Transcript: Sacred Home of Manitou | Jul 11, 1988

Aerial views of forests, mountains and lakes appear on screen.

A male voice says EACH
OF THE TRIBES
HAS THEIR OWN
CREATION STORY.
WELL, OURS HAS IT AFTER
THE CREATOR FINISHED
THE UNIVERSE, HE SELECTED
A VERY SPECIAL SPOT
FOR WHICH TO REST, SUPPOSEDLY
ON THE SEVENTH DAY.
AND HE PICKED
MANITOULIN.
HE NEEDED A SPECIAL PLACE,
AND HE CHOSE IT AS HIS
PERSONAL RESIDENCE
AFTER THE CREATION
OF ALL THE UNIVERSE AND
ALL LIVING THINGS.
SO THE ISLAND ITSELF
WAS HELD MORE OR LESS
LIKE A SHRINE BY ALL
THE NATURE PEOPLE
FROM THE
GENERAL AREA.

A title reads "People Patterns, Sacred home of Manitou."

The male voice continues AND WHAT I MEAN BY
THE GENERAL AREA
IS THE GREAT
LAKES INDIANS.

A clip shows a group of famers. Then, it shows many cows in corrals.

Another male voice says MANITOULIN
ISLAND IS BEEF COUNTRY SIMPLY
BECAUSE WE HAVE A LOT
OF LANDS THAT IT'S LESS
THAN A FOOT OF
TOPSOIL.
IT CAN BE ONLY
UTILIZED WITH CATTLE,
AND THEY ARE MOST
EFFICIENT AT UTILIZING IT.
WE DON'T HAVE THE OPTIONS
ON MANITOULIN ISLAND,
AND THEREFORE, MANITOULIN
IS BEEF CATTLE COUNTRY.

Views of the lakeshore appear.

A female voice says IT'S THE
CARIBBEAN OF THE NORTH,
REALLY, WITH THE SAILING
BOATS AND THE BEAUTIFUL
CLEAR WATERS FOR
SAILING AND SWIMMING.
AND ASIDE FROM
OUR FISHING,
IT HAS A GREAT DEAL TO
OFFER, AND SO CLOSE.
IT'S JUST A STONE'S
THROW FROM SUDBURY.
WE RUN OUR OWN CLIMATE
HERE, AS A RULE.
QUITE OFTEN IT'LL BE
RAINING IN ESPANOLA
AND SOUTHWESTERN
ONTARIO, AND WE'LL
BE THE ISLAND IN
THE SUN.

Now, Joan Reed Olsen sits by the lake. She is in her fifties, with short, curly dark brown hair. She wears large glasses, a white shirt, olive green pants and a brown patterned sweater.

Joan says JUST AS WE THOUGHT,
MANITOULIN ISLAND
IS MANY THINGS TO
MANY PEOPLE.
I'M JOAN REED-OLSEN
SHARING WITH YOU
A FEW DAYS WE SPENT ON THE
ISLAND LEARNING SOMETHING
ABOUT THE HISTORY, AND
LIFE ON THE ISLAND TODAY.

An old picture of the Manitoulin area appears on screen. It shows a few houses at the background and people gathering in groups in the front.

Joan says IN 1852, AFTER THREE YEARS
OF VOLUNTEER LABOUR
BY THE PEOPLE OF
WIKWEMIKONG RESERVE,
HOLY CROSS CHURCH, A
RECTORY, A SCHOOL,
AND TRAINING CENTRE,
WERE COMPLETED.
A LITTLE OVER A
HUNDRED YEARS LATER,
A DEVASTATING FIRE
DESTROYED THE CHURCH COMPLEX,
BUT AGAIN, A COOPERATIVE
EFFORT BY THE FAMILIES
OF THE RESERVE
REBUILT THE CHURCH
IN TEN MONTHS.

Now, aerial views of Manitoulin appear on screen. Then, close-ups of a building with arched windows appear.

Joan continues THERE ARE LONG-TERM PLANS
TO RESTORE AND CONVERT
THE REMAINING RUINS
TO A COMMUNITY HALL
FOR THE RESERVE.
ORIGINALLY, THIS BUILDING
WAS A TRAINING CENTRE
FOR YOUNG NATIVE PEOPLE TO
BE ARTISANS AND FARMERS.

The camera moves along the remaining walls of the building.

Joan says FATHER MAURICE, LONG
BEFORE THE CHURCH
WAS BUILT, THERE WERE
MISSIONARIES HERE.

Father Maurice is in his fifties, with receding white hair. He wears glasses, and a black soutane.

Father Maurice says OH, YES,
BEFORE THIS CHURCH WAS BUILT,
THEY CAME IN THE EARLY
1640s FROM THE HURONIA.
AND SEVERAL OTHER PRIESTS
FOLLOWED THEM IN THE 1670s,
AND THAT WAS WHEN
THEY BUILT THE FIRST
SMALL BIRCHBARK
CHAPEL AT THE HEAD
OF THE WIKWEMIKONG BAY, OR
THE BAY OF THE BEAVERS,
AS IT WAS KNOWN THEN.

Father Maurice and Joan walk around the building.

Joan says THEY DIDN'T
STAY TOO LONG?

Father Maurice says NO, THEY DIDN'T STAY.
IT WAS JUST
OVER THE WINTER.
THEY WINTERED, AND THEY
FOUND THE WINTER SEVERE,
AND THEY COVER
THE WHOLE AREA,
SO THEY JUST STAYED
FOR A WHILE UNTIL
JUST ABOUT THE 1670s.
AND THEN FROM 1700 ON,
THERE WAS NO ONE HERE.

