Transcript: The Bees' Needs | Feb 08, 2016

Steve sits in the studio. He's slim, clean-shaven, in his fifties, with short curly brown hair. He's wearing a gray suit, gray shirt, and gray tie.

A caption on screen reads "The bees' needs."

Steve says FOR SEVERAL CONSECUTIVE
WINTERS, ONTARIO HONEY BEES DIED
IN DROVES, OFTEN AT RATES DOUBLE
THE NATIONAL AVERAGE.
TO GET UP ON THE BUZZ AND FIND
OUT HOW TO SAFEGUARD OUR
POLLINATORS, WE ARE JOINED BY:
TIBOR SZABO, PRESIDENT OF THE
ONTARIO BEEKEEPERS' ASSOCIATION;

Tibor appears on screen against a background showing bookshelves and pictures of buildings. He's in his late forties, clean-shaven, with longish wavy blond hair. He's wearing a lilac shirt.

Steve continues AMRO ZAYED, PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY
AT YORK UNIVERSITY;

Amro is in his late thirties, clean-shaven and bald. He's wearing black-rimmed glasses, a gray suit, argyle sweater, and white shirt.

Steve continues AND SHEILA COLLA, ASSISTANT
PROFESSOR IN THE FACULTY OF
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES, ALSO AT
YORK UNIVERSITY.

Sheila is in her thirties, with shoulder-length straight chestnut hair. She's wearing a black blazer over a pink shirt.

Steve continues WE'RE HAPPY TO WELCOME ALL THREE
OF YOU TO TVO TONIGHT.
TIBOR, I WANT TO START WITH YOU.
WE SUGGESTED IN THE INTRO THINGS
ARE REALLY BAD.
PUT A LITTLE MORE INFORMATION ON
THAT, IF YOU WOULD?
HOW BAD?

The caption changes to "Tibor Szabo. Ontario Beekeepers' Association."

Tibor says VERY BAD.
LAST YEAR, 2015, THE OVERWINTER
LOSS WAS 38 percent IN ONTARIO.

Steve says JUST EXPLAIN WHAT
THAT MEANS.

Tibor says 38 percent OF THE
MANAGED BEE COLONIES IN ONTARIO
PERISHED DURING THE WINTER
PERIOD.
THE YEAR BEFORE, 58 percent PERISHED
DURING THE WINTER PERIOD.
AND THAT DOESN'T INCLUDE SUMMER
LOSSES WHICH, IN MANY CASES,
EQUAL THE WINTER LOSSES.

The caption adds "Hard times for hives."

Steve says WHAT WOULD BE A
NORMAL PERCENTAGE FOR LOSS OVER
THE WINTER?

Tibor says NORMAL
PERCENTAGE IS IN THE 10 TO
15 PERCENT RANGE.

Steve says SO THIS IS WAY
BEYOND THOU.

Tibor says WAY BEYOND THAT.

Steve says THE EXPLANATION IS?

Tibor says THE
EXPLANATION IS THE BEES ARE
PICKING UP NEUROTOXINS OFF THE
CORN AND SOY POLLEN AND THE
FIELD WATER THEY DRINK AND IT'S
IMPACTING THEIR ABILITY TO
SURVIVE.

Steve says LET'S AGAIN SEE IF
WE CAN JUST GET A LITTLE MORE
DETAILS ON WHAT IS HAPPENING?

The caption changes to "Amro Zayed. York University."

Amro says PESTICIDES IN
ONTARIO AND Québec ARE LINKED TO
HONEY BEE DEATHS, ESPECIALLY
AROUND CORN PLANTING AND THERE
IS RESEARCH SUGGESTING THAT BEES
EXPERIENCING SUB LETHAL AMOUNTS
OF PESTICIDES, ESPECIALLY
NEONICOTINOIDS.

Steve says WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

Amro says IT'S A
PESTICIDE THAT IS MODELLED TO
RESEMBLE THE NICOTINE MOLECULE.
FOR INSECTS, IT INTERFERES WITH
SIGNAL TRANSMISSION IN THE BRAIN.

