Transcript: Creatures of Aspen Valley | Aug 23, 1990

A countryside landscape appears on screen.

A title reads "People Patterns."

A woman walks by a farm carrying a goat. She is in her late fifties, with long gray hair. She wears large glasses, a long gray coat over a pink sweater, and brown trousers.

Joan Reed Olsen stands in a green field. There are trees, and two houses at the background. She is in her mid-fifties, with short, curly dark brown hair. She wears large glasses, a light pink shirt under a light gray pullover.

Joan says HELLO, I'M JOAN
REED-OLSEN.
OCCASIONALLY, WHEN WE
RESEARCH MATERIAL FOR OUR
SEGMENT ON THE
PEOPLE
PATTERNS
PROGRAM, WE FIND
THAT THE CONTENT IS SO
INTERESTING AND SO RICH,
THAT IT BECOMES A WHOLE
HALF HOUR PROGRAM.
THAT WAS THE CASE WHEN
WE VISITED ASPEN VALLEY
WILDLIFE SANCTUARY, AND
MET ANIMAL PROTECTIONIST
AUDREY TOURNAY.

The woman carrying the goat walks towards a shed.

A caption on screen reads "Creatures of Aspen Valley."

Audrey says I'VE BEEN ON THIS
PARTICULAR FARM SINCE 1971,
WHEN, AS I WAS TELLING YOU,
WE HAD A BIG LOG HOUSE HERE,
WHICH BURNED DOWN THE
DAY BEFORE I MOVED IN,
SO WE BUILT THE HOUSE
THAT'S HERE NOW.
WE HAVE 300 ACRES IN THE
VALLEY, AND IT'S ALL GIVEN
OVER TO THE ANIMALS, TO
LOOKING AFTER THEM, TO
TRAINING THEM TO GO BACK
INTO THE WILD, AND FOR SOME
OF THEM THAT CAN'T
ADAPT OUT INTO THE BIG
WILDERNESS, FOR JUST
LIVING HERE WITH US.

The same woman appears on screen. She sits in front of a wooden house. Now, she wears a striped shirt and brown trousers.

A caption appears. It reads "Audrey Tournay."

She says I DON'T KNOW, I'VE ALWAYS
BEEN INTERESTED IN ANIMALS.
THE SANCTUARY ITSELF
WAS RATHER AN ACCIDENT.
THE GAME WARDEN, WHO WAS
HERE BACK IN '71-'72
WAS DON LOVE.
HE'S UP AT MANITOUWADGE NOW.
AND HE BROUGHT ME ONE LITTLE
BABY RACCOON, AND THEN HE
BROUGHT ME TWO
LITTLE BABY RACCOONS.
AND THEN HE BROUGHT ME
THREE BABY RACCOONS.
SO IT JUST SORT OF
GREW FROM THERE.
AND THE FIRST OTHER THAN A
RACCOON HE BROUGHT ME WAS
A HAWK.
AND HE HANDED IT TO
ME IN A BURLAP SACK.
AND I THOUGHT HE WAS
KIDDING, YOU KNOW, BECAUSE
HE WAS LIKELY TO DO
THINGS LIKE THAT.
I THOUGHT IT WAS A DEAD HEN,
BUT IT WASN'T, IT WAS A HAWK.
AND EVENTUALLY, IT
FLEW AWAY AGAIN.
SO AFTER THAT, WE GOT A
LICENSE AND JUST KEPT
LOOKING AFTER ANIMALS.

A woman in her thirties walks in the grass. Five baby raccoons follow her.

She says COME ON.
COME ON, BABIES.
COME ON.
COME ON.

Audrey says THE LICENSE IS
ISSUED BY THE MINISTRY OF
NATURAL RESOURCES, AND THEY
GIVE YOU PERMISSION TO LOOK
AFTER WILD ANIMALS.
IT'S NOT SOMETHING THAT
ANYBODY CAN JUST DO LEGALLY,
ALTHOUGH A LOT OF PEOPLE DO
IT, AND IT'S FINE THAT THEY DO.
I THINK IT JUST GIVES THE
MINISTRY SOME SORT OF
CONTROL IN CASE
THINGS GO WRONG.
ALSO, THE MINISTRY CERTAINLY
HAS FELT FREE TO BRING ALL
SORTS OF ANIMALS HERE TO
US, SO WE LOOK AFTER THEM
FOR THE MINISTRY.
WE'RE NOT TECHNICALLY
EMPLOYED BY THEM TO DO THAT,
BUT THEY DO BRING
US THIS AND THAT.

A raccoon climbs a tree.

Audrey says THE SKILLS THAT ARE
NECESSARY, AS FAR AS I'M
CONCERNED, HAVE COME
THROUGH PRACTICE.
NOW, I WORK VERY
CLOSELY WITH THE VETS.
AND DOUG AND NADINE ARE
WORKING CLOSELY WITH A VET, TOO.
Dr. CHRISTIE IN PARRY SOUND
WORKED FOR YEARS WITH ME,
ALL THE TIME I WAS WORKING
IN PARRY SOUND AND DID
MARVELLOUS THINGS
FOR ANIMALS.
THE DOCTOR IN HUNTSVILLE,
WHICH IS MUCH CLOSER TO US
NOW, Dr. STOCK, HE DOES
ALL OUR WILD ANIMAL WORK,
AND HE DOES IT FREE.
WE DON'T DO ANYTHING MAJOR
WITHOUT CONSULTING HIM,
YOU KNOW, ONE OR
THE OTHER OF THEM.
HE'S VERY GOOD BECAUSE IF HE
HAS ANYTHING THAT HE'S NOT
SURE OF, SUCH AS TREATING
THE BEAVERS, HE WILL PHONE
GUELPH, OR HE'LL PHONE THE
METRO ZOO FOR INFORMATION.