Joan says WELL, TELL ME ABOUT
THE DESERTION.
I DON'T UNDERSTAND
ABOUT THAT.

Father Maurice says THE LEGEND IS THE INDIANS
BURNT THE WHOLE ISLAND
BECAUSE THEY SAY THERE WAS
A LOT OF SICKNESS,
AND THERE
WERE EVIL SPIRITS,
AND THIS WOULD
DRIVE THEM AWAY,
AND ALL THE
INDIANS LEFT IT.
SO THERE'S NO RECORDED
HISTORY OF ANYBODY
LIVING ON MANITOULIN
UNTIL 1825.

Joan says WHERE HAD
THEY GONE?

Father Maurice says WELL, SOME WENT
TO MICHIGAN.
THE ONES THAT CAME BACK
FIRST WENT TO MICHIGAN.
THEY WERE CATHOLIC
INDIANS WHO CAME BACK,
AND THEY BROUGHT A
PRIEST WITH THEM.
ONCE THEY WERE SETTLED,
THERE WERE M'CHIGEENG
THERE, THERE WERE
ANCESTORS OF THE PRESENT
CHIEF RON WAKEGIJIG,
AND THEY BROUGHT THEIR
FAMILIES WITH THEM,
ABOUT NINE OF THEM,
AND THEN ONCE
THEY SETTLED,
OTHERS STARTED TO COME
BACK FROM THE SAULT STE. MARIE
AREA, AS FAR WEST AS
DULUTH AND THUNDER BAY
AND THAT AREA,
AND MISSISSIPPI.
SO THEY GRADUALLY FILTERED
BACK FROM ALL THE PARTS
IN 1825 ON.

Joan says SO THEY WERE THE
DESCENDANTS OF THE ONES
WHO LEFT IN THE 18TH
CENTURY, CAME BACK.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Father Maurice S.J."

Father Maurice says OH, YES.

Joan says SO THE PEOPLE
THAT ARE HERE NOW,
THE INDIAN BANDS
THAT ARE HERE NOW,
ARE NEARLY ALL
DESCENDANTS FROM -

Father Maurice says THEY'RE NEARLY ALL DESCENDANTS
FROM THE ORIGINAL ONES
WHO LIVED HERE, TOO.
BECAUSE IT WAS ONLY
NATURAL FOR THEM TO COME
BACK TO THEIR
HOMELAND LIKE THAT,
ONCE THEY FOUND OUT IT
WAS HABITABLE, YOU SEE?

A man appears on screen. He is in his fifties, clean-shaven, with short graying hair. He wears a brown shirt.

A caption on screen reads "Ernest Debassige."

He says I THINK THE FIRST
MISSIONARIES,
THEY DIDN'T
BOTHER TO ASK,
OR FIND OUT WHAT THESE
PEOPLE BELIEVED.
THEY THOUGHT THEY
HAD TO SAVE THEM.
BUT I THINK THEY
WERE VERY RELIGIOUS
BEFORE THE
MISSIONARIES CAME.

Fast clips shows drawings and images depicting moments of that time in history. They show the missionaries and the Indians.

Ernest continues THE WAY THEY
LIVED, I GUESS,
A LOT DEPENDED
ON NATURE.
WE CALL IT AWARENESS.
THEY WERE MUCH MORE
AWARE OF A HIGHER BEING.

Another man appears. He is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven, with short brown hair. He wears sunglasses and a white and yellow t-shirt.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Chief Wakegijig Wikwemikong Reserve."

