Transcript: Survival One | Jan 04, 1989

(music plays)

The opening sequence plays with several clips showing different landscapes of Canada and people in different activities: kids in school, girls dancing, an architect drawing a blueprint, a man cutting a trunk, etc.

A title reads "People Patterns, Servival One."

Joan Reed Olsen stands in front of a lake. A bridge crosses the lake behind her.

She is in her fifties, with short, curly dark brown hair. She wears large glasses, and a dark blue shirtdress.

Joan says HELLO, I'M JOAN
REED-OLSEN.
ONE DAY LAST WINTER I WAS
CLEANING OUT SOME FILES
AND CAME ACROSS A LITTLE
NEWSPAPER CLIPPING.
IT DIDN'T HAVE
A DATE ON IT,
BUT IT WAS
VAGUELY FAMILIAR.
IT TALKED ABOUT THREE
FAMILIES LEAVING
THE BIG CITY TO COME TO
THE LITTLE TOWN OF TWEED
AND ESTABLISH THEIR
OWN COMMUNITY,
WHICH THEY WERE
CALLING SERVIVAL ONE.
I WAS COMING THROUGH TWEED
JUST ABOUT THAT TIME,
SO I THOUGHT I'D
CHECK OUT AND SEE
HOW SUCCESSFUL
THEY WERE.
I FOUND OUT
TWO THINGS.
IN THE FIRST PLACE,
THE CLIPPING
WAS NINE YEARS OLD.
THE SECOND THING WAS,
YES, SERVIVAL ONE
HAS SURVIVED.

A clip shows a rural landscape. There is a house on the left and a barn on the right.

Joan continues AND ALTHOUGH THE ORIGINAL
CONCEPT HAS CHANGED,
THERE'S EVIDENCE
SERVIVAL ONE IS STILL
AN INFLUENCE IN
THE COMMUNITY.

A woman appears on screen. She's in her forties, with shoulder length, curly light brown hair. She wears big glasses, a brown jacket and a white shirt.

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Roely DeVries."

She says WHEN WE FIRST STARTED
AS A COMMUNITY,
WE WERE GOING TO BE A
COMMUNITY UNTO OURSELVES.
AT ONE TIME, THERE WERE 45
PEOPLE LIVING WITHIN
THIS PARTICULAR COMMUNITY,
THE COMMUNITY OF SERVIVAL ONE,
ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF
THE TOWN CALLED TWEED.
THE EMPHASIS WAS ON
LEARNING TO HANDLE
OUR FINANCES TOGETHER,
HAVING OUR OWN SCHOOL,
BUILDING OUR
HOMES TOGETHER,
RUNNING OUR OWN
BUSINESSES,
HAVING OUR OWN BAKERY.
WE ACCOMPLISHED
ALL OF THIS,
AND THEN THROUGH
EXPERIENCE,
HAVE FOUND THAT WE'VE
DRIFTED AWAY FROM THAT.
FAMILIES BEGAN TO LOSE
THEIR OWN IDENTITY
BECAUSE OF THE
CLOSENESS OF DOING
EVERYTHING TOGETHER.
AND SO IN THE
LAST FOUR YEARS,
THESE FAMILIES WHO
WERE ONCE VERY CLOSE
HAVE NOW BECOME MEMBERS
OF THE LARGER COMMUNITY
HERE IN TWEED.
AND WE, OURSELVES, ARE
STILL PHYSICALLY LIVING HERE,
BUT OUR INVOLVEMENT
IS MOSTLY IN TWEED ITSELF
THROUGH OUR SCHOOL, BUT
ALSO THROUGH ACTIVITIES
HAPPENING IN TWEED.
SOCIAL EVENTS, HAVING TO DO
WITH THE BUSINESS WORLD,
AND THE
ARTS AND SO ON.

Now, a man draws the blueprint of a house in his studio. He is in his late forties, with short white hair and a full beard. He wears a checkered shirt, and black trouser.

A caption on screen reads "John DeVries."

He says ONE OF THE THINGS
THAT WE TRIED TO DO
AT SERVIVAL ONE WAS TO
DEVELOP INDUSTRIES,
COTTAGE INDUSTRIES THAT
WOULD BRING IN FUNDS
AND MAKE OURSELVES
MORE INDEPENDENT.
SO I FOUND A FELLOW
DOING THIS KIND OF WORK,
BUILDING WITH LOGS, AND I
GOT TREMENDOUSLY EXCITED
ABOUT IT, AND LEARNED HOW
TO DO IT VERY QUICKLY.
WOOD IS A BEAUTIFUL
MATERIAL.
I THINK, STILL,
THE MOST BEAUTIFUL
BUILDING MATERIAL.
AND IT'S ALIVE.
EACH LOG IS
DIFFERENT.
WHEN WE BUILD A HOUSE,
WE KNOW EACH LOG.
IT'S PRACTICALLY YOU CAN
GIVE A NAME TO A LOG
AND YOU KNOW THAT ONE.
AND WHEN YOU COME BACK AND
VISIT THE PEOPLE THREE,
FOUR, FIVE YEARS LATER,
YOU REMEMBER THAT LOG.
AND THAT'S THE BEAUTIFUL
THING ABOUT IT.
I'VE DONE A NUMBER OF
THINGS IN MY LIFE,
AND I GET A GREAT DEAL OF
SATISFACTION FROM THIS WORK.

