Transcript: The People Make the Valley | Aug 17, 1988

In a farm, a young man carries a calf on his shoulder.

Tom says HE DOESN'T EVEN SEEM
TO CARE A BIT ABOUT THEM.
[cow bellowing]
SHE'S THE SECOND
BLACK COW IN THERE.

The young man says s IS THAT HER?

Tom says YEAH, THAT'S HER OUT IN
THE HIGH GROUND THERE NOW.

[reins jingling]

Fast clips show images of men leading horses inside a paddock.

One says WHOA.
WHOA.

Another clip shows a man working with leather and a group of young boys playing baseball in the field.

One says ALL RIGHT!

The title "People Patterns" appears on screen.

Joan Reed-Olsen appears. She’s in her early sixties with short curly brown hair and wears glasses, a white shirt, a blue short-sleeved jacket and a brown belt.

She says WHEN WE TALK OF THE UPPER
OTTAWA VALLEY, THOUGHTS GO
IMMEDIATELY TO THE VAST
FORESTS, TO THE GREAT NETWORK
OF RIVERS, THE MILLIONS OF LOGS
FLOATING DOWN TO THE SAWMILLS.
BUT ONCE YOU'VE TRAVELLED
THROUGH THIS UNIQUE TRIANGLE
ON THE MAP, THE TINY VILLAGES
AND THE FARMING COMMUNITIES,
MOST OF ALL, THE PEOPLE
REMAIN STRONGEST IN MEMORY.

The title "People make the valley" appears.

A caption reads "Tom Donohue."

Tom is in his late fifties, clean-shaven and with short white hair. He wears a gray sweater, a brown beret and a watch.

He says MY ANCESTORS ON BOTH SIDES
OF HOUSE CAME FROM IRELAND
IN THE MID-1800s.
I THINK MAYBE SETTLED BRIEFLY
IN BECKWITH TOWNSHIP OR
SMITH FALLS AREA OR ALMONTE AND
CAME THEN TO THE HILLS ALONG THE
OPEONGO WHERE MY FATHER WAS
BORN AND SHANTIED AND LOGGED
AND EVENTUALLY BECAME
INTERESTED IN CATTLE.
AND HE WORKED WITH CATTLE ALL
HIS LIFE AND PASSED ON HIS
KNOWLEDGE TO ANOTHER
GENERATION, AND WE TOOK IT FROM
THERE AND WE'VE BEEN WORKING
WITH CATTLE ALL OUR LIVES.
WELL, MY MOTHER AND FATHER HAD
TEN CHILDREN, SIX BOYS AND
FOUR GIRLS, AND ONE YOUNGSTER,
ONE BOY DIED IN INFANCY
AND NINE ARE LIVING YET.
AND ME BEING THE THIRD
YOUNGEST OF A FAMILY OF NINE
LIVING -- MY MOTHER LIVES YET
AND MY FATHER PASSED AWAY
IN 1970.
BUT IT WAS ALMOST A TYPICAL
FAMILY IN THAT ERA.
EVERYBODY HAD LARGE FAMILIES
AND, CONSEQUENTLY, WE'RE ONE
OF THEM, I SUPPOSE.

A fast clips shows men in a van carrying haystacks for the cattle.

One of the men says SURE THE DOGS'LL LET THE
REST OF THEM GO NOW, EH.

The other man says HE'S IN THERE SOMEPLACE.

The first man says THEY'LL LET THE REST OUT.

Now a clip shows the front of a hunting and fishing store called "Hartwig’s Harness."

The caption changes to "Franklin Hartwig."

Franklin is in his early fifties, clean-shaven and with short straight gray hair. He wears a gray shirt.

He works on a horse saddle in his workshop.

He says WELL, I DON'T KNOW HOW
IMPORTANT IT IS TO HAVE A
HARNESS-MAKER, BUT I'VE HAD
LOTS OF WORK TO DO ANYWAY
AND NEVER BEEN OUT OF WORK.
ALWAYS SOMEBODY WANTING
REPAIRS OR NEW HARNESS.
WELL, A LOT OF THE HORSES ARE
USED IN THE BUSH IN THIS AREA
AND THEN THERE'S A LOT
OF THEM USED ON THE FARM
AND LAND TOO, EH.
THERE'S NOT TOO MANY THAT
USE THEM MUCH ON THE FARM,
BUT THERE'S A FEW.
A FEW THEY'RE
STILL USING THEM.

On a field, Alex feeds the horses.

The caption changes to "Alex McGrath."

Alex is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven and with short wavy brown hair. He wears a khaki shirt and an orange cap.

A male voice says I DON'T KNOW HOW YOU'LL GET
A PICTURE OF THE FOALS,
YOU KNOW.

Alex smiles.