He says IT'S PRETTY COMPLICATED
HISTORY, ACTUALLY.
THE OTTAWA TRIBE
TRADITIONALLY HAS CLAIMED
OWNERSHIP TO THE
ISLAND, IF YOU CAN
CALL IT OWNERSHIP.
TO US, IT'S A RATE
OF OCCUPANCY
MORE THAN
ANYTHING ELSE.
THESE ARE OUR TRADITIONAL
GROUNDS HERE.
IN 1836, THERE WAS AN
AGREEMENT DRAWN UP OF SORTS
BETWEEN THE NATIVE
PEOPLE THAT WERE LIVING,
RESIDING ON THE
ISLAND AT A TIME,
AND SIR FRANCIS BOND HEAD
REPRESENTING THE CROWN.
SO THIS AGREEMENT,
EVERYBODY CEDED,
SUPPOSEDLY THEIR
RIGHT TO MANITOULIN,
INCLUDING THE GOVERNMENT
AT THAT TIME.
WITH THE INTENTION OF
MAKING IT SORT OF A HAVEN
FOR ALL NATIVE
PEOPLE OR TRIBES
THAT WOULD SO WISH TO
SETTLE ON THIS ISLAND.
HOWEVER, IT DIDN'T
TURN OUT THE WAY,
I GUESS BOND HEAD MUST
HAVE BEEN AN IDEALIST,
AND WE DIDN'T NECESSARILY
CONFORM TO WESTERN
EUROPEAN WHIMS AND
WISHES AT THE TIME.
WE HAD OUR WAYS.
WE MOVED AROUND QUITE A
LOT IN THE GREAT LAKES AREA.
IN 1853, ANOTHER
TREATY WAS DRAWN UP,
WHICH IS KNOWN AS
THE ROBINSON-HURON,
WHERE THE BANDS AROUND
THE GEORGIAN BAY,
LAKE HURON AREA, AS
WELL AS SUPERIOR,
WHICH IS A DIFFERENT
TREATY AREA, ACTUALLY,
CEDED AWAY, SUPPOSEDLY
GAVE UP TRACTS OF LAND
IN LIEU OF BEING
GUARANTEED CERTAIN PARCELS
WHICH THEY MIGHT
CALL THEIR OWN.
WELL, WE HAD NO
PART OF THAT.
WE'RE NOT ROBINSON-HURON
TREATY INDIANS.
WE'RE NOT TREATY
INDIANS, ACTUALLY,
WELL, ROUGHLY HALF
OF THE POPULATION
OF THIS RESERVE.
IN 1862, WE HAD THE
McDOUGALL TREATY,
OCTOBER 6, 1862, WHERE
MCDOUGALL NEGOTIATED
WITH THE NATIVE PEOPLE
AT THE TIME TO CEDE
MOST OF THE ISLAND AWAY TO
NON-INDIAN SETTLEMENT.
THEY WERE GUARANTEED
AGAIN, PARCELS OF LAND.
I THINK IT WAS 100
ACRES PER PERSON.
I HAVE MY DOUBTS AS TO
WHETHER IT TURNED OUT
THAT WAY BECAUSE SOME OF
THE RESERVES ARE GETTING
TOO SMALL TO HOLD
THEIR POPULATION.
THIS PARTICULAR RESERVE,
IT'S AN UNCEDED RESERVE,
WHICH SIMPLY MEANS WE
NEVER DID SIGN A TREATY
WITH ANYBODY, AND WE DON'T
INTEND TO AT THIS POINT
IN TIME BECAUSE
WE'VE SEEN WHAT
THEY'VE DONE WITH
THOSE TREATIES.
THEY'VE BEEN
TOTALLY IGNORED.
TAKEN INTO COURTS OF
LAW AND DEFEAT
THE ORIGINAL INTENT
OF THOSE TREATIES.

A view of the lake at sunset appears on screen.

Joan says MANITOULIN IS ONE
OF ONTARIO'S MAJOR
CATTLE RAISING DISTRICTS.
250 FAMILIES
FARM FULL-TIME.
195 FAMILIES SUPPLEMENT
FARMING WITH A SECOND INCOME.

Fast clips pass by showing cows grazing in the fields.

Joan continues FARMING HAS A MUCH LONGER
HISTORY ON MANITOULIN
THAN TOURISM, BUT TODAY
THEY SHARE THE ECONOMIC
RESPONSIBILITY
OF THE ISLAND.

A man appears on screen. He is in his late thirties, clean-shaven, with short light brown hair. He wears a light blue checkered shirt.

A caption on screen reads "Ken Ferguson."

He says WELL, AT THE OUTSET,
FARMERS DIDN'T HAVE
ANY CENTRAL PLACE TO
MARKET THEIR CATTLE.
AND A GROUP OF
ISLAND FARMERS,
BACK PRIOR TO 1944, GOT
TOGETHER AND DECIDED
THAT THAT'S WHAT THEY
ARE GOING TO DO.
THEY WERE GOING TO SET
UP A CENTRAL AUCTION,
GATHER THE CATTLE
ALL TOGETHER,
AND HAVE A SALE.
AND THE VERY FIRST, '44,
THEY HAD A VERY PRIMITIVE
OPERATION, TWO
CORRALS, I UNDERSTAND,
AND THEY WENT OUT
AND SOLD THEM.
BUT THAT SHOWED THEM
WHAT THEY COULD DO
COOPERATIVELY.
AND THE NET RESULT WAS THE
CO-OP SALE HAS BECOME
A VERY BIG ALTERNATIVE
TO SELLING THEM
BY PRIVATE TREATY.
IT'S OFFERED THEM A GREAT
DEAL OF ADVANTAGE
OF THE DROVERS JUST COMING
AND OFFERING WHATEVER
THEY WISH TO BUY
THEIR CATTLE.
OF COURSE, THE FARMERS,
WITHOUT THE AUCTION,
THEY HAD NO CHOICE.
THEY TOOK WHATEVER
WAS OFFERED,
OR THEY KEPT
THE CATTLE OVER.

Another man appears. He is in his late forties, clean-shaven. He wears a gray jacket, brown shirt, and a baseball hat with an inscription that says "Fernlee farm."

A caption on screen reads "Orland Wismer."

He says THE SALE ORIGINATED IN
1944 BECAUSE PRICES
WEREN'T WHAT FARMERS
THOUGHT THEY SHOULD BE.
SO THEY POOLED
THEIR CATTLE,
AND BUILT THESE YARDS.
AND A LOT OF HARD
WORK GETTING STARTED.
IT PAID OFF.
THE OLD FELLAS THAT WERE
AROUND AT THAT TIME
TELLS ME THE TUNE
ABOUT 11 CENTS
THE FIRST YEAR
PER POUND.
IT'S NEVER
STOPPED SINCE.
WE SOMETIMES DON'T
TOP THE MARKET,
BUT IT PRETTY WELL SETS
THE MARKET NOW, TOO.

Now, a man appears on screen. He is in his late forties, clean-shaven, with short white hair. He wears a dark blue jacket over a dark blue shirt.