Now, a man and a woman walk by.

Audrey says DOUG AND NADINE LIVE HERE
PERMANENTLY AT THE FARM.
THEY CAME UP FROM
St. CATHARINES, PURPOSELY,
TO WORK WITH THE ANIMALS.
OF COURSE I COULDN'T SUPPORT
THEM, AND THEY DIDN'T WANT
TO BE SUPPORTED, BUT DOUG
HAD A JOB WITHIN TWO WEEKS.

A man appears on screen. He is in his mid-thirties, with short light brown hair and a moustache. He wears a white t-shirt under a blue checked flannel shirt and a cap.

A caption on screen reads "Doug Carr."

He says WE'RE GOING TO BUILD A
HOUSE, HOPEFULLY, WHERE I'M
SITTING, WITHIN THE
NEXT COUPLE OF YEARS,
BUT FIRST THINGS FIRST.
THE ANIMALS ALWAYS SEEM TO
COME WHEN EVERYTHING ELSE
NEEDS TO BE DONE, AND THEY
DON'T HAVE HOMES, SO WE'LL
LOOK AFTER THEM FIRST.
WE'D LIKE TO BUILD THE
SANCTUARY UP MORE.
WE'D LIKE TO GET SOME
MORE PROPER FACILITIES.
WE'D LIKE TO BUILD
SOME PROPER PENS.
WE'RE GETTING THERE, BUT
IT'S A VERY SLOW PROCESS.
IF I COULD BE HERE FULL-TIME
WITHOUT HAVING TO WORK TO
KEEP THINGS GOING, IT
WOULD BE SO MUCH NICER.
WE'D GET DONE TWICE AS FAST.
BUT WE'LL GET THERE SLOWLY.
WE GET SOME HELP FROM
PEOPLE, SO MONEY MAKES
A BIG DIFFERENCE.

A woman bottle-feeds a baby raccoon. She's in her thirties, with long brown hair. She wears a striped shirt and denim overalls.

A caption on screen reads "Nadine Carr."

She says THESE ONES ARE
FROM OAKVILLE.
I JUST GOT THEM YESTERDAY.
THERE'S FIVE OF THEM.
TWO DIFFERENT LITTERS.
AND THEY'RE ABOUT
MAYBE FIVE WEEKS OLD.
SO FOUR OR FIVE WEEKS OLD.

Audrey says A LOT OF WHAT WE HAVE
LEARNED TO FEED THEM IS
FROM EXPERIENCE, BUT ALSO
THERE IS SOME LITERATURE ON IT.
WE HAVE A VERY GOOD BOOK
WHICH GIVES US GOOD, GOOD
FORMULAS FOR THE ANIMALS.
THINGS LIKE THE BABY COONS
AND THE BABY SQUIRRELS,
WE HAVE FORMULAS FOR ALL
OF THOSE WHICH WE USE,
AND IT SEEMS TO KEEP
THEM PRETTY HEALTHY.
THE MONEY FOR IT ALL COMES
FROM PUBLIC DONATIONS.
WE'VE BEEN VERY FORTUNATE
TO HAVE A GOOD NUMBER OF
FRIENDS WHO HELP US, AND
THE ANIMALS HAVE NEVER HAD
TO GO ON STARVATION
DIETS, ANYWAY.
WE HAVE TO DO IT ON A
ROUTINE SO WE BE SURE
WE MISS NOBODY.
RIGHT NOW NADINE IS BOTTLE
FEEDING ABOUT EIGHT
BABY RACCOONS.
SHE HAS 21 BABY RACCOONS
SHE'S LOOKING AFTER,
SO THAT SHE HAS ORGANIZED
JUST BEAUTIFULLY SO NOBODY
MISSES THAT.

Nadine says THESE GUYS ARE ON SOYBEAN,
MIXED BABY CEREAL, BABY
VITAMINS, CALCIUM OIL, WHEAT
GERM OIL, AND CORN SYRUP.
THOSE GUYS THERE, THAT ARE
FROM TORONTO,

She points to a cage behind her.

She continues THEY'RE ON
GOAT'S MILK, BABY CEREAL,
WHEAT GERM OIL, BABY
VITAMINS AND CALCIUM OIL.
THE COONS THERE ARE, I'VE
JUST GOTTEN THEM COMPLETELY
OFF THE BOTTLE ABOUT A WEEK
AGO, AND THEY'RE JUST ON
CAT KIBBLE.
AND USUALLY THEY'RE OLD
ENOUGH, LIKE ALL OF THESE
COONS WILL BE OLD ENOUGH BY
THE FALL TO BE RELEASED.
WE USUALLY TAKE THEM, WELL,
WE ALWAYS TAKE THEM BACK IN
THE BUSH WHERE THEY ARE NOT
GOING TO FIND PEOPLE AGAIN,
BUT WE HAVE A COUPLE
OF FAVOURITE SPOTS.
ONE, SOME FRIENDS OF OURS
HAVE A HUGE, HUGE BOG OUT
THE BACK OF THEIR PROPERTY.
AND BEHIND THEIR PROPERTY
IS ALL CROWN LAND.
AND SO IT'S A PERFECT SPOT
FOR RACCOONS TO BE RELEASED.
AND THERE'S LOTS OF
FOOD OUT THERE FOR THEM.
THEY HAVE NO PROBLEM FINDING
FOOD ONCE THEY'RE RELEASED.
THEY START FINDING
FOOD RIGHT AWAY.
SOON AS THEY'RE OUT OF
CAGE THEY'RE FINDING FROGS
AND GRASSHOPPERS.