Steve says IS THERE SOMETHING
NEWER AND MORE DANGEROUS ABOUT
THE PESTICIDES THAT ARE BEING
USED NOW THAT MAKE SO MANY MORE
BEES DIE THAT SAY WOULDN'T HAVE
HAPPENED 25 YEARS AGO?

Amro says THEY'RE
SYSTEMIC AND THEY'RE WATER
SOLUBLE.
SYSTEMIC MEANS THAT ONCE THEY
ARE PUT IN THE SOIL, THEY'RE
TAKEN UP BY ALL PARTS OF THE
PLANTS AND THEY'RE WATER SOLUBLE
WHICH MEANS THAT WHEN YOU PUT
THEM ON A FIELD AND THEN IT
RAINS, THEN THEY DISPERSE
THROUGH THE ENVIRONMENT.
SO THEY LEAK THROUGH THE
ECOSYSTEM, THEY DON'T STAY PUT
AND WORK FOR A SPECIFIC TIME.
ONCE YOU PUT THEM IN THE
ENVIRONMENT, THEY MOVE VERY
READILY FROM WHERE WE WANT THEM
TO BE, ON CROPS, TO OUTSIDE OF
CROPS INTO NATURAL AREAS.

Steve says ALL RIGHT.
LET'S DO A CLIP HERE.
AROUND THE WORLD THERE HAVE BEEN
STEPS TAKEN TO PROTECT BEES FROM
ALL OF THE THINGS WE'VE BEEN
TALKING ABOUT HERE, BUT THERE
HAS ALSO BEEN SOME RESISTANCE TO
SOME OF THESE MOVES AS WELL, AND
WE JUST WANT TO PLAY AN EXCERPT HERE.
THIS IS A REPORT FROM NBC NEWS
IN THE STATES TO BRING US UP TO
SPEED ON SOME OF THOSE EFFORTS
AND THEN WE'LL COME BACK AND
CHAT.
GO AHEAD, SHELDON.
LET'S ROLL THE CLIP.

A clip plays on screen in which fast clips show researchers studying bees in a lab.

A female announcer says THIS RESEARCHER HAS
IDENTIFIED RESIDUES OF 150
DIFFERENT CHEMICALS IN IN THE
BEE COLONIES HE'S STUDIED.

The researcher speaks in an interview. He's in his late fifties, clean-shaven, with short wavy gray hair.

He says WHEN YOU MIX CERTAIN
CHEMICALS IN TOGETHER, THEY
BECOME MUCH MORE TOXIC TO THE
BEES THAN EITHER ONE OF THEM
ALONE WOULD BE.

A caption on screen reads "More about the disappearing honeybee: ncbnightlynews.com"

The Reporter says THE EUROPEAN
UNION VOTED TO SUSPEND THE USE
OF NEONICOTINOIDS, WIDELY USED
ON CORN, WHEAT, AND SOYBEANS
BECAUSE OF POSSIBLE LINKS TO BEE
COLLAPSE.
THE PESTICIDE INDUSTRY DISPUTES
ANY CONNECTION, SAYING THE
SCIENTIFIC BASIS FOR SUCH A
DECISION IS POOR.

The clip ends.

Steve says OKAY.
LOTS TO FOLLOW UP ON THERE.
DO YOU BELIEVE THAT THESE -- CAN
I CALL THEM NEONICS?
IS THAT A SHORT FORM?
THE PESTICIDES THAT THEY ARE
SPRAYING THAT ARE AFFECTING THE
STATUS OF THE BEE POPULATION ARE
AS DANGEROUS AS BEEKEEPERS SAY
THEY ARE?

The caption changes to "Sheila Colla. York University."

Sheila says I THINK THEY
DEFINITELY ARE.
THEY'RE INSECTICIDES.
THEY'RE DESIGNED TO KILL
INSECTS.
BEES HAPPEN TO BE INSECTS.
IT'S SORT OF A RECIPE FOR
DISASTER.
I ALSO WORK ON WILD BEES OUTSIDE
OF AGRICULTURAL AREAS.
THERE ARE ADDITIONAL THREATS,
NOT ONLY PESTICIDES, BUT HABITAT
LOSS AND DISEASES ARE ALSO
ISSUES WITH WILD BEES AS WELL.

Steve says YOU ARE ALLOWED TO
CORRECT THE HOST.

