Transcript: Music Without Borders | Mar 08, 2019

Jeyan stands in the studio. He's is in his thirties, with short black hair and a trimmed beard. He's wearing a gray suit, white shirt, and striped blue tie.

As a wall screen behind him shows a picture of people playing brass instruments, A caption on screen reads "Ontario Hubs: Crossing borders with music. Jeyan Jeganathan. @JeyanTVO. @theagenda."

Jeyan says FOR OVER 60 YEARS
TWO BORDER COMMUNITIES HAVE BEEN
COMING TOGETHER TO CREATE MUSIC.
THE INTERNATIONAL SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA IS MADE UP OF BOTH
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN MUSICIANS.
THE BI-NATIONAL ORCHESTRA
PERFORMS IN BOTH COUNTRIES AND
I HAD THE PLEASURE OF WATCHING
THEM PLAY AT SARNIA'S IMPERIAL THEATRE.

An animated slate reads "Ontario Hubs."
Then, fast clips show an orchestra performing at the Imperial Theatre.

Jeyan narrates FOR OVER 60 YEARS
THE INTERNATIONAL SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
HAS BEEN MAKING MUSIC, MUSIC
THAT CAN BE HEARD ON BOTH SIDES
OF THE BORDER.
THAT'S BECAUSE THE COMMUNITY
ORCHESTRA PLAYS BOTH IN SARNIA,
ONTARIO AND ITS NEIGHBOUR TO THE
WEST, PORT HURON MICHIGAN.

A map shows the locations of both cities.

Then, a man sits in an empty theatre.
A caption reads "Anthony Wing."

Anthony, in his fifties, clean-shaven, with curly black hair, says THERE WERE TWO SMALL
ENSEMBLES IN 1968 ON BOTH SIDES,
AND IT WAS FELT THAT PERHAPS
THEY COULD MAKE A GO OF IT AND
SURVIVE IF THEY TEAMED UP.

Jeyan narrates IT'S THE LITTLE
ORCHESTRA SOCIETY OF SARNIA AND
THE PORT HURON STRING ENSEMBLE
ENTERED ITS PARTNERSHIP, THEY'VE
GROWN FROM TWO CONCERTS A YEAR
TO A FULL SEASON, WHICH INCLUDES
SHOWS ON BOTH THE CANADIAN AND
AMERICAN SIDE.
AND IT'S ONLY ONE OF A HANDFUL
OF CROSS-BORDER SYMPHONIES IN
THE PROVINCE.
THE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA HAS A
FULL ENSEMBLE, A STRINGS
SECTION, WOODWINDS, BRASS AND
PERCUSSION.

Fast clips show each of the instruments.

Jeyan narrates AT THE HELM IS CONDUCTOR AND MUSIC DIRECTOR DOUGLAS YANKEE.

A caption reads "Douglas Bianchi. Music Director."

Douglas, in his sixties, clean-shaven, with short gray hair, says WE HAVE A LOT OF FINE PLAYERS
THAT MAKE THEIR LIVING PLAYING.
AND WE ALSO HAVE A COMMUNITY
MANDATE, SO WE HAVE COMMUNITY
PLAYERS IN A LOT OF THE SECTIONS
FILL IN.
BUT IT'S A VERY HARD-WORKING
GROUP, A VERY DEDICATED GROUP,
VERY LOYAL.

Jeyan narrates SO LOYAL THAT SOME
MEMBERS HAVE BEEN WITH THE
ORCHESTRA FOR OVER THREE
DECADES, BUT WHAT MAKES THIS
GROUP SPECIAL ISN'T THAT THEY
PERFORM ACROSS THE BORDER FROM
TIME TO TIME, BUT THAT IT'S
COMPROMISED OF BOTH CANADIAN AND
AMERICAN CITIZENS.
AND EVEN DUAL CITIZENS, LIKE
PRINCIPAL VIOLA PLAYER STEPHEN COLLINS.

Clips show Stephen playing the viola.

Jeyan narrates COLLINS HAS BEEN A MEMBER OF THE
INTERNATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
SINCE 2001.
INSIDE THE KIWANIS CENTRE,
CONVINCE IS HELPING SHAPE THE
FUTURE OF THE PERFORMERS IN THE LAMBTON AREA.

