Transcript: In the Spirit of Sharing | May 03, 1989

(music plays)

A man in his late forties plays the guitar. He has short wavy brown hair and a moustache. HE wears jeans and a unbuttoned gingham shirt.

A caption reads "West Bay. Manitoulin Island. August 1984."

The song goes IT'S TIME TO
GET TOGETHER
A TIME TO LAUGH
AND SING
A TIME TO REMEMBER
AND TO SHARE
EVERYTHING
IT'S TIME FOR
THE YOUNG
AND THE OLD TO
UNDERSTAND
THE SPIRIT OF
THANKSGIVING
WILL BE SHARED
ACROSS THE LAND
WE TRAVEL FAR FOR
MANY REASONS
IT'S A TIME OF
GIVING AND TAKING
SHOW OUR FRIENDS AND PEOPLE
SMILE FROM THE HEART
MAKING PLANS
FOR THE FUTURE
TO BEGIN AGAIN
FROM THE START
IT'S TIME TO GET
TOGETHER
A TIME TO LAUGH
AND SING
A TIME TO REMEMBER
AND TO SHARE
EVERYTHING
IT'S TIME FOR
THE YOUNG
AND THE OLD TO
UNDERSTAND
THE SPIRIT OF
THANKSGIVING
WILL BE SHARED
ACROSS THE LAND

He now performs the song onstage with a band of native musicians.

The song continues IT'S TIME TO GET
TOGETHER
A TIME TO LAUGH
AND SING
A TIME TO REMEMBER
AND TO SHARE
EVERYTHING
IT'S TIME FOR
THE YOUNG
AND THE OLD TO
UNDERSTAND
THE SPIRIT OF
THANKSGIVING
WILL BE SHARED
ACROSS THE LAND

The title "People Patterns. In the spirit of sharing" appears.

The caption changes to "Roberta Hill."

Roberta is in her early forties, with short wavy brown hair. She wears glasses and a short-sleeved patterned blouse. She sits in a classroom desk.

She says WELL, THIS IS
A BEGINNING,
THE FESTIVAL
OF SHARING.
THAT'S THE MOST IMPORTANT
THING, I THINK TO ME.
IT'S A BEGINNING, BUT YET
IT'S A RENEWAL, BECAUSE
FOR SOME TIME,
THOUSANDS OF YEARS AGO,
INDIAN NATIONS USED TO
SHARE WITH ONE ANOTHER.
TRADE WITH ONE
ANOTHER IN COMMERCE,
SHARE IN POLITICAL
MEETINGS AND I THINK
WE'VE SEEN A LITTLE OF EACH
AT THIS SESSION SO FAR.
I DON'T THINK THAT
THIS WILL BE THE END.
I THINK WE ALL HAVE
SOMETHING OF VALUE,
VERY SPECIAL TO US TO
SHARE WITH ONE ANOTHER.
IT'S THE ATMOSPHERE,
SOMETHING THAT ONE CAN'T
PUT INTO WORDS THAT IS
MOST IMPORTANT TO ME.

The caption changes to "Mary Lou Fox."

Mary Lou is in her late fifties, with short curly brown hair. She wears a blue T-shirt and a polka dotted blue and white scarf.