Sheila says I THINK
THERE'S ALSO A SOIL DRENCH
OPTION AS WELL.
A VARIETY OF WAYS TO APPLY IT.

Steve says I TAKE IT YOU
BELIEVE THESE PESTICIDES ARE
DANGEROUS AND EXTREMELY
ADVERSELY AFFECTING YOUR INCOME?

The caption changes to "Well-bee-ing."

Tibor says ACCORDING TO
PEST MANAGEMENT REGULATORY
AGENCY, THESE ARE THE MOST TOXIC
SUBSTANCES KNOWN TO BEES THAT
HAVE EVER BEEN PRODUCED.
THEY'RE PERSISTENT IN THE
ENVIRONMENT, WHICH MEANS THE
EXPOSURE TO THE COLONY IS
THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE SEASON AND
THE MIXING OF CHEMICALS THAT WAS
IN THE CLIP, IT'S NOT
NECESSARILY A FARMER THAT'S
MIXING THEM BUT THE RESIDUE OR
THE PERSISTENT MEANS THEY MIX
FROM ONE SEASON TO THE NEXT WITH
CROP ROTATION WHERE THE BEES
THEMSELVES HAVE SUCH A LARGE
FORAGE AREA THEY'RE BRINGING IN
CONTAMINATED POLLEN OR NECTAR
AND THEY GET MIXED IN THE COLONY
AND SYNERGIZED WITH EACH OTHER.

Steve says WHAT'S THE FARMER'S
ARGUMENT TO WHY THEY NEED TO USE
THIS PRODUCT, NEONICS?

Amro says FOR THE LONGEST
TIME THERE WAS NO CHOICE.
UP TO I THINK THREE YEARS AGO,
EVERY SINGLE CORN SEED SOLD IN
ONTARIO WAS TREATED WITH
NEONICOTINOID COATINGS.
SO THE ARGUMENT IS THAT IT
PROTECTS -- IT'S CHEAP INSURANCE
FOR THE FARMER BY NOT HAVING TO
DO ANY EXTRA WORK, THEY JUST BUY
THE SEED THAT'S TREATED WITH
THESE TOXINS, THEY PLANT THEM,
AND THEY'RE KIND OF PROTECTING
THEIR CROP.

Steve says FROM WHAT?

Amro says FROM PESTS THAT
WOULD EAT CORN.

Steve says THEY'RE NOT INTENDED
ACTUALLY TO GO AFTER THE BEES,
THE BEES ARE SORT OF COLLATERAL
DAMAGE HERE?

Amro says EXACTLY.
THERE ARE OTHER STUDIES ALSO
SHOWING THAT THE BENEFITS OF
THIS PROPHYLACTIC TREATMENT OF
CORN IS NOT THERE.
SO STUDIES FROM THE E.P.A.
SHOWING IT DOESN'T ACTUALLY SEEM
TO BE ANY ECONOMIC BENEFIT FOR
THE FARMER IN TERMS OF HOW WELL
THE YIELD INCREASES DUE TO USING
THE INSECTICIDES.

Steve says WE SAW IN THAT CLIP
WHAT'S HAPPENING IN CALIFORNIA.
HOW ABOUT HERE IN ONTARIO?
WHAT ARE WE DOING HERE TO TRY TO
DEAL WITH THIS ISSUE?

Amro says THE ONTARIO
GOVERNMENT INTRODUCED
LEGISLATION TO TRY TO LIMIT THE
USE OF NEONICOTINOIDS.
SO BEFORE IT WAS JUST FARMERS
BOUGHT THE SEEDS THAT ARE
TREATED WITH NEONICOTINOIDS.
NOW A FARMER HAS TO DEMONSTRATE
THE NEED FOR THESE INSECTICIDES
BEFORE THEY'RE USED, WHICH I
THINK IS A MOVE IN THE RIGHT
DIRECTION.
PUTTING PESTICIDES ON EVERYTHING
WHEN WE DON'T NEED IT SEEMS NOT
A SMART WAY TO GO.

Steve says WHAT DO YOU THINK OF
THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT'S
RESPONSE TO THIS CHALLENGE?

