Transcript: The Forgotten Equine | Sep 19, 2019

Jeyan sits in the studio. He's is in his thirties, with short black hair and a trimmed beard. He's wearing a dark blue suit, white shirt, and striped blue tie.

A caption on screen reads "Ontario Hubs: The forgotten equine. Jeyan Jeganathan. @JeyanTVO. @theagenda."

Jeyan says THE DONKEY SANCTUARY
OF CANADA HAS BEEN GIVING ABUSED
AND NEGLECTED DONKEYS A FOREVER
HOME SINCE THE EARLY '90s.
THEY HAVE RESCUED OVER 200
DONKEYS, AND I RECENTLY TOURED
THEIR FACILITY TO FIND OUT HOW
THE SANCTUARY IS HELPING CHANGE
THE CONVERSATION AROUND THIS
OFTEN FORGOTTEN EQUINE.

An animated slate reads "Ontario Hubs."

A young woman walks inside a barn, surrounded by over a dozen donkeys.

[Whistling]

She says BREAKFAST.
C'MON.
C'MON, ABBY.
C'MON, MISTY.

[Whistling]

Two more donkeys walk into the barn, surrounded by green pastures.

Jeyan says THIS IS HOW MORNINGS
START AT THE DONKEY SANCTUARY
OF CANADA.
THIS IS ROUTINE FOR KAYLA
JOHNSON, WHO IS THE WELFARE AND
EDUCATION MANAGER HERE AT THE SANCTUARY.

A tractor unrolls a bale of hay, then Kayla spreads it out onto the barn floor for the donkeys.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Kayla Johnson. Donkey Sanctuary of Canada."

Kayla is in her twenties, with long straight brown hair and bangs.

As she stands inside an office, she says WE CLEAN OUT THE BARNS FROM
THE PREVIOUS DAY, LAY DOWN NEW
STRAW AND NEW HAY THAT THEY
ALWAYS HAVE ACCESS TO FREE
CHOICE STRAW AND WE FEED THEM
ABOUT 1 TO 2 percent OF THEIR BODY
WEIGHT IN HAY.

A map of Ontario appears briefly on screen showing the locations of Guelph and Puslinch, then homes in on the Donkey Sanctuary.

Jeyan says THE SANCTUARY IS IN
PUSLINCH, ONTARIO, JUST OUTSIDE
OF GUELPH, AND IS A SAFE HAVEN
FOR THESE MISUNDERSTOOD EQUINES.
THERE ARE OVER 100 ANIMALS
SPREAD ACROSS 100 ACRES OF
FARMLAND.
THEY HAVE 86 DONKEYS, 14 MULES,
WHICH ARE A CROSS BETWEEN A
DONKEY AND A HORSE, AND EVEN A GOAT.

A goat sits inside a small pen chewing hay. Then Kayla serves kibble in large bowls inside a room.

She says EACH ANIMAL HAS THEIR OWN
KIND OF SCHEDULE AND THAT WE
FOLLOW ON A DAY-TO-DAY BASIS, AS
WELL AS ANY MEDICATIONS WE MIGHT
DO. WE HAVE ABOUT 15 MILLION
WHITEBOARDS IN THIS ROOM TO HELP
US KEEP TRACK OF ALL THE
DIFFERENT TYPES OF CARE THAT AN
ANIMAL MIGHT NEED, WHICH CAN
RANGE FROM TOPICAL TREATMENTS,
ORAL MEDICATIONS, MEDICATIONS
THAT GO IN FEED OR INTO TUBES
THAT WE HAVE TO GIVE THEM.

She feeds the kibble to individual animals.

Jeyan says THESE GREEN PASTURES
ARE RELATIVELY NEW SURROUNDINGS
FOR THESE DONKEYS.
SOME WERE NEGLECTED OR ABUSED
AND SEIZED BY ANIMAL CONTROL,
WHILE OTHERS CAME FROM A LOVING
HOME BUT THEIR OWNERS COULD NO
LONGER TAKE CARE OF THEM.

A woman walks a donkey around a pen.

Jeyan continues LESLEY BAYNE IS THE EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR OF THE DONKEY SANCTUARY
AND HAS BEEN AT THE FOREFRONT OF
EDUCATING PEOPLE ON THESE OFTEN
FORGOTTEN EQUINES.

A caption reads "Lesley Bayne. Donkey Sanctuary of Canada."

Lesley is in her thirties, with long straight brown hair.