A clip shows two men peeling logs. Then, a clip shows a group of men building a log house.

John says WE'VE BUILT ABOUT
20 HOUSES NOW.
ALL OF THEM IN ONTARIO,
EXCEPT FOR ONE.
THERE IS A GROWING
INTEREST IN IT,
SIMPLY BECAUSE I BELIEVE
PEOPLE ARE SEARCHING FOR,
AND THEY WANT
QUALITY AGAIN.
WE'VE GONE THROUGH QUITE
AN INDUSTRIAL, WELL,
PART OF THE INDUSTRIAL
REVOLUTION, OF COURSE,
WAS THE MANUFACTURED-TYPE
OF MATERIALS
IN EVERYTHING, IN
COOKING WARE,
AND PARTICULARLY IN
BUILDING MATERIALS,
AND IT'S SHOWN THERE IS
LITTLE INDIVIDUALISM
LEFT IN THE STYLE
AND SO ON.
AND PEOPLE DEFINITELY ARE
LOOKING FOR INDIVIDUALISM
IN THEIR HOMES,
EXPRESSION OF THEIR OWN
VALUES, AND IT JUST
TURNS OUT VERY WELL.
IT'S JUST AN EXTENSION
OF WHAT THEY
LOOK FOR IN LIFE.
PARTICULARLY THE
AESTHETICS OF IT.
TO BUILD A HOUSE,
A LOG HOUSE,
FROM BEGINNING TO END,
DEPENDS GREATLY
ON THE SIZE, OF COURSE,
AND ON THE DESIGN,
AND COMPLEXITY,
PARTICULARLY
OF THE ROOF STRUCTURE.
BUT ORDINARILY, SAY, A
FOUR-WALLED HOUSE
WOULD TAKE FOUR
TO FIVE WEEKS.
AND MOST OF
THAT IS LABOUR.
WE GET THE RAW
MATERIALS SHIPPED IN,
THE LOGS IN THE BARK, SO
THERE IS A LOT OF HAND
TOOLING AND LABOUR
INVOLVED WITH IT,
WHICH MAKES IT
RATHER NICE.
YOU CAN'T HAVE A LABOUR
OF LOVE UNLESS
YOU LOVE THE LABOUR.
AND THAT'S REALLY
IMPORTANT.
IT'S AN IMPORTANT
ELEMENT OF THIS WORK.

Now, John shows pictures of the houses they have built.

He continues IT'S HANDS ON.
YOU PUT YOUR CHARACTER,
YOUR VALUES,
YOUR EYE GOES INTO THE
MATERIALS RIGHT
FROM CONCEPTION, DESIGN,
RIGHT TO THE END OF IT,
FINISHING TOUCHES.

A group of kids walk to school.

Joan says THE SCHOOL OPERATED
BY SERVIVAL ONE
IS LOCATED ON THE
DEVRIES PROPERTY.
THIS ALTERNATIVE TO A
MORE STRUCTURED FORM
OF EDUCATION IS BASED
LOGISTICALLY ON
THE CONCEPT OF THE ONE
ROOM SCHOOLHOUSE.

[bell ringing]

The kids run and enter the school.

A woman in her late thirties stands on the door and says DON'T FALL.
EASY.
ALL RIGHT,
LET'S GO.

The kids sit in the classroom reading and doing exercises. Roely walks between the kids' desks and helps them with their activities.

She says IT'S NOT OUR INTENTION TO
TRY TO COPY THE PUBLIC
SCHOOL SYSTEM, OR TO SAY
THAT THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
SYSTEM HAS SO MANY
THINGS WRONG WITH IT,
THEREFORE WE NEED TO
DO SOMETHING ELSE.
AS IN ALL THINGS, NOT
EVERYONE FITS
INTO WHAT IS SET UP.
AND SO FOR US, THE
SCHOOL WAS AN EXTENSION
OF THE FAMILY.
IT WAS AN EXTENSION
OF COMMUNITY LIVING,
AND WE WANTED
THAT TO CONTINUE.
WE FELT THE SCHOOL COULD
BEST DO THAT BY REMAINING
SMALL, BY REMAINING
VERY MUCH IN CONTACT
WITH CHILDREN
YOUNGER AND OLDER,
AND REMAINING IN CLOSE
CONTACT WITH ADULTS
DURING THE COURSE
OF THE DAY.

A woman appears. She is in her mid-thirties, with long curly brown hair. She wears a blue sweater over a white blouse.

A caption reads "Sharon Brittain."

As she speaks, fast clips show kids in different activities at school.