She says WELL, ACTUALLY, THE
ONTARIO INDIAN CULTURAL
EDUCATION CENTRES HAVE
WORKED VERY CLOSELY
OVER THE PAST TEN
YEARS AND, IN FACT,
WE'RE SORT OF CELEBRATING
HAVING BEEN AROUND
FOR TEN YEARS, OUR CENTRE,
THE OJIBWAY CREE CULTURAL
CENTRE, AND THE NORTH
AMERICAN INDIAN
TRAVELLING COLLEGE.
SO, WE'VE WORKED TOGETHER
VERY CLOSELY FOR THE PAST
TEN YEARS AND CERTAINLY
SHARING THE SAME CONCERNS,
HAVING THE SAME HOPES AND
ASPIRATIONS FOR INDIAN
PEOPLE THAT WE WORK FOR.
SO, WE HAD A VERY CLOSE
WORKING ASSOCIATION AND
COMMUNICATION AND HAVE
DONE A NUMBER OF THINGS
TOGETHER AND I THINK THAT
PERHAPS THIS FESTIVAL
OF THANKSGIVING IS
PERHAPS A CULMINATION
OF WORKING TOGETHER IN
THE PAST TEN YEARS.
SOME OF THE THINGS THAT
WE'VE WORKED TOGETHER ON
IS, SAY, DISCUSSING
THE CONCERNS IN ARTS
AND CRAFTS BECAUSE IT'S
VERY IMPORTANT FOR INDIAN
PEOPLE, IT'S ONE OF REALLY
THE MAJOR INDUSTRIES SO,
WE ALL ADDRESS IT IN
SOME WAY OR ANOTHER.

The caption changes to "Gary Farmer."

Gary is in his early forties, with short wavy brown hair. He wears a purple polo T-shirt.

He says WELL, I DON'T THINK, WE
CERTAINLY HAVEN'T DONE
IT ENOUGH, I MEAN, IT'S
IMPORTANT TO HAVE
THESE TYPES OF
FESTIVALS BECAUSE,
FOR SEVERAL REASONS.
ONE IS CERTAINLY THE ARTISTS
GET TO KNOW EACH OTHER.
TOO OFTEN, TOO LONG THE
VISUAL ARTISTS HAVE BEEN
TOO FAR AWAY FROM THE
PERFORMING ARTISTS.
I THINK THEY CAN FIND A
REAL BOND WITH EACH OTHER
AND I THINK IT'S
STARTING TO HAPPEN.
I THINK THIS NEEDS TO
HAPPEN EVERY YEAR,
IT REALLY DOES AND I
THINK IT WOULD BE
JUST FASCINATING FIVE
YEARS DOWN THE ROAD,
SOME OF THE WORK THAT
WOULD BE COMING UP.
YEAH, IT'S TOO BAD THAT
WHAT SEEMS TO BE THE PROBLEM
IS POLITICS SEEMS TO
GET IN THE WAY, FINANCES.
EVERYONE IS SO SCARED TO
GIVE MONEY TO THE ARTS,
I DON'T KNOW WHY.
I THINK THERE WOULD BE
SO MANY MORE BENEFITS
FOR THE COMMUNITY IF THEY
COULD REALIZE THE POWER
OF THE THEATRE AND HOW
WE COULD UTILIZE IT,
NOT ONLY IN THEATRE
BUT ALL THE ARTS.
PRIMARILY DEALING WITH
SOME OF THE ISSUES
THAT THEY'RE FACING
POLITICALLY,
I THINK WE COULD DEAL WITH
THOSE THROUGH THE THEATRE.
THE ONLY WAY WE'D GET TO
DEVELOP THAT IS BY DOING
THIS AND WORKING TOGETHER,
YOU KNOW, TO WORK IT OUT.

(music plays)

A fast clip shows people doing all types of crafts and performing artistic activities.

[classroom chatter]

At a crafting class, the teacher teaches the students how to make dolls out of corn husks.

The caption changes to "Debra Doxtater."

Debra is in her early forties, with short curly brown hair. She wears glasses and a patterned dress.

She says YOU CAN MAKE A SMALLER
HEAD IF YOU WANT.
IF YOU'LL NOTICE
THAT EVERY DOLL HERE
DOESN'T HAVE A FACE.
THE ONE ON THE END OF THE
TABLES AND THE ONES
THAT WE'RE MAKING, BECAUSE
PEOPLE BELIEVE THAT
WHEN YOU CARRY A DOLL OR
HAVE A DOLL WITH YOU,
THE FACE OF A LOVED ONE IS
SUPPOSED TO APPEAR ON IT.
YOU'RE SUPPOSED TO DRESS
THEM IN THE SAME FASHION
AS THE PERSON
YOU LOVE, EH.
WELL, THIS WAS A LONG
TIME AGO WHEN PEOPLE
WERE DRESSED IN
DIFFERENT STYLES
OF INDIAN CLOTHES
AND THAT.
ARE YOU DOING OKAY?