As she stands next to a donkey pen, she says THEY CERTAINLY ARE USED TO
THE FULLEST EXTENT AND UNTIL THE
END OF THEIR LIVES.
THE FIRST TIME I SAW A DONKEY
AND REALLY, REALLY REMEMBERED IT
WAS WHEN IT HAD BEEN ABANDONED
DEAD AT THE SIDE OF THE ROAD.
LIKELY IT HAD CARRIED A LOAD AND
DIDN'T QUITE MAKE IT AND HAD
JUST PASSED OUT AND WAS LEFT
THERE.
THE DONKEY IS PART OF THE EQUINE
GROUP, WHICH IS ZEBRA, HORSE,
AND DONKEY.
NOW, WE SEE THE ZEBRA, IT'S
EXOTIC, BEAUTIFUL, THE HORSE IS
MAJESTIC, AND TYPICALLY THE
DONKEY DOESN'T GET GREAT
DESCRIPTIVE TERMS THAT GO ALONG
WITH IT, AND WE'D LIKE TO CHANGE THAT.

Jeyan says UNLIKE HORSES,
DONKEYS HAVE A SHORT, WIDER BODY.
THEIR TAILS LOOK MORE LIKE
TASSELS AND THEY'RE KNOWN FOR
THEIR LONG EARS.
THERE'S A LOT MORE THAN JUST
THEIR PHYSICAL TRAITS THAT SET
THEM APART.

Lesley says THE BEHAVIOUR CAN BE REALLY
DIFFERENT AS WELL.
SO, DONKEYS ARE MORE OF THAT
FIGHT INSTINCT, WHERE HORSES ARE
MORE OF THAT FLIGHT INSTINCT.
SO HORSES WILL RUN AWAY IF
THEY'RE AFRAID OF SOMETHING.
WHEREAS DONKEYS WILL STOP AND
ASSESS THE SITUATION, AND
THEY'LL SEE WHAT THE BEST COURSE
OF ACTION IS, AND THAT MIGHT BE
TO RUN AWAY, BUT IT MIGHT BE TO
STAY AND FIGHT.

An aerial view shows a farm with cattle.

Jeyan says AND BECAUSE OF THEIR
FIGHT INSTINCTS, SOME FARMERS
KEEP DONKEYS TO PROTECT
LIVESTOCK FROM PREDATORS LIKE
COYOTES.
BUT ACCORDING TO THE
ORGANIZATION, DONKEYS THRIVE IN
EITHER SMALL GROUPS OR BONDED PAIRS.

A woman in her seventies sits outside a house.
A caption reads "Sandra Pardy. Donkey Sanctuary of Canada Founder."
Sandra has short gray hair and wears glasses.

She says THE ANIMALS WE TAKE IN, FROM
THE BEGINNING, WE'VE OFFERED
THEM A LIFE-LONG HOME.
AND I WANT TO BE SURE THAT THE
ORGANIZATION LASTS LONG ENOUGH
THAT THE ANIMALS THAT ARE IN ITS
CARE LIVE FULL LIVES.

Jeyan says SANDRA PADY IS THE
FOUNDER OF THE DONKEY SANCTUARY OF CANADA.
SHE STARTED RESCUING DONKEYS
AFTER LEARNING ABOUT THEIR BLEAK
FUTURES ONCE THEY'RE NO LONGER
WANTED BY THEIR OWNERS.

Sandra says IF THERE ISN'T SOMEONE RIGHT
THERE TO BUY IT, IT'S SENT TO
THE SLAUGHTERHOUSE.

Jeyan says SHE RESCUED NINE
DONKEYS SLATED FOR AUCTION AND
TOOK THEM IN WITH THE THREE SHE
ALREADY HAD ON HER PROPERTY.
THE NOT-FOR-PROFIT CHARITY,
WHICH IS MODELLED AFTER THE
DONKEY SANCTUARY IN ENGLAND, HAS
GONE ON TO RESCUE OVER 200
DONKEYS SINCE.
THE DONKEYS THAT COME INTO THE
SANCTUARY COME IN VARIOUS
CONDITIONS:
OVERGROWN HOOVES, MATTED COATS,
AND WEIGHT ISSUES.
SOME DONKEYS ARE FITTED WITH FLY
MASKS TO PROTECT FROM THE SUN
AND INSECTS.
AND IN MORE SEVERE CASES,
DONKEYS ARE FITTED WITH CUSTOM
PANTS TO KEEP THE BUGS AWAY.

Fast clips show donkeys wearing mesh masks and white cloth pants.