She says THE CURRICULUM THAT WE
DEAL WITH AT THE SCHOOL
IS PRIMARILY TAILORED TO
THE CHILDREN'S NEEDS.
THE THINGS THEY BRING IN,
THE THINGS THEY HAVE
TO DEAL WITH EVERY
DAY IN THEIR LIFE.
THIS WAY OF DEALING WITH
THE PROGRAM MAYBE ALLOWS
THEM TO BE THEMSELVES FOR
A LONGER PERIOD OF TIME.
IN THE LARGER
SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT,
MAYBE IT'S A LITTLE
HARDER TO BE WHO YOU ARE,
TO HAVE WHO YOU
ARE BE ACCEPTABLE.
AND HERE AT THE SCHOOL, WE
TRY TO BE ABLE TO BE MORE
ACCEPTING OF THE
SORT OF INDIVIDUAL
IDIOSYNCRASIES OF
THE CHILDREN.

Now, a woman sits at a kitchen table. She is in her thirties, with long brown hair tied in pigtails. She wears a patterned blouse and a denim skirt.

A caption reads "Sandra Magwood."

She says BOTH MY CHILDREN WERE IN
THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM.
CHRISTOPHER, MY
OLDEST, STILL IS,
AND HE'S THRIVING,
AND HE'S DOING WELL,
AND HE LOVES IT.
GREGORY, ALSO, HE
WAS QUITE CONTENT
IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
UNTIL A CERTAIN GRADE,
I THINK IT WAS GRADE 6,
AND THEN WE STARTED
NOTICING, HMM, NOT SO
HAPPY TO GO TO SCHOOL,
LESS HAPPY WHEN YOU
CAME HOME FROM SCHOOL,
AND KEPT FEELING THAT
BUILD AND BUILD
AND BUILD UNTIL IT WAS
REALLY A PROBLEM.
IT WAS GREGORY'S
PROBLEM.
I NEVER SORT OF SAY ONE
SCHOOL IS GOOD AND ONE
SCHOOL IS BAD; GREGORY
HAD A PROBLEM
IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL
SYSTEM, AND WE WERE LUCKY
HERE TO HAVE AN ALTERNATIVE
SCHOOL TO EVEN
TRY TO SEE IF THIS
WAS SOMETHING
THAT WOULD HELP
HIM PERSONALLY.
AND IT HAS.
IT'S BEEN
WONDERFUL FOR HIM.
HAVING ALL THE CHILDREN
FROM THIS BIG TO THIS BIG,

She moves her hand showing different heights of kids.

She continues WHERE YOUR SIZE,
YOUR STATURE DOESN'T
MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE, WHERE
YOU CAN BE WHO YOU ARE
WITHOUT HAVING TO
BE COOL, TO FIT IN,
AND THESE WERE THE
THINGS - IT WAS NOTHING
TO DO WITH SCHOOL,
WORK OR MARKS,
OR ANY OF THOSE THINGS,
IT WAS THE ABILITY
TO FEEL PART OF
THE SCHOOL.

Roely appears again and says IF YOU ARE GOING TO BE A
COMMUNITY-ORIENTED SCHOOL,
YOU HAVE TO HAVE ADULTS
INVOLVED, AS WELL.
IT'S NOT JUST CHILDREN
BETWEEN THESE HOURS
OF THE DAY.
SO WHEN ADULTS COME IN,
THEY VOLUNTEER THEIR WORK.
THEY WORK WITH THE TEACHER
TO SEE WHERE THEY CAN
BEST OFFER THEIR SERVICES
TO THE CHILDREN.
IT'S IMPORTANT THAT
YOU WORK CLOSELY
WITH THE TEACHER.