A student says GETTING THERE.

Another student says IS THAT TO KEEP YOU
FROM FEELING LONELY?

Debra says PARDON ME?

The student says IF YOU DRESS THEM
LIKE A FRIEND,
WAS THAT TO KEEP YOU
FROM FEELING LONELY?

Debra says WHEN YOU GOT
LONESOME FOR THEM,
IF YOU PUT THE DOLL OUT
AND YOU LOOKED AT
THE THING, THEN YOU FIGURED
THAT IT TOOK THE PLACE
OF THE LOVED ONE
THAT YOU'RE MISSING.

Another student says DID CHILDREN MAKE
THEIR OWN DOLLS OR DID
THE GRANDMOTHERS MAKE
THEIR DOLLS FOR THEM?

I THINK THEY PROBABLY
MADE THEIR OWN.
THESE KIDS ARE
DOING FINE, EH.
[classroom chatter]

The caption changes to "Dennis Austin. Co-ordinator. Contemporary Music."

Dennis is in his late thirties, with short wavy light brown hair and a moustache. He wears white sweats and a baseball cap.

He says WELL, WHEN THEY
ORIGINALLY TALKED ABOUT
THE FESTIVAL, THEY
HADN'T REALLY CONSIDERED
CONTEMPORARY MUSIC.
THEY HAD THEATRE AND ARTS
AND CRAFTS AND DANCE AND
OTHER THINGS AND AS SOON
AS THE IDEA CAME UP,
EVERYBODY THOUGHT IT
WAS A GOOD IDEA TO DO
CONTEMPORARY MUSIC.
AND THE THING IS, I GUESS
THE SAME WITH THEATRE,
ONCE IT'S GONE,
IT'S GONE.
AND FOR THE MUSICIANS,
ESPECIALLY FROM THE MORE
REMOTE COMMUNITIES, IT'S
REALLY IMPORTANT TO HAVE
DEMO MATERIAL AND AN
ALBUM THAT'S OUT THERE
WORKING FOR THEM.
AND WE JUST DECIDED THAT
WE'RE GOING TO HAVE A LOT
OF MUSICIANS TOGETHER, WE
COULD PUT TOGETHER SOME
KIND OF MOBILE STUDIO
AND BRING EVERYBODY
TOGETHER AND SEE IF WE
COULD CUT A RECORD.
INITIALLY WE HAD ANOTHER
LOCATION PICKED THAT
WOULD'VE BEEN MUCH MORE,
THERE WOULD'VE BEEN A LOT
MORE CREATURE COMFORTS
FOR EVERYBODY INVOLVED.
UNFORTUNATELY, WE COULDN'T
GET IT AND THEN WE LOOKED
AT A BOAT; WE COULDN'T GET
THE BOAT; AND THEN WE SAW
THIS BUILDING AND THIS
BUILDING HAS THE ADVANTAGE
THAT IT'S A LITTLE BIT
AWAY FROM OTHER HOUSES
SO IF WE'RE PLAYING AT
NIGHT, WE'RE NOT GOING
TO KEEP PEOPLE AWAKE.
AND ALSO, THERE'S VERY
LITTLE THAT YOU CAN
DAMAGE IN THIS
BUILDING.

A fast clip shows the façade of an old building by a river.

