Transcript: Four Artists, Two Couples | Jun 07, 1989

A man in his fifties plays the saxophone.

Fast clip shows a woman working on a tapestry, a woman working on her pottery and a man in his sixties working on a painting.

The screen splits in four to show these activities.

The title "People Patterns: 4 artists, 2 couples" appears.

Joan is in her early sixties, with short wavy brown hair. She wears glasses and a blue sweatshirt over a white turtleneck.

She says HELLO, I'M JOAN
REED-OLSEN.
ON THIS PROGRAM, I'D
LIKE YOU TO MEET
FOUR UNUSUALLY
TALENTED PEOPLE:
ELENA AND BERT WEIR WHO
LIVE AND WORK IN PARRY SOUND,
RIMA AND PAUL BRODIE WHO
SPEND LONG SUMMERS
ON THE MOON
RIVER NEAR BALA,
BUT WHOSE HOME
BASE IS TORONTO.
ALL FOUR ARE RECOGNIZED
AND IMPORTANT
CANADIAN ARTISTS.
STRANGELY ENOUGH, THE TWO
COUPLES HAVE NEVER MET.
AND HERE THEY ARE SHARING A
PEOPLE PATTERNS PROGRAM
DEDICATED TO THEM
AND TO THEIR ART.

A caption reads "Rima Brodie."

Rima is in her mid-forties, with very short straight brown hair. She wears a pink sweater and a checker gray, red and blue jacket.

She says WHEN WE WERE
FIRST MARRIED,
I WAS DANCING AND PAUL HAD
A QUARTET AND WE WERE BOTH
WORKING WITH MANY
DIFFERENT PEOPLE.
AND WE USED TO HAVE TO TOUR AND
WORK SEPARATELY ALL THE TIME.
AND THAT WAS VERY HARD.
PAUL DOESN'T HAVE HIS
QUARTET ANYMORE.
I'VE CHANGED CAREERS
SO, IT'S JUST ME
AND MY MATERIALS.
WE STILL DON'T WORK
TOGETHER AT ALL.
BUT SINCE THERE ARE ONLY
TWO OF US, IT'S POSSIBLE
TO COORDINATE OUR TOURS SO
THAT IF I'M WORKING IN
A GALLERY, SAY, IN ENGLAND
AND I KNOW ABOUT IT TWO
YEARS IN ADVANCE, PAUL HAS
TIME TO BOOK AN ENGLISH TOUR
SO THAT WE'RE BOTH IN THE
SAME CITY AT THE SAME TIME.

The caption changes to "Paul Brodie."

Paul is in his mid-fifties, with short wavy gray hair and a thick beard. He wears a green shirt and a fishing hat.

He says TWO YEARS AGO, RIMA AND I
WENT AWAY FOR THREE MONTHS
AND TOURED TOGETHER
IN INDIA, SINGAPORE,
HONG KONG, THE PHILIPPINES
AND AUSTRALIA.
SHE HAD THE LARGEST ART
GALLERIES IN BOMBAY
AND NEW DELI AND
PLACES LIKE THAT.
AND I PLAYED ABOUT
59 CONCERTS.
AND IT TOOK A LOT OF
PHONE CALLS AND A LOT
OF TIME TO SET THIS UP
FOR BOTH OF US, BUT IT'S
TERRIFIC WHEN WE CAN BOTH
GO AND DO OUR THING.
THIS PAST SUMMER, WE
TOURED IN ENGLAND AND
ISRAEL AND SHE HAD A
TERRIFIC SHOW
IN TEL AVIV FOR
THREE WEEKS.
AND I PLAYED AT CANADA
HOUSE IN LONDON
AND IN JERUSALEM IN
TEL AVIV; AND WE ARRANGED FOR
RIMA TO GO BACK TO LONDON
FOR A ONE-WOMAN SHOW
NEXT YEAR AND TWO YEARS
FROM NOW WE'RE TOURING
THE UNITED
STATES TOGETHER.
IT CERTAINLY TAKES A
LITTLE BIT OF WORK FOR
BOTH OF US TO ARRANGE OUR
LIFE THIS WAY, BUT IT'S
NO FUN WHEN YOU TRAVEL ALL
BY YOURSELF AND END UP
SPENDING MONTHS AT A TIME
MAKING LONG DISTANCE CALLS
AND NOT BEING TOGETHER.
THIS WAY, WE HELP EACH
OTHER AND SHE'S A VERY
SEVERE CRITIC FOR ME AND
I ALWAYS HELP HER CARRY
AROUND HER DRAGONS AND
NINE-FOOT TOTEM POLES
AND STUFF LIKE THAT.
THIS IS WHY I'M IN
SUCH GOOD SHAPE.
WE HAVE A GOOD TIME
TOURING THE WORLD TOGETHER
AND I HOPE WE CAN CONTINUE
DOING THIS FOR A LONG TIME.