In a clip, Sandra says LAST YEAR, WE HAD A MUCH
LARGER PARTICIPATION
FROM THE PARENTS.
AND IT HAS ITS
PROBLEMS.
I DON'T WANT ANYONE
TO THINK AN ALTERNATE
SCHOOL, YOU JUST MOVE
IN AND EVERYTHING
IS WONDERFUL, AND IT'S
PROBABLY GOING TO BE LIKE
THAT ALWAYS BECAUSE
EVERY NEW TEACHER,
EVERY NEW CHILD
THAT COMES IN,
IN A SMALL
GROUP LIKE THAT,
PRESENTS ITS PROBLEMS.
ORIGINALLY, LAST YEAR,
WE HAD AN AWFUL LOT
MORE PARENT
PARTICIPATION.
THAT'S HOW THE
TEACHER FUNCTIONED,
AND THAT'S HOW
SHE WANTED IT.
IT HAD ITS ADVANTAGES,
AND ITS DISADVANTAGES.
THE ADVANTAGES WERE IT TOOK
SOME OF THE PRESSURE OFF
OF THE TEACHER, AND
SHE COULD GET ON
WITH CERTAIN OTHER
THINGS TO DEAL WITH.
THE DISADVANTAGE WAS IT
LOST ITS CONTINUITY
WITH THE CHILDREN.
IF EVERY DAY SOMEBODY ELSE
APPEARS WITH THEIR IDEAS,
AND THEIR THOUGHTS, AND
HOW THEY'RE GOING TO DO IT,
THIS CAN BE A PROBLEM.
AND SHARON, THIS YEAR,
FELT SHE WANTED
TO HAVE MORE CONTROL.
SO THE PARENTS -
THE LARGER CONTROL.
SO THE PARENTS STEPPED
BACK SOMEWHAT.
WE STILL HAVE PARENTS
WHO ARE TREASURERS AND
SPECIAL EVENTS, AND
CERTAIN THINGS
THAT ARE GOING ON LIKE
THAT, BUT ON THE WHOLE,
SHARON MAINTAINED
THE GROUP HERSELF.
BUT AS I WAS TALKING
TO HER YESTERDAY,
SHE WAS SAYING SHE COULD
SEE HOW NOW SHE COULD USE
THE PARENTS IN
CERTAIN ASPECTS
THAT SHE WASN'T
AWARE OF.
SO WE PLAY WITH
IT LIKE THAT.
AND WE'LL SEE NEXT YEAR
IF MAYBE WE SHOULD
HAVE MORE OR LESS.
IT'LL BE THROWN BACK TO
THE PARENTS TO SEE
HOW THEY FEEL
ABOUT IT.

In another clip, Sharon says CONCERNING KEEPING UP WITH
THE CHILDREN OF THEIR OWN AGE,
AND IN THE SORT OF
GRADE LEVELS THAT GO
CHRONOLOGICALLY, IT'S MY
PERSONAL BIAS THAT I TRY
TO KEEP THAT AS MUCH AS
POSSIBLE WITHIN SORT
OF WHAT I CALL SORT
OF SHOUTING RANGE
WITHIN CHILDREN
THAT ARE THEIR AGE,
SO THEY COULD BE
INTERCHANGEABLE
IF THEY WANT TO BE.
AND WE TRY TO FIND A
WAY OF BUILDING
THE CURRICULUM AROUND THE
THINGS THAT ARE HAPPENING
AND VICE VERSA.
ALTHOUGH, I USE A LOT OF
THE MATERIALS
THAT ARE USED IN
THE PUBLIC SCHOOL.
THERE'S NO POINT IN
REINVENTING THE WHEEL,
BUT WE'RE SORT OF TRYING
TO COMBINE BOTH THINGS.

Now, a kid reads a book sitting in his dad's lap.

He says WOULD YOU LIKE TO BUY
A PAIR OF THOSE BOOTS?

Dad says I WOULD LIKE TO
BUY EIGHT PAIRS.
DO YOU HAVE
THAT MANY?

The kid says EIGHT PAIRS?
I'M SORRY, SIR, BUT WE
ONLY HAVE FOUR PAIRS
IN THE SHOP.

Dad says WELL, I WILL TAKE
THEM AND COME BACK
FOR MORE IN A
FEW WEEKS.

Now, a clip shows a group of people around a table, some of them are eating.

Sharon says AT 9:00, I'LL LOAD
YOU GUYS ALL UP,
THAT I CAN IN MY CAR,
TAKE YOU TO THE STORE,
AND YOU GUYS CAN HELP
GARY UNLOAD THE VAN.
SANDY'S GOT MY...

[everyone chattering at once]

Roely says IT'S NOT
JUST FOR THE REST
OF THE AFTERNOON,
IS THAT RIGHT?
WHO IS GOING TO
FEED THE BIRD...
RIGHT AFTER LUNCH?

Now, two boys feed a bird.

One of the boys says I THINK WE'RE OUT.

[chirping]

One of the boys puts a worm inside the bird's beak.

The other boy says ALL RIGHT.
HERE WE GO.
THAT WORM IS CRAWLING
OUT OF HIS MOUTH.

[chirping]

A sign appears on screen. It reads "Rub a leaf gently, Who am I?"

Two girls stand in front of a table with jars with leaves from different plants. They examine the leaves.

One of the girls says THAT'S SPEARMINT.
I KNOW THIS
IS CHIVES.
PUT THAT
ONE THERE.

The other girl says WHAT WOULD
THAT BE?

One of the girls rubs a leaf and then she smells her fingers.

She says I DON'T KNOW, MY HANDS
SMELL LIKE PEPPERMINT.
YOU SMELL IT.
I DON'T KNOW
WHAT IT IS.

The other girl smells the leave too and says I DON'T KNOW
EITHER.

They smell another bunch of leaves.

The girl says I THINK THAT'S
THE LAVENDER ONE.
SMELL IT.

The other girl says YEAH.
OKAY.

They stand in front of the table and look at the different leaves.

One of the girls says I DON'T KNOW
THAT ONE.
LAVENDER?

The other says YEAH, THAT'S LAVENDER.

They put little pieces of paper with the names of the plant under each jar with leaves.

