MORE
TIME THERE OR NOT?

Sophie says A LITTLE BIT.
NOT SO MUCH, BUT I'M A LITTLE
WORRIED IS THE END OF MY
CRESCENDO, I'M
GOING TO SO LOW.
IF IT'S NOT TO...
THERE'S SO MUCH I
CAN DO, YOU KNOW?
I CANNOT...

John says DO TOO MUCH THERE.

Sophie says IF IT'S POSSIBLE.

John says SUPPORT IT MORE.

Christopher says I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO TELL YOU
ABOUT MY LOVE OF MUSIC EXCEPT
I LOVE TO FEEL THERE'S MUSIC
GOING ON IN THE HOUSE AND THAT
THE HOUSE IS BEING USED IN
THAT SORT OF A WAY, YOU KNOW,
AND THAT I CAN BE PART OF IT.
IT'S LOVELY.

The Female Narrator says EARLY MORNING TRAFFIC ON THE
ROAD BETWEEN LONDON AND OXFORD
THINS OUT AS YOU
APPROACH OXFORD.
JAMES CAMPBELL AND THE ALLEGRI
STRING QUARTET PLAN TO REHEARSE
IN THE HISTORIC HOLYWELL
MUSIC ROOM IN THIS BEAUTIFUL
UNIVERSITY TOWN.

People walk down the street.

The caption changes to "Mozart. Quintet in A major K. 581."

James and the Allegri String Quartet play classical music in a church.

James says WELL, I WONDER HOW MANY TIMES
THAT PIECE HAS BEEN PLAYED
HERE IN THIS HALL.

Keith says IT'S ALWAYS BEEN IN THE
CHARTS, I SUPPOSE, HASN'T IT?

David says EVER SINCE IT'S BEEN WRITTEN.

Peter says I WONDER HOW MANY TIMES
THIS FIDDLE'S PLAYED IT.
THIS FIDDLE'S ABOUT THE SAME
AGE AS THE HALL, 1750, I THINK.

James says 1750 AND THE
HALL WAS 17--

Peter says '48.

David says ALL OUR INSTRUMENTS
EXCEPT YOURS.

James says THIS ONE IS 1985.

Keith says HOW MANY TIMES --

David says PLAYED IT IN THIS HALL.

James laughs.

James says TWICE.
TWO OR THREE TIMES.

Bruno says WELL, YOUR INSTRUMENT IS NICE
AND SHINY, SO IS THIS AND A
LITTLE KID CAME UP TO ME AND
SAID, THAT CELLO IS LOVELY
AND SHINY.
IS IT NEW, HE SAID.
I SAID, NO, AS A MATTER OF
FACT IT'S 300 YEARS OLD.
COR, HE SAID, HAVE YOU
HAD IT ALL THAT TIME?
SO I SAID, NO, I HAD ANOTHER
ONE BEFORE THIS ONE.

Bruno and James laugh.

The caption changes to "Leslie Thompson. Retired Music Critic. The Oxford Times."

Leslie is in his sixties, clean-shaven with receding white hair. He’s wearing a gray suit, a white shirt and a gray tie.

Leslie says IN THE EARLY DAYS,
HANDEL PERFORMED HERE.
HAYDEN PERFORMED HERE.
AND THE ROOM CHANGED ITS
GEOGRAPHY SOMEWHAT DURING LAST
CENTURY WHEN THEY HAD REMOVED
ALL THE FURNITURE THAT IS
AROUND THE ROOM NOW.
IT WAS A FLAT FLOOR.
IT WAS USED FOR MUSIC AND
THERE WERE ARMCHAIRS ALL OVER
THE PLACE, A COUPLE OF
GRAND PIANOS, AND SO ON.
BUT IN 1959 TO '60, THE THEN
HEAD, THE PROFESSOR OF MUSIC
HERE HAD THE PLACE RESTORED
TO WHAT IS PRESUMABLY ITS
ORIGINAL STATE AND AS WE SEE
IT NOW, IT'S AS UNDOUBTEDLY
HANDEL AND HAYDEN SAW IT.
IT'S AN IDEAL SIZE
FOR CHAMBER MUSIC.
THOSE PEOPLE WHO PLAY
HERE LOVE IT VERY MUCH.
WE WHO LISTEN HERE SO MUCH
LOVE IT VERY MUCH ALSO AND,
OF COURSE, WE HAVE THE ALLEGRI
STRING QUARTET VISITING US
VERY OFTEN INDEED, AND I SHOULD
SAY OUR REVERED ALLEGRI STRING
QUARTET, AND RECENT TIMES,
WE'VE HAD THE TREMENDOUS
PLEASURE OF WELCOMING
ROSEMARIE LANDRY AND JAMES
CAMPBELL, TWO MAGNIFICENT
ARTISTS WHO PLAY WITH THE
QUARTET AND THAT IS SOMETHING
VERY SPECIAL FOR US NOW.