Sheila says ONE OF THE
BIGGEST ISSUES RIGHT NOW IS, IF
WE BAN THE NEONICS, WHAT'S GOING
TO COME NEXT?
WE'RE STILL GOING TO NEED
PESTICIDES.
WHAT WE SHOULD BE TRYING TO
SHIFT TOWARDS IS USING
PESTICIDES ONLY WHERE WE NEED
THEM, AND IN A WAY THEY DON'T
SPREAD INTO NATURAL AREAS AND
THEY DON'T IMPACT WILDLIFE.
I THINK WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT
THE BIGGER PICTURE AS WELL AND
NOT JUST FOCUS TOO MUCH ON THIS,
BUT IT IS A VERY GOOD START.

Tibor says THE BIG CHANGE
IN THIS REGULATION COMPARED TO
WHAT HAPPENED BEFORE IS THAT
INSECTICIDE-TREATED SEEDS WILL
NOW BE -- THEY'RE NOW
CATEGORIZED AS AN INSECTICIDE
AND THEY WILL FALL UNDER THE
SAME REGULATIONS AS OTHER
PESTICIDES THAT ARE SOLD.
SO THAT'S HOW THE GOVERNMENT
WILL BE ABLE TO REGULATE THIS.
IN ORDER TO PURCHASE SEED, YOU
NEED TO SHOW -- IF YOU WANT
TREATED SEED, YOU HAVE TO SHOW
YOU ACTUALLY NEED IT.
THE FARMER WILL HAVE TO DIG SOME
HOLES IN THE FIELD, DO A FEW
TESTS TO SEE IF THEY HAVE THESE
PESTS THAT ARE TARGETED.
IF THEY CAN PROVE THEY NEED IT,
THEY WILL BE ABLE TO OBTAIN
THESE CHEMICALS ON THEIR SEED.
IF NOT, THEY'LL ORDER UNTREATED
SEED.
THERE'S A PHASE-IN PERIOD.
THIS UPCOMING PLANTING SEASON,
FARMERS CAN PLANT UP TO 50 percent OF
THEIR ACREAGE WITH TREATED
SEEDS.
THE YEAR AFTER THAT, THEN IT
WILL BE REDUCED TO 20 percent, WHICH IS
IN LINE WITH RESEARCH THAT SHOWS
THESE PESTS ONLY OCCUR ON ABOUT
20 percent OF THE FIELDS ANYWAYS.
THERE SHOULD BE A COST SAVINGS
BY NOT HAVING THE INSECTICIDE ON
THE SEED.

Steve says OKAY, BUT LET'S BE
CLEAR HERE.
THE GRAIN FARMERS OF ONTARIO ARE
NOT HAPPY ABOUT THIS, RIGHT?
I MEAN, THEY ARE GOING TO THE
COURT OF APPEAL --

Tibor says GRAIN FARMERS
ASSOCIATION.

Steve says GRAIN FARMERS
ASSOCIATION ARE NOT HAPPY ABOUT
THIS.
THEY'RE GOING TO THE COURT OF
APPEAL OF ONTARIO TO CHALLENGE
THE REGULATIONS THAT HAVE BEEN
PUT IN PLACE.
I KNOW YOU ARE MAKING IT SOUND
AS THOUGH IT IS NOT THAT BIG A
DIFFERENCE TO THE WAY THAT THEY
DO BUSINESS, BUT CLEARLY THEY
THINK SO.
RIGHT?

Tibor says WELL, THE
GRAIN FARMERS ASSOCIATION DOES
HAVE AN ISSUE WITH THIS
LEGISLATION.
THERE'S A LOT OF GRAIN FARMERS
THEMSELVES THAT ARE ALSO
BEEKEEPERS AND THEY'RE VERY
HAPPY WITH THIS AND THEY SEE
THAT THIS IS SOMETHING THAT'S NEEDED.

Steve says MOVING ON.
AMRO, TELL US ABOUT THE GENETICS
WORK THAT YOU ARE DOING RIGHT
NOW TO TRY TO HELP BEES SURVIVE.

The caption changes to "Building a better bee."