Rima says WHAT CAN I
SAY, IT'S GREAT!
IT'S JUST VERY,
VERY NICE.
EVEN WHEN WE'RE UP HERE,
WE DON'T WORK TOGETHER,
BUT WE'RE ABLE TO BE
IN THE SAME VICINITY
AND IT MAKES A TREMENDOUS
DIFFERENCE, IT'S LOVELY.

Joan says THE WEIRS WORK AND LIVE
AT THE LOON STUDIO
IN PARRY SOUND.
DURING THE WAR
IN LITHUANIA,
ELENA HAD TO
LEAVE ART SCHOOL.
IN THE MID '40s, SHE STUDIED
SCULPTURE IN DUSSELDORF,
THEN APPLIED TO COME TO
CANADA AS AN ART STUDENT.

The caption changes to "Elena Zebrauskas-Weir."

Elena is in her mid-fifties, with short wavy brown hair with bangs. She wears glasses, khaki trousers and a red blouse.

She says RIGHT AWAY I TRIED TO ENTER
THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF ART.
I MEAN, I DIDN'T HAVE
ANY MONEY AND NOTHING
THAT EVER LASTS
YOU KNOW.
WE WORKED WITH SOME
OTHER REFUGEE GIRLS,
AT A SUMMER RESORT PLACE
DURING THE SUMMER AND MADE
ENOUGH MONEY TO PAY FOR
TUITION AND HERE I CAME
WITH A SUITCASE TO
TORONTO AND ENROLLED
IN ONTARIO
COLLEGE OF ART.

The caption changes to "Bert Weir."

Bert is in his late fifties, with sort wavy gray hair and a goatee. He wears a dark gray shirt.

He says FROM MY POINT OF
VIEW, IT WAS BEAUTIFUL.
I WAS DVA AND SO OUR
TUITION WAS PAID AND
WE HAD A SMALL
LIVING ALLOWANCE.
AND EVERYBODY HAD COME BACK AND
THEY ALL THOUGHT THEY MISSED
SOMETHING AND THEY WERE
ALL STRUGGLING TO GRAB
AND GET WHAT THEY FIGURED
THEY WERE MISSING
AND IT WAS A VERY
BEAUTIFUL TIME.
THE WHOLE ATMOSPHERE OF
THE DESIRE TO LEARN
WAS THERE AND IT WAS
VERY EXCITING I THINK.

Elena says AND OF COURSE, I
MET BERT THERE
AT ONTARIO
COLLEGE OF ART.
NOW, WE MARRIED IN MY
LAST YEAR OF SCHOOL.
NO, A YEAR BEFORE LAST
WE MARRIED AND THEN
WE WENT TO
SCHOOL TOGETHER.
BUT, OF COURSE, THE FIRST
BABY WAS ON THE WAY AND
I INTERRUPTED - I WAS SHORT A
FEW MONTHS OF GRADUATING.
BERT GRADUATED
AND I NEVER DID.

Bert says I THINK THAT THE REASON
I WENT TO AN ART SCHOOL
IN THE FIRST PLACE WAS I HAD
BEEN WORKING IN THE BUSH
AND I REALLY WANTED TO
DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.
AND I FOUND THAT
I COULDN'T WRITE.
I TRIED DRAWING AND IT WAS
VERY BAD AND THIS IS
WHAT MOTIVATED ME TO GO
TO THE ART COLLEGE.
SO THAT WHEN WE FINISHED
AND GRADUATED FROM
THE ART COLLEGE THIS WAS
ALL WE TALKED ABOUT.
GETTING BACK TO NATURE,
TO UNDERSTAND HOW I'LL
BE ABLE TO DO THE THINGS
THAT I COULDN'T DO BEFORE.
AND SO IT WAS JUST
A NATURAL STEP,
IT WASN'T A BIG
DECISION TO BE MADE.
THIS WAS THE ONLY
ROUTE WE COULD TAKE
BECAUSE THIS IS WHAT
OUR OBJECTIVE WAS.
I MEAN, WE DIDN'T
SAY THAT THEN,
BUT THAT'S EXACTLY
WHAT IT WAS.

Elena says WE BUILT A CABIN
AND MOVED HERE.
NOW WE WERE LIVING IN
THE CABIN TWO WINTERS
AND FOUR SEASONS ON
A LITTLE ISLAND.
A CABIN BUILT LIKE ALL
THIS FROM LOGS, YOU KNOW,
LIKE A FINISHED BUILDING
OR HOW THE LOG
IS PUT ONE ON TOP
OF THE OTHER.
A WARM CABIN.

Old pictures of the cabin appear.