The girl says OKAY, I KNOW
CHIVES GOES THERE.

The other says CHIVES.

The girl says AND I GUESS THAT
WOULD GO THERE.
SMELL IT.

They smell the leaves and put the name under the jar.

In a clip, Roely says OUR OLDEST DAUGHTER,
WHO IS NOW 18,
NEVER EXPERIENCED SCHOOL
IN THE LARGER SENSE.
SHE WAS ONE OF
THE FIRST ONES,
SO HER LEARNING WAS MOSTLY
AROUND THE KITCHEN TABLE.
AND THEN WHEN THE SCHOOL
BECAME MORE FORMALIZED,
MORE FORMALIZED
THAN IT WAS,
SHE WAS SORT OF
JUST ON THE FRINGES.
SHE WAS JUST A LITTLE
BIT TOO OLD FOR IT.
AND SHE ATTENDED HIGH
SCHOOL FOR TWO YEARS.
DID VERY WELL
ACADEMICALLY,
HAD AN AWFUL HARD TIME
ADJUSTING SOCIALLY.
SHE FOUND SHE WAS
LIVING TWO LIVES.
ONE WHAT WAS NORMAL,
CONSIDERED NORMAL BEHAVIOUR,
NORMAL WAY OF
DOING THINGS AT HOME,
AND THEN SHE FOUND SHE HAD
TO PLAY GAMES AT SCHOOL.
AND THAT WAS VERY
DIFFICULT FOR HER.
AND MOST OF THE CHILDREN
THAT HAVE GRADUATED
FROM OUR SCHOOL HAVE TO
MAKE THAT ADJUSTMENT.
THERE IS NO
GETTING AROUND IT.
THAT'S WHAT MAKES US
AN ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL.
SO THEY ARE NOT MADE TO
FIT INTO A CONTINUATION
OF THE OTHER SCHOOL, AND
THERE IS AN ADJUSTMENT
THAT THEY HAVE
TO MAKE.
MOST OF THE STUDENTS
THAT HAVE GRADUATED
FROM OUR SCHOOL AND ARE
IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL
DO ACADEMICALLY
VERY WELL.

Now, Sandra says THE PHILOSOPHY OF
SERVIVAL ONE IS,
I THINK SHARON MENTIONED
IT TO YOU, TOO.
THE ABILITY TO ALLOW THE
CHILDREN TO BE WHO
THEY ARE A LITTLE BIT
LONGER BEFORE THEY HAVE
TO FIT INTO THE MOULD
OF WHAT IS EXPECTED,
WHAT YOU SHOULD DO,
THE ACADEMIC WORK
THAT MAKES YOU FUNNEL
INTO A CERTAIN WAY.
THEY HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY
TO KEEP THE TWINKLE
IN THEIR EYE JUST A
LITTLE BIT LONGER.
AND LISTEN, THEY'RE GOING
TO GROW UP SO QUICKLY
ANYWAY, WHAT'S THE
PROBLEM WITH THAT?
I FEEL THERE'S SO MUCH
STRESS PUT ON ACADEMICS
IN OUR SOCIETY NOW.
I MEAN, IF YOU'RE
BEAUTIFUL AND YOU'RE
INTELLIGENT, THESE ARE
THE THINGS WE JUDGE
CHILDREN ON,
AND ADULTS ON.
WE LIKE TO STEP BACK A BIT
AND SAY, THAT'S NOT ALL,
THERE'S ANOTHER QUALITY
THAT WE'RE MISSING,
AND THAT'S SORT OF THE
HOW PEOPLE RELATE
TO PEOPLE, SORT OF THE
GOODNESS IN YOUR HEART.
AND THAT'S AS IMPORTANT,
IF NOT MORE IMPORTANT
THAN ALL THE OTHER THINGS
THAT WE TEND TO STRESS.
AND SCHOOL GIVES THEM THE
OPPORTUNITY TO USE
THOSE SKILLS AND
LEARN THEM.
IT IS SOMETHING THAT
HAS TO BE LEARNED.

A group of girls walk along a street. A woman in her mid-thirties joins them.

Joan says THE OLD OPERA
HOUSE IN TWEED
IS BEING RESTORED.
AMONG OTHER USES, IT'LL
BE THE HOME OF A DANCE
COMPANY, A VIBRANT
EXCITING ASPECT
OF SERVIVAL ONE.
TO FOLLOW IN THE FOOTSTEPS
OF THESE YOUNG DANCERS,
DOZENS OF YOUNGSTERS
IN THE TWEED AREA
ARE BEING MOULDED
BY TEACHER DANCER
CHOREOGRAPHER
VICTORIA SLAGER.