[church bell ringing]

The caption changes to "Tom Wells, Agent General Ontario House, London." Tom is in his mid-sixties, with combed white hair and clean-shaven. He’s wearing a dark suit, an orange tie and a white shirt.

Tom says I GUESS BRITAIN, AND
PARTICULARLY LONDON, IS SUCH A
CULTURAL CENTRE THAT PEOPLE
HERE TEND TO BELIEVE THAT
EVERYTHING CULTURAL EVOLVES
AROUND LONDON AND WE LIKE TO
KEEP THEM CONTINUALLY AWARE
THAT WE DO HAVE A LOT OF
ARTISTS, OF SINGERS, OF
GREAT ORCHESTRAS, OF BALLET
COMPANIES, OF ARTISTS AND SO
FORTH, VIRTUOSO MUSICIANS IN
CANADA AND IN ONTARIO.
AND SO WE HELP THOSE PEOPLE
COME OVER HERE, PRESENT THEM
IN THIS VERY IMPORTANT MILIEU
HERE IN LONDON AND HELP THEM
GET A FOOTHOLD IN
THIS CULTURAL AREA.
NOW, DOING THAT HELPS
THEM AND IT HELPS ONTARIO
AND IT HELPS CANADA.

Two female singers sing German opera on a stage.

The Female Narrator says WITH JOHN YORK AT THE PIANO,
CANADIAN SOPRANO ROSEMARIE
LANDRY AND BRITISH
MEZZO-SOPRANO SARAH WALKER
REHEARSE IN WIGMORE HALL.
IT WAS OBVIOUS AN UNUSUAL
RAPPORT HAD DEVELOPED IN A
VERY SHORT TIME.

The caption changes to "Rosemarie Landry" and "Sarah Walker."

Sarah is in her fifties, with short gray hair. She’s wearing a blue dress under a dark silk jacket and a black necklace.

Sarah snaps her fingers and says JUST LIKE THAT.

Rosemarie is in her late forties, with short curly gray hair. She’s wearing square earrings and a pink blouse.

Rosemarie says YEAH, VERY.

Sarah says YEAH BUT WE'RE VERY LUCKY --
BECAUSE YOU DON'T DO THAT
WITH EVERYBODY, DO YOU?

Rosemarie says NO.
OH, MY GOD, NO.

Sarah says I MEAN, WE WERE VERY LUCKY.
WE'VE OBVIOUSLY GOT VERY
SIMILAR MUSIC TASTES.
WE'VE ALSO GOT SIMILAR VOICES.
THEY BLEND WELL.

Rosemarie says OH, YES, BUT YOURS IS ROUNDER
AND I'M TRYING TO MATCH.

Sarah says NO, MINE'S NOT --

Rosemarie says YES, YES, YES.

They laugh.

Rosemarie says WE JUST GOT ALONG
IMMEDIATELY.

Sarah says WE TALKED.

Rosemarie says WE IMMEDIATELY TALKED.

Sarah says WE BOTH LOVE CLOTHES.
YES, EXACTLY, CLOTHES
IS THE KEY TO EVERYTHING.

Rosemarie laughs.

Sarah says AND I'M ABOUT TO MAKE THIS
YOUNG GIRL SPEND ALL HER MONEY.