Bert says IT WAS A CROWN
LAND ISLAND
AND IT COST US 45
BUCKS AND WE CUT ALL
OUR OWN LOGS AND THINGS
AND HAULED THEM OVER
AND WE BUILT THE
WHOLE CABIN.
AND I THINK WE HAD
TO PAY 120 BUCKS
TO HAVE THE LAND
SURVEYED BUT WE BUILT
THE WHOLE THING
FOR 425.
WINTERS UP HERE, THIS IS
SOMETHING THAT MOST PEOPLE
THAT HAVEN'T EXPERIENCED
THEM, THEY REALLY,
REALLY CAN'T ACCEPT THAT
WINTERS ARE SO BEAUTIFUL
THAT I'M USUALLY
DISAPPOINTED
WHEN I SEE THEM LEAVE.
THE FIRST YEAR
ON THE ISLAND,
WHEN THE ICE FORMED AROUND,
YOU COULDN'T GET OFF.
AND YOU GET THIS BLACK,
BLACK ICE AND THEN YOU GET
A VERY LIGHT SNOW AND THEN
AS THE FREEZING COMES,
THE ICE EXPANDS
AND CRACKS.
AND BECAUSE THE ISLAND
IS IN THE MIDDLE
INTERRUPTING, YOU GET
ALL THESE CRACKS
GOING OFF LIKE A WAGON
WHEEL AND STUFF.
SO ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU
BEGIN TO FEEL LIKE YOU'RE
LIVING IN THE CENTRE OF
THE EARTH AND EVERYTHING
IS FOCUSSING IN ON
YOUR LITTLE ISLAND.
AND IT'S QUITE AN EXCITING
TIME WHEN YOU'RE LIVING
WINTER THIS WAY.

[saxophone playing]

Rima says I GUESS I'M VERY PREJUDICED,
BUT THIS ENVIRONMENT,
TO ME, IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL
PLACE IN THE WORLD.
IT'S VERY RELAXING.
THERE'S NO
PRESSURE OUT HERE.
PAUL AND I BOTH COME
OUT AND THINK THAT
WE'RE ON HOLIDAYS.
WE END UP WORKING SIX OR
SEVEN OR SOMETIMES EVEN
EIGHT HOURS A DAY, BUT
THERE'S NO TIME SCHEDULE.
AND IT FEELS LIKE WE'RE
NOT WORKING VERY HARD
AT ALL AND AT THE
END OF THE SUMMER,
WE HAVE MORE DONE
THAN WE WOULD HAVE
IN EIGHT MONTHS
IN THE CITY.
IT'S JUST, I FEEL THAT
WE'RE BOTH AT OUR VERY BEST
EVERY WAY WHEN
WE'RE UP HERE.
BEING ABLE TO COME UP
TO THE COTTAGE IN ALL
OF THE DIFFERENT
SEASONS OF THE YEAR
IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE
HIGH POINTS OF OUR LIVES.
IT DOESN'T MATTER
WHERE WE TRAVEL,
WE ALWAYS FIND OURSELVES
SAYING TO EACH OTHER,
WE SEE THESE GLAMOROUS
PLACES AND WE SAY,
IT'S NOT AS NICE
AS MOON RIVER!
IT SEEMS TO WORK
THAT WAY, DOESN'T IT?

Paul says ACTUALLY, WE'RE TOURING
ABOUT THREE OR FOUR MONTHS
OF THE YEAR AND WHENEVER
YOU FLY TO ANY COMMUNITY,
AS SOON AS YOU GET OFF THE
AIRPLANE, YOU'RE ON STAGE.
AND YOU'RE ON STAGE UNTIL
YOU GET BACK ON THE AIRPLANE.
AND WHEN WE COME UP HERE
TO MUSKOKA WE CAN JUST
SORT OF LET IT ALL
HANG OUT AND BE OURSELVES.
AND I THINK, IF YOU'RE
UNDER PRESSURE TO PERFORM
AS MUCH AS WE ARE, AND YOU
DON'T HAVE A CHANCE TO GET
AWAY LIKE THIS, EVENTUALLY
IT'S VERY PHYSICALLY
AND EMOTIONALLY
BAD FOR YOU.
SO I THINK COMING UP
HERE IS A VERY IMPORTANT
PART OF OUR LIFE.

Bert says I TAUGHT FOR 11
YEARS IN HIGH SCHOOL.
AND THE FIRST FEW YEARS
I THOUGHT IT WAS
ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS.
I WAS REALLY, REALLY
EXCITED ABOUT TEACHING.
AND THEN THE SYSTEM CHANGED
IN A DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS
THAT DIDN'T AGREE WITH ME,
AND SO I LEFT AND THEN
I WENT AND WORKED IN THE
MEDIA CENTRE OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR.
I WAS A GRAPHIC
ARTIST WORKING WITH
ALL THEIR TV
PRODUCTIONS.
I WAS WORKING WITH
ALL THE VISUALS
AND THIS KIND
OF GARBAGE.
I LIKED THIS KIND OF A JOB
TOO BUT SOMEHOW OR OTHER
THERE WAS SOMETHING
REALLY MISSING COMPLETELY.
AND SO WE SAID,
HECK, LET'S GO.
OUR KIDS HAVE LEFT SCHOOL;
THEY DON'T NEED US ANYMORE;
LET'S GO, SO WE
CAME BACK.