Alex says WELL, IT'S THE HOURS YOU
WORK, EH, FOR ONE THING.
IF YOU PUT THE HOURS IN A
YEAR IN A CITY MAN'S JOB,
WHAT HE GETS PAID, IT'D
BE QUITE A DIFFERENCE.
I WAS ON THE TRACTOR YESTERDAY
MORNING 'TIL 7 O'CLOCK, AND I
COME IN LAST NIGHT 9:30.
AND I MIGHT HAVE HAD AN HOUR
OFF TO EAT, BUT I WOULDN'T
HAVE WORKED THAT LONG WHEN I --
ALL FARMERS DO THE SAME
NOW, TRYING TO GET IT DONE.
BUT WE HAVE HAD
AWFUL WET SPRING, TOO.
IF I WANT TO TAKE A DAY OFF,
I JUST DROP EVERYTHING AND GO.
I WAS AT A WEDDING LAST
SATURDAY IN PETERBOROUGH.
MAYBE I SHOULD HAVE
BEEN IN THE FIELD.
I JUST SAID THE HELL WITH IT.
I'M GOING TO THE WEDDING.
[laughing]

The caption changes to "Ronald Bromley."

Ronald is in his late fifties, clean-shaven and with short wavy gray hair. He wears gray trousers and a flannel shirt.

He says I'VE ALWAYS FARMED.
MY FATHER FARMED AND
MY GRANDFATHER AND
GREAT-GRANDFATHER.
SO THE GREAT-GRANDFATHER
ACTUALLY CLEARED THE FARM
WHERE I WAS BORN, WHICH WAS
DOWN ON THE BROMLEY LINE.
THIS PLACE, I BOUGHT IT IN '57.
THOSE WERE THE DAYS WHEN I HAD
AMBITION, AND I DECIDED TO GO
INTO COW CALF, WHICH WASN'T
POPULAR IN THOSE DAYS.
AND I WAS TOLD
THAT I'D STARVE.
AS YOU CAN SEE, I
HAVEN'T STARVED.
AND I STARTED WITH SIX
COWS AND TEN CALVES.
AND WE DON'T COUNT THEM CLOSE
NOW, BUT WE'VE ABOUT 140 HEAD
NOW AND IT'S JUST STARTING TO
GET PRETTY INTERESTING HERE NOW.

The caption changes to "Lorne Siegel."

Lorne is in his early sixties, clean-shaven and with short graying hair. He wears light gray trousers, a floral shirt and a black and white cap.

He says WE STARTED ON THE FARM DOWN
HOME AND WORKED THE WHOLE FARM.
WE HAD 400 AND SOME ACRES.
WORKED THE WHOLE
FARM WITH THE HORSES.
SOMETIMES WE HAD THREE CANE, BUT
THERE WAS NO TAXES TO BE GOT.
BUT THEN I WENT TO SUDBURY AND
WAS THERE FOR A FEW YEARS,
AND I COME BACK AND WE
BOUGHT THIS FARM, THE WIFE.
BACK IN HORSES AGAIN.
AND I WOULDN'T LIKE TO DO
WITHOUT THEM, ESPECIALLY
IN THE BUSH.
LIKE SKIDDING OR
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.
I THINK THAT JUST PERFECT
BECAUSE I SEEN SOME SKIDDERS
DOING THE WORK AND THEY KNOCK
DOWN THE WHOLE BUSH BEFORE THEY
HAVE IT OUT, BUT YOU DON'T HAVE
TO DO THAT WITH THE HORSES.
THE LOGS IS CUT SHORT, AND THEY
GO AROUND PRETTY NEAR EVERY
LITTLE TREE OR BIG TREES SO
YOU HAVE NO PROBLEM TO BRING
THEM OUT.
SO THAT'S WHY I'M
STILL WITH HORSES.

Young boys play baseball of a field.

A boy says THAT WAS TERRIBLE.
YOU SHOULD HAVE JUST TOUCHED.

Joan says IN 1978, A GROUP OF PEOPLE IN
THE RURAL DISTRICT OF DACRE
DECIDED IT WAS TIME FOR A
COMMUNITY CENTRE FOR YOUNG
PEOPLE, FOR SENIORS,
FOR EVERYONE.
SIX YEARS OF MONEY RAISING
EFFORTS, HUNDREDS OF MEETINGS,
AND THOUSANDS OF HOURS OF
VOLUNTEER LABOUR AND THE
CENTRE IS ALMOST COMPLETE.
LUCY COLTERMAN, ONE OF THE
DRIVING FORCES REMEMBERS.

The caption changes to "Lucy Colterman."

Lucy is in her seventies, with long straight gray hair in a ponytail. She wears glasses, a floral shirt and a khaki jacket.