A caption on screen reads "Hugh Moggy"

He says FROM DAY ONE, WHAT HAPPENS
IS BACK IN AUGUST,
THE LOCAL COOPERATIVES
SEND OUT A LISTING FORM
AND ASK THE FARMERS
TO LIST THEIR CATTLE
FOR LIVESTOCK SALE.
THEY HAVE UNTIL SEPTEMBER
FIRST TO LIST X NUMBER
OF HEAD, HOWEVER MANY
THEY WISH TO LIST.
THEN, WE TAKE
THE LISTINGS,
WE ENTER THEM ON THE
MASTER SHEET YOU SEE
IN THERE, AND ISSUE A
TAG TO THE FARMERS.
THE FARMERS, ABOUT TEN
DAYS BEFORE THE SALE,
START TO ROUND
UP THEIR CATTLE,
AND PUT THE IDENTIFICATION
TAG ON THEM.
ABOUT EIGHT DAYS BEFORE -
IT WAS LAST WEDNESDAY,
THEY STARTED TO HAUL
THE CATTLE IN HERE.
SO AT THAT TIME,
FEED GANG START,
AND THE CATTLE
STARTED TO COME.
ACTUALLY, FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY WERE OUR
BIG DAYS FOR CATTLE TO
BE BROUGHT IN HERE.

Images of different corrals pass by. The cows come down of the trucks and walk into these corrals.

Hugh continues ONCE THEY'RE
BROUGHT IN HERE,
THEY'RE SORTED INTO
LARGER LOTS, HORN STEERS,
THE LARGER STEERS,
THE BLACKS,
THE HEIFERS ARE SEPARATED
AND PUT INTO LARGE PENS.
THEN THIS MORNING, WE
STARTED TO BRING THEM UP,
PUT THEM INTO LOTS.
AND THAT'S WHAT
MR. WICKS IS DOING.
GRADING THEM.
SORTING THEM FOR SIZE,
QUALITY, COLOUR, WHATEVER.

A man stands in front of the corrals. He is in his forties, clean-shaven, with short light brown hair. He wears a light gray shirt and red baseball hat.

A caption on screen reads "Jim Wicks Grader."

He says MOSTLY WE TRY TO GRADE
FOR QUALITY FIRST.
AND WE SIZE THE CATTLE.
WE GO TO BREEDS, BUT
MOSTLY WE'RE STARTING
OFF WITH QUALITY.
AND I'M TRYING TO GRADE
WITH THE BEST QUALITY
INTO THE BEST BUNCHES,
AND THEN FROM THERE DOWN.
WELL, HERE WE PUT TWO OR
THREE MEN ON THE GATES,
AND I'M GRADING THEM AS
THEY'RE COMING DOWN,
SAY WE'RE DOING
HEREFORD STEERS,
AS YOU WATCHED
ME DO THERE,
THE PEN ONE WILL BE MY
FIRST PICK OF MY TOP
QUALITY, AND MY PEN TWO
WILL BE MY NEXT PICK,
AND BYE WILL BE THE CULLS.
THEN I'LL RESORT AGAIN
INTO LOAD SIZES.

[cattle lowing]

The cows move through the corrals. Three men stand in the corrals helping the cows move.

One of the men says LET'S GO,
LET'S GO.
LET'S GO, COME
ON, LET'S GO.
COME ON.
COME ON.

A cow enters the scale. A man closes the gates.

Another man says 520.

A woman standing in front of a long table says D 1.

Now, the man moves the sliding weights in the scale.

Then, he says 500.

The woman says C CAROL 6.
101.

A man says 530.

Another man does some math's calculations and says 530 AS WELL.

Two men in the corrals push the cows into the scale.

One of them says IN.
IN.

Another man says HEY, COME ON,
ACTION, BOYS, ACTION!
IT'S A MOVING PICTURE.

Two men laugh.

Now, a man drives a pickup truck by the fields.

A male voice says YEAH, MY GRANDFATHER
CAME IN TO SHESHEGWANING
IN ABOUT 1866, AND
AS FAR AS I KNOW,
HE CAME IN
BY SAILBOAT.
AND THE ONLY WAY I CAN
TELL THAT HE CAME HERE,
AND IT WOULD BE MY IDEA,
I THINK HE CAME
WAS THE LAKE WAS
HIS ATTRACTION,
AND THE GOOD
SOIL WAS HERE.
BUT THE LAKE WAS
ONE BIG THING.
PLENTY OF WATER.

A man appears on screen. He is in his mid-sixties, clean-shaven. He wears sunglasses, a light gray jacket over a white checkered shirt and a fedora hat.

A caption on screen reads "John Dunlop."

He continues HE HAD TO CLEAR, START
TO CHOP TREES DOWN
BECAUSE IT WAS
SOLID TREES.
ABSOLUTELY SOLID
TREES, AND BIG TREES.
LOTS OF THEM.
HARD MAPLE, YELLOW
BIRCH, AND BIG ELM.
SO IT WAS JUST ALL TIMBER
WHEN HE FIRST CAME.

Now, images of the farm flash by.