Elena says WHEN WE SETTLED HERE,
BACK IN PARRY SOUND
AFTER 18 YEARS
BEING IN WINDSOR.
NOW, WE CAME TO GEORGIAN
BAY DISTRICT AND GEORGIAN BAY
IS A LOVELY - THE
ROCK FORMATION.
IT IS SEDIMENTARY ROCK
WHICH COMES WITH THE LAYERS.
AND THEN OF COURSE
BY MOVEMENT OF THE EARTH,
THOSE LAYERS BROKE AND
TURNED UPSIDE DOWN SO THE
LINES INSTEAD OF HORIZONTAL,
YOU CAN SEE THEM VERTICAL
AND YOU KNOW, ALL KIND
OF CRUMPLED.
AND THEN THE WATER RUSH
IN SOMETIMES YOU KNOW,
BANGING ALL THE
TIME AGAINST THOSE.
SO WASHED OUT AND THE SOFTER
LAYERS AND ALL KIND OF FORMS.
BUT WHAT WE NOTICED IS
THE FORMS ARE SOMETIMES
SO MUCH ORGANIC FORM.
IT'S NOT GEOMETRICAL; YOU
THINK ROCK, IT'S THE FORMS
SHOULD BE HARD, YOU KNOW,
GEOMETRICAL, NOT AT ALL.
THE FORM IS VERY
MUCH ORGANIC.
MAYBE THE SOFTER MOVEMENT
OR ORGANIC AND BEAUTIFUL
SOMETHING SENSUAL
FORMS ON THE ROCKS.

Bert and Elena walk along a rocky shore.

[water lapping against rocks]

Bert says WHEN I WAS PAINTING
IN THE CITY,
I GOT VERY MUCH INVOLVED
WITH THE HUMAN ELEMENT.
AND WHEN WE CAME BACK,
I SAID I WILL NO LONGER
WORK WITH FIGURE.
WE'LL BEGIN TO
TRY AND FIND OUT
WHAT LANDSCAPE
WILL TEACH US.
SO I WENT RIGHT BACK TO
AN ACADEMIC APPROACH
AND I WENT RIGHT INTO
NATURE AND STARTED WORKING
LIKE CRAZY WITH IT.
WHEN I GET IN THERE, I
BEGIN TO FIND THAT THERE IS
ALL SORTS OF STRANGE
FORMS OF COMMUNICATION.
AND THIS WAS THE THING THAT
REALLY KNOCKED ME OUT FOR
A LONG TIME, LIKE WHEN YOU
GO IN AND YOU WALK THROUGH
THE BUSH, AND ALL OF A
SUDDEN YOU FEEL LIKE IT'S
GOING TO RAIN OR IT'S
GOING TO BE HEAVY AND YOU
WONDER WHY YOU FEEL THIS.
AND AFTER WATCHING THE
TREES YOU'LL FIND
THAT AS A BAROMETER
CHANGES, THE TREES,
THE LEAVES CHANGE.
AND SO THAT ALTHOUGH YOU
DON'T SEE THIS, YOU FEEL IT.
BECAUSE THERE'S
A DIFFERENT QUALITY,
THERE'S A DIFFERENT
QUALITY TO THE LEAF.
AND ALSO, IN THE
WINTERTIME YOU WATCH
WHEN THE BRANCHES
ARE SPREAD AND WIDE.
AND AS IT COOLS, THEY'LL
CLOSE AND THE TREES COME UP.
AND YOU CAN WALK THROUGH
THE BUSH QUITE CLEARLY
IN THE WINTER BUT IN THE
SUMMER THOSE TREES OPEN AGAIN.
YOU'LL SEE JUNIPERS COME
RIGHT UP LIKE THIS
IN THE WINTER TIME AND BE
STANDING STRAIGHT UP
TO PROTECT THEMSELVES
FROM THE SNOW.
BUT ANYWAY, THIS KIND OF
THING I BEGIN TO SEE.
SO I WORKED A LONG, LONG TIME
WITH PURELY COMMUNICATION
BETWEEN INANIMATE OBJECTS
LIKE A SORT OF A ZEN
APPROACH OF LOOKING FOR
ONE HAND CLAPPING,
THE SOUND OF ONE HAND
CLAPPING, SORT OF THING.
SO THAT THERE IS
COMMUNICATION BETWEEN
ALL OF THESE OBJECTS
IN SOME FASHION.
BUT IT'S A TYPE OF
COMMUNICATION THAT
WE'RE NOT AWARE OF AND
ONCE WE BECOME AWARE OF IT,
YOU READ NATURE OR TALK TO
NATURE IS WHAT YOU WOULD DO.

[saxophone playing]

A series of abstract paintings appear on screen.

Joan syas HOW HAS ELENA MANAGED THE
COMBINED ROLE OF WOMAN,
WIFE, MOTHER AND ARTIST?