Victoria says SO FAR I'VE BEEN
TEACHING IN THE SCHOOLS
ALL THE TIME.
I'VE BEEN TEACHING
IN VARIOUS HALLS,
BUT THEY'RE ALWAYS BUSY,
A LOT OF THE TIMES
THEY'RE BUSY, AND
IN THE SCHOOLS,
IT'S THE WRONG KIND OF
ATMOSPHERE, I FIND,
FOR DANCE.
IT'S BEEN GREAT
TO TEACH THERE,
BUT I'M READY TO MOVE
INTO A PLACE THAT
HAS MORE OF A
THEATRICAL AIR TO IT.
WHERE THERE WILL BE A
FEELING OF THE YEARS
THAT HAVE GONE
INTO THEATRE.
AND THAT PLACE
IS FROM 1913.
IT REEKS OF THEATRE.

The girls and the woman enter a building.

(music plays)

Five women wearing black dresses and black tights practice a choreography in a dance studio.

A woman appears on screen. She's in her thirties, with long, curly light brown hair. She wears a black blouse and trousers.

A caption reads "Victoria Slager."

She says OK, WE STARTED, WE DANCE,
NOUS DANSON
THREE-AND-A-HALF
YEARS AGO.
I STARTED IT MYSELF
BECAUSE I WANTED
A PLACE FOR THE
GIRLS TO PERFORM.
IN MY DANCE EDUCATION,
I NEVER RECEIVED
ENOUGH OF A
CHANCE TO PERFORM.
AND I THINK THAT'S A
REALLY VALUABLE PART OF
THE DANCE EDUCATION, THAT
THE GIRLS GET TO PUT ON
AN AIR ABOUT THEM, GET
TO PERFORM FOR PEOPLE,
GET TO GIVE WHAT
THEY'RE GETTING.
BECAUSE YOU CAN LEARN AND
LEARN AND LEARN DANCE,
AND THE FEET CAN
ALL BE RIGHT,
AND YOU DON'T YET KNOW
HOW TO GIVE IT OUT
TO OTHER PEOPLE.
AND THAT'S WHY WE STARTED
WE DANCE, NOUS DANSON.
AND WE WORKED AND
WORKED AND WORKED ON
BECOMING VERY PRECISE.
WORKED ON THE PRECISION
OF THE NUMBERS.
AND I CHOREOGRAPHED
NUMBERS ON THE GIRLS,
SO EACH ONE OF THEM HAS
SOLOS AND DANCE TOGETHER
AS A UNIT, AS WELL.
AND OVER THE YEARS,
WE'VE PERFORMED ALL OVER
ONTARIO, AND PERFORMED FOR
SENIORS AND IN PARKS,
AND FOR CHILDREN, AND
WE'VE TRIED TO MAKE OUR
PROGRAMS AVAILABLE AND
ATTRACTIVE FOR
ALL AGE GROUPS, AND
ALL TYPES OF PEOPLE.
WE ALSO INCLUDE
A WORKSHOP,
AND WE PERFORM
ALL OVER.

Now, Sandra says WHEN WE FIRST CAME, WE HAD
NO IDEA, FIRST OF ALL,
THAT THERE WERE ANY
YOUNG PEOPLE HERE.
WE JUST CAME BECAUSE IT
HAPPENED TO HAVE
THE HOUSE WE
WANTED IN IT.
WE CAME OUT TO
BE HERMITS.
WE WERE JUST GOING TO
LIVE ON THE FARM
AND BE SELF-SUFFICIENT.
WE DIDN'T KNOW ANYBODY
AT ALL, REALLY,
WHO LIVED HERE.
THAT LASTED FOR
TWO YEARS.
WE GOT THE
TWITCHIES.
WE WANTED TO SEE
A LITTLE BIT MORE.
WE OPENED THE
STORE IN TOWN,
WHICH WAS ALREADY A
FUNCTIONING
HEALTH FOOD STORE.
AND AS A HEALTH
FOOD STORE,
WE FELT WE WERE MISSING
SO MUCH OF THE COMMUNITY,
IT ALIENATED A LOT
OF THE OLDER PEOPLE.
THEY DON'T LIKE THE IDEA
OF A HEALTH FOOD STORE.
AND THEY DON'T EVEN
KNOW WHAT IT IS.

A clip shows the façade of a store. The sign reads "The great Stoco and Moira food company." The, it shows the inside of the food store and people buying in it.