She says to the baby raccoon
WANT ANY MORE?
NO?
COME HERE.

Don stands next to a deer.

Audrey says DEER CAME HERE WHEN
HE WAS ABOUT A MONTH OLD.
HE WAS A LITTLE
WEE SPOTTY FAWN.
THE MINISTRY OF NATURAL
RESOURCES PHONED ME, AND
THEY ASKED IF I COULD LOOK
AFTER A FAWN WITH A BROKEN LEG.
AND THAT DIDN'T SEEM TO ME TO
BE ANY PARTICULAR PROBLEM
BECAUSE I KNEW Dr. CHRISTIE
WOULD COME THROUGH,
SO I SAID SURE.
AND THEY BROUGHT OUT THIS
LITTLE FAWN IN A BOX.
AND THE LEG WASN'T BROKEN,
THE LEG HAD BEEN CHEWED OFF.
IT HAD BEEN CHEWED OFF
BY SOME DOGS WHICH WERE
RUNNING FREE.
MOST DEER THAT I GET ARE
DAMAGED, ARE DAMAGED BY DOGS
OR PEOPLE, NOT BY OTHER
PREDATORS IN THE BUSH.
I WAS SURE THE LITTLE FAWN
WOULD HAVE TO BE PUT DOWN,
SO I TOOK IT IN TO Dr.
CHRISTIE, AND IT WAS
ABOUT 10 O'CLOCK AT NIGHT.
AND HE WAS STILL THERE.
HE HAD BEEN OPERATING FOR
ABOUT THREE HOURS ON A DOG
WHICH UNFORTUNATELY DIED,
AND HE CAME OUT AND LOOKED
AT THE FAWN, AND HE SAID...
I SAID, I THINK WE SHOULD
PUT IT DOWN.
BUT HE WAS TIRED OF DEATH,
AND HE SAID, NO, THIS ONE'S
GONNA LIVE.
SO HE OPERATED ON IT.
HE CUT THE LEG UP NEAR THE
HAUNCH BECAUSE HE SAID IF HE
LEFT THE STUB IT WOULD
KNOCK AGAINST THE LEG.
AND AFTER HE FINISHED THE
OPERATION, THE FAWN WAS OUT
LYING ON THE TABLE, AND I
WAS LOOKING AT IT, AND IT
STOPPED BREATHING.
AND I SAID, OH,
IT JUST DIED.
AND HE SAID, NO IT DIDN'T,
AND HE PICKED IT UP AND
THUMPED IT DOWN SO HARD
ON THE TABLE THE DEER WAS
SCARED TO DIE.
SO HE SAID, WELL, YOU'RE
GONNA TAKE IT HOME, AND YOU'RE
GONNA STAY UP ALL NIGHT IN
CASE THAT HAPPENS AGAIN.
WHICH I DID, AND IT DID
HAPPEN TWICE, BUT SINCE
DEER IS STILL HERE,
YOU KNOW, HE LIVED.
I REALLY ENJOYED HIM.
ESPECIALLY WHEN
HE WAS SMALL.
I STILL ENJOY HIM, BUT
HE WAS REALLY FUNNY WHEN
HE WAS SMALL.
HE PLAYED WITH THE DOGS.
I THOUGHT HE WOULD BE AFRAID
OF DOGS, BUT HE WASN'T.
HE PLAYED WITH THEM.
HE STILL DOES.
THEN WINTER CAME, AND HE
HAD A BEAUTIFUL PEN, AND
I COULD REMEMBER ALL THE
BLIZZARDS, AND I THOUGHT,
WELL, I'VE GOT TO GET THIS
DEER IN THE BARN, HE CAN'T
BE OUT IN THE BLIZZARDS.
SO I PHONED THE MEN AT THE
MINISTRY, AND WHEN THEY
STOPPED LAUGHING AT ME, THEY
SAID, LOOK, EVERY DEER IN
THE COUNTRY IS OUTSIDE
ALL WINTER LONG.
YOURS HAS A SHELTER, YOU
GIVE IT GRAIN EVERY DAY,
AND YOU WANT TO
PUT IT INSIDE?
SO I LEFT DEER OUT.
BUT THE FIRST BLIZZARD, I
STILL WORRIED, SO I WENT
RUNNING OUT TO SEE
HOW HE WAS DOING.
AND HE WAS LYING THERE IN A
CUP OF SNOW CHEWING HIS CUD
AS THOUGH IT WAS THE
MIDDLE OF SUMMER.
SO NOW I DON'T
WORRY ABOUT HIM.
HE'S FINE.

Audrey caresses the deer.

She says WE TRY TO GIVE HIM A VERY,
VERY HAPPY LIFE, OR
WE COULDN'T KEEP HIM.
I THINK IT'S SAD WHEN THE
WILD DEER COME DOWN AND
THEY TOUCH NOSES THROUGH
THE FENCE, AND THEY SEEM TO
BE GOOD FRIENDS, BUT THEN
THE WILD DEER RUN AWAY,
AND HE STANDS AND WATCHES THEM,
AND I FIND THAT PRETTY SAD.
I WOULD LIKE HIM
TO BE ABLE TO GO.
IN HUNTING SEASON, I'M
GLAD HE'S IN A PEN.

Blue jays are on a cage.

Don walks carrying a beaver.

[whimpering]

He releases the beaver in a pond and says OH, OKAY, OKAY,
LOOK AT THE FROGS.