Elena is in her studio working on a sculpture.

Elena says I THINK A WOMAN
ARTIST, I MEAN,
IT CAN'T BE ENTIRELY JUST
INVOLVED WITH THE ART.
THE MOST PART, LIKE HER
ATTENTION SHOULD BE DIVIDED
BETWEEN THE
FAMILY AND ART.
SO, I MEAN, SHE CAN'T PUT
ALL HER ENERGY AND STRENGTH
IN ONE DIRECTION.
TO GET SOMETHING REALLY
GOING YOU HAVE TO BE VERY
MUCH INVOLVED.
AND I THINK, A WOMAN IS MORE
FLEXIBLE, I WOULD SAY.
SHE WOULD WORK AROUND
A DIFFERENT DIRECTION
AND LOOK AT THESE
THINGS FROM DIFFERENT
POINT OF VIEW.
I THINK WOMEN HAVE
A DEEPER, MAYBE,
UNDERSTANDING
ABOUT ART.
I WOULD SAY, I CAN
INVOLVE MORE TIME NOW
TO MY ART CREATIVITY.
I STILL AM INVOLVED WITH
THE FAMILY EVEN WITH
THE CHILDREN GROWN UP, YOU
KNOW, YOU STILL WORRY,
WONDER WHAT THEY'RE DO AND
THEN GRANDCHILDREN
THEY'LL COME, YOU LIKE
REPEATING YOURSELF.
BUT I MEAN, I WOULD SAY,
THAT LATER ON IF YOU HAVE
ALL THE TIME, YOU DON'T
HAVE SUCH A BUNDLE
OF CREATIVE
ENERGY ANYMORE.

Rima says WHEN WE FIRST STARTED
COMING UP HERE,
I WAS RIDING IN TORONTO
AND I USED TO HAVE
TO LEAVE MY HORSE IN
HIS STABLE NEAR TORONTO
AND NOT RIDE
ALL SUMMER.
THAT WASN'T A REALLY GOOD
IDEA SO WE STARTED LOOKING
AROUND AT ALL THE
DIFFERENT PLACES
THAT KEPT HORSES AND WE
FOUND LAKEVIEW FARM.
I WALKED INTO THIS
DRIVEWAY AND I SAW THESE
SLEEK, GORGEOUS WELL-FED
HORSES AND I THOUGHT,
THIS IS THE PLACE
TO BOARD MY HORSE.
WE HAD A VERY INTERESTING
THING HAPPEN ABOUT
A YEAR AFTER I WAS
BOARDING MY HORSE THERE.
THEY HAD THIS TERRIBLE
EPIDEMIC CALLED SWAMP FEVER
AND ALL THE HORSES
WERE QUARANTINED.
AND I HAD TO COME UP OFF SEASON
WHEN THERE WAS PLENTY OF TIME
TO TALK AND SYMPATHIZE
AND I GOT TO KNOW IRIS
AND DAN VERY WELL AND
PAUL GOT TO KNOW THEM.
I GUESS THAT MUST'VE
BEEN 15 YEARS AGO.
AND WE'VE BECOME REALLY,
REALLY CLOSE FRIENDS.
ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS WE
DO WHEN WE COME UP HERE
IS GIVE THEM A CALL
AND WE GET TOGETHER.
AND WE STILL GO TO THE
FARM VERY, VERY OFTEN.
PAUL ISN'T A COMPLETE
HORSE PERSON BUT HE'S
A COMPLETE IRIS AND DAN
LAKEVIEW FARM PERSON.

Iris is in her fifties, with short wavy red hair.

Iris says YEAH, WE'VE GOT A SUNDAY
SCHOOL PICNIC COMING IN
AND THEY'RE GOING
TO BARBEQUE OVER
IN THE KIDDY CORRAL.

Rima says OH, THAT'S GREAT.

Paul says THAT WAS A LOVELY
ARTICLE ABOUT THE FARM
IN
THE MUSKOKA SUN.

Iris says OH, YEAH.

Rima says THAT'S BEAUTIFUL.

Iris says YEAH, THAT WAS
OUR DAY CAMP, YUP.

Dan says YOU GOT HALF A PAGE
IN THERE ALTOGETHER.

Paul says THREE PICTURES.

Rima says AND WELL,
ACTUALLY YEAH.