John says IT WAS A MIXED FARM.
CATTLE, SHEEP, PIGS, AND
TURKEYS EVEN IN THE EARLY,
CHICKENS, THEY HAD DUCKS.
WITH THE LAKE, IT WAS
A WONDERFUL PLACE
TO GROW GEESE
AND DUCKS.
WE USED TO HAVE
PLENTY OF THEM.
AS YOU CAN SEE,
THIS IS ALFALFA.
THE VERY BEST OF
ALFALFA LAND HERE.
DEEP SOIL.
WHEN I WAS RUNNING AT
THE PEAK, I OWNED 319,
AND RENTED TWO,
MADE IT 519,
AND WE RENT ABOUT 125
TO 150 HEAD OF CATTLE.
AND SHEEP, ABOUT
30, 50 SHEEP.
WELL, I'M 65, AND
I'M LOOKING FOR THAT
OLD AGE SECURITY
PENSION.
IN FACT, MY HEALTH WON'T
EVEN STAND THE HARD WORK.
BUT I'M STILL CUTTING
THE HAY THIS SUMMER.
I DID STILL CUT -
WELL, I CUT OVER
5,000 BALES OF HAY.
SOME OF IT IS IN THE BARN,
AND SOME OF IT WAS SOLD
RIGHT OUT OF THE FIELD.
AND AT PRESENT, I HAVE
22 HEAD OF CATTLE.
I'M JUST MORE OR LESS
SOMETHING TO COME
BACK TO THE FARM.
I CAN'T GET USED TO THE
CITY OR TOWN LIVING,
AND I STILL HAVE TO COME
BACK TO THE FARM
AFTER BEING HERE,
WELL, FOR 60 YEARS.
I WAS BORN HERE
RIGHT ON THIS FARM.
IT'S HARD TO, IT'S PRETTY
HARD TO GIVE HER UP.

It's a foggy day. There are many cars parked outside.

Joan says EARLY MORNING FOG
DOESN'T DETER CATTLE
BUYERS FROM FLOCKING
TO LITTLE CURRENT
FOR THE COOPERATIVE
CATTLE AUCTION,
HELD ANNUALLY ON THE LAST
THURSDAY IN SEPTEMBER.
OVER 2,000 HEAD OF CATTLE
ON THE BLOCK THIS YEAR.

A group of men stands among the corrals. Aerial views of the cows flash by. Then, clips show people in the auction.

A male voice says THE GRADING OF THE CATTLE
THAT ARE IN THE SALE
OFFERED HERE
TRADITIONALLY STARTED
OUT WITH THE OLD
ENGLISH BREEDS,
PLUS THE HOLSTEINS,
THE DAIRY CATTLE
THAT WERE UNSUITABLE FOR
BREEDING PURPOSES,
ENDED UP HERE.
AS OF THE LAST FEW YEARS,
THE OLD ENGLISH BREEDS
HAVE BEEN SORT OF
INTERMINGLED
WITH CHAROLAIS, SIMMENTAL
AND QUITE A FEW
OTHER EXOTIC BREEDS.
I EXPECT THE PREDOMINANT
BREEDS IS NO LONGER
ENGLISH BREEDS NOW.

A man appears on screen. He is in his sixties, with short gray hair and moustache. He wears glasses, a gray jacket, light green shirt and a cowboy hat.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Verdun Shepherdson, auctioneer."

He says WELL, I'M ON
THIS CIRCUIT NOW,
AND I DID FOUR THIS WEEK,
AND I'LL DO THREE NEXT WEEK,
BUT I DO ONE OR TWO
EVERY WEEK, STEADY.
A sign appears on screen. It reads "Manitoulin Co-op Livestock, selling Manitoulin feeder cattle since 1944, head office, Gore Bay."

A man speaks on a microphone.

He says AND ON BEHALF OF THE
MANITOULIN CO-OP,
ITS STAFF, MANAGEMENT,
PRODUCERS, MYSELF,
WE WISH AT THIS TIME TO
THANK YOU IN ADVANCE
FOR YOUR ATTENDANCE,
YOUR ATTENTION,
AND YOUR BIDDING.
WE ARE SELLING THE
CATTLE, GENTLEMEN,
IN THE RING THIS
MORNING.
WE'RE STARTING
WITH NUMBER ONE,
AND CONSECUTIVELY RUNNING
DOWN THE CATALOGUE.
AND NOW WE ARE READY
TO START THE SALE.

A group of cows goes to the auction ring.

The auctioneer says ALL RIGHT, COMING OFF
THE SCALES, GENTLEMEN,
WE HAVE 40 HEAD OF CATTLE
FOR YOU, GENTLEMEN.
40 HEAD.
ALL RIGHT, GENTLEMEN,
CONDITION, YES, SIR,
BOY, CONDITION EXCELLENT.
THAT'S 75 AND
AWAY WE GO...

He calls bids.

Then, he says SOLD! 74.50!
74.50.

(murmur)

A man handles a paper to a man in the stands. He signs it.

The auctioneer continues FANCY PACK OF
CATTLE, BOYS.
CLEAN HEAD.
ROSEY TYPE NELLOR CATTLE.
COMING OFF THE SCALES,
INTO THE RING, GENTLEMEN.
AND AWAY WE GO, GENTLEMEN,
WHAT DO YOU SAY?

The auction goes on.

A man says WELL, QUALITY CATTLE
ARE QUITE SUPERB HERE,
YOU KNOW?
THEY'RE SUPREME.
THEY'RE GOOD CATTLE.
THEY'RE WELL-GRADED.
EVERYBODY LIKES THEM.
EVERYBODY KNOWS THEM.
THEY'VE DONE WELL WITH
THEM SO THEY COME
BACK AND THEY
BUY THEM.
THE RING MEN ARE VERY
IMPORTANT TO ME.
THEY HAVE TO
BE ON THE BALL.
THEY HAVE TO BE ACCURATE,
THEY HAVE TO REMEMBER,
AND I MUST HAVE
THEIR COOPERATION.
I'M BLESSED
WITH THAT.
THE TALKING IS
THE EASY PART.
KNOWING THE VALUE IS
THE IMPORTANT PART.