Amro says IN ADDITION TO
PESTICIDES AND PESTICIDES ARE
ONE OF A BIG PROBLEM FOR BEES
RIGHT NOW, THERE'S ALSO OTHER
PROBLEMS THAT WE'VE KNOWN ABOUT
FOR A WHILE.
THESE INCLUDE SEVERAL BACTERIA
THAT CAN INFECT BEES.
MYSELF AND A COLLEAGUE AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA,
DR. LEONARD FOSTER, WE'VE BEEN
TRYING TO DEVELOP WAYS TO USE
GENETICS AND GENOMICS TO BREED
HEALTHIER BEES.
WE RECENTLY GOT A LARGE SCALE
PROJECT FUNDED BY GENOME BRITISH
COLUMBIA AND GENOME CANADA, AND
THE GOAL AFTER FOUR YEARS OF
WORK, WE'RE GOING TO DEVELOP AN
INFRASTRUCTURE WHEREBY
BEEKEEPERS CAN SEND IN SAMPLES
OF BEES TO SEVERAL DIAGNOSTIC
CENTRES WITHIN CANADA AND HAVE
THESE BEES GENETICALLY TESTED
AND GET A REPORT BACK ABOUT
THEIR ESSENTIALLY POTENTIAL IN
TERMS OF HOW WELL THEY'RE LIKELY
TO RESIST BACTERIA, HOW THEY
MAINTAIN A CLEAN AND HYGIENIC
COLONY, AND THE BEEKEEPERS CAN
SELECTIVELY BREED COLONIES THAT
HAVE THE BEST CHANCE OF BEING
PRODUCTIVE AND HEALTHY.
ONTARIO HAS DONE GREAT AT
BREEDING BEES IN TRADITIONAL
METHODS.
TIBOR HAS BEEN --

Steve says I WANT TO FOLLOW UP
ON THIS.
DO YOU THINK IT'S POSSIBLE TO
GENETICALLY MODIFY BEES TO MAKE
THEM HARDIER?

Amro says YOU SAID
GENETICALLY MODIFICATION AND
WE'RE NOT CREATING GENETICALLY
MODIFIED BEES.
WE'RE NOT ALTERING THE DNA,
WE'RE PROVIDING WAYS TO SCREEN
BEES AND HAVING THE BEE BREEDERS
BREED BEES LIKE THEY'VE DONE IN
THE PAST.
WE'RE JUST DOING GENETIC
SCREENING BUT NOT GENETIC
MODIFICATION.

Steve says GOOD CLARIFICATION.
OKAY.

Tibor says ACTUALLY
BREEDING THE HONEY BEES IS
BASICALLY THE CHOICE OF THE BEE
KEEPER OR THE RESEARCHER THAT'S
WATCHING THE ORGANISM ON WHAT HE
CHOOSES TO PROPAGATE OR NOT.
TO PROPAGATE BEES THAT ARE
RESISTANT TO DISEASES AND HAVE
GOOD WINTERING ABILITY AND HIGH
HONEY PRODUCTION, THAT'S
SOMETHING THAT'S BEEN ONGOING
FOR DECADES IN THE BEE WORLD.
BUT THE TRADITIONAL TECHNIQUES
ARE PUTTING HIVES ON SCALES AND
WATCHING THEM CLOSELY, DO TESTS
ON THE BEES AND SEEING THE
RESULTS.
WATCHING THE REACTION OF BEES TO
DIFFERENT STIMULUSES' AND THOSE
ARE TRADITIONAL BREEDING
TECHNIQUES.
WHAT AMROSE IS DOING IS CUTTING
EDGE.
IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT BECAUSE A
LOT OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM OF THE
BEE IS BEHAVIOURAL IMMUNITIES
AND INSTEAD OF TRYING TO WATCH
THESE BEHAVIOURS, ESPECIALLY IN
A CLIMATE WITH VARYING STATES OF
POISONING, IT'S IMPOSSIBLE TO
USE TRADITIONAL BREEDING
TECHNIQUES WHEN YOUR COLONIES
ARE SUFFERING FROM DIFFERENT
STATES OF POISONING BECAUSE YOU
DON'T SEE A CLEAR PICTURE.
IF YOU GO OUT TO THE DNA STRANDS
AND YOU WILL HAVE A -- YOU WILL
HAVE THE CLEANEST PICTURE
POSSIBLE IN A BREEDING
SITUATION.
I THINK IT'S VERY INTERESTING
AND EXCITING.