Dennis says IT'S JUST STONE WALLS
AND A CONCRETE FLOOR.
WHEN WE FIRST MOVED IN,
OF COURSE BECAUSE
THE WALLS ARE ALL STONE,
THE ACOUSTICS ARE NOT
APPROPRIATE FOR
RECORDING MUSIC.
SO, WE TALKED TO SOME
PEOPLE TO GET SOME IDEAS
ABOUT WHAT YOU COULD DO
IN A KIND OF A TEMPORARY
WAY TO MAKE IT
A STUDIO.
SO, WE ORDERED UP ABOUT
200 DOLLARS' WORTH
OF TWO-BY-FOURS AND PINK
INSULATION AND WE JUST
BUILT NO PARALLEL WALLS
AND NOTHING IS PARALLEL.
THAT WAS THE EASY PART.
ONE OF THE REALLY NICE
SURPRISES OF THIS FESTIVAL,
THE BAR ROAD BAND FROM
BRANTFORD CAME UP.
AND THEY'VE WORKED
TOGETHER FOR TEN YEARS AND
PLAYED COUNTLESS NUMBER
OF GIGS TOGETHER.
AND WE JUST STARTED UP -
WE WERE JUST GOING TO DO
A SOUND CHECK ONE NIGHT,
AND THEY GOT INTO A TUNE.
AND WITHIN PROBABLY FOUR
HOURS WE HAD TWO TUNES
RECORDED WITH VOCALS AND
OVERDUBS AND EVERYTHING.
AND IT WAS A LOT OF
FUN WORKING WITH THEM.
THEY'VE GOT ABOUT A DOZEN
TUNES, ORIGINAL TUNES,
AT THIS POINT.
WE'VE RECORDED ABOUT FIVE
AND THERE'LL PROBABLY BE
TWO OR THREE ON THE ALBUM.
IT'S BEEN JUST A TREAT
WHILE THEY'VE BEEN IN TOWN.

The caption changes to "Mel Stewart. Sound Engineer."

Mel is in his late thirties, with short wavy blond hair and a beard. He wears a pale blue shirt with a print on the front.

He says YOU HEAR ME ON
THE FLOOR?
OKAY, THAT LAST TAKE
WAS PRETTY GOOD.
NOW, WE'LL PUT
THE HARMONIES IN.
YOU READY, FARON?
YOU READY FOR
THE OVERDUBS?

The caption changes to "Faron Johns. Harmony Vocals."

Faron is in his mid-thirties, clean-shaven and with short wavy brown hair. HE wears a burgundy polo shirt.

The caption changes to "Murray Porter. Composer."

Murray is in his mid-thirties, clean-shaven and with short curly light brown hair. He wears sunglasses and a denim shirt.

The caption changes to "Sidney J. Hill. Guitar."

Sidney is in his late thirties, clean-shaven and with short brown hair. He wears jeans and a striped shirt.

The caption changes to "Don Powles. Bass"

Don is in his mid-forties, with long straight brown hair and a moustache. He wears a white blouse and a red bandana across her forehead.

The caption changes to "Mark A. Jamieson. Drums."

Mark is in his mid-thirties, with short wavy brown hair and a beard. He wears a yellow T-shirt with a print of the front.

[drum sticks counting in]

The band starts to plays.

The song goes SOMEBODY ONCE TOLD ME
NEVER LET A GOOD THING GO

MAYBE THAT'S THE REASON
I WANT YOU TO KNOW
I FEEL LIKE I'M IN LOVE
FOR THE FIRST TIME
LIKE IT NEVER DID BEFORE
BABY, YOU'RE MY
GOOD THING
AND I'M NEVER GOING
TO LET YOU GO
I USED TO BE A ROAMER
MY HEART WAS LIKE A STONE
I'D LOVE 'EM AND
I'D LEAVE 'EM
AND WIND UP ALL ALONE
THAT'S BEFORE I
FELT THE MAGIC
OF YOUR SMILE I'VE
COME TO KNOW
'CAUSE, BABY, YOU'RE
MY GOOD THING
I'M NEVER GOING
TO LET YOU GO
I FEEL LIKE I'VE KNOWN
YOU FOR A LIFETIME
BUT IT'S NOT
SO LONG AGO
I WAS GOING THROUGH
THE MOTIONS
NOW YOUR LOVE'S
MADE ME WHOLE

(music plays)
[crowd chattering]

Fast clips show images of a crafts exhibition.