One of the buyers says INTERESTED PEOPLE
IN THE CATTLE BUSINESS
OVER MOST OF SOUTHERN ONTARIO,
OR NOT MOST OF SOUTHERN
ONTARIO, BUT THE CATTLE
BUYING FEEDER LOTS
COME HERE, AND ISLAND
BUYERS THAT WANT
TO FEED CATTLE AS
WELL DO BUY HERE.
CANADA PACKERS
HAVE BEEN HERE.
THEY BUY THE
COWS, GENERALLY.
SWIFT, SOMETIMES.
SOME OF THE BIGGER
FELLAS, RANCHES DOWN,
OR FEEDER LOTS
DOWN KITCHENER,
WATERLOO AREA
HAVE BEEN HERE.

The auctioneer says SOLD
AT 79 CENTS!
ANOTHER PACKAGE COMING
IN, GENTLEMEN, SAME LOT.
60 HEAD.
CHAROLAIS
CATTLE, BOYS.
THE CONDITION IS
PERFECT, GENTLEMEN.

The ring men say MOVE UP THERE!
COME ON!
MOVE UP THERE.

[cattle lowing]

A man appears on screen. He is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven, with short brown hair. He wears a red checkered shirt.

He says AS FAR AS MANITOULIN
COOPERATIVE,
WE'RE VERY HAPPY
WITH THE DAY.
WE CONSISTENTLY HAVE
PRICES THAT ARE EQUAL
TO OTHER SALES IN
THE COMMUNITY.
WE'RE WELL PLEASED.
AS FAR AS THE BUYERS
ARE CONCERNED,
I THINK THEY'LL BE
REASONABLY WELL PLEASED.
THE CATTLE WERE
IN GOOD QUALITY.

Another man appears on screen. He is in his late forties, clean-shaven, with receding gray hair. He wears a white jacket over a cream sweater and white shirt.

He says WE'VE BEEN COMING
HERE ABOUT 12, 13 YEARS
TO BUY CATTLE
FOR A SMALL FEED LOT.
AND THEY HAVE ALWAYS
DONE VERY WELL FOR US.
THE QUALITY HAS IMPROVED
OVER THE 12, 13 YEARS,
AND WE TRY TO MIX THEM
WITH WESTERN CALVES
WE BRING FROM ALBERTA
AND SASKATCHEWAN
LATER IN THE FALL.
THEY JUST GIVE US A BLEND
OF DIFFERENT SIZES
AND DIFFERENT PRICES
TO TRY AND
MAKE THE
OPERATION WORK.

Another man appears on screen. He is in his late forties, clean-shaven, with short gray hair. He wears big glasses, a white shirt under a black coat.

He says I'M QUITE PLEASED.
I THINK THE FARMER GOT
A FAIR PRICE TODAY.
CATTLE WERE IN
GOOD CONDITION.
EVERYTHING WENT
OVER SMOOTHLY.
AND I THINK WE SHOULD BE
REASONABLY HAPPY
WITH THE WAY THE BUYERS
PARTICIPATED AND WERE KEEN.
AND IT WAS NICE TO SEE
OLD FACES BACK AGAIN.
SO THAT PROVES THEY WERE
HAPPY WITH THE RESULTS
OF LAST YEAR'S SALE, HOW
THE CATTLE DID FOR THEM.
WE'RE QUITE
PLEASED WITH TODAY.

Now, a house by the shore appears on screen.

Joan says ACCORDING
TO JUDY CHAPMAN,
THE DEVELOPMENT OF
UNTAPPED NATURAL RESOURCES,
AND YEAR-ROUND
TOURISM ARE SURE WAYS
TO STRENGTH THE
ISLAND'S ECONOMY.

Judy appears on screen. She is in her forties, with long light brown hair tied in a bun. She wears a dark red shirt under a white jacket.

A caption on screen reads "Judy Chapman."

She says IN THE PAST, THE THREE
MONTHS OF THE YEAR HAS
BEEN THE PRIME SEASON
FOR THE MANITOULIN,
AND FROM AN ECONOMIC
POINT OF VIEW,
IF THERE WERE PEOPLE
COMING HERE ALL THE TIME,
WE'RE BASICALLY 80
MILES FROM SUDBURY,
WE'RE 214 MILES FROM
DOWNTOWN TORONTO,
AND FOR CITY PEOPLE,
THERE'S EVERYTHING
TO OFFER HERE, AND
THEREFORE, I'M QUITE SURE
THAT THE PEOPLE OF THE
ISLAND CERTAINLY
WANT MORE HAPPENING.
THEY DON'T WANT THE
WRONG THING HAPPENING.

Now, aerial views of the island appear on screen.

Judy continues THEY DON'T WANT TO PART
WITH THAT UNIQUE
BEAUTY AND OUR PURE
WATER AND SO ON,
BUT I THINK PEOPLE
WOULD BE VERY HAPPY.
THEY'RE HARD
WORKING PEOPLE.
THE PEOPLE WHO HAVE
SURVIVED HERE,
IT'S NOT THE EASIEST
PLACE IN THE WORLD
TO SURVIVE, REALLY.
AND IT IS IMPORTANT
THAT PEOPLE KEEP
WORKING YEAR ROUND.
VERY UNFORTUNATE, WE
HAVE VERY HIGH WELFARE,
VERY HIGH U.I.C.
THERE'S NO REASON WHY IT
CERTAINLY SHOULDN'T BE
BUSY YEAR ROUND.