Steve says IS THERE SOMETHING
IN YOUR WORK, AS YOU TRY TO GET
BEES TO BE MORE RESILIENT, THAT
YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE DOESN'T
GET INTO THEIR DNA OR THEIR GENETICS?

Amro says YES.
WE'RE ALSO DEVELOPING TESTS TO
DETECT AFRICANIZED SO-CALLED
KILLER BEES FROM THE U.S.
UNFORTUNATELY, BECAUSE WE LOSE A
LOT OF OUR COLONIES AND QUEENS
EVERY WINTER, WE RELY ON
IMPORTING QUEENS.
NOW ONTARIO DOES HAVE ITS OWN
BREEDING PROGRAM.
BUT CANADA JUST DOES NOT PRODUCE
ENOUGH QUEENS TO SATISFY
INTERNAL DEMAND.
SO WE HAVE TO --

Steve says EVEN HIM?
EVEN HIM, EH?
NOT ENOUGH QUEEN BEES.

The caption changes to "Connect with us: Tvo.org, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, @theagenda"

Tibor says TRADITIONALLY
ONTARIO WAS A SELF-SUFFICIENT
PROVINCE WITH ITS BEE NEEDS.
THERE'S ENOUGH QUEEN AND BEE
PRODUCERS TRADITIONALLY IN
ONTARIO THAT WE DIDN'T REALLY
IMPORT BEES.
LAST YEAR 33,000 QUEEN BEES AND
25,000 PACKAGED HIVES WAS
IMPORTED, PRETTY MUCH HALF THE
POPULATION OF ONTARIO-MANAGED
BEE HIVES ARE IMPORTED AS OF
LAST YEAR.
THIS IS RELATED TO THE HEAVY
LOSSES BECAUSE WE'VE LOST OUR
ABILITY TO SUSTAIN.
IT'S NOT SUSTAINABLE, THE
CURRENT SITUATION.
THE WESTERN PROVINCES HAVE
TRADITIONALLY IMPORTED LOTS OF
BEES EVERY YEAR.

Amro says EVERY TIME WE
IMPORT A BEE FROM THE U.S.,
WE'RE ESSENTIALLY ROLLING THE
DICE ON GETTING A BEE THAT HAS
AFRICANIZED GENETICS AND WE
DON'T WANT THOSE BEES IN CANADA.
SO WE'RE DEVELOPING A TEST
THAT'S BASED ON ANCESTRY WHERE
YOU CAN ANALYSE THE DNA BUT IN
THE END DETERMINE WHETHER IT'S
AFRICANIZED OR NOT AFRICANIZED.

Steve says SHEILA, WHAT CAN
ANYBODY WATCHING THIS RIGHT NOW DO?

Sheila says WELL, THE
FIRST THING IS TO NOT FEAR BEES.
THAT'S SOMETHING WE RUN INTO ALL
THE TIME.
I THINK YELLOW JACKETS IN LATE
AUGUST REALLY GIVE BEES A BAD RAP.
THOSE ARE WASPS.
WE'RE TALKING ABOUT BEES.
PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO
APPRECIATE THE ROLE THAT BEES
HAVE IN OUR ECOSYSTEMS.
YOU CAN PLANT A GARDEN, USE
NATIVE PLANTS, HAVE THINGS
BLOOMING FROM FIRST THING IN THE
SPRING TO IN THE FALL, BECAUSE
BEES NEED FORAGE ALL YEAR LONG.
THERE ARE A VARIETY OF CITIZEN
PROJECTS.
YOU TAKE PICTURES OF BEES AND
YOU'RE GIVING US DATA TO START
LOOKING AT SOME OF THESE PATTERNS.

A screen-print pops up showing a close-up picture of a bumblebee on a pink flower. The title reads "Welcome to bumble bee watch!"

Steve says THERE WE HAVE A SHOT
UP THERE RIGHT NOW.

Sheila says HOW
BUMBLEBEES PARTICULARLY ARE
BEING AFFECTED BY CLIMATE CHANGE
AND HABITAT LOSS.
WE NEED A LOT OF EYES ON THE
GROUND AND THIS IS THE PERFECT
WAY YOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE
SCIENCE.