Kayla says OUR TREATMENT BARN IS THE
FIRST PLACE THEY'LL GO.
IT ALLOWS US A LITTLE MORE TIME
TO WORK WITH ANY BEHAVIOURAL
NEEDS OR MEDICAL NEEDS.
A LOT OF THEM WILL COME IN
OVERWEIGHT OR UNDERWEIGHT.
SO THIS IS A GREAT PLACE TO
ABLE TO CONTROL THEM WITH THE
USE OF OUR STALLS.

Jeyan says THE SANCTUARY HAS
ONLY A FEW STAFF AND DEPENDS ON
THE HELP OF OVER A HUNDRED
VOLUNTEERS TO CARE FOR EACH
INDIVIDUAL DONKEY.
IN SOME CASES DONKEYS NEED
ONE-ON-ONE REHABILITATION FOR
YEARS BEFORE THEY CAN BE
INTRODUCED TO THE MAIN
POPULATION.

As she walks a gray donkey in a small room next to a white donkey, Kayla says HEY, DUNCAN...

She continues WE NEEDED TO FOCUS MORE ON
THAT TRUSTING BOND AND THAT
MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS AS WE DO
NOW SO MUCH IN OUR HUMAN COMMUNITY.
AND THAT'S EQUALLY AS IMPORTANT
KNOWING HOW INTELLIGENT OUR
DONKEYS AND MULES ARE, TO TAKE
SURE WE'RE ADDRESSING THOSE
NEEDS AS WELL AS THE PHYSICAL.

Jeyan says DUNCAN CAME HERE
NEARLY THREE YEARS AGO, AROUND
THE SAME TIME JOHNSON STARTED
WORKING AT THE SANCTUARY.
HE WAS RESCUED FROM A FARM WHERE
HE WAS OFTEN HIT WITH A SHOVEL
IN ORDER TO DO WORK.

Kayla says DUNCAN CAME FROM A SITUATION
WHERE MANY OF OUR DONKEYS AND
MISUNDERSTANDINGS FROM THE
PUBLIC COME FROM ABOUT DONKEYS
BEING GUARD ANIMALS AND WORK
ANIMALS.
OF COURSE, I BELIEVE THAT
ANIMALS WITH JOBS HAVE PURPOSE
AND THAT, YOU KNOW, BEING AS
EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT AS THEY
ARE, THAT THAT'S IMPORTANT FOR
THEM, TO HAVE WORK.
BUT IT'S ALSO IMPORTANT TO MAKE
SURE THAT THEIR QUALITY OF LIFE
AND NECESSITIES OF CARE IS NOT
DECREASED BECAUSE OF THE WORK
THAT THEY'RE DOING.
SO DUNCAN WAS USED ON A FARM
WHERE HE WAS USED FOR WORK AND
WAS UNFORTUNATELY ABUSED IN
THOSE CASES IN ORDER TO GET HIM
TO DO THAT WORK.
CERTAINLY DUNCAN HAD SOME
SETBACKS WHEN HE ARRIVED HERE,
WHEN HE NEEDED TO HAVE BASIC
NEEDS LIKE HIS FEET TAKEN CARE OF.
SO THAT WE MAKE SURE THAT WE
BOND AND FORM THAT BOND OF
TRUST.
WE NEED TO MAKE SURE THEY'RE
COMFORTABLE AND SAFE AND HAPPY
AND HEALTHY.
BUT ALSO ME TAKING OPPORTUNITIES
TO LEARN ABOUT THE DIFFERENT
TYPES OF CASES, WHAT MAKES THEM
TICK AND HOW TO HELP THEM
THROUGH THINGS THAT THEY NEED TO
OVERCOME, THINGS THEY MIGHT HAVE
HAD BAD EXPERIENCES WITH OR NO
EXPERIENCE WITH BEFORE.

Jeyan says THE SANCTUARY RELIES
ON DONATIONS IN ORDER TO CARE
FOR ITS ANIMALS.
IT OPENS ITS DOORS AT LEAST ONCE
A WEEK TO THE PUBLIC TO HELP
EDUCATE AND DEBUNK ANY
MISCONCEPTIONS.
IT'S ALL IN HOPES OF CHANGING
THE WAY WE LOOK AT DONKEYS.

Sandra says I HOPE THEY COME AWAY
UNDERSTANDING THAT THE ANIMALS
ARE WORTHY OF RESPECT.

A caption reads "Ontario Hubs Field Producer, Jeyan Jeganathan, @JeyanTVO. Editor, David Erwin."

An animated slate reads "Ontario Hubs. Ontario Hubs are made possible by The Barry and Laurie Green Family Charitable Trust and Goldie Feldman."

Watch: The Forgotten Equine