Sandra continues SO WE CHANGED IT TO
A BULK FOOD STORE,
AND WE WORKED VERY,
VERY HARD AT MAKING
THE LOCAL PEOPLE
FEEL WELCOME.
IT WAS HARD JUST TO
GET THEM IN THE DOOR.
ONCE WE GOT THEM IN THE
DOOR, WE WERE OKAY.
WE'VE HAD THE STORE
A YEAR AND A HALF,
ALMOST TWO YEARS NOW,
AND THAT'S MADE
A BIG DIFFERENCE.
NOW, WE HAVE AN
OPPORTUNITY TO REALLY SEE
WHAT THE
TOWN IS ABOUT.
WE GET THE
WHOLE SPECTRUM.
SENIOR CITIZENS ARE A VERY
BIG PART OF OUR BUSINESS.
I THINK THEY'RE
A BIT LONESOME.
THEY NEED SOMEONE
TO TALK TO,
AND SOME PLACE TO GO
FOR A CUP OF COFFEE.
SO INSTEAD OF DOING THEIR
SHOPPING ONCE A WEEK,
OR ONCE EVERY TWO WEEKS,
THEY COME EVERY TWO
OR THREE DAYS AND GET A
LITTLE BIT, YOU KNOW?
THEY HAVE A GOOD CHAT.
WE GET SOME OF
THE NEW FOLKS.
WE JUST HAVE A GREAT
SELECTION OF PEOPLE.
IT'S BECOME A BIT LIKE
THE OLD GENERAL STORE,
THE COMMUNITY CENTRE,
THE PLACE TO GATHER.
ALL THE KIDS COME AFTER
SCHOOL WITH THEIR 50 CENTS
CLUTCHED IN THEIR
HAND AND GO THROUGH
THE CHOCOLATE CHIPS AND
THE CHOCOLATE BARS,
AND I'M GOING TO
HAVE CHEESIES.
AND IT'S NICE.
FOR ME, THAT'S MY WHOLE
PURPOSE OF BEING THERE,
IS THE COMMUNICATION
WITH ALL OF THE PEOPLE.

A man behind a counter says 10.80, PLEASE.

A man leans on a yellow open-wheel car. He is in his thirties, with short light brown hair. He wears sunglasses, a light blue shirt and denim trousers.

A caption on screen reads "Gary Magwood."

He says WELL, THE RACING BUSINESS,
AS IT HAS BECOME,
IT WAS GETTING TO BE
HARDER AND HARDER
FOR SOMEONE LIKE MYSELF
WHO HAD TO PROMOTE
THEIR OWN FUNDS
FROM CORPORATIONS.
AND IF YOU ADDED UP THINGS
LIKE THE COST OF RACING,
AND MY AGE STARTED TO
CREEP IN THERE A WEE BIT,
THOSE CONSIDERATIONS
STARTED TO WEIGH
FAIRLY HEAVILY.
AND I HAD SPENT 12 TO
14 YEARS OF WHICH,
IN RACING, OF WHICH
PROBABLY SIX OR SEVEN
WERE IN THE BUSINESS
PART OF RACING.
WE SET OUT TO ACCOMPLISH
CERTAIN THINGS.
AND I SAW THOSE GOALS
STARTING TO SLIP AWAY
FROM ME A WEE BIT BECAUSE
OF THOSE CIRCUMSTANCES.
SO I STARTED THE RACING
SCHOOL AT MOSPORT,
AND COMBINED THAT
WITH THE SHOP I HAD
THAT PREPARED RACING
CARS AT ONE TIME,
AND THAT WORKED
VERY, VERY WELL.
I ENJOYED THAT PART OF
IT, BUT IT MEANT
NO MORE ACTIVE
COMPETITION.
AND THAT STARTED TO
WEIGH HEAVILY, AS WELL.
A FEW OPPORTUNITIES CAME
UP TO COMPETE AGAIN,
BUT THEY WOULD HAVE
INTERFERED WITH
THE BUSINESS PART OF RUNNING
A SCHOOL AND A SHOP.

Now, a close-up of an inscription over the car appears on screen. It reads "Canadian school of motor racing."

Gary continues I HAD TO WEIGH THEM UP,
AND I MADE THE OPTION
TO TRY RACING AGAIN.
AND THAT SORT OF NEGATED
THE BUSINESS ASPECTS OF IT.
SO ONCE WE SAW THAT
STARTING TO UNFOLD,
SANDY AND I STARTED
LOOKING FOR THE FARM
THAT WE HAD PRETTY WELL
DECIDED ON DOING
MANY YEARS AGO,
LOOKING DOWN.

Now, two boys ride motorbikes through the countryside.

Gary says MY SONS, CHRIS
AND GREG, I THINK,
WHEN WE FIRST CAME
OUT TO THE FARM,
THE PROBLEM IS YOU'RE
MOVING INTO A NEW COMMUNITY,
THEY'RE MOVING INTO
NEW SCHOOLS AGAIN,
AND YOU DO WIND UP
BEING A LITTLE REMOTE
FROM YOUR CLASSMATES
AND THINGS LIKE THAT.
DISTANCE DOES
BECOME A PROBLEM.

The two boys sit on the motorbikes. One of them is in his mid-teens, with short dark hair. He wears a black and blue biker jacket over a beige t-shirt and denim trousers. The other is in his tweens with short brown hair. He wears a blue sports jacket, light gray trousers and a red cap.

The younger boy says BIG CHANGE.
BECAUSE MOST OF YOUR
FRIENDS ARE FIVE MILES
AWAY, TEN MILES
AWAY, WHATEVER.
IT'S A BIG BIKE
TO GET NEAR THEM,
EXCEPT FOR SCHOOL.