Another print reads "How to submit a sighting. 1) Take a photo of a bumble bee; 2) log in and upload your photo; 3) identify your species; 4) Sighting will be verified by expert."

Steve says THAT'S
BUMBLEBEEWATCH.ORG.
VERY GOOD.

Sheila says BEING ENGAGED
AND UNDERSTANDING THESE ISSUES
WITH INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT
AND PESTICIDE USE AND KEEPING
AWARE OF WHAT YOUR LOCAL M.P.P.
THINK ABOUT THESE ISSUES AND
HAVING THAT CONVERSATION.

Steve says WE'VE HEARD THIS
MAYBE A BIT FACETIOUSLY PUT IN
THE PAST BUT THE FUTURE OF THE
WORLD DEPENDS ON A HEALTHY BEE
STOCK, RIGHT?
YOU WANT TO MAKE THAT ARGUMENT?

Sheila says WELL, I
THINK, YOU KNOW, WE'D HAVE
REALLY EXPENSIVE COFFEE AND
MAYBE WE'D BE MISSING SOME
IMPORTANT FRUITS AND VEGETABLES,
LIKE TOMATOES AND PEPPERS AND
BERRIES.
A LOT OF THESE THINGS WE ENJOY
EATING RELY ON INSECT
POLLINATION.
WE'D HAVE A LOT OF RICE AND CORN
TO EAT BECAUSE THOSE ARE WIND
POLLINATED CROPS.
I DON'T KNOW IF WE WOULD DIE BUT
WE WOULD LIVE SADDER LIVES.

Steve says SO WHAT'S GOING TO
HAPPEN NOW?

Tibor says HOPEFULLY
PEOPLE WILL USE THESE CHEMICALS
IN A WISER FASHION,
UNDERSTANDING THAT THEY DO
IMPACT POLLINATORS, AND OUR BEE
POPULATIONS CAN RECOVER AND WE
CAN GO FORWARD IN A SMARTER AND
MORE RESPONSIBLE MANNER.

Steve says YOU KNOW THE PREMIER
WHEN SHE FIRST GOT INTO OFFICE
AS THE PREMIER, WAS THE
AGRICULTURE MINISTER AT THE
SAME TIME. WHICH MANY PEOPLE
SAY GAVE HER A HEIGHTEN
AWARENESS OF THIS ISSUE AND SHE
PERSONALLY GOT INVOLVED WITH THE
FILE, BUT TRY TO FIND THE
COMPROMISE TO MAKE EVERYBODY
HAPPY. YOU THINK THAT'S 'HAPPENED?

Tibor says WELL I THINK
THEY HAVE DONE THEIR BEST AT
FINDING A COMPROMISE TO MAKE
EVERYBODY HAPPY BECAUSE THE FACT
OF WHETHER THESE CHEMICALS ARE
SAFE AT ALL TO USE OUTSIDE IS
STILL A QUESTION BUT THEY'RE
STILL AVAILABLE FOR PEOPLE THAT
NEED THEM. ALSO BY RESTRICTING
TO IF YOU NEED IT, IT KEEP
UP TO 80 PER CENT OF THESE
CHEMICALS FROM ENTERING THE
ENVIRONMENT, WHICH WILL EQUAL
A HEALTHIER ENVIRONMENT FOR
POLLINIZERS. SO YES
I THINK THE ONTARIO GOVERNMENT
HAS DONE THE BEST THEY COULD
UNDER THESE CIRCUMSTANCES
BECAUSE IT'S FEDERALLY
REGULATED.
THESE CHEMICALS ARE FEDERALLY
REGULATED.
SO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS ARE
LIMITED TO THE EXTENT OF WHAT
THEY CAN DO.

The caption changes to "Producer: Gregg Thurlbeck, @GreggThurlbeck"

Steve says THANKS FOR THIS, EVERYBODY.
WE'LL KEEP WATCHING.
TIBOR SZABO, PRESIDENT
BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION, AMRO
SZABO, DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AT
YORK UNIVERSITY, SHEILA COLLA,
ALSO AT YORK UNIVERSITY IN THE
FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL
STUDIES.
THANKS, EVERYBODY.

Watch: The Bees' Needs