She says WELL, THE FIRST THING WE
DONE WAS THE MEN STARTED TO
TEAR DOWN BARNS.
THEY DEMOLISHED THREE BARNS,
AND THEY MOVED THEM HERE WITH
THEIR TRACTORS AND WAGONS
FOR TO BUILD THE BUILDING.
AND THEN THEY HAD -- THEY
WERE BRINGING TRACTORS
AND FRONT END LOADERS TO DIG.
THEY DUG FOR ABOUT -- OH, I'D
SAY FOR ABOUT TWO WEEKS AND
ALL THE FARMERS AND ESPECIALLY
THOSE YOUNG LADS, THE
TEENAGERS, THEY REALLY WORKED
HARD BECAUSE THE EARTH ALL HAD
TO BE DUG OUT AND CEMENT PUT
IN AND THEN IT HAD TO BE PACKED.
THE EARTH HAD TO BE PACKED
WITH THOSE PACKERS.
AND WE HAD ALL THOSE
YOUNG FELLOWS ON THIS.
SO THEY WORKED HARD AT IT.
SO WHEN THEY GOT THE WALLS UP
AND THE ROOF ON, THEN IT WAS...
ALL THE WOMEN TURNED IN.
THEY ALL BROUGHT THEIR HAMMERS
AND WE ASKED FOR OLD NAILS.
SO WE GOT OLD NAILS
BY THE PAILFUL.
AND SOME OF THEM STRAIGHTENED
THOSE NAILS AND THE REST OF US
AND A FEW MEN, WE PUT THE
NAILS IN THOSE LOGS TO HOLD
THE PLASTER IN WHEN
THEY PUT THE PLASTER ON.
WE EVEN HAD KIDS FOUR AND FIVE
YEARS OLD CARRY THE NAILS.
WHEN WE GOT UP ON
CHAIRS OR WHATNOT,
THEY HANDED US THE NAILS.

The caption changes to "Jack Nolan."

Jack is in his early fifties, clean-shaven and with short white hair. He wears jeans, a patterned brown and white shirt and a beige cap.

He says A WAY BACK, I'VE ALWAYS LIKED
HORSES FROM THE TIME I'VE BEEN
SMALL, YOU KNOW.
WE NEVER HAD ONLY A TEAM.
THEN, ABOUT PRETTY NEAR TWENTY
YEARS AGO, I STARTED INTO MY
OWN INTO HORSES AND STARTING
UP THIS PMU STABLES.
YOU KNOW, YOU MAKE MEDICINE
OFF THE WATER OF THESE
PREGNANT MARES, EH.
SO THEN EVENTUALLY WE KEPT
GOING AND GOING, AND WE HAVE
OWNED AS HIGH AS FIFTY AND
SIXTY HORSES FOR OUR OWN, SO
THAT'S BEEN THE TRADITION
WE'VE HAD UP TO ABOUT THIRTY,
UP TO A YEAR OR TWO AGO.
WE'VE BEEN TRYING TO GET DOWN
WITH THEM AND TRYING NOT TO
GIVE THEM AWAY BECAUSE
THE PRICES WENT DOWN LIKE
EVERYTHING ELSE, EH.
BUT WE STILL -- WE'VE
EVENTUALLY GOT DOWN TO SIXTEEN
NOW, BUT FOUR MORE FOALS
COMING, SO IT'S JUST HARD.
LIKE WE HAVE STARTED -- I'VE
WORKED SINCE '75 A LOT FOR THE
FORESTRY WITH MAYBE AS HIGH AS
SIX HORSES IN THE WINTER TIMES
AND THE FALL.
LIKE IN THE SUMMER TIMES, TOO.
BUT THEN WE KEEP SOME FEW
SADDLE HORSES AND EVERYTHING.
IT'S JUST HARD WHEN YOU LIKE
THEM TO GET RID OF THEM.
LIKE IT KEEPS SEEMING TO GET
ON MORE AND MORE ALL THE TIME.
MOST OF THE HORSES LIKE TO
PULL AT THESE HORSE PULLS.
IF THEY'RE GOOD HORSES,
THEY'RE KEEN AND EAGER AND THE
MORE YOU DRAW THEM, THE MORE
THEY WANT TO DRAW, YOU KNOW.
STAY RIGHT AT IT BECAUSE THESE
HORSE PULLS HAVE COME A
LONG WAYS THIS
LAST WHILE.
AS I SAY, EVERYONE'S GONE
INTO BETTER HORSES, YOU KNOW,
BECAUSE THEIR GAS HAS GOT DEAR
AND THEY JUST DON'T WANT TO
GO OUT FOR A
PULLER HORSE, EH.
AND WHEN YOU GO TO THESE HORSE
PULLS NOW, THERE'S -- LIKE
THERE'S NO END TO THEM
THIS YEAR BECAUSE I'M IN
THE HORSE ASSOCIATION THERE
AND I'M A DIRECTOR ON THE BOARD.
AND I WAS AT A MEETING
THERE THE OTHER NIGHT
AND LIKE THERE'S A LOT
OF DRAWS COMING UP FOR THIS
BICENTENNIAL THIS YEAR, EH,
AND THEY'RE JUST GOING TO
BE TWO IN A DAY NOW,
EH, SOME PLACES.
SOMETIMES YOU CAN'T GET TO
TWO, BUT IF THEY'RE CLOSE YOU
DO GO TO THEM, EH.
WHEN I STARTED OUT, I REMEMBER
THE FIRST TIME I EVER STARTED,
I DIDN'T EVEN GET HARDLY
THE FIRST LOAD OUT AND IT'S
HAPPENED A COUPLE TIMES SINCE
TOO WITH THESE LAST FEW YEARS.
YOU GET BETTER AT EVERYTHING,
YOU KNOW, AND IT'S LIKE YOU'RE
PLAYING A GAME OF BASEBALL AND
EVERYONE COMPETES IN IT, EH.
AND YOU JUST GO AND SEE HOW
BEST YOU CAN DO EACH TIME, EH.
AND NO MATTER IF YOU LOSE,
YOU'LL STILL BE BACK THE NEXT
TIME TO SEE IF YOU COULDN'T
COMPETE, YOU KNOW, EH.

