Transcript: TVO On The Road: The Thousand Islands Parkway | Feb 08, 2016

Steve sits in the studio. He's slim, clean-shaven, in his fifties, with short curly brown hair. He's wearing a gray suit, blue shirt, and pin-dotted blue tie.

He says THE STORY OF THE THOUSAND
ISLANDS BEGINS LONG BEFORE
HUMANS FIRST ARRIVED, AND
REACHES NOW TO A BUSTLING REGION
WITH AN EYE TO THE FUTURE.
TVO.org's MICHAEL LEHAN VENTURED
ON THE ROAD FOR MORE.
HAVE A LOOK.

A clip plays.

Music plays as fast clips show a car driving down coastal roads.
The presenter sits at the wheel of the car. He's in his forties, with a stubble.

He says I'M TRAVELLING ALONG THE
THOUSAND ISLANDS PARKWAY.
IT'S A SCENIC BYPASS ROUTE
BETWEEN BROCKVILLE AND GANANOQUE
IN ONTARIO.

Now in animation, a map of Canada pops up with a red line traveling up the coast next to a blue line marked "401." Captions on the map read "Gananoque, Bridge to the U.S.A.," and "Thousand islands parkway."

The presenter narrates
BUILT IN THE 1930s, THE
39-KILOMETRE STRETCH WAS
ORIGINALLY PART OF HIGHWAY 2,
THE FREEWAY THAT CONNECTED
TORONTO TO Montréal.
LOCAL OPPOSITION IN THE 1950s
SUCCESSFULLY LOBBIED TO HAVE THE
HIGHWAY 401 BYPASS BUILT FARTHER
INLAND, CONNECTING THE SCENIC ROUTE.
TODAY THE THOUSAND ISLANDS ARE A
UNESCO WORLD BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

Satellite images show the eastern coast of Canada, followed by fast clips of birds, a border patrol building, and people conversing at a café.

The man continues IT'S A PLACE WHERE TECTONIC
PLATES MEET, WHERE NATURE MEETS,
WHERE NATIONS MEET.
WHERE PEOPLE MEET.

A title reads "TVO on the Road."

Then, clips show scenic routes as seen from inside a moving vehicle.

The presenter continues
LIKE THE SALTY ADMIRALS AND
GREAT BATTLESHIPS OF THEIR
NAMESAKES, THE WATERS MAG
IN REMEMBRANCE OF A TIME WHEN
THE SHORES WERE IN CONFLICT TWO
CENTURIES AGO.
THE THOUSAND ISLANDS HAVE A MUCH
DEEPER HISTORY.
TO DISCOVER THIS HISTORY, I
STOPPED AT THE FRONTENAC ARCH
OFFICE.
I SPOKE WITH DON ROSS,
VICE-CHAIR OF THE RESERVE.

A map of the region highlights the Frontenac Arch Biosphere Network.

Then, Don Ross speaks in an interview.
A caption reads "Don Ross. Frontenac Arch Biosphere Network."
Don is in his sixties, clean-shaven, with receding blond hair. He's wearing a checkered shirt and a gray sweater.

He says THE STORY OF THE THOUSAND
ISLANDS ACTUALLY BEGINS ABOUT
A BILLION AND A HALF YEARS AGO.

An aerial view of snowy mountains reads "Ontario: 1.5 billion years ago."

As the aerial view floats over snowy rocky peaks, Don narrates
THERE WAS A SET OF MOUNTAIN
RANGES THAT GREW IN THIS REGION
AS CONTINENTS COLLIDED.
AS GRADIOS AS THE HIMALAYAS OR
THE ROCKIES OF TODAY.
MOUNTAINS WEAR DOWN TO THE POINT
WHERE ALL THAT'S LEFT ARE THE
ROOTS OF THOSE MOUNTAINS.
THE FRONTENAC ARCH CONNECTS THE
ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS TO THE
SOUTH OF US TO THE CANADIAN
SHIELD TO THE NORTH.

The Canadian Shield, the Frontenac Arch, and the Adirondack massif, appear highlighted on an animated map.
Then, a different view highlights Oswego and New York State, as a caption reads "Lake Ontario: 10,000 years ago."

Don continues LAKE ONTARIO ORIGINALLY FLOWED
SOUTHWARD OUT THE RIVER AT OSWEGO
AND DOWN INTO THE HUDSON VALLEY
AND OFF TO THE ATLANTIC COAST.
AFTER THE LAND ROSE AFTER THE
LAST ICE AGE, THEY STILL HAD TO
ESCAPE SOMEWHERE AND THEY BEGAN
TO FLOW OUT ACROSS THE TOP OF
THE FRONTENAC ARCH AND SO THAT
THE THOUSAND HILLTOPS BECAME A
THOUSAND ISLANDS.

Fast clips show animals and plants in the area.