The caption changes to "Walter Sunahara. Ontario arts Council."

Walter is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven and with short straight black hair. He wears glasses and a striped polo T-shirt.

He says WELL, ONE OF THINGS I
FEEL THAT THIS EXHIBITION
DOES IN TERMS OF
DEVELOPMENT WITH
THE PEOPLE HERE
IS, FOR EXAMPLE,
WE'VE TAKEN QUILTS
AS A GOOD EXAMPLE.
WE'VE HAD A REAL
DEVELOPMENT IN THIS
COMMUNITY OVER THE LAST
OH, SEVEN OR EIGHT YEARS.
FIRST OF ALL, WE WERE
INTERESTED IN HELPING
THE NATIVE CRAFTSPERSON
DEVELOP TECHNIQUES,
NEW TECHNIQUES AND WE HAVE
SEEN A LOT OF CHANGES
HAPPEN IN THE LAST FEW
YEARS WITH SOME OTHER
CRAFTSMEN COMING IN TO
SHOW AND TALK ABOUT COLOUR
CHANGES; AND YET, HAVING A
REAL INTEREST IN LOOKING
BACK AT THEIR ROOTS,
LOOKING AT A LOT OF
THINGS THEY'VE DONE
IN THE PAST AND NOW
COMING BACK WITH
NEW IDEAS.
AND THEY'VE COME UP WITH
SOME REAL FRESH APPROACHES
TO THINGS THAT THEY HAVE
BEEN DOING IN THE PAST.

Fast clips show images of different craft pieces at the exhibition.

He says THEY HAVE LOOKED AT
STITCHERY IN A MUCH,
MUCH DIFFERENT LIGHT.
THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS
KIND OF A FESTIVAL,
I THINK IS AS ON-GOING
AND I THINK THE MATERIAL
THAT WE HAVE GATHERED HERE
TODAY IS JUST, I THINK,
IT HAS SEVERAL SORT
OF IMPLICATIONS.
ONE IS THE REINFORCEMENT
AND HAVING SOME
SORT OF PRIDE FOR THE
CRAFTSMEN IN THE COMMUNITY.
I KNOW THAT SOME OF
THE KIDS THAT COME IN,
THE YOUNG PEOPLE
COME IN AND SAY,
HEY, MY MOM DID THIS.
AND I THINK IT'S GREAT,
IT GIVES PRIDE TO THE
CRAFTSMEN AND IT GIVES
PRIDE TO THE FAMILY
AND I THINK THIS
IS REALLY GREAT.
ALSO, GIVES AN OPPORTUNITY
FOR OTHER CRAFTSMEN
IN THE COMMUNITY TO
SEE WHAT EXCELLENCE
IS ALL ABOUT AND I HAVE
SELECTED A NUMBER OF WORKS
WHICH I THINK IT SHOWS
GOOD CRAFTSMANSHIP
AND GOOD ARTISTIC
JUDGEMENT.

The caption changes to "Doctor Johanna Feest. Vienna."

Johanna is in her late thirties, with shoulder length slightly wavy brown hair. She wears a yellow T-shirt.