A fast clip shows Jack working with pull horses.

Lorne says I THINK THE HORSES, FOR JUST
A LITTLE PULL, I THINK THEY
DON'T MIND THAT AT ALL.
THEY JUST PULL IT FIFTEEN FEET
AND THEN THEY GET A REST OF
FIFTEEN MINUTES, TWENTY
MINUTES, STANDING THERE,
TAKING A GOOD REST
FOR THE NEXT ONE.
I THINK THEY ENJOY IT.
BUT THERE ARE SOME
HORSES THEY DON'T DO IT.
THEY GETTING CUTE BECAUSE
THEY WON'T WORK ANY HARDER
THAN THEY HAVE TO.
THAT'S JUST ABOUT
THE SIZE OF IT.
YEAH.
THEY HAVE DIFFERENT CLASSES
AND THEY UP TO 3300 POUNDS.
THAT'S ONE CLASS.
AND THEY DRAW UNTIL THE LAST --
THEY PILE ON EVERY TIME
THEY MAKE A ROUND.
AND THEY PILE ON A FEW MORE
BLOCKS, CEMENT BLOCKS, UNTIL
NONE OF THEM CAN TAKE IT.
AND THE ONE THAT TOOK THE
FURTHEST THE LAST TIME,
HE GETS FIRST PRIZE.

A clip shows Lorne guiding horses pulling a load of logs.

He says HERE.
WHOA.

Franklin says WELL, I GUESS IT'S
JUST LIKE A SPORT.
SOME PEOPLE LIKE BALL OR
HOCKEY, AND OTHER PEOPLE ENJOY
TAKING THEIR HORSES OUT AND
SEE WHO CAN DO THE MOST, EH.
IT'S JUST LIKE ONE TEAM IF
THEY MAKE A WHOLE LOT OF
FIRSTS AND ONE HOCKEY PLAYER
GETS A WHOLE LOT OF GOALS.
IT'S THE SAME THING.
THE OTHER ONES TRY TO CATCH UP
BUT THEY DON'T ALWAYS DO IT, EH.

A trophy appears with the inscription "Franklin Hartwig. Best teamster. 1974. Ruby and Rose."

Franklin says HORSES SHOULD BE KEPT ON DRY
FEED AND GRAIN, AND THEY SHOULD
BE HITCHED EVERY DAY, GETTING
READY FOR THE DRAWING MATCHES
SO THAT THEY'RE MUSCLED UP AND
THEIR SHOULDERS IS HARDENED UP
AND EVERYTHING.
AND A YOUNG HORSE UNDER FOUR
YEAR OLD, I DON'T THINK IT'S
A GOOD THING TO TAKE THEM
TO THE DRAWING MATCHES.
THEY SHOULD BE WORKED, BUT IN
A DIFFERENT WAY THAN WHEN YOU
WANT THEIR BEST.
BECAUSE THEY'RE -- WHEN THEY'RE
GROWING, THEIR BONES IS SOFTER
AND THAT, AND IT
COULD HURT A HORSE.
I USE THEM FOR SOWING GRAIN
AND SOWING CORN, CUTTING HAY.
I USE THEM IN THE BUSH.
GO TO THE DRAWING
MATCHES, SOME OF THEM.
BUT I FIND I'M GOOD TO MY
HORSES, THEY'LL DO ALL THEY
CAN FOR ME WITHOUT ANY ABUSE.
YOU DON'T HAVE TO
BEAT THEM OR NOTHING.
THEY JUST ENJOY WORKING FOR
YOU IF YOU USE THEM RIGHT, EH.
THAT'S THE WAY I FIND.
I DON'T KNOW IF EVERYBODY USES
THE HORSES THE SAME, BUT IF
MINE DO SOMETHING GOOD, I GO
AND PAT THEM AND SAY GOOD BOYS.
WHEN I PICK UP THE LINES THEY'RE
ALWAYS READY TO GO AGAIN.

A fast clip shows Jack on a horse driven plough driven.