Audrey says I CAN ALWAYS
TALK ABOUT BEAVERS.
THE ONE WE CALL BIG BEAVER,
AND HE'S UNFORTUNATELY
SMALLER THAN LITTLE BEAVER NOW,
BUT BIG BEAVER LIVES OUTSIDE.
HE WAS BROUGHT TO US BY
THE MINISTRY OF NATURAL
RESOURCES AND
WAS ORPHANED.
LITTLE BEAVER TRAVELS TO
SCHOOLS WITH ME TWO OR THREE
TIMES A WEEK, AND WE TALK TO
CHILDREN ABOUT BEAVERS AND
TEACH THEM ALL WE CAN.
BEAVERS ARE ONE ANIMAL WHICH
CANNOT BE RETURNED TO THE
WILD, SO WE HAVE THOSE
HERE ALL THE TIME.
THEY GET A LITTLE MORE
SPOILED THAN OUR OTHER WILD
ANIMALS DO BECAUSE THE
COONS AND THE SKUNKS, AND
EVERYTHING ELSE EVENTUALLY
RETURN TO THE WILD.

Now, Audrey sits in the grass surrounded by kids. Her dog sits on her left and on the right; she has a beaver in a cage.

She says OKAY, NOW I BROUGHT TWO
SPECIAL, SPECIAL ANIMALS
WITH ME TODAY TO SHOW YOU.
ONE IS JUST A PLAIN DOG,
PROBABLY VERY MUCH LIKE THE
DOG YOU'VE GOT IN YOUR
HOUSE, AND THE OTHER IS
AN ANIMAL THAT COMES
OUT OF THE WOODS.
THIS IS A DOMESTIC ANIMAL,

She points to the dog.

She continues AND THIS IS A WILD ANIMAL.

She touches the beaver's cage.

She says BUT THEY'RE BOTH
VERY, VERY SPECIAL.
NOW, I'M GOING TO TAKE
BEAVER OUT OF THE CAGE
IF YOU LET ME.
AND I'M GOING TO MAKE
HIM SIT ON MY KNEE.
SO HE'LL LOOK KIND
OF FUNNY TO YOU.
BUT WHILE I TAKE HIM OUT OF
THE CAGE, YOU'LL BE VERY QUIET
SO YOU WON'T
FRIGHTEN HIM, OKAY?
BECAUSE HE'S A BIG BEAVER.
HE WEIGHS ALMOST 50 POUNDS.
AND I BET THAT'S HEAVIER
THAN A LOT OF YOU PEOPLE ARE.
OKAY, BEAVER, ARE YOU GOING
TO COME OUT OF YOUR CAGE?

She opens the cage.

One of the kids says HE'S GONNA COME
OUT OF HIS CAGE.

Audrey grabs the beaver and says YOU COME HERE, BEAVER.
FIRST I'LL LET BEAVER
TALK TO YOU, OKAY?

[whimpering]

She continues EVER HEAR BEAVER
TALK BEFORE?

The children say NO.

Audrey says ARE YOU SAYING HELLO
TO THE CHILDREN?
OKAY, HE'S SAYING HELLO.
HE'S SAYING HELLO.
OKAY?
I WANT TO SHOW YOU WHY
THIS BEAVER IS SO SPECIAL.
ALL BEAVERS IN THE WORLD ARE
SPECIAL, BUT THIS IS THE
SPECIALIST BEAVER.
ARE YOU SPECIAL?
YES, HE SAYS HE IS.
OKAY, IF YOU WERE GOING
OUT IN THE WOODS, AND YOU
WANTED TO SEE A BEAVER, WHERE
WOULD YOU LOOK FOR ONE?
YES?

A child says IN THE WATER.

Audrey says IN THE WATER.
WHAT KIND OF WATER?

A child says IN A POND.

Audrey says IT WOULD BE IN A POND.
WOULD IT BE IN A
SWAMPY...

A kid says BY A DAM.

Audrey says AND WHO MADE THE DAM?

A child says THE BEAVER.

Audrey says THE BEAVERS
MADE THE DAM.
SO YOU'D LOOK FOR A BEAVER
DAM, AND YOU'D LOOK FOR THE
POND BEHIND IT,
WOULDN'T YOU?
AND IF YOU WERE LOOKING
IN THE POND, YOU'D FIND
A BEAVER HOUSE.
AND WHAT'S A BEAVER
HOUSE CALLED?

A child says A DAM.

Audrey says A DAM MAKES THE LAKE, BUT
WHAT'S THE HOUSE WHERE
HE LIVES CALLED?
DOES ANYBODY KNOW?

One of the kids says OH!

Audrey says YEAH.

A boy says IT'S CALLED...
I REMEMBER IT.

Audrey says YOU REMEMBER IT
AND YOU JUST FORGOT IT
FOR A MINUTE.

The boy says A LODGE?

Audrey says THAT'S RIGHT,
IT'S A BEAVER LODGE.
NOW, BEAVERS HAVE TO BUILD
THEIR DAMS AND BUILD THEIR
LODGES, DON'T THEY?
TO BUILD THEIR DAMS AND
TO BUILD THEIR LODGES,
THEY HAVE TO BE VERY
SPECIAL ANIMALS.
NOW, WHEN THIS PARTICULAR
BEAVER STOPS WIGGLING, I'M
GOING TO SHOW YOU HOW HE'S
MADE SPECIAL TO DO THOSE
THINGS, OKAY?
ALL RIGHT, BEAVER, THIS
IS YOUR BIG MOMENT.
OKAY?
NOW, IN A MINUTE, WHEN HE
GETS REAL QUIET, IF YOU'RE
REAL QUIET, HE'S GOING TO
LET ME PUT MY FINGER IN HIS
MOUTH, OKAY?
SO YOU BE QUIET, 'COS I
DON'T KNOW THAT BEAVER'S
GOING TO LIKE THIS.
COME ON, BEAVER.
THERE.