She says ON THIS VERY ISLAND
YOU SEE WHAT KIND OF
CREATIVITY IS
AROUND HERE.
YOU CAN EVEN BREATH IT,
YOU CAN SMELL IT, YEAH.
IT'S JUST WONDERFUL; I LIKE
THIS EXHIBIT HERE ESPECIALLY.
WELL THE INTEREST IN
EUROPE HAS BEEN
VERY GREAT SINCE A
LONG TIME AGO.
IT DATES BACK FAR
INTO THE 16TH CENTURY.
ACTUALLY, WHEN THE FIRST
PROOFS OF INDIANNESS
CAME OVER TO THE
CONTINENTAL EUROPE.
AND SO THERE ARE QUITE A
LOT OF HUGE COLLECTIONS
IN THE VARIOUS
MUSEUMS IN EUROPE.
AND PEOPLE USED TO SEE
THESE COLLECTIONS
AND THEY'RE
VERY INTERESTED.
THE INTEREST GROWS DAILY
AND THAT'S THE REASON
WHY I'M HERE
RIGHT NOW.

A fast clip shows images of different native inspired accessories.

She says I'M TRYING TO COLLECT
AND TO FIND OTHER ITEMS
FOR THESE MUSEUMS IN EUROPE
AND TO FILL THE GAPS
IN THE EXISTING
EXHIBITS ALREADY
AND TRY ONCE AGAIN, TO
ESTABLISH CONTACT
WITH CRAFTSPEOPLE AND
ARTISANS AS WELL.
SO, I'M SOMEWHAT OF
A DIFFERENT PERSON.
I'M NOT A COLLECTOR IN THE
ACTUAL SENSE OF THE WORD
BECAUSE I'M NOT
A DEALER.
I TRY TO KNOW PEOPLE
BEFORE I COLLECT.
I WANT ESTABLISH A
THOROUGH RELATIONSHIP
TO THE VARIOUS PEOPLE.
AND THEN I SELECT
SOMETHING,
WHICH I VERY
APPRECIATE.
CREATIVITY GREW
WITHIN THE CULTURES,
WITHIN HUMAN
MANKIND AND WHETHER
IT'S DONE PROFESSIONALLY
OR WITHIN THE ABILITIES
OF PEOPLE GENERALLY,
IT DOESN'T MAKE ANY
DIFFERENCE AT ALL, AT
LEAST FROM MY JUDGEMENT.

The caption changes to "Barry Karp. Theatre Co-ordinator."

Barry is in his late forties, clean-shaven and balding. He wears sunglasses and an off white shirt.

He says WELL NATIVE THEATRE
IS A COMPONENT
OF THE FESTIVAL
OF THANKSGIVING.
PROBABLY AN IMPORTANT
ONE BECAUSE IT IS
A HIGH-PROFILE EVENT
THAT THE GENERAL PUBLIC
CAN RELATE TO.
THERE ARE FIVE COMPANIES
FROM AROUND THE PROVINCE
SHOWING OFF THEIR
TALENT IN SIX
DIFFERENT PRODUCTIONS.
WE SHOW THEM AT
2 O'CLOCK, A MATINEE,
EVERY DAY AND AT
7:00 IN THE EVENING.
BEHIND US NOW, WELL THIS
INTERVIEW IS OBVIOUSLY
TAKING PLACE IN THE
MORNING AND WE HAVE
A REHEARSAL OF ONE OF
THE PERFORMING GROUPS.
THEY'LL BE ON AT
2 O'CLOCK TODAY,
THE NATIVE
THEATRE SCHOOL.

Gary says WELL THE NATIVE THEATRE
SCHOOL STARTED IN 1975
AND, OF COURSE, IT GOT
GOING BY A JAMES BULLER
THROUGH THE ASSOCIATION.
THE FIRST ONE WAS
ACTUALLY TAKEN CARE OF
BY DAVID CALDERISI,
A WELL-KNOWN ACTOR
IN THE TORONTO AREA.
FROM THERE IT JUST
BLOSSOMED AND BLOSSOMED
AND BLOSSOMED AND A LOT OF
PEOPLE HAVE GONE THROUGH
THOSE RANKS, I SUPPOSE.
ALL THE PEOPLE, I
SUPPOSE, ON THE BASIS
OF THE PERFORMING ARTS'
COMMUNITY IN THE NATIVE
SIDE OF THINGS AND IN
ONTARIO, ANYWAY.
[speaking in Cree]

Two Indian characters appear on stage with the caption "Wonska."