Fast clips show people on a boat in the lake and people walking in the woods, feeding a raccoon.

Judy says PERHAPS A MAJOR RESORT
WOULD BE ONE OF OUR BEST
FACTORS THAT WOULD PUT A
LOT OF PEOPLE TO WORK,
AND IT WOULDN'T BE
POLLUTING ANYTHING, EITHER.
THERE'S SO MANY VARIOUS
WAYS PEOPLE COULD GO
TO WORK ON THIS ISLAND.
BUT OF COURSE WE
NEED THE LEADER,
SOMEBODY WITH MONEY
THAT CAN LEAD US.

Now, a woman sits in front of a table. She sews something.

Joan says THE OJIBWAY CULTURAL
FOUNDATION AT WEST BAY
RESERVE SERVES AS A
RESOURCE AND EDUCATION CENTRE,
A GALLERY FOR THE
PROMOTION OF ARTISTS AND
CRAFTSMEN, AND A MEETING
PLACE FOR PEOPLE CONCERNED
WITH THE PRESERVATION
OF NATIVE HERITAGE.

A woman appears on screen. She is in her forties, with long, curly brown hair. She wears a dark red shirt with big white spots.

A caption on screen reads "Mary Lou Fox, director."

She says WHEN WE TALK ABOUT
NEEDS OF INDIAN PEOPLE,
ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT
THINGS IS THE ECONOMY,
AND ECONOMIC NEEDS.
AND THAT'S PROBABLY WHY
WE ARE SO INVOLVED
IN ARTS AND CRAFTS.
CERTAINLY, WHEN PEOPLE
COME INTO THE CULTURAL CENTRE,
THEY THINK REALLY
THAT'S ALL WE DO IS
INVOLVE OURSELVES
WITH ARTS AND CRAFTS.

A close-up of the work the woman is sewing appears on screen. Then, other art works appear. They are embroidered animal figures and silhouettes.

Mary continues AND WHILE THAT'S A
VERY IMPORTANT AREA
OF INVOLVEMENT FOR THE
REASON I MENTIONED,
THAT IT SOMETIMES IS THE
BASIS FOR FAMILY INCOME,
BUT CERTAINLY A
SUPPLEMENT TO MANY OF THEM,
IT'S ALSO THE MOST
IMPORTANT INDUSTRY
FOR INDIAN PEOPLE,
THE ARTS AND CRAFTS.

A woman knits in a loom.

Mary says BUT MOST OF THE WORK
IS WITH GRANDMOTHERS,
EVEN THOUGH NOW THEY HAVE
A CONCERN FOR PASSING ON
TRADITIONAL CRAFTS
TO YOUNG PEOPLE.
THEY SEE THAT AS
BEING VERY IMPORTANT
AND ARE DOING
IT THEMSELVES.

Close-ups of loom knitted pieces appear on screen.

A woman appears on screen. She is in her mid-thirties, with long brown hair and bangs. She wears a light green blouse with gold details.

A caption on screen reads "Deborah Pitawanakwat, designer."

She says WELL, I STUDIED AT THE
GEORGE BROWN COLLEGE
IN TORONTO.
AND WHEN I WAS WORKING
ON MY GARMENTS FOR
THE RUNWAY THERE, I DECIDED
TO PUT THE BEADWORK
INTO THE GARMENTS, AND
IT CHANGED THE WHOLE
OUTLOOK ON THE WHOLE
GARMENT TOGETHER.

Mary says A LOT OF TIMES INDIAN
PEOPLE SORT OF DON'T TEND
TO TALK ABOUT THEMSELVES
AND WITH DEBBIE,
SHE JUST HAPPENED TO COME
IN ONE DAY AND HAD
DONE SOME RIBBON SHIRTS.
AND THEY WERE SO NICE
I ASKED HER, YOU KNOW,
WHERE SHE HAD BECOME
INVOLVED IN SEWING,
AND THEN LEARNED SHE
WAS A FASHION DESIGNER,
AND WAS JUST RETURNING
HOME FROM SCHOOL.
SO WE GOT HER INVOLVED IN
A PROGRAM DESIGNING
VERY MODERN FASHIONS, BUT
USING TRADITIONAL DESIGNS.

A female model walks in a park near the lake. She wears a blue dress.

Mary continues AND IT WAS SORT OF ALMOST
LIKE A TWOFOLD THING
BECAUSE ONE OF THE
FOCUSES WE HAVE HERE
IS IN EDUCATION.
Another female model walks in. She wears an open back peach dress with tassels.

Mary continues SO IN THAT WAY, WE WERE
ABLE TO INVOLVE YOUNG
HIGH SCHOOL LADIES
TO DO THE MODELLING,
WHICH WAS SOMETHING THAT
WAS VERY NEW TO THEM.
BUT IT GAVE THEM
A LOT OF POISE,
A LOT OF
SELF-CONFIDENCE.

A new model walks in. She wears a mustard top with long tassels and a mustard trouser.

Then, other models appear on screen.