Rosemarie says THAT'S EASY TO DO, SARAH.

Sarah says YOU CAN RETURN THE
COMPLIMENT WHEN I COME OVER.
I LOVE SHOPPING IN CANADA.

Rosemarie says WELL, SHOPPING IN LONDON
IS QUITE SOMETHING.

Sarah says MM-HMM.

Rosemarie says YES.

Sarah says NOW WHAT ARE WE MEANT
TO TALK ABOUT, MUSIC?
YES, I'M SORRY, WOULD YOU
LIKE TO TALK ABOUT MUSIC?

They sing a German opera.
The caption changes to "Brahms. Die Schewestern Zwei."

Rosemarie says WE SHOULDN'T DO TOO MUCH.

Sarah says WOW, YOU SAY IT.

Rosemarie says WELL, I HOPE THIS
RELATIONSHIP WILL GO --
KEEP ON, ON THE OTHER
SIDE OF THE ATLANTIC.

Sarah says ME, TOO.

Rosemarie says I WOULD BE SO HAPPY.
I HOPE TO BE ABLE TO -- I
DON'T KNOW, SOMETHING HAS
TO COME UP.

Sarah says WELL, MAYBE WE COULD HAVE A
COLLABORATION AT THE FESTIVAL
OF THE SOUND ON YOUR
SIDE OF THE ATLANTIC.

Rosemarie says YES.

Sarah says AS OPPOSED TO OVER HERE.

Rosemarie says JIM WILL HAVE US AT
THE FESTIVAL OF THE SOUND

Sarah says YES, PLEASE, JIM.
NO, WE'D VERY MUCH LIKED TO.

Rosemarie says YES.

Sarah says AND I'D LIKE TO
DO SOME RECORDINGS.
I'D LIKE TO RECORD
SOME OF THESE DUETS.
MAYBE WHEN WE ARE OVER
THERE, WE COULD DO THAT.
HERE YOU ARE, WE'RE THROWING
OUT ALL THESE IDEAS.
MAYBE THERE'S SOMEBODY THERE
LISTENING WHO IS GOING
TO PICK THESE THINGS UP.

The caption changes to "William Lyne. General Manager, Wigmore Hall." William stands in a room. He’s in his fifties, clean-shaven with gray hair. He’s wearing a gray suit, a striped white shirt and black tie.

William says CANADIAN ARTISTS USE THE HALL
REGULARLY THROUGH -- A LOT OF
THEM THROUGH THE
CANADIAN GOVERNMENT.
YOU ALWAYS HAVE A VERY
NICE CULTURAL ATTACHE HERE,
AND THEY BOOK A REGULAR SERIES
OF CONCERTS HERE OR WHEN
ARTISTS BOOK THEIR OWN
CONCERTS, THE CANADIANS ALWAYS
LOOK AFTER THEM WELL.
I'M AUSTRALIAN AND I WISH THAT
OUR AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT
LOOKED AFTER AUSTRALIAN
ARTISTS AS WELL AS THE
CANADIANS DO BECAUSE I
THINK THEY'RE THE BEST.

Sophie and Rosemarie speak in French.

The Female Narrator AFTER THE FINAL CONCERT IN
WIGMORE HALL, ARTISTS AND
GUESTS GATHER FOR A SMALL
RECEPTION TO WANDER THE
PERFORMANCE AND
TO BID FAREWELL.

A Male Journalist says WHAT HAS IT DONE FOR
CANADA WOULD YOU SAY?
I SUPPOSE YOU'D PUT
PERRY SOUND ON THE MAP.

Diana says IT CERTAINLY HAS, AND I THINK
ALSO IT'S BUILDING FOR THE
FUTURE BETWEEN THE ARTISTS,
AGENTS, PRESS AND SO ON.
YOU GET A VERY GENERAL
PROFILE, WE JUST ELEVATE IT.
AND THIS KIND OF INTERNATIONAL
EXPOSURE DOES A LOT OF GOOD
FOR ALL SORTS OF ARTISTS IN
DIFFERENT FIELDS, AND IT SPREADS
OUT, WHICH IS MARVELLOUS.