Alex says HORSES AREN'T AS HIGH AS
THEY WERE LIKE TWO YEARS AGO.
YOU COULD GET
2000-2500 DOLLARS FOR A HORSE.
AND THEN FOALS WERE --
OH, THEY WERE UP TO 1000 DOLLARS.
BUT NOW YOU'D HAVE
TROUBLE GETTING 500 DOLLARS.
THEY WERE REALLY TOO HIGH FOR
A WHILE, AND THEN THEY'RE GOING
TO HAVE TO LEVEL
OFF SOMEWHERE.
THERE WAS A LOT MORE COLTS
RAISED LAST FIVE YEARS THAN
THERE WAS FOR QUITE A
WHILE THERE TOO, EH.
BUT, STILL, IF YOU WENT
LOOKING FOR A GOOD HORSE,
YOU'RE STILL GOING TO
HAVE TO PAY FOR THEM.
A LOT OF THEM AREN'T
BROKE IN AND WHATNOT.
BUT IT'S BETTER TO SELL A GUY
A GOOD HORSE THAN A BAD ONE
BECAUSE YOU SELL HIM THE
BAD ONE, YOU WON'T SELL HIM
ANOTHER ONE.
I DON'T BREED THAT MANY
OUTSIDE MARES BECAUSE I CHARGE
100 DOLLARS A MARE AND THE
GUY THAT -- THERE'S A
FELLOW LIVES ABOUT TEN MILES
FROM HERE, HE BREEDS THE MOST,
I GUESS, VAN MASSENHOFEN.
HE CHARGES SOMETHING,
65 OR 75 DOLLARS.
BUT HE'LL LEND HIS
TRAILER TO A GUY.
BUT I'M KIND OF INDEPENDENT.
IF THEY WANT TO BREED
TO MY HORSE, OKAY.
AND IF THEY
DON'T, IT'S OKAY.
WELL, THIS GUY HAS
A STALLION, TOO.

A man in his late thirties with a moustache appears on screen.

Alex says IF I HAD FOUR MARES AND I WENT
TO GET THEM BRED, IT'D COST ME
400, EH, AND THEN ALL
THE RUNNING AROUND BESIDES.
BUT STILL, YOU KNOW, I DO THE
NEIGHBOURS AROUND WITHIN SIX,
EIGHT MILES.
I'LL TRUCK THE HORSE THERE
JUST TO BE NEIGHBOURLY.
AND IF HE SAYS HERE'S TEN
DOLLARS FOR GAS, I TAKE IT,
AND IF HE DON'T...
IT'S OKAY, TOO.

The man says YOU SAID YOU
LIKED HIM BETTER.

Alex says YEAH.

The man says HE'S LONGER, EH.
LONGER IN THE BACK AND
HEAVY FRONT END ON HIM.
AND THE MARE IS... WELL, I'M
NOT REALLY CRAZY OVER THEM
BEING THAT TALL ANYWAY.

Alex says NO, I LIKE A LOW SADDLE.

The man says IT'S RUNNING A LITTLE
BIT BETTER YOUR STEPS.

Alex says I HAVE TWO 2-YEAR-OLD COLTS
OFF THIS FELLOW, AND I HAVE
TWO FOALS OFF THIS GUY.
HE HAS A STALLION OF HIS OWN,
BUT JUST ONE OF THE MARES
HE HAS IS OFF THAT STALLION.
IT'S A GOOD THING IT HAPPENS
THAT WAY OR I MIGHTN'T GET
ANY BUSINESS.
[laughing]

The man says I'LL HAVE TO GET ONE
OF YOURS OUT THERE.

Alex guides a horse inside the stable.

Joan says SOME VALLEY FARMERS TAKE
PRIDE IN MAINTAINING A HEALTHY
FOREST, BUT THE OLD ARGUMENT
CONTINUES, EVEN IN VALLEY SONGS.
SKIDDING BY HORSES OR BY
GIANT MECHANICAL SKIDDERS.

Lorne says THEY'RE RUINING OUT THE BUSH
BECAUSE I SEEN DOWN HERE
A LAD WAS SKIDDING.
I KNEW THE LAD THAT WAS
CUTTING, SO I HAD NOTHING TO
DO SO I HAD THE TRUCK.
I DROVE DOWN THERE AND TALKED
TO HIM, AND THEN I WATCHED THE
SKIDDER COMING IN.
SO HE COME IN AND WHILE HE WAS
COMING IN, HE WAS HOOKING ON
THESE TREES, YOU KNOW.
AND WHEN HE HAD ENOUGH, THEN
HE SWUNG AROUND IN THE BUSH
AND KNOCKED EVERYTHING DOWN
BECAUSE THE POLES WERE LONG.

Franklin says BUT I KNOW IN SOME AREAS THE
FORESTRY IS STARTING THAT
THEY WON'T LET THE SKIDDERS IN.
THEY'RE GOING BACK TO THE
HORSES, ESPECIALLY IN PINE BUSH.
IN HARDWOOD, IT'S NOT QUITE
SO BAD IF THEY'RE CAREFUL
WITH THE SKIDDERS.
BUT IN THE PINE, IF THERE'S
YOUNG STUFF GROWING,
THEY DAMAGE TOO MUCH TIMBER
FOR WHAT THEY TAKE OUT.
THEY DAMAGE AS MUCH
AS WHAT THEY TAKE OUT.

Alex says PRODUCTION IS
EVERYTHING NOWADAYS, EH.
WHEN YOU SKID 5,000 FEET IN A
DAY WITH A SKIDDER -- OR WITH
THE HORSES, THE SKIDDER
WILL PUT OUT 15,000.
BUT IT'S GOOD-BYE TO THE
BUSH AFTER HE'S DONE.

The caption changes to "Barney McCaffrey."