A narrator says THE NATIVE THEATRE SCHOOL'S
PRODUCTION IS."
WONSKA."
IN THE CREE LANGUAGE,
WONSKA IS A CALL FOR
AN AWAKENING FROM THE DREAM
WORLD TO A NEW DAY'S COMING.
THE STORY IS BASED ON A
COYOTE WHO HAS BEEN GIVEN
THE POWER TO TRANSFORM
INTO A HUMAN, AND
THE ANTHROPOLOGIST BINNY
WHO LIVES IN A WORLD
OF MUSEUMS AND
ARTIFACTS.
TOGETHER, THEY GO THROUGH
A RUDE AWAKENING
IN A FANTASY WORLD MANIFESTED
BY TWO LAUGHING SPIRITS.
EVENTUALLY, THEY LEARN
TO UNDERSTAND CULTURAL
RESPECT AND DIGNITY.
BUT, IT'S A
HAZARDOUS JOURNEY.
[humming]

A dancing and singing scene rolls.

Three girls sing HEY, BIG BOY, HOW
BIG IS YOUR WAND?
[giggling]

A male character says WELL HELLO,
SISTER DUCKS.
[quacking]

Two girls dressed as ducks quack.

The man says I SUPPOSE YOU WANT TO
KNOW WHAT'S IN MY BAG.
[quacking]
WELL IN ORDER FOR YOU
SISTER DUCKS TO KNOW
WHAT'S IN MY BAG, WE
HAVE TO HAVE A CEREMONY.
[quacking]
FOLD THE WINDS AND SHUT
YOUR EYES AND DANCE
AROUND THE BAG AND I'LL
SING A MEDICINE CHANT.
[Cree medicine chant]
[smacking sounds]

The man kicks one of the ducks on the tail.

[beeping]

Three men are now dressed as astronauts.

One of them says WE ARE NEARING
THE PLANET.
ALSO KNOWN AS MUSEUM
FOR EARTHLINGS.
PREPARE FOR LANDING.
[whooshing sounds]
[drumbeats, rhythmic clapping]

Another character claps and says LOOK IT'S WORKING,
I TOLD YOU, GUYS!
[drumbeats, rhythmic clapping]
KEEP IT UP, DON'T STOP!
[drumbeats, rhythmic clapping]

Barry says ONE OF THE MOST
INTRIGUING,
THE MOST WONDERFUL
ASPECTS OF NATIVE THEATRE
IS A SENSE OF COOPERATION
THAT COMPANIES
HAVE WITH ONE ANOTHER.
THE SHARING OF TALENT,
THE WORKING TOGETHER
AND THE TRUST THEY
HAVE FOR ONE ANOTHER.
THIS MAKES IT, GIVES
IT A CHARACTERISTIC,
A QUALITY THAT WE
REALLY DON'T FIND
IN COMMERCIAL THEATRE.

Fast clips show images at a pottery workshop.

The narrator says THE SATISFACTION OF
WORKING IN CLAY
AT ONE OF THE FESTIVALS
MOST POPULAR WORKSHOPS.
ADULTS AND CHILDREN
SHARING THE SKILLS
AND TALENTS OF
CREATIVE ARTISTS.

Two men are working with pots.

One says PINCH THAT OUT SOME
MORE DOWN THERE.

The other one says DOWN HERE?

The first man says MM-HMM.

The second man says OKAY.

The first man says SHOULD BE ABOUT, MAYBE,
A QUARTER OF AN INCH,
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.
THERE'S A LOT OF SANDING
YET, SMOOTHING OUT.

The second man says OKAY.