A man wearing black-rimmed glasses says IT'S A VERY GOOD PLACE,
LONDON, FOR MUSIC.

Sophie says OH, YES, OF COURSE.

A woman with red hair says HI, HOW ARE YOU.

A gray-haired woman says VERY WELL, THANK YOU.
HOW ARE YOU?
IT'S LOVELY TO SEE YOU.

Holding a drink, James says WELL, ANTON KUERTI STARTED
THE FESTIVAL, AND HE ASKED ME
TO TAKE OVER, I
GUESS, TWO YEARS AGO.
THIS WILL BE MY THIRD SUMMER.
SO MOST OF THE MUSICIANS AND
ARTISTS LIVE IN TORONTO --
WELL, LIVE ALL OVER THE WORLD
BUT THEY COME TO PARRY SOUND
AND -- BUT THE BOARD IS IN
PARRY SOUND, ALL THE FUND
RAISING GOES FROM PARRY SOUND.
ALL THE HARD WORK GOES
UP IN PARRY SOUND.

Speaking to all the guests, Curtis says WHEN WE'RE LOOKING AT A
CONCERT AS WE SAW TONIGHT, IN
FACT SERIES WE'VE SEEN OVER
THE PAST WEEK, SOMEHOW
NATIONALITY DOESN'T SEEM
VERY IMPORTANT ANYMORE.
BUT I JUST WANT TO SAY HOW
WONDERFUL IT IS TO SEE
CANADIAN AND BRITISH ARTISTS
WORKING TOGETHER IN A
WONDERFUL VENUE LIKE
THE WIGMORE HALL.
THANKS TO ALL
WHO PARTICIPATED
AND THANKS FOR
BEING HERE TONIGHT.

Guests say THANK YOU.

[applause]

A young man with brown hair says THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
WE'LL SETTLE UP AFTERWARDS.
[laughing]

Rosemarie says IT'S VERY DIFFICULT TO FIND A
YOUNG COMPOSER WHO WRITES WELL
FOR THE VOICE.

Sarah and Curtis chat.

Curtis says NO, BUT I THOUGHT
TONIGHT WAS REALLY --

Sarah says IT WAS LOVELY, WASN'T IT?

Curtis says WONDERFUL.

Sarah says LOVELY CONCERT.

Curtis says WELL, WE REALLY ENJOYED IT.

Sophie, John and Fiona have a drink.

Sophie says THREE DAYS.

Fiona says DO YOU EVER SEE RICHARD?

Sophie says WELL, I SEE HIM LESS AND
LESS BECAUSE HE GOT MARRIED.

John says GOT MARRIED?

Pointing at a map, David says WE WERE JUST LOOKING FOR
HIM IN ELORA WHICH IS THERE.
WE MIGHT GET A CONCERT IN
KITCHENER I SUPPOSE AND,
OF COURSE, PARRY SOUND.

(music plays)

James says THE INTEREST OF THE COMMUNITY
HAS JUST GROWN TREMENDOUSLY
AND IN REAL TERMS, I.E. MONEY.
THE TOWN HAS
GIVEN US MORE MONEY.
THE ROTARY CLUB HAS
GIVEN US MORE MONEY.
SOME OF THE LOCAL SERVICE
GROUPS ARE HELPING A LOT.
SOME OF THE LOCAL PEOPLE ARE
SUPPORTING THE FESTIVAL MORE.
THIS IS, OF COURSE, A LOT TO
DO WITH OUR BOARD WHO'S OUT
WORKING ALL THE TIME.

An aerial view shows a bay.

James continues BUT I THINK THE PROFILE THAT
THE FESTIVAL DEVELOPED IN
ENGLAND HAS HELPED A LOT, AND
IN THE SIX MONTHS BETWEEN THE
LONDON FESTIVAL IN DECEMBER
AND THIS SUMMER, I'VE ACTUALLY
BEEN TO ENGLAND A COUPLE OF
TIMES AND HAVE SPOKEN TO
PEOPLE WHO WERE PART
OF THAT FESTIVAL.
THE BBC PRODUCERS AND PEOPLE
LIKE THAT AND THEY STILL HAVE
A TREMENDOUSLY HIGH REGARD FOR
THE EXPERIENCE, AND THEY'RE
VERY EXCITED ABOUT
THE WHOLE EVENT.