Barney is in his late fifties, with long wavy messy gray hair and a thick beard. He wears jeans, a gingham shirt and a yellow and green cap.

He says MY NEIGHBOUR ON THE NEXT FARM,
HE DOESN'T LIVE THERE ANYMORE.
HE LIVES IN TOWN NOW.
BUT HE COMES OUT EVERY ONCE IN
A WHILE AND BORROWS MY HORSE,
SKID A FEW LOGS OUT.
AND SOMETIMES HE GETS TO
TELLING ME A FEW STORIES
OF THE OLD DAYS WHEN HE USED
TO WORK IN THE LOGGING CAMPS.
AND WE GOT TO TALKING ONE TIME
ABOUT HORSES PULLING THIS AND
THAT, AND HE TOLD ME THE STORY
OF HIS TEAM, PEGGY AND FLOSS.
AND WHAT A GOOD TEAM THEY WERE
AND HOW HE KEPT THEM IN SUCH
GOOD SHAPE, AND HE WAS THE ONLY
TEAMSTER IN THE LOGGING CAMP
THAT HAD HIS OWN TEAM.
THE OTHERS JUST HAD TEAMS THAT
BELONG TO THE LOGGING BOSSES.
AND HE KEPT HIS HORSES
IN REAL GOOD SHAPE.
AND ONE DAY, WHEN THE
BULLDOZER WENT DOWN, WELL,
THEY HAD TO GET BRONUS AND
HIS TEAM TO GET IT GOING.
SO I THOUGHT IT WAS A GREAT
STORY, SORT OF A JOHN HENRY
AND THE HORSES, AND WE HAD TO
WRITE THROUGH THE BALLAD
AND I DID, AND I DON'T THINK
HE'S EVEN HEARD IT YET.
WE JUST HAVEN'T BEEN
ABLE TO GET IT TOGETHER.
BUT WE'LL TRY FOR YOU, OKAY.

He plays the accordion and sings. Three teenage boys accompany him with violins and guitars.

The song goes IN THE OLD MARNEKA LUMBER
CAMP ALONG THE BONNECHERE
BRONUS TROTSKY OF WILNO
HE WAS A TEAMSTER THERE
WORKING ALL DAY AND
INTO THE NIGHT
THEY DEVELOPED HIS TEAM
AND TREATING THEM RIGHT
WORKING ALL DAY AND
INTO THE NIGHT
THEY DEVELOPED HIS TEAM
AND TREATING THEM RIGHT
ONE MORNING IN THE LUMBER
CAMP ALONG THE BONNECHERE
THE BOSS WAS ANGRY,
THE BOSS WAS MAD
THERE WAS TROUBLE
IN THE AIR
THE BULLDOZER WAS DOWN,
ITS BATTERY OUT
WITH AN ICE COLD MOTOR
THAT WOULDN'T START
THE DOZER WAS DOWN,
ITS BATTERY OUT
WITH AN ICE COLD MOTOR
THAT WOULDN'T START
TOO FAR THE TOWN
FROM THE LUMBER CAMP
ALONG THE BONNECHERE
I HOOKED UP THE TEAMS
TO START THAT MACHINE
WITH WHAT WE'VE
GOT RIGHT HERE
NOW TEAM NUMBER ONE
AND TEAM NUMBER TWO
TRIED SO HARD,
COULDN'T MAKE IT MOVE
NOW TEAM NUMBER ONE
AND TEAM NUMBER TWO
TRIED SO HARD
COULDN'T MAKE IT MOVE
NOW THESE WERE THE TEAMS
IN THE LUMBER CAMP
ALONG THE BONNECHERE
TEAM NUMBER ONE,
AND TWO AND THREE
ALL TRIED BUT THEY FAILED
TROTSKY'S TEAM WAS
THE ONLY ONE NOW
BRONUS, CAN YOU DO IT?
DOES YOUR TEAM KNOW HOW?
TROTSKY'S TEAM WAS
THE ONLY ONE NOW
BRONUS, CAN YOU DO IT?
DOES YOUR TEAM KNOW HOW?
WELL, COME ON, FLOSSY,
COME ON, PEG
COME ON NOW,
SHAKE A LEG
COME ON, PEGGY
COME ON, FLOSS
COME ON NOW, YOU'RE
A GOOD OL' HORSE

(music plays)
THERE WAS SILENCE IN
THE LUMBER CAMP
ALONG THE BONNECHERE
AS HE HOOKED UP
THE TEAM TO THE DOZER
STANDING COLD AND
SILENT THERE
ON MY KONICH,
COME GET YOURSELF SET
COME ON NOW
WE'LL SHOW HIM YET
COME ON, MY KONICH,
GO GET YOURSELF SET
COME ON NOW, WE'LL
SHOW HIM YET
WELL, COME ON, FLOSSY,
COME ON, PEG
COME ON NOW,
SHAKE A LEG
COME ON, PEGGY
COME ON, FLOSS
COME ON NOW, YOU'RE
A GOOD OL' HORSE
THOSE TWO HORSES
PULLED IN THE LUMBER CAMP
ALONG THE BONNECHERE
THEIR BOSS BRONUS WAS
DRIVING THEM HARD
IN THE COLD
AND FROSTY AIR
AN INCH, A FOOT,
A YARD, A WHIR
THE MOTOR STARTS,
WE DID IT, OLD GIRL
AN INCH, A FOOT,
A YARD, A WHIR
THE MOTOR STARTS,
WE DID IT, OLD GIRL
WELL, COME ON, FLOSSY,
COME ON, PEG
COME ON NOW,
SHAKE A LEG
COME ON, PEGGY
COME ON, FLOSS
YOU PULLED THAT DOZER
AND SHOWED THE BOSS