Paul says YOU'RE VERY
PHOTOGENIC.
[laughing]

Paul says SAXOPHONE TO MOST PEOPLE
MEANS AN INSTRUMENT
THAT'S USED IN JAZZ
AND POPULAR MUSIC.
PEOPLE EVEN TODAY, ARE
SURPRISED WHEN YOU TELL THEM
THAT THE INSTRUMENT WAS
INVENTED IN THE YEAR 1840
BY A MAN CALLED ADOLF SAX
WHO WANTED THE INSTRUMENT
TO BE IN THE
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.
AND THERE ARE 14 DIFFERENT
SIZES AND SHAPES OF SAXOPHONES.
AND THE FIRST TIME A
SAXOPHONE WAS EVER USED
IN A SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
WAS WAY BACK IN 1844
AND HAD NOTHING TO DO
WITH THE WORLD OF JAZZ
UNTIL THE TURN OF THE
CENTURY WHEN FRENCH
MILITARY BANDS TOURED
NORTH AMERICA.
AND SOME OF THE
PLAYERS IN THOSE BANDS
WERE STUDENTS
OF ADOLF SAX WHO PLAYED
THE SAXOPHONE.
AND THEY DIDN'T LIKE
THE WEATHER UP NORTH
SO THEY MOVED DOWN
TO LOUISIANA.
THERE WERE A LOT OF
FRENCH PEOPLE THERE
AND IT WAS WARM AND IN
NEW ORLEANS, AROUND 1903,
SOME LITTLE MILITARY BAND
SAXOPHONE PLAYER GOT UP
AT A CHURCH PARTY AND PLAYED
A RAGTIME TUNE ON THE SAXOPHONE.
AND THE CLARINET
PLAYERS IN NEW ORLEANS
HEARD THIS AND
THEY THOUGHT,
WOW, WOULDN'T
THIS BE TERRIFIC?
SO BY 1915, THE SAXOPHONE
HAD BECOME THE MOST POPULAR
MUSICAL INSTRUMENT
IN NORTH AMERICA.
AND EVERYBODY FORGOT
ABOUT THE SAXOPHONE
AS A CLASSICAL INSTRUMENT
UNTIL AROUND 1930.
SO, IT'S ONLY BEEN THESE
LAST 20 YEARS OR SO THAT
PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO
REALIZE THAT THE SAXOPHONE
HAS HAD A RENAISSANCE AS
A CLASSICAL INSTRUMENT.
WHEN I STARTED
STUDYING THE SAXOPHONE
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN IN THE EARLY '50s,
THERE WERE TWO RECORDS AVAILABLE
OF CLASSICAL SAXOPHONISTS.
NOW THERE ARE OVER 150
RECORDS AVAILABLE.
IT'S NOT AN UNUSUAL THING
FOR A SAXOPHONIST TO APPEAR
WITH A SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OR TO
PLAY A COMMUNITY CONCERT.
WE HAVE OUR ORGANIZATION
CALLED THE WORLD SAXOPHONE
CONGRESS THAT'S HAD
MEETINGS IN NUREMBERG,
GERMANY, AND BORDEAUX,
FRANCE, AND LONDON AND
IN TORONTO AND CHICAGO.
THE NEXT ONE IS
IN TOKYO IN 1988.
AND SO THE SAXOPHONE
NOW HAS A REAL IMAGE
AS A CLASSICAL
INSTRUMENT.

Rima says ONE YEAR, PAUL AND I GOT
A LITTLE TIRED OF BEING
SERIOUS AND HE DECIDED
THAT THIS CONCERT
SAXOPHONIST WAS GOING TO
DO A BARN DANCE RECORD.
HE DID OLD-TIME FIDDLE
MUSIC AND INSTEAD OF
THE LEAD MELODY
BEING ON FIDDLE,
IT WAS ON SAXOPHONE.
AND I SAID CAN I DESIGN
THE ALBUM COVER?
AND HE SAID, SURE!
AND SO I HAD A PICTURE
IN MY MIND OF PAUL
SITTING ON A BALE OF HAY
INSTEAD OF WEARING A TUXEDO -
AND BESIDE HIM, AN
OLD-TIME FIDDLER
OF 6'2" AND THIS
IS ZEKE.

A large toy fiddler appears sitting on a chair in a corner.

Rima says AND HE SITS ON THE
ALBUM COVER BESIDE PAUL
AND THAT'S HOW
ZEKE CAME TO BE.
I WAS VERY UPSET THAT PAUL
WASN'T 5'2" AFTER FOUR
MONTHS OF WORKING
ON ZEKE'S LEGS.
BUT HE'S 6'2."
JUST TO BALANCE PAUL.

A photo of the album cover appears.

Paul says I HAD DONE MOST
OF MY RECORDING
IN THE UNITED
STATES IN NEW YORK.
I MADE 17 ALBUMS IN NEW
YORK AND MY EXPERIENCE
WITH CANADIAN RECORDING
COMPANIES IS SUCH
THAT WHEN I MAKE A
RECORD IN CANADA,
I'M ALMOST PRODUCING
IT BY MYSELF
AND MARKETING
IT BY MYSELF.
AND I FIND THAT MOST OF
THE RECORD PEOPLE HERE
ARE VERY INACCESSIBLE.
AND IT'S GETTING BETTER
BUT IT'S NOT NEARLY
AS PROFESSIONAL
AS IT SHOULD BE.
WE HAVE SOME GREAT SOUND
RECORDING ENGINEERS
IN CANADA AND GREAT BANDS AND
ORCHESTRAS TO PLAY WITH.
BUT THE MARKETING OF
GETTING RECORDS ACROSS
THE COUNTRY IS
ALMOST PRIMITIVE.