She puts her index finger in the beaver's mouth.

Audrey says NOW, CAN YOU SEE HIS TEETH?
BIG ORANGE TEETH.
AREN'T THEY SOMETHING?
THOSE BIG ORANGE TEETH,
OKAY, NOW YOU CAN GET BACK
SO OTHER CHILDREN CAN SEE.
THOSE BIG ORANGE TEETH ARE
WHAT HE CHEWS THE BARK OFF
THE TREES WITH.
AND HE CAN GO CHEW, CHEW,
CHEW AROUND A TREE,
AND HE CAN CUT
REALLY FAST.
AND THEN HE TAKES THE
BRANCHES, AND HE CARRIES
THEM IN THE WATER, AND HE
MAKES HIS DAM AND HIS LODGE
OUT OF BRANCHES, AND
WHAT ELSE DOES HE USE?

A child says HE USES MUD.

Audrey says HE USES MUD.
NOW, THIS BEAVER CAN'T CARRY
MUD IN HIS MOUTH, SO HE
CARRIES, LET'S JUST
LOOK AT YOUR FRONT PAW.
SEE HIS FRONT PAWS,
THEY'RE JUST LITTLE.
AND THEY DON'T HAVE
ANY WEBS ON THEM.
SEE?
SO HE CARRIES THE MUD
WITH HIS FRONT PAWS.
SO THIS LITTLE BEAVER,
AND HE WAS DOING IT THIS
MORNING IN HIS OWN POND, HE
GATHERS ALL KINDS OF MUD UP
WITH HIS FRONT PAWS.
HE'S GOT NICE LONG CLAWS TO
SCRATCH IT UP WITH, AND HE
GATHERS IT IN A BIG BALL,
AND HE PUTS IT AGAINST HIS
CHEST, AND THEN HE SWIMS TO
HIS DAM, AND HE PACKS IT IN
WITH THOSE FRONT FEET.
AND HE REALLY WORKS
HARD WITH THOSE.
SO HE CARRIES HIS STICK IN
HIS MOUTH, AND HE CARRIES
THE MUD WITH HIS FRONT
FEET, AND THAT'S WHAT
HE BUILDS THE DAM WITH.
BUT HE HAS TO GO UNDER
WATER A LOT, DOESN'T HE?
TO GET ALL THOSE STICKS
AND TO GET ALL THAT MUD.
DO YOU KNOW HOW LONG THIS
BEAVER CAN STAY UNDERWATER?

The children say NO.

Audrey says 12 MINUTES.
THAT'S A
LONG
TIME.
SO IF ANYBODY EVER TELLS YOU
THAT BEAVERS DROWN RIGHT
FAST IN TRAPS, THEY DON'T.
IT TAKES THEM
12 LONG MINUTES.
SO THIS LITTLE BEAVER, HE'S
GOT A STICK IN HIS MOUTH,
COME ON, YES, YOU HAVE.
OKAY, SO THE STICK IS RIGHT
THERE IN HIS MOUTH, RIGHT
THERE WHERE MY FINGER IS,
BEHIND HIS FRONT TEETH.
AND HE GOES
UNDERWATER WITH THAT.
NOW, DO YOU KNOW WHAT?
WHEN GOD MADE THIS BEAVER,
HE KNEW HE WAS GOING TO
HAVE TO GO UNDER THE WATER
A LOT, SO HE MADE HIM JUST
PERFECT FOR UNDERWATER
NAVIGATION.
FIRST THING THAT HAPPENS,
COME ON, STOP WIGGLING,
OKAY.
YOU EVER SEE SUCH
A BIG BELLY?
FIRST THING THAT HAPPENS
WHEN THIS BEAVER GOES
UNDERWATER, HE TAKES A BIG
BREATH, AND IN A MINUTE,
HE'S GOING TO WALK AROUND
AND VISIT YOU, AND YOU LOOK
VERY CAREFULLY AT HIS NOSE.
BECAUSE HIS NOSE
SEALS CLOSED.
HE DOESN'T GET ANY
WATER DOWN HIS NOSE.
SO HE CAN HOLD IT
THERE FOR 12 MINUTES.
AND THEN HIS FUNNY LITTLE
EARS, AND YOU LOOK AT HIS
EARS WHEN HE GOES
AROUND TO SEE YOU.
BECAUSE HIS EARS GO
RIGHT CLOSED TIGHT.
HE DOESN'T GET ANY
WATER DOWN HIS EARS.
AND HIS EYES, YOU KNOW, THE
FIRST TIME I WENT SWIMMING
WITH A BEAVER, I THOUGHT OH,
SOMETHING AWFUL'S HAPPENED
TO HIS EYES BECAUSE THEY
LOOKED KIND OF WHITE.
BUT YOU KNOW THERE'S A FILM
THAT COMES DOWN OVER HIS EYES.
NOW, IT'S A TRANSPARENT
FILM HE CAN SEE THROUGH,
BUT IT KEEPS THE WATER
OUT OF HIS EYES.
SO THAT BEAVER, HE CAN GO
UNDERWATER, AND HE DOESN'T
GET ANY WATER IN HIS EYES
OR HIS EARS OR HIS NOSE,
OR HIS MOUTH.
WHEN MY FINGER IS RIGHT
THERE IN HIS MOUTH, FIRST
OF ALL HE DOESN'T LIKE IT
VERY WELL, BUT APART FROM
THAT, HIS MOUTH
IS STILL CLOSED.
DO YOU KNOW THAT?
BEHIND MY FINGER THERE'S A
FLAP OF SKIN, TWO FLAPS OF
SKIN, AND THEY STAY CLOSED
WHEN HE WANTS THEM TO.
SO HE CAN SWIM, HE CAN CARRY
THAT STICK UNDERWATER, AND
HE DOESN'T GET ANY
WATER DOWN HIS THROAT.
NOW, WHEN HE EATS, THAT
FLAP OF SKIN OPENS.
SO YOU CAN EAT
OKAY, CAN'T YOU?
YES, HE SAYS.
BUT HE CAN SWIM UNDERWATER,
AND HE DOESN'T GET ANY
WATER DOWN HIS THROAT.
NOW, ISN'T THAT A
NEATLY MADE ANIMAL?