The first man says LEAVE ENOUGH FOR
SOME WORK ON IT.
[classroom chatter]

A woman in her early thirties says WELL, I'M JUST MAKING - I
JUST CALLED IT MY FACE CUP.
I MEAN, FOR YOU KNOW,
MAYBE INDIAN PEOPLE
A LONG TIME AGO WOULD'VE
CALLED IT A CEREMONIAL,
CEREMONIAL JAR WITH
WHATEVER AND IT'S JUST A...
JUST A FACE CUP.
[chuckling]
THE FACES WILL LOOK BETTER
LATER ON, BECAUSE TODAY
THEY JUST SORT OF LIKE THAT,
TOMORROW IT'LL BE SCULPTED
AND ALL THE LITTLE
FEATURES WILL BE,
WILL BE DRAWN IN, NOT
DRAWN IN BUT SCRATCHED IN
AND IT'LL LOOK
PRETTY NICE.

A native young man sits by the river, plays the guitar and sings.

(music plays)
[humming]

The caption changes to "Leland Bell. From the upper side."

The song goes ON THE OTHER SIDE
OF THE LAND
LIVED A LIFE
HIDDEN IN TIME
NOT NO MORE,
NOT NO MORE
[humming]
DON'T BRING THE MISERY
DON'T BRING NO PAIN
JUST AT ANOTHER WAY OF
LOOKING AT THE SAME THING
TRY TO FIND
TRY TO FIND
[humming]
NO NEED TO
TWIST NO ARMS
THE SEARCH IS ON
THEY'LL FIND THE WAY
IF THEY STAND ALONE
FROM THE OTHER SIDE
OF THE LINE
THAT'S WHAT I SEE
THAT'S WHAT I SEE

(music plays)
[humming]

The man now appears painting a mural. The mural shows people interacting with nature and with other people.

He says THE MURAL IS SUPPOSED
TO BE ABOUT TIME.
THE PRESENT LINKING
ITSELF WITH THE PAST
AND THE IDEA IS
TIME AND SURVIVAL.
THAT TIME IS AN
ENTITY OF ITS OWN,
LIKE A POWER
OF ITS OWN.
IT EXISTS, IT
ONLY EXISTS.
SO, IN A SENSE,
THERE'S NO PAST,
ALL OF THE PAST IS
IRRELEVANT TO THE FUTURE
AND THE PRESENT.
AND THE THING IS, THE PAST
IS JUST AS IMPORTANT NOW
IN A SENSE THAT IT IS GOING TO
GIVE OUR PEOPLE A FOUNDATION,
A FIRM FOUNDATION SO
THEY CAN BUILD ON IT.
SO THE OTHER PART OF THE
PAINTING TALKS ABOUT
NOW THAT WE HAVE
OUR CULTURE,
WHAT ARE WE GOING
TO DO WITH IT?
AND IT'S UP TO US TO
BUILD OUR CULTURE,
IT'S NOT UP TO
ANYBODY ELSE.
SO IT'S BASICALLY A
STATEMENT TO MY PEOPLE,
THE PEOPLE OF THE THREE
FIRES, THEY'RE CALLED.
IT'S NOT PARTICULARLY
DIRECTED TOWARDS
THE PEOPLE WHO
LIVE IN RESERVES.
BUT IT'S DIRECTED TO THOSE
PEOPLE WHO HAVE CHOSEN
TO TAKE THE PAST
AND LIVE IT AS BEST
AS THEY CAN IN
THESE TIMES.
BUT THE IMPORTANT THING
IS IT'S GOING TO BE
THE BASIS OF OUR SURVIVAL
AND WE NEED A STRONG
FOUNDATION IN
ORDER TO BUILD,
RE-BUILD OUR CULTURE.
[humming]

(music plays)

The end credits roll.

Cinematographer, Robert Brooks C.S.C

Videotape editor, David Bevan.

Production manager, Rodger G. Lawson.

Producer-director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario.

Copyright. The Ontario Educational Communications Authorities. 1985.

Watch: In the Spirit of Sharing