Rima says WE OPENED THE BRODIE
SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND
MODERN DANCE AND I HAD
MY OWN DANCE COMPANY
AND THEN I GOT TO
CHOREOGRAPH ALL THE TIME.
I CHANGED THIS WHEN WE
MOVED TO BALA AND BOUGHT
A COTTAGE THAT WAS
ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL
AND MUCH TOO EXPENSIVE,
SO WE HAD NO MONEY TO PUT
ANYTHING ON THE WALLS.
AND SO I STARTED
PUTTING THINGS TOGETHER
AND THEY WERE THINGS
FROM NATURE.
AND THEY WERE GORGEOUS BUT
I DIDN'T LIKE MY KNOTS.
SO I STARTED LEARNING
HOW TO MAKE KNOTS.
THAT WAS DURING
THE MACRAME CRAZE.
AND ONE THING LEAD TO
ANOTHER AND I ENDED UP
WITH TWO CAREERS AND
I HAD TO CHOOSE
AND I CHOSE BEING
A FIBRE ARTIST.
I DON'T LIKE WORKING
ONE WAY ALL THE TIME.
I GET VERY EASILY BORED
SO IF I DO SOMETHING
VERY LITTLE AND DELICATE,
THE NEXT THING I WANT TO DO
IS SOMETHING GREAT,
BIG AND STRONG.
I SAW A PICTURE OF A MAN
ON TELEVISION TRYING
TO RIDE AN OSTRICH
AND IN AUSTRALIA.
AND THIS OSTRICH WAS
NOT GOING TO BE RIDDEN.
AND HE MADE A COMPLETE
FOOL OF THIS MAN.
AND HE WAS SO FUNNY
AND SO ADORABLE
THAT I COULDN'T GET
HIM OUT OF MY MIND.
AND I ENDED GOING INTO
MY STUDIO AND MAKING
A LIFE-SIZED SIX-FOOT
OSTRICH CALLED OLIVER.
AND I'M AN ANIMAL
LOVER AND SO A LOT OF
MY LARGE SCULPTURES
ARE ANIMALS.
I ALSO AM VERY INTERESTED
IN OUR NATIVE PEOPLES'
SCULPTURE AND I
LOVE TOTEM POLES.
FOR ANYBODY WHO LIVES
ANYWHERE NEAR THE ONTARIO
MUSEUM YOU KNOW THAT
BEAUTIFUL TOTEM POLE
GOING UP THE STAIRWELL?
AND MY TEACHER TOOK
ME WHEN I WAS ABOUT
SIX YEARS OLD AND I NEVER
GOT OVER THAT TOTEM POLE.
AND I FINALLY ENDED
UP MAKING A JUTE ONE.
AND HE'S 9-FEET TALL.
I'M NEGOTIATING
RIGHT NOW, HOPEFULLY,
WITH AN ART CONSULTANT TO
DO ONE THAT'S 20-FEET TALL.
AND I KNOW THAT I CAN
DO IT STRUCTURALLY NOW.
I JUST LIKE
WORKING LARGE.

Fast clips show images of Rima’s macramé creations, la a big ostrich and a totem pole.

Bert says WHAT I STARTED DOING IS
TAKING THE ANATOMICAL
FORM AND PAINTING IT
WITH AN ORGANIC
OR NATURE-ORGANIC
COLOURS.
AND THEN I TURNED AROUND
AND WORKED DIFFERENTLY,
I USED A NATURE FORMS AND
PAINTED HUMAN COLOURS
AND PAINTED
ORGANIC SHAPES.
AND SO THIS WAY, I FELT
THAT WHAT I'M TRYING
TO DO IS BLEND NATURE AND
MAN CLOSER TOGETHER.
AND I WENT THROUGH THAT
FOR A LONG TIME AND NOW
I'VE REACHED THE STAGE
WHERE I DON'T USE
THE NATURE FORM
THE WAY I DID.
I'M MORE CONCERNED NOW WITH
THE RELATIONSHIP OF FAMILY.
IT'S THE FORMATION OR
THE BEGINNING OF FAMILY.
I THINK THE FAMILY IS THE
ONLY PURPOSE OF EXISTING;
I FEEL NO OTHER PURPOSE.
AND AS LONG AS YOU
CAN ENRICH THE FAMILY,
THEN THAT'S WHY WE LIVE.
WHEN I SAY ENRICH IT, I DON'T
MEAN WITH MATERIAL THINGS,
I MEAN LET THE MIND GROW
AND THIS SORT OF THING.
AND SO THAT WHEN I SEE
MY KIDS COMING ON AND
STARTING TO PAINT AND
THINGS, I FEEL OKAY,
HERE THEY FOUND SOMETHING
REALLY BEAUTIFUL.
THEY'RE GOING TO SPREAD
IT OUT AND PASS IT ON.
AND I THINK THIS
IS THE NICE THING
ABOUT THE ART BUSINESS
IN OUR FAMILY.