The children say YEAH.

Audrey says OKAY, AND YOU KNOW THE
OTHER THING ABOUT HIM
WHEN HE'S UNDERWATER, HE
DOESN'T GET VERY WET.
NO, YOU DON'T.
HE TAKES SOME OIL OUT OF A
GLAND THAT'S RIGHT THERE AT
THE BASE OF HIS TAIL, AND HE
TAKES IT OUT WITH HIS PAWS,
AND HE SPREADS IT
ALL OVER HIMSELF.
SO HE DOESN'T
GET HIS COAT WET.
AND HE CAN GO UNDERWATER,
AND HE FEELS KIND OF
SLIPPERY ON TOP, BUT IF YOU
PUSH THE HAIR BACK, HE'S
NOT WET UNDERNEATH AT ALL.
AND THEN, OF COURSE, WHEN
HE'S UNDERWATER, HE DOESN'T
USE THESE FOR SWIMMING,

She points at the beaver's paws.

She continues HE
PUTS THOSE UP AGAINST HIS
CHEST OR HE CARRIES
MUD WITH THEM.
YEAH.
HE USES HIS TAIL.
SEE THAT TAIL?
HE USES THAT LIKE WE WOULD
USE THE RUDDER ON A BOAT.
AND HE STEERS WITH IT, AND
HE GOES UP AND DOWN WITH IT,
AND HE CAN DO
ANYTHING WITH IT.
NOW, LET'S SEE YOUR FEET.
LET'S SHOW THE CHILDREN YOUR
FEET, AND THEN I'LL LET
YOU GO, I PROMISE.
SEE HIS BIG BACK FEET?
THEY'RE LIKE FLIPPERS
WHEN YOU GO IN SWIMMING.

A boy says YEAH, AND THEY
HAVE WEBS, TOO.

Audrey says FLIPPERS HAVE WEBS,
BEAVER HAS WEBS.
AND THESE ARE SPECIAL.
HE CAN SWIM FAST WITH THESE.
BUT THERE'S SOMETHING
SPECIAL HERE, TOO.
SEE HE'S GOT A
DOUBLE CLAW THERE.
WHEN HE WALKS AROUND TO
VISIT YOU, YOU LOOK AT THAT.
THAT'S HIS COMBING CLAW.
AND HE CAN COMB HIMSELF ALL
OVER WITH THAT COMBING CLAW.
OKAY?
I'LL TELL YOU WHAT I'M
GOING TO DO RIGHT NOW.
I'M GOING TO LET THE BEAVER
WALK AROUND THE CIRCLE
AND VISIT YOU.
NOW, HE WON'T HURT YOU.
HE'S A VERY FRIENDLY BEAVER.
AND IF HE TRIES TO GET
OUT IN SPACES LIKE THAT,
YOU PUSH HIM BACK SO
HE DOESN'T GET OUT.
TURN HIM AROUND SO
HE VISITS EVERYBODY.
AND YOU LOOK AT ALL THE
SPECIAL THINGS ABOUT BEAVERS.
WHEN HE COMES BACK TO ME,
WE'LL SEE IF YOU'VE GOT ANY
QUESTIONS ABOUT
BEAVERS, OKAY?

The beaver walks around the circle of kids. The kids touch him.

[giggling]

One of the kids says HE'S CUTE.

The beaver completes the circle and returns to where Audrey sits. Audrey gives him a banana.

A boy says BANANA?

Audrey says YOU GO AND SHOW THE CHILDREN
HOW NICELY YOU EAT A BANANA.

The beaver walks towards Audrey carrying the banana.

Audrey pushes the beaver to the middle if the circle and says NO, I DON'T WANT TO
SEE, SHOW THE CHILDREN.
WANT ME TO TURN
HIM AROUND?
THERE.

A boy says HE'S CHEWING ON IT.

The beaver peels the banana and then eats it.

[laughing]

Now, back in the farm, a skunk appears on screen.

Nadine says SKUNKY, COME HERE.
UNCOOPERATIVE OR WHAT?
COME ON.
SKUNKY, COME HERE.

Two skanks flank Nadine. One of them is all white.

Nadine points to a black and white skunk and says THIS ONE HERE, SKUNKY, I BELIEVE WAS THROWN OUT OF AN
APARTMENT WINDOW IN TORONTO,
IN A GREEN GARBAGE BAG.
AND SOME PEOPLE FOUND HIM.
AND ENDED UP COMING.
THEY HAD HIM DE-SCENTED.
THIS IS WHY HE'S HERE.
THIS IS WHY BOTH SKUNKS WERE
HERE, THEY WERE DE-SCENTED,
SO OBVIOUSLY THEY CAN'T
DEFEND FOR THEMSELVES BACK
OUT IN THE WILD.
PEOPLE LIKE TO GET SKUNKS
WHEN THEY ARE JUST LITTLE
WEE BABY THINGS, BUT ONCE
THEY GET BIGGER, THEY TEND
TO BE RATHER CRANKY.
THEY BITE A LOT, AND THEY
GET INTO A LOT OF MISCHIEF,
AND PEOPLE DON'T WANT THEM
ANY LONGER, SO THIS IS WHY
WE USUALLY GET THEM.
THE HUMANE
SOCIETIES GET THEM.
SNOWMAN HERE, HE, I BELIEVE,
BELONGED TO SOME PEOPLE
THAT FOUND HIM, AND
THEY HAD HIM ON DRUGS.
THEY GOT A REAL KICK OUT OF
SEEING HIM HIGH ON DRUGS.
AND THE HUMANE SOCIETY
FINALLY GOT AHOLD OF HIM,
AND HE CAME UP HERE.
BUT IT JUST SHOWS YOU
WHAT SOME PEOPLE WILL DO.