(music plays)
[cows bellowing]

Tom says FARMING IS MUCH MORE -- ALWAYS
WAS MUCH MORE MY PART OF LIFE
IN THE VALLEY THAN LOGGING.
LOGGING WAS ALWAYS
ALL AROUND US.
AND MY FATHER WAS A LUMBERMAN,
ALONG WITH BEING A CATTLEMAN
AND FARMER.
BUT WE BOYS, I THINK, ARE ALL
FARMERS AND NOT LOGGERS
OR LUMBERMEN.
I WAS A BEEF BREEDER IN THE
OTTAWA VALLEY, AND IT'S ALMOST
PREDOMINANT IN
EASTERN ONTARIO.
IT'S RELATIVELY NEW TO BE IN
THE FORE WITH BEEF BREEDING,
ESPECIALLY EXOTIC BREEDS.
WESTERN ONTARIO IS OUR MARKET
FOR OUR STOCK CATTLE AND UP
UNTIL NOW THEY HAVE LOOKED
ALMOST ENTIRELY TO WESTERN
CANADA FOR THEIR SUPPLY OF
STOCK CATTLE AND WE FEEL THAT
THE HIGHER FREIGHT RATES AND
THE CORE RATE AND ALL THESE
THINGS THAT WE COULD CASH IN
ON SOMETHING PRETTY GOOD HERE
IF WE HAVE THE QUALITY OF
CATTLE THAT FARMERS IN WESTERN
ONTARIO WANT.
AND WE FEEL RIGHT NOW WE HAVE.
THIS TO BE THE DELIVERY
ROOM, IT'S KIND OF BROAD.
IT'S MORE THAN
A DELIVERY ROOM.
IT'S ALMOST A HOME FOR THE
CATTLE IN THE WINTERTIME.
AND ABOUT FOURTEEN OR FIFTEEN
YEARS AGO NOBODY FED CATTLE IN
THE BUSH IN THE WINTERTIME.
THEY WERE ALL HOUSED IN BARNS
AND EVER YEAR THERE SEEMED TO
BE MORE DISEASES OF
ONE NATURE OF ANOTHER.
SO IT WAS EITHER GET OUT OF
THE CATTLE BUSINESS OR GET THE
CATTLE OUT OF THE BARNS FOR US.
AND WE CHOSE TO TRY IT IN THE
BUSH AND IT WORKED AND THE
HUMANE SOCIETY DIDN'T COME AND
PUT US ALL IN JAIL.
SO FOR THE LAST FOURTEEN OR
FIFTEEN YEARS WE'VE KEPT THE
CATTLE IN THE BUSH
IN THE WINTERTIME.
THE CATTLE ARE SO CLEAN WHEN
THEY'RE KEPT IN THE BUSH.
AND AS YOU CAN ALMOST NOTICE,
CATTLE HERE AS OPPOSED TO
CATTLE IN THE BARN WHERE ALL
THE DIRT IS ON THEM AND I'M
SURE THAT THAT ALSO HAS A
LOT TO DO WITH DISEASES.
IT'S ALMOST DISEASE
FREE OUT HERE.
IT SMELLS GOOD AND -- WELL,
OUT OF, I THINK OUT OF 54 COWS
THAT CALVED OUT HERE, LIKE
WE MAYBE ONLY LOST ONE CALF.
AND HAD THAT BEEN IN THE
BARN SITUATION, OR A BARN
SITUATION, THAT PROBABLY WOULD
HAVE BEEN FIVE OR SIX CALF LOST.
I'M SURE IT WOULD HAVE BEEN.
EVERYTHING ELSE IS
PRESENT AND ACCOUNTED FOR.

A young man chases a calf in the woods.

Tom says THAT'S THE IDEA.
YOU'RE JUST AS WELL TO CATCH
HIM, I THINK, AND BRING HIM
BECAUSE HE'S GOING TO GET AWAY
ON YOU WHEN HE GETS IN THE
GOOD FOOTING.
THAT'S THE IDEA.
TAKE IT RIGHT OVER TO
WHERE THE COWS ARE.

The young man carries the calf on his shoulder.

Tom says SHE DOESN'T EVEN SEEM
TO CARE A BIT ABOUT HIM.
SHE'S THE SECOND
BLACK COW IN THERE.

The young man says IS THAT HER?

Tom says YEAH, THAT'S HERE OUT IN
THE HIGH GROUND THERE NOW.
OKAY, LET HER DOWN.
LET HIM DOWN.