A series of paintings appear on screen.

Elena says I LIKE CLAY BUT I MEAN,
THIS IS GOING TO BE
IN A BRONZE CAST AND
BRONZE IS BEAUTIFUL.
I LIKE THE SHAPE.
PATINA AND EVERYTHING
IS VERY BEAUTIFUL.
THIS IS WHY I WORK
IN WAX, AND LATER
PUT ON THE BRONZE.
BRONZE HEADS ARE
BEAUTIFUL TOO.

Some of Elena’s pieces appear, such as heads and religious figures.

In a classroom full of students, Paul says
AND THE NAME OF THE
MOMMY SAXOPHONE IS?
A SOPRANO SAXOPHONE!
EVERYBODY SAY THAT.

The students shout A SOPRANO SAXOPHONE!

Paul says AND THE MOMMY ALSO HAS A
VERY BIG TOOTHBRUSH
AND I'M GOING TO STAND
HER UP SO YOU CAN SEE
HOW MUCH THEY
LOOK ALIKE.
THE SOPRANINO AND THE
SOPRANO AND IN THIS POUCH
I HAVE A PART CALLED...

The kids say THE MOUTHPIECE.

Paul plays the saxophone for the students.

Paul says AND THAT'S THE HAT THAT
KEEPS HER EARS WARM
WHEN IT'S COLD.
WELL, I FIRMLY BELIEVE
THAT IF CLASSICAL
MUSICIANS DON'T GO
INTO THE SCHOOLS,
THAT IN 25 YEARS,
OUR CONCERT HALLS
ARE GOING TO BE
EMPTY BECAUSE KIDS,
WHY SHOULD THEY GO TO
A CLASSICAL CONCERT
AND SEE THOSE SERIOUS
PEOPLE ON THE STAGE
DRESSED IN FUNNY
COSTUMES AND THEY DON'T
REALLY LOOK LIKE THEY'RE
HAVING TOO MUCH FUN.
SO I, FOR THE LAST TEN
YEARS, HAVE PLAYED FOR
OVER HALF A MILLION
STUDENTS IN CANADA.
WHERE I'LL GO INTO A
SCHOOL IN A GYMNASIUM
WHERE THERE'S 200 OR 300
KIDS SITTING AROUND.
AND FOR LITTLE WEE
CHILDREN LIKE KINDERGARTEN
TO GRADE 4, I TELL THEM
THE STORY OF Mr. SAXOPHONE
AND THE THREE BEARS.
AND I PLAY DIFFERENT
INSTRUMENTS AND SHOW THEM
HOW YOU LICK THE REED AND
WHAT HAS TO BE INVOLVED.
SO THEY GO OUT OF THE ROOM
LEARNING A GREAT DEAL
ABOUT THE INSTRUMENT AND
HAVING A LOT OF FUN AND
SEEING THAT I'M
HAVING A LOT FUN.
AND KIDS CAN'T REMEMBER
THE NAME BRODIE
SO THEY CALL ME
MISTER SAXOPHONE NOW.

He instructs a little girl to move around her finger across the keys and he would just blows.

The crowd laughs at the result.

Paul says ON YOUR MARK,
GET SET, GO!
[saxophone honking]
LET'S GIVE HER A
BIG HAND!
THANK YOU VERY MUCH!
[clapping]
NOW, GIRLS AND BOYS,
THE NEXT SAXOPHONE
I'M GOING TO PLAY FOR YOU TODAY
WILL BE THE BABY SAXOPHONE.
HERE IT IS!
NOW YOU'LL BE SURPRISED
WHEN I TELL YOU THIS.
THERE'S ONLY TWO OR THREE
OF THESE IN ALL OF CANADA.
THEY STOPPED MAKING THIS
LITTLE SAXOPHONE ABOUT
100 YEARS AGO AND THE REASON
THEY STOPPED MAKING THEM
IS THEY'RE SO DARN
HARD TO PLAY THAT MOST
SAXOPHONE PLAYERS DON'T
EVEN GET A SOUND OUT OF IT.
BUT IT'S A BEAUTIFUL
SAXOPHONE.
I WISH THEY
MADE THEM STILL.
HERE IS THE LITTLE
BABY'S VOICE.

He plays a piece on the baby saxophone.

[high pitched saxophone]
[clapping]

The caption changes to "Bert and Elena Weir."

They sit at their dining table.

The caption changes to "Paul and Rima Brodie."

They sit at a café.

(saxophone music plays)

The end credits roll.

Cinematography, Robert Brooks C.S.C, Brian Gedge.

Editor, David Bevan.

Production manager, Rodger G. Lawson.

Producer-director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario.

Copyright. The Ontario Educational Communications Authorities. 1986.

Watch: Four Artists, Two Couples