Stephen teaches a young woman in a room and says ONE, TWO.

Jeyan narrates COLLINS HAS BEEN
RUNNING THE ST. CECILIA'S
CONSERVATIVE FOR SEVEN YEARS.
IT'S ALSO WHERE HE SPENDS HOURS
MAKING STRING INSTRUMENTS, LIKE
VIOLAS AND VIOLINS.

In a clip, Stephen sands a thin piece of wood.

Then, he sits in a room and says 160 TO 200 HOURS, SO 4, 5, 6
WEEKS, DEPENDING HOW FAST YOU
WORK AND WHAT LEVEL OF DETAIL
YOU'RE GOING TO.

Jeyan narrates COLLINS WAS BORN IN
MICHIGAN, HAS LIVED IN CANADA
FOR MOST OF HIS LIFE, AND FOR
THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS HAS
CALLED SARNIA HOME.

Stephen says REALLY WARM BUNCH OF PEOPLE
WHO GET ALONG VERY WELL.
THERE ARE LOTS OF MEMBERS OF THE
ORCHESTRA THAT HAVE BEEN THERE
FOR A LONG TIME.
IN FACT, WHEN I LEFT IN 2008 TO
GO OUT WEST FOR A FEW YEARS,
WHEN I CAME BACK I WAS RECEIVED
LIKE IN A FAMILY.
AND I THINK AT THE PERFORMANCE
YOU FEEL THAT CAMARADERIE.

Jeyan narrates JUST LIKE THE
PERFORMANCES, THE GROUP TRAVELS
BACK AND FORTH OVER THE BLUE
WATER BRIDGE THAT CONNECTS
SARNIA AND PORT HURON FOR
REHEARSALS.
ALTHOUGH THE BORDER CAN
SOMETIMES CREATE A BIT OF A
WAIT.

Douglas says THE LAST CONCERT WAS KIND OF
SCARY.
THERE WAS A BIG BACKUP, AND I
THINK I GOT HERE FIVE MINUTES
BEFORE DOWNBEAT.
I WASN'T THE ONLY ONE THAT WAS
TEXTING SAYING, OH, MY LORD, I'M
STILL AT THE BRIDGE!

Jeyan narrates HAVING TO PERFORM IN
TWO DIFFERENT COUNTRIES MEANING
PERFORMING FOR TWO DIFFERENT
AUDIENCES.
EVERY CONCERT STARTS WITH BOTH
THE AMERICAN AND CANADIAN
ANTHEMS, BUT THE REST OF THE
SHOW CAN VARY.

Douglas says THEY TEND TO LIKE DIFFERENT
THINGS.
COLE MUSIC GOES OVER MUCH BIGGER
ON THE CANADIAN SIDE THAN THE
AMERICAN SIDE, AND SO YOU HAVE
TO TRY TO FIND PROGRAMMING
THAT'S GOING TO APPEAL TO BOTH
SIDES.
YOU WOULDN'T THINK THERE WOULD
BE THAT MUCH OF A DIFFERENCE,
BUT THERE'S ENOUGH TO HAVE TO
FIGURE THAT IN TO YOUR DESIGN,
YOUR PROGRAM, YOUR SEASON.

Jeyan narrates EVEN THOUGH THERE ARE
SUBTLE DIFFERENCES AND TASTE
ACROSS THE BORDER, THERE'S AN
APPRECIATION FOR MUSIC THAT
BONDS BOTH COMMUNITIES.

Anthony says IT'S A CELEBRATION OF SOUND,
OF PITCH, AND IN OUR CASE OF
VERY, VERY SPECIAL FRIENDSHIP
AND SET OF FRIENDSHIPS BETWEEN COUNTRIES.

A caption reads "Ontario Hubs Field Producer, Jeyan Jeganathan, @JeyanTVO. Editor, David Erwin."

A clip shows Douglas conducting the orchestra as it performs a lively piece.

An animated slate reads "Ontario Hubs. Ontario Hubs are made possible by The Barry and Laurie Green Family Charitable Trust and Goldie Feldman."

Watch: Music Without Borders