The caption changes to "Carol Campbell." Carol stands in an office. She’s in her late thirties, with short curly blond hair. She’s wearing a white sweater.

Carol says WELL, CRITICALLY,
WE DID VERY WELL.
THE LONDON CRITICS WERE
ECSTATIC ABOUT THE SERIES
WHICH WAS VERY ENCOURAGING AND
WE ALSO HAD A LOT OF COVERAGE
IN CANADA IN THE CANADIAN
NEWSPAPERS, TOO.
AND FINANCIALLY WE
JUST ABOUT BROKE EVEN.
WE DIDN'T LOSE OUR SHIRTS,
WHICH WE THOUGHT WE MIGHT DO.
THERE WAS THAT POSSIBILITY,
BUT WE JUST ABOUT BROKE EVEN
WHICH WAS -- I THINK WE HAD
ABOUT A SURPLUS OF 300 DOLLARS AT THE
END, SO THAT WAS FINE.
SO WE DID QUITE WELL.

Carol types in a computer. Two little kids sit on her lap.

Carol says WHOOPS I MADE A MISTAKE.

James says THE ACTUAL PRACTICAL WORK,
THE WRITING OF LETTERS, THE
FILING OF CONTRACTS, THE
ACTUAL MAKING UP OF THE
CONTRACTS, ALL THE VARIOUS
NITTY GRITTY THINGS,
I DIDN'T DO AT ALL.
IT'S REALLY MY WIFE CAROL
WHO DOES ALL THAT AND, QUITE
FRANKLY, I COULDN'T DO HALF
OF WHAT I DO IF SHE WASN'T
THERE DOING THE OTHER HALF.

Speaking to a little boy, Carol says NOW THIS ONE, W, THAT'S IT.

Back in the office, Carol says WELL, THE MAJOR THING WAS
GETTING THE FINAL REPORT
FINISHED, AND WE COULDN'T DO
THAT UNTIL WE GOT THE FIGURES
FROM LONDON FROM THE AGENT
WHO WAS HANDLING EVERYTHING
IN LONDON.
SO EVERYTHING GOT A BIT
DELAYED, SO WE HAD A LITTLE
HIATUS WHICH WAS RATHER NICE,
AND THEN THE FIGURES CAME,
HOW MUCH HAD COME IN AND
HOW MUCH HAD GONE OUT.
AND THEN WE HAD TO WORK
ON THE FINAL REPORT WHICH WE
SUBMITTED TO WINTARIO AND
GET THE BOOKS TO BALANCE,
WHICH WAS A MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT.
NOT BEING AN ACCOUNTANT, I'M
NOT VERY GOOD AT THAT, AND
BASICALLY THAT FELL ON MY
SHOULDERS TO MAKE SURE THAT
THE TWO COLUMNS DID MATCH,
WHICH THEY DID EVENTUALLY.

James says WELL, THE ALLEGRI WILL BE
COMING BACK TO PARRY SOUND
THIS SUMMER FOR THE LAST WEEK
OF THE FESTIVAL, AND THEY'LL
BE WORKING ACTUALLY WITH SOME
OF THE PEOPLE THEY WORKED WITH
OVER IN ENGLAND.
ROSEMARIE LANDRY AND THE
ALLEGRI GOT ON SO WELL DURING
THE TIME THEY WERE TOGETHER
IN ENGLAND THAT THEY ALMOST
PLEADED WITH ME TO HAVE THEM
BACK TOGETHER THIS SUMMER AT THE
FESTIVAL, SO THEY'LL BE DOING
SOME PIECES WITH JOHN YORK.
SO THERE'LL BE A GROUPING
OF FAURE SONGS FOR STRING
QUARTET, SOPRANO, AND PIANO.
IT WILL BE THOSE PEOPLE.