The caption changes to "Ron Bromley."

Ron says WHAT I FOUND WHEN I BOUGHT
THE PLACE IN '57, THE PREVIOUS
OWNERS COULDN'T HAVE CARED
LESS ABOUT THE RIVER.
OF COURSE THAT WAS A TIME
NOBODY CARED MUCH ABOUT A RIVER.
YOU WATERED THE CATTLE THERE
OR YOU TOOK A SWIM ONCE
OR TWICE A YEAR.
BUT I THOUGHT THAT WAS
ONE OF THE NICEST THINGS
OF THIS PLACE.
IN FACT, WHERE I SIT TO EAT
AT THE TABLE, I SEE THE RIVER
EVERY MEAL.
AND WHAT IS INTERESTING IS ITS
COLOUR CHANGES WITH THE SKY
AND THIS IS SO NICE.
BUT TODAY, WE COULD SELL THE
RIVER FRONTAGE FOR -- ONE LOT
FOR AS MUCH AS I PAID
FOR THE FARM ORIGINALLY.
BUT IT'S NOT FOR SALE.
IT'S QUITE TRUE.
THIS AREA WAS
FAMOUS FOR THE PINE.
LIKE THE VILLAGE OF WESTMEATH.
JUST ABOVE IT WAS WHAT THAT
THEY CALLED THE MAST SWAMP.
THAT'S WHERE THEY GOT THE
MASTS FOR THE SAILING SHIPS
AND THE SQUARE TIMBER.
IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT.
BUT THEN OF COURSE YOU HAD
TO HAVE FARMS TO FEED YOUR
ANIMALS FOR
SKIDDING, THE HORSES.
AND THERE ARE POCKETS OF
VERY GOOD LAND AROUND HERE.
MY OWN FARM IS MORE SUITED FOR
BEEF IN THAT IT'S QUITE ROUGH
BUT I HAVE BROTHERS IN DAIRY
AND THEY HAVE QUITE GOOD
GROUND FOR THAT.
NOT TOO MUCH CASH CROP.
AND WE'RE A BIT FAR NORTH BUT
PEOPLE HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL,
BUT IT'S RISKY.
LATELY THERE SEEMS TO BE MORE
BEEF, PARTICULARLY BECAUSE
SOME OF THE FARMERS ARE
GETTING A LITTLE TOO OLD TO
MILK AND THEY DON'T WANT TO
QUIT FARMING SO THEY SWING
INTO BEEF.
THEY'LL FIND OUT WHAT I KNOW.
[chuckling]
THERE SEEMS TO BE A LOT
OF MISUNDERSTANDING.
PEOPLE LIVING IN TOWNS DON'T
JUST SEEM TO KNOW HOW IT WORKS
ON A FARM.
LAST SEVERAL YEARS, WE'VE HAD
BUSLOADS OF STUDENTS FROM
SCHOOLS COME HERE.
I THINK THIS IS WONDERFUL.
AND 4H IS ANOTHER GOOD WAY OF
BRIDGING THIS INFORMATION GAP.
SEE, PEOPLE SEEM TO THINK
IF YOU GROW YOUR OWN MEAT,
THEREFORE YOU CAN EAT IT.
IT DOESN'T COST YOU ANYTHING.
IT DOES.
WHETHER IT BE MONEY
OR SWEAT OR SOMETHING.
IT COSTS YOU.
I DON'T THINK I'D GO INTO
FARMING TO MAKE MONEY,
BUT I WOULD GO INTO IT
FOR A WAY OF LIFE.
THERE'S NOTHING TO COMPARE
BECAUSE YOU ARE WORKING WITH
LIVING THINGS ALMOST ALL THE
TIME, WHETHER IT BE PLANTS,
VEGETABLES OR
ANIMALS OR PEOPLE.
IT'S LIVING THINGS.

Tom says THE PEOPLE, OF COURSE, MAKE
THE VALLEY, AND I JUST THINK
THEY'RE THE MOST WONDERFUL
PEOPLE IN THE WORLD.
WE HAVE MIXED RACES
THROUGHOUT THE VALLEY.
IT WAS FIRST SETTLED BY
PREDOMINANTLY BRITISH ISLES
PEOPLE, BE IT SCOTLAND,
ENGLAND, OR IRELAND,
AND A SMATTERING OF
FRENCH THROWN IN.
AND SINCE THEN, WE'VE HAD
GERMANS, POLISH, YOU NAME IT,
AND EVERYBODY -- THEY'RE JUST
WONDERFUL PEOPLE AND SEEM TO
MOLD TOGETHER TO
MAKE THE VALLEY.
STRONG-WILLED PEOPLE,
TOO, I MIGHT ADD.

Lorne syas THAT WOULD STILL MAKE THE
SAME HORSES AS FAR AS I KNOW.
[reins jingling]

The end credits roll.

Cinematographer, Mark Irwin C.S.C

Videotape editor, David Bevan.

Unit manager, Rodger G. Lawson.

Producer-director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario.

Copyright. The Ontario Educational Communications Authorities. 1984.

Watch: The People Make the Valley