A close-up of a blue jay appears on screen.

Audrey says THE BLUE JAYS CAME
FROM A FRIEND OF MINE,
CHRIS PLANT IN TORONTO.
NOW, HE RAISED THEM FROM THE
TIME THEY WERE VERY TINY.
ONE BLUE JAY TALKS.
HE SAYS, 'GET
AWAY, GET AWAY'.
AND A STARLING WHICH IS IN
WITH HIM, HE TALKS, TOO.
HE SAYS, 'GEORGE,
MY NAME'S GEORGE'.
I HAVE FOUND THAT IF I RELEASE
BIRDS, AND IT'S PRINCIPALLY
BEEN CROWS, WHO TALK, THE
WILD BIRDS WILL KILL THEM.
SO THESE BIRDS
ARE IN THE PEN.
THE SECOND BLUE JAY HAS A
PARALYZED WING, HE CAN'T
FLY, SO WE KEEP HIM, TOO.
WE HAVE A LITTLE PURPLE
FINCH IN THE HOUSE.
SHE HIT A CAR
IN THE WINTER.
I DON'T KNOW WHY
SHE CAN'T FLY.
SHE LOOKS LIKE SHE
SHOULD, BUT SHE CAN'T.

The birds jump inside their cage.

Audrey says SO WE'RE JUST GOING TO HAVE TO
KEEP HER AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS.
I THINK ALMOST EVERYBODY IN
THE VILLAGE SAVES US SCRAPS
OF FOOD, AND WE GO AROUND
AND WE HAVE ALL THESE BAGS
OF SCRAPS.
THE PEOPLE AT THE GENERAL
STORE, LIL AND BEN TASSEY,
HAVE FOR YEARS KEPT ALL
THEIR VEGETABLES AND FRUIT
AND LETTUCE FOR
THE ANIMALS.
GARY AT THE G and G RESTAURANT
IN ROSSEAU, HE SENT A
BIG BOX OF ONION
RINGS LAST WEEK.
AND I THOUGHT, WHAT
EATS ONION RINGS.
BUT SKUNKS EAT ONION RINGS,
BEAVERS EAT ONION RINGS,
AND RACCOONS
EAT ONION RINGS.
I FOUND THAT OUT.
THE NEIGHBOURS AROUND HERE,
WHICH ARE OF COURSE QUITE
DISTANT, PRINCIPALLY BOB AND
BARB FRENCH, THEY HAVE BEEN
MOST COOPERATIVE.
AND WHEN SOME OF OUR
RACCOONS SHOW UP AT THEIR
BACK DOOR, THEY
DON'T MIND AT ALL.
ONE TIME, I WENT DOWN AND
FOUND ONE OF THE RACCOONS
I'D RELEASED A WEEK
BEFORE SLEEPING ON
THEIR CHESTERFIELD.

Now, a man and a woman dig a ditch around a pen.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Mike and Hope Richardson."

Mike is in his thirties with short brown hair. He wears a light blue shirt under a brown vest and denim pants.

He says WE'RE HERE HELPING AUDREY
REVAMP THE BEAVER PEN.
HE HAS A TENDENCY OF DIGGING
UNDERNEATH THE FENCE.
AND HE CAN GET OUT.
HE'S GOTTEN OUT ONCE BEFORE.
SO WE'RE JUST DIGGING A
TRENCH ALONG THE SIDE WHERE
HE USUALLY GOES, AND WE'RE
GOING TO PUT SOME WOOD
DOWN AND AFFIX THE
FENCE TO THE WOOD.
PUT THE WOOD DOWN ABOUT
THREE FEET, THAT WAY HE'LL
HAVE A LITTLE HARDER
TIME GETTING OUT.
AND THAT'S BASICALLY WHAT
WE'RE HERE TO HELP AUDREY FOR.
SHE NEEDS ALL THE VOLUNTEER
HELP SHE CAN GET.

Hope is in her thirties, with short brown hair. She wears big glasses, a pink hoodie and pink trousers.

She says WE FIRST CAME TO KNOW
AUDREY WHEN WE SAW HER ON
A TELETHON TO RAISE MONEY
TO BUILD THE BEAVER PEN.
AND WE CONTACTED HER WITH
A LETTER, AND TOLD HER WE
WERE INTERESTED IN
CONSERVING WILDLIFE.
AND SHORTLY AFTER THAT, WE
OURSELVES WERE BROUGHT TWO
ORPHANED RACCOONS.
THE ONE WE COULDN'T SAVE,
BUT WE DID MANAGE TO SAVE
THE OTHER ONE WITH
AUDREY'S HELP.
WE'RE FROM DOWN NEAR DOUGLAS
POINT, AND I CALLED HER ON
THE PHONE RIGHT AWAY AND
ASKED HER WHAT TO FEED HIM.
AND SHE HELPED US SAVE HIM.
AND THEN WE BROUGHT HIM UP
HERE, AND SHE RELEASED HIM,
AND WE BECAME INTERESTED
IN HER SANCTUARY HERE,
AND WE'VE COME UP TO
DO VOLUNTEER WORK.
AND THERE IS A LOT
OF WORK TO DO AROUND.
WE COULD USE ALL
THE HELP WE CAN GET.
BUT WE'LL BE HAVING THIS
DONE PROBABLY BY SUNDAY,
AND THEN HEAD BACK HOME.