(piano music plays)
Rosemarie and the string quintet rehearse.

Rosemarie says DON'T PLAY STACCATO.

John says FOR THE ARPEGGIO --
YES, I WON'T PLAY.

Rosemarie laughs.

The caption changes to "Fauré. La Bonne Chanson Op. 61 (Une Sainte en Son Auréole.)."

Rosemarie sings UNE SAINTE EN SON AUREOLE,
UNE CHATELAINE EN SA TOUR,
TOUT CE QUE CONTIENT LA PAROLE
HUMAINE DE GRACE ET D'AMOUR;
LA NOTE D'OR QUE
FAIT ENTENDRE UN COR
DANS LE LOINTAIN DES BOIS,
MARIEE A LA FIERTE TENDRE
DES NOBLES DAMES D'AUTREFOIS;
AVEC CELA LE CHARME INSIGNE
D'UN FRAIS
SOURIRE TRIOMPHANT
ECLOS DANS DES CANDEURS DE
CYGNE ET DES ROUGEURS
DE FEMME-ENFANT; DES ASPECTS
NACRES, BLANCS ET ROSES,
UN DOUX ACCORD PATRICIEN: JE
VOIS, J'ENTENDS TOUTES CES
CHOSES DANS SON
NOM CARLOVINGIEN

Keith says ONE FINAL QUESTION, WHEN YOU
FIRST PLAY OM BOM BOM DE BOM
AFTER 'A', YOU KNOW?

The Female Narrator says RIVKA GOLANI, JOHN YORK, AND
JAMES CAMPBELL WERE NEXT TO
REHEARSE IN THE PARRY
SOUND HIGH SCHOOL GYM.

(classical music plays)
The caption changes to "Schumann. Fairy Tales."

Rivka holds a viola. She’s in her mid-forties, with short curly red hair. She’s wearing a blue striped shirt over a dress.

Rivka says I WOULD LIKE JUST TO SAY
SOMETHING FOR THE VIOLA AND
NOT SO MUCH FOR MYSELF.

The caption changes to "Rivka Golani."

She continues ALTHOUGH I DEDICATE MY LIFE
IN A CERTAIN WAY TO THIS
INSTRUMENT, I FIND IT
EXTREMELY EXCITING HAVING
AN INSTRUMENT THAT IS NOT
RECOGNIZED AS A SOLO
INSTRUMENT AND SOMEHOW
PUTTING IT MORE ON THE MAP
AS A SOLO INSTRUMENT.
AND BY TODAY I HAVE TO SAY
THAT I HAVE MORE THAN 60
PIECES WRITTEN FOR MYSELF FOR
THE VIOLA AND 11 CONCERTOS.
I'M VERY PROUD OF IT.

[general chatter]
The musicians have lunch outdoors.

Carol says IT IS SORT OF GROWING
INTO A VERY -- A FEELING
OF A FAMILY BECAUSE WE
SEE THE SAME PEOPLE AGAIN.
WE SEE THE ALLEGRI IN ENGLAND
AND WE SEE THEM IN PARRY SOUND
AND IT IS GROWING INTO
A GREAT BIG WARM FAMILY.

James says AND PEOPLE INCLUDE
YOU IN VERY QUICKLY.
YOU ARRIVE ON A FRIDAY NIGHT
AND BY SATURDAY, EVERYBODY
SORT OF KNOWS YOU, AND YOU FEEL
IMMEDIATELY THAT YOU'RE PART
OF A BIGGER FAMILY OF PEOPLE
ALL TAKING PART IN THE
FESTIVAL AND EVERYBODY SEEMS
TO KNOW EVERYBODY AND YOU GET
THE SAME PEOPLE IN THE
AUDIENCE COMING TO SEE YOU ONE
WEEK AND THE NEXT WEEK AND
REMARKING ON THE LAST TIME
THEY SAW YOU, SO IT'S GREAT.
VERY FRIENDLY.

Fiona and John give a four hands piano concert.

The caption changes to "Grainger. An English Country Garden."

[applause]

The end credits roll.

Producer/Director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 1987, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: Round Trip: Parry Sound - London