The presenter says THE UNITED NATIONS
EDUCATIONAL, SCIENCE, AND
CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS DECLARED
IT A WORLD BIOSPHERE RESERVE.

Don says THE REASON IS BECAUSE OF THE
ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY.
ONE-THIRD OF THE SPECIES AT RISK
IN THE WHOLE PROVINCE ARE FOUND
JUST WITHIN THIS RESERVE.
THE FRONTENAC ARCH AND THE ST.
LAWRENCE RIVER VALLEY CONVERGING
HERE PUT US AT THE CROSSROADS OF
THE CONTINENT IN A SENSE FOR
MIGRATIONS OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS
AND THEY'RE KEPT HERE TODAY
OFTEN IN IN SMALL REMNANT
POPULATIONS.

Now a clip shows ancient petroglyphs.

Don continues THIS HAS BEEN AN AREA THAT HAS
BEEN TRADED UPON, TRAVELLED
ACROSS, SETTLED BY, WARRED OVER
BY ALL SORTS OF CULTURES.
THESE MIGRATIONS ROUTES FOR
PLANTS AND ANIMALS WERE ALSO
MIGRATION ROUTES AND TRADE
ROUTES FOR PEOPLE AND IT BROUGHT
A LOT OF DIFFERENT CULTURES INTO
CONTACT.

As Don speaks, arrows and different objects he mentions appear on a physical map of Canada, showing the migratory and trade routes of different cultures.

Don continues WHALEBONE TOOLS FROM THE
ATLANTIC COASTAL REGION,
CARIBBEAN SEA SHELF, COPPER
TOOLS AND KNIVES FROM THE
YELLOWKNIFE, POTTERY TYPES AND
STONE IMPLEMENTS AND SO FORTH
THAT HAD THEIR ORIGINS FAR TO
THE WEST OF HERE.
THE ICE AGES, AS YOU SAY, HAVE
ONLY BEEN OFF THIS PART OF THE
LANDSCAPE FOR 10,000 TO 15,000
YEARS.
THERE'S A CAMPSITE DISCOVERED
THAT GOES BACK OVER 9,000 YEARS.
ONE OF THE FIRST TO SEE AND NAME
THE AREA WAS GOOD OLD SAMUEL
DECHAMPLAIN.
THE STORY GOES AS HE STOOD ON
THE NORTH SHORE THERE AND SAID,
WHAT'S ALL THAT I SEE IN THE
DISTANCE?
MANY, MANY ISLANDS.
AND SO HE CALLED IT THE THOUSAND
ISLANDS.

As he speaks, different ancient maps of the region flash by.

Don continues AFTER THE AMERICAN WAR OF
INDEPENDENCE AND PEOPLE THAT
WERE LOYAL TO THE BRITISH CAUSE
WERE CALLED LOYALISTS AND DRIVEN
OUT, WE HAD A BIG INFLUX OF
PEOPLE FROM EASTERN SEABOARD
STATES, IN PARTICULAR VERMONT
AND NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Now clips show a small burial ground.

The presenter says BURIED IN THE FAMILY CEMETERY
IS THE FOUNDER OF THE MILLS,
WILLIAM LEROUX, HIS WIFE ABIGAIL
AND SIX OF THEIR NINE CHILDREN.
HE WAS A UNITED EMPIRE LOYALIST
SETTLER, BORN IN ALBANY, NEW
YORK, IN 1760.
HE CAME TO THIS AREA IN 1790 AND
ESTABLISHED A SAWMILL AND GRIST
MILL ON THE CREEK NEARBY.

Don continues IF YOU TRAVEL AROUND THE
LANDSCAPE, THERE ARE A LOT OF
SMALL MILLS AND MILL SITES THAT
WERE THERE.
THEY WERE THE INDUSTRIAL HUBS OF
A LOT OF THE COMMUNITIES.
THEY COULD PRETTY WELL BE
SELF-CONTAINED AND SUPPLY SOUP
TO NUTS IN A VERY BROAD SENSE TO
THE COMMUNITY IN THE SURROUNDING
REGION AND THAT STORY KIND OF
REPEATS ITSELF IN MANY, MANY
PLACES AROUND THE LANDSCAPE.

Clips show postcards of beautiful sceneries laid out on a map of the region.

The presenter says THE THOUSAND ISLANDS EARNED
THEIR FAME DURING THE GILDED AGE
WHEN AMERICAN ELITES AND
CULTURAL ICONS IN THE LATE 19TH
AND EARLY 20TH CENTURIES
DISCOVERED ITS NATURAL BEAUTY AS
A PLACE TO ESCAPE CITY LIFE.
AT THE WESTERN END OF THE
THOUSAND ISLANDS PARKWAY IS THE
HISTORIC TOWN OF GANANOQUE.
LIKE MUCH OF SOUTHERN ONTARIO,
IT'S FACED THE CHALLENGE OF A
DECLINING MANUFACTURING SECTOR
BUT IT'S ALSO SEEN A BOOM IN
TOURISM.
AS THE SELF-STYLED GATEWAY TO
THE THOUSAND ISLANDS, THE TOWN
IS FILLED WITH THRIVING SMALL
TOURISM BUSINESSES.
INNS, BOAT TOURS, AND SINCE
2011, THE GANANOQUE BREWING
COMPANY.
IT'S ONE THE OVER 300 SMALL
BREWERIES THAT HAVE OPENED IN
ONTARIO OVER THE PAST DECADE.