They keep digging the trench.

Audrey says IF YOU FIND A HURT ANIMAL,
START WITH A BABY ANIMAL,
IF YOU FIND A BABY ANIMAL IN
THE BUSH, THE BEST THING TO
DO IS LEAVE IT ALONE.
ITS MOTHER IS PROBABLY
NOT VERY FAR AWAY.
JUST YESTERDAY, DAY BEFORE
YESTERDAY, DON LOVE, THE
CONSERVATION'S OFFICER,
HIS WIFE WAS DOWN
FROM MANITOUWADGE.
SHE BROUGHT A LITTLE WEEK
OLD BABY MOOSE DOWN TO THE
METRO ZOO.
SOME PEOPLE SAW IT WALKING
ALONG THE EDGE OF A RIVER
JUST AFTER IT HAD BEEN
BORN, AND THEY PICKED IT UP
AND TOOK IT HOME.
AND THAT MEANS FOR THE
REST OF THAT MOOSE'S LIFE,
IT'S GOING TO BE IN A ZOO
RATHER THAN OUT IN THE BUSH.
AND THIS IS TRUE OF THE BIG
MOOSE, IT'S ALSO TRUE OF
THE LITTLE RACCOON.
ITS MOTHER PROBABLY ISN'T
VERY FAR AWAY, SO LEAVE IT
ALONE NO MATTER WHAT
YOUR TEMPTATION IS.
COME BACK FIVE OR
SIX HOURS LATER.
IF IT'S STILL THERE, THEN
YOU HAVE REASON TO WONDER.
BUT MOSTLY LEAVE IT ALONE.
IF IT'S SICK OR HURT, GET
IT QUICKLY TO A VET OR TO
SOMEBODY WHO KNOWS WHAT
THEY'RE DOING WITH IT.
WILD ANIMALS DO NOT MAKE
GOOD PETS IN 99 PERCENT
OF THE CASES.
YOU'RE GOING TO END
UP IN TROUBLE WITH IT.
YOU'RE GOING TO BRING IT TO
SOMEPLACE LIKE THIS A YEAR
LATER, AND SAY THIS WAS SO
CUTE WHEN IT WAS A BABY,
BUT IT'S GOTTEN FIERCE.
SO FAR THIS YEAR, IN THE
LAST MONTH AND A HALF,
WE'VE HAD 13 RACCOONS THAT
WERE SOMEBODY'S CUTE BABY
PETS LAST YEAR, AND THEY'VE
COME UP HERE AND WE'VE HAD
TO TAKE THEM
OUT TO THE BUSH.
SO GET IT TO SOMEBODY WHO
KNOWS WHAT THEY'RE DOING
WITH IT.
IF YOU WANT A PET, THERE'S
THOUSANDS OF DOGS AND CATS
IN THE HUMANE SOCIETY, AND
THEY NEED HOMES, AND THEY
NEED THEM VERY BADLY, AND
THEY MAKE EXCELLENT PETS,
BUT WILD ANIMALS DON'T.

A raccoon climbs a branch in a pen.

Joan says UNLIKE THE OTHER
RACCOONS AT ASPEN VALLEY,
MOSES IS BLIND AND WILL
SPEND ALL HIS DAYS
AT THE SANCTUARY.

Audrey says A LOT OF PEOPLE
ASK US WHY WE MAKE THESE
ANIMALS LIVE.
THERE'S NO SHORTAGE OF
RACCOONS IN THE WORLD,
THERE'S NO SHORTAGE OF
BEAVER IN THIS PART
OF THE COUNTRY.
THERE'S CERTAINLY NO
SHORTAGE OF PET RABBITS.
BUT I BELIEVE THEY HAVE
A RIGHT TO BE ALIVE.
AND THEY HAVE A RIGHT TO
AS HAPPY A LIFE AS THEY
CAN POSSIBLY HAVE.
AND PEOPLE SAY YOU'RE
INTERFERING WITH NATURE,
BUT MAN HAS INTERFERED WITH
NATURE SO HOPELESSLY NOW,
WE HAVE NEVER BROUGHT MORE
RACCOONS UP FROM TORONTO
THAN WE HAVE PASSED
DEAD ON THE ROAD.
AND DEAD COONS ON THE ROAD
ARE NOT PART OF NATURE,
THEY'RE PART OF MAN'S
CONTRIBUTION TO THE ECOLOGY.

Audrey caresses the deer.

She says YOU'RE THE BEST
DEER IN THE WORLD.
YOU'RE PRETTY
SCHMOOTZY, THOUGH.
YEAH, PRETTY SCHMOOTZY.

Nadine walks in the grass. The baby raccoons follow her.

She says COME ON.
COME ON.
BABY, COME ON.
COME ON.
COME ON, GUYS.
YES.

The end credits roll.

Special thanks to the human, wild and domestic creatures of Aspen Valley Wildlife Sanctuary.

Cinematographer, Brian Gedge

Camera assistant, Douglas Colling

Sound recordist, Ian Hendry, John Megill

Telecine transfer, Guy Nason

Editor, David Bevan

Stills research, Nancy Green

Production manager, Rodger G. Lawson

Production assistant, Mary Louise Lynde

Producer-director, Joan Reed Olsen.

A production of TVOntario, copyright The Ontario Educational Communications Authority 1985.

Watch: Creatures of Aspen Valley