Mary says THERE'S AN ENTERPRISE
GOING ON IN THE WEST BAY
RESERVE, BY THE
WEST BAY BAND,
AND IT'S DESIGNING SHEEP
SKIN GARMENTS FOR SALE.
AND THIS IS SOMETHING THAT
DEBBIE HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN.
IT'S CALLED THE
OJIBWAY SHEEP HERDER.

Now, a man stands in front of a painting. He is in his forties, with short dark hair. He wears a white t-shirt over a black shirt.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "James Simon Mishibinijima."

He says I'VE BEEN GOING TO A LOT
OF DIFFERENT STYLES,
LIKE SINCE, THIS IS
MY 14TH GOING ON,
THIS NATIVE PAINTING, OR
NATIVE ART RENAISSANCE,
A LOT OF PEOPLE CALL IT
DIFFERENT NAMES, OKAY?
EVERY TIME I CHANGE A
STYLE, THINGS LIKE THAT,
I'M SEARCHING
FOR SOMETHING.
LIKE THE LAST
PAINTINGS I DID WAS,
ROCK PAINTINGS,
YOU WOULD SAY.
SAY I DRAW A PERSON,
THEN WRITE OR DRAW ROCKS
AROUND IT, AND TREES,
THINGS LIKE THAT.
A PERSON RELATING
TO A MAN AND LAND
SEEMS ON THE
SAME SUBJECT.
IT'S MORE LIKE YOU
CAN TOUCH THE SKY,
HE CAN TOUCH THE AIR,
HE CAN TOUCH THE WIND,
ANYTHING HE CAN
SEE, HE CAN TOUCH.
THE THING WE CAN
SEE NOW, OKAY?
I'VE BEEN GOING ON AND
GOING ON TO ALL DIFFERENT
STYLES, I'VE BEEN
SEARCHING FOR SOMETHING.
THEN I CAUGHT ON
TO THIS LAST STYLE,
THIS LAST STYLE.

Drawings in black and white appear on screen. One of them shows a house and a men crawling to the door. Other shows a man hanging from a tree.

James continues JUST FEELS
GOOD INSIDE.
YOU DO SOMETHING, HOW
FAR I CAN EXPLAIN IT,
YOU JUST DO IT AND
YOU FEEL SATISFIED.
YOU FALL IN LOVE
WITH IT.
EACH PIECE YOU DO,
THEY'RE ALL PERFECT.
AND...
HOW SHOULD I PUT
THIS; IT'S A NATIVE -
IT'S NOT NATIVE AT ALL;
IT'S A CAPTURE OF ART,
IT'S A CAPTURE
OF SOMETHING.
LIKE, SAY TAKE SOMETHING
OUT OF THE SKY,
PIECE OF THAT AIR, AND
YOU MAKE SOMETHING OUT
OF IT, THEN YOU
GOT THAT...
CREATION OF LIFE.
THAT'S WHAT IT IS.

[drumming, singing]

A group of men plays a drum. Little kids surround them.

A man appears on screen. He is in his forties with short black hair and moustache. He wears glasses and a white striped shirt.

A caption on screen reads "Ron Odjig."

He says IT'S ALWAYS BEEN KNOWN
THAT EVERY TIME A DRUM
IS BEING HEARD SOMEWHERE
THAT JUST NATURALLY,
PEOPLE WILL GATHER AND
KIND OF COME TOGETHER,
IN THE SAME WAY SOMEBODY
WOULD MAKE A FIRE.
IF SOMEBODY MAKES A
FIRE AND IT'S COLD,
PEOPLE KIND OF
GATHER TOGETHER.
IT'S KIND OF THE SAME
WAY WITH THE DRUM.
THERE'S A FEELING
THERE THAT PEOPLE JUST
AUTOMATICALLY COME
TOGETHER BECAUSE
THERE'S SOMETHING THAT KIND
OF WARMS YOUR HEART
WHEN YOU COME
TOGETHER LIKE THAT.
IN THE TEACHINGS, IT
IS SAID THE DRUM
IS THE HEARTBEAT
OF OUR NATION.
SO MAYBE THAT EXPLAINS
THE REASON WHY.

Now, a man wearing a tribal costume dances. A group of kids walk behind him.

Joan says PRESCHOOLERS LEARN
THEIR NATIVE LANGUAGE
AND CEREMONIAL DANCES
EFFORTLESSLY THROUGH A
NEW,
INNOVATIVE OJIBWAY
CULTURAL PROGRAM.

Ron says I THINK TRADITIONAL VALUES
ARE VERY MUCH ALIVE HERE
TODAY, YOU KNOW, AND
MOST OF NATIVE PEOPLE'S
HEARTS, YOU KNOW, BUT
MAYBE THEY'RE JUST SHY
TO EXPRESS SOME OF
THOSE FEELINGS.
WE CAN LIVE IN 1983 AND
STILL SING THESE SONGS.
THERE'S NO REASON
WHY IN THE YEAR 2000
THESE SONGS SHOULDN'T
STILL BE AROUND.

[drumming, singing]

The end credits roll.

Stills courtesy of Imperial Oil Royal Ontario Museum.

Stills research, Nancy Green.

Cinematographer, Robert Brooks C.S.C

Camera assistant, Ryan McMaster

Sound recordist, Douglas Ganton

Telecine transfer, Guy Nason

Videotape editor, David Bevan

Unit manager, Rodger G. Lawson

Production assistant, Mary Louise Lynde

Producer-director, Joan Reed Olsen.

A production of TVOntario, copyright The Ontario Educational Communications Authority 1983.

Watch: Sacred Home of Manitou