Fast clips show the small town, with its pointy rooftops and quiet streets.
Then, Bruce speaks during an interview.
A caption reads "Bruce Davis. Cananoque Brewing Company."
Bruce is in his late forties, clean-shaven, with short gray hair. He's wearing a gray shirt and a grays sweater.

He says WE STARTED THE BREWERY REALLY
BEFORE THE BIG WAVE OF CRAFT
BREWERS, RIGHT?
SO NOW THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF
BREWERIES IN ONTARIO.
WE CAME INTO THIS ABOUT FOUR
YEARS AGO, STARTED TO BREW BEER,
AND OPENED THIS BREWERY UP ABOUT
A YEAR AND A HALF AGO.
SO I THINK OUR TIMING WAS
PERFECT.
YOU KNOW, THE PUBLIC IS MUCH
MORE ACCEPTING OF CRAFT BEER,
AND AS PART OF A TOURIST THING
TOO, PEOPLE HAVE MADE IT PART OF
THEIR TRAVEL PLANS.
SO WHEN PEOPLE TRAVEL, THEY
START TO LOOK FOR CRAFT
BREWERIES.
SO I THINK OUR TIMING IS PERFECT.

Clips show women enjoying pints of draft beer at a brewery.

Bruce says WE'VE CHANGED THE WAY THAT
BEER IS CONSUMED IN GANANOQUE.
THIS EASTERN ONTARIO TOWN USED
TO BE VERY, VERY MUCH A BIG BEER
KIND OF TOWN.
BUT LOCALS ARE REALLY ACCEPTING
OF CRAFT BEER.
BUT MORE THAN THAT, I'D SAY A
LOT OF INTERNATIONAL VISITORS, A
LOT OF Quebecers COME HERE OR
PEOPLE TRAVELLING BETWEEN
TORONTO AND Montréal AND OTTAWA,
PEOPLE WHO ARE JUST LOOKING FOR
A BIT OF A BREAK SO THEY WANT TO
STOP.
WE'RE REALLY PROUD OF OUR
TERROIR PROGRAM.
ONE OF THE LOCAL FARMERS IS ON
OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND IN
FACT THIS WEEK WE WERE MAKING A
BEER WITH LOCAL APPLES AND LOCAL
WHEAT.
WE'VE USED LOCAL RYE, LOCAL
OATS.
WE HAVE IN THE PAST USED LOCAL
HOPS.
WE HAVE TWO LOCAL HOP YARDS.
I THINK THE GRAIN IS SOMETHING
THAT WE REALLY DO THAT'S
DIFFERENT.
GETTING A LOCAL FARMER TO GROW
LOCAL GRAIN AND THEN HE MILLS IT
AND THEN HE BRINGS IT TO US.
THAT'S PRETTY COOL.
ACROSS EASTERN ONTARIO, I'M
NOTICING A LOT OF THE BREWERIES
ARE VERY, VERY CLOSE TO FARMERS.
IT'S A BIG THING THAT WE DO HERE.
SO IT'S NOT JUST THE GANANOQUE
BREWING COMPANY.
OTHER BREWERIES IN EASTERN
ONTARIO HAVE THAT CONNECTION,
THAT LINKAGE TO LOCAL CROPS THAT
YOU DON'T SEE WITH SOME OF THE
DOWNTOWN BREWERIES.
IT'S HARDER FOR THEM TO BUILD
RELATIONSHIPS WITH FARMERS, BUT
I THINK FOR US IN THIS PART OF
THE PROVINCE, YOU KNOW, WE DON'T
WORK IN ISOLATION.
WE HAVE TO WORK WITH LOCAL
RESTAURANTS.
THEY SELL OUR BEER.
YOU KNOW, WE WANT TO
CROSS-PROMOTE WHEREVER POSSIBLE.
IF WE'RE GOING TO DO A TRADE
SHOW IN OTTAWA OR A TRADE SHOW
IN TORONTO, THE TOWN WILL -- OUR
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OFFICE WILL
BRING US ALONG AS PART OF THE TEAM.
WE WANT TO BE PART OF THAT.
SO WE REALLY SEE THE BREWERY AS
BEING A CATALYST TO REALLY HELP
DRIVE GROWTH AND RENEWAL.
IT'S AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR BUSINESS.

Watch: TVO On The Road: The Thousand Islands Parkway