The older one says WHEN YOU FIRST COME HERE,
IT'S HARD TO GET ACCEPTED
AT FIRST BECAUSE MOST OF
THE PEOPLE HAVE
SORT OF BEEN HERE ALL THEIR
LIVES, BROUGHT UP HERE,
AND IT'S HARD, IT TAKES
YOU A COUPLE OF YEARS
TO FEEL YOU ARE
A TWEEDY.

(music plays)

Panoramic views of Tweed appear on screen. A sign reads "Welcome to Tweed."

Gary says I WOULD LIKE TO SEE
TWEED TAKE THE FUNDS THAT
HAVE BEEN GRANTED TO IT FOR
THE BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT
PART OF THE HIGH STREET,
AND DO THE RENOVATIONS,
SORT OF BRING TWEED BACK
TO AN ERA, '40s, '50s,
TYPE OF ERA, WHERE THE
STORES LOOK NEAT AND OLD.
THE COMMUNITY MAKING ITS
MONEY FROM THE FARM AND
AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY AS
IT HAS FOR MANY, MANY YEARS,
BUT MAKE IT A NICE PLACE
FOR TOURISTS TO VISIT.
WE'VE GOT A THEATRE
OPENING UP.
AND JUST GENERALLY, A
PEACEFUL BACKWATER,
BUT STILL APPEALING TO
PEOPLE WHO WANT TO COME
AND RELAX AND HAVE A
HOLIDAY THAT DOESN'T
ENTAIL RUSHING AROUND AND
DOING BIG CITY THINGS.

(music plays)

Now, fast clips show different views of Tweed.

A woman stands in the city centre. She is in her thirties, with long blonde hair. She wears a white jacket over a pink t-shirt.

A caption reads "Tina Skelly."

She says BEING A REPORTER
IN A SMALL TOWN,
IT'S HARD WORK, AT THE
SAME TIME IT'S FUN.
BASICALLY, THE THINGS
I COVER ARE POSITIVE.
THEY BUILD A COMMUNITY,
SUCH AS RESURGENCE
OF MINING EXPLORATION.
AT THE SAME TIME, I GET
OPPORTUNITY ONCE
IN A WHILE TO REALLY
DO SOME HARD NEWS,
AND I LIKE THAT.

Now, a sign appears on screen. It reads "The Tweed News."
Then, Tina enters Tweed news' building.

Joan says REPORTER TINA SKELLY
HAS JUST DONE A STORY
ON US DOING A STORY
ON SERVIVAL ONE.
WE VISITED "TWEED NEWS,"
A LONG ESTABLISHED
INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER, TO
FIND OUT HOW OUR STORY
COMES OFF THE PRESS, AND
WHY A LOCAL NEWSPAPER
IS SO VITAL IN A
SMALL TOWN.

Fast clips show the workers at the printing room, preparing the newspaper.

Robert says TO A
COMMUNITY, A SMALL WEEKLY
NEWSPAPER, SUCH AS "THE
TWEED NEWS," I FEEL
IS A VERY VITAL PART OF
THE COMMUNITY.
IT HELPS WITH THE
COMMUNICATION.
THERE REALLY IS NO OTHER
METHOD OF COMMUNICATION
IN A SMALL COMMUNITY AREA
LIKE TWEED, AND DISTRICT.

A man appears on screen. He is in his mid-forties, with short white hair. He wears glasses, a white shirt, blue tie and gray trousers.

A caption reads "Wm. Robert Hanna."

He says I THINK EVERYONE LIKES
TO SEE THEIR NAME
IN THE NEWSPAPER.
AND THE WEEKLY IS QUITE A
BIT DIFFERENT THAN OTHER
PERIODICALS OR
DAILIES, IN THAT WE
DO NOT PUBLISH
THE HARD NEWS.
IT'S MOSTLY WHAT PEOPLE
DO IN A SMALL COMMUNITY.

A woman sits in an office. She is in her late thirties, with short, curly light brown hair. She wears a white sweater and denim trousers.

A caption on screen reads "Susan Donovan."

She says NEWSPAPER WORKS FOR THE
COMMUNITY IN THE SMALL TOWN.
IT HELPS THEM TO
HELP US.
IT SPEAKS FOR
THE PEOPLE.

Now, fast clips show the paper in the printing press.

Joan says WELL, WE GOT
GREAT COVERAGE.
FRONT PAGE, LARGE PICTURE
FEATURING OUR CAMERAMAN
BOB BOOKS, AND THE PEOPLE
AT SERVIVAL ONE SCHOOL.
AS BOB HANNA OF "THE
TWEED NEWS" CLAIMS,
EVERYONE LIKES TO SEE
THEIR NAME IN PRINT,
AND WE'RE NO EXCEPTION.
A LOT OF PEOPLE WILL READ
ABOUT PEOPLE PATTERNS'
ACTIVITIES IN THIS
COMMUNITY BECAUSE
ALTHOUGH TWEED HAS A
POPULATION OF ONLY 1,700,
THERE ARE 3,000
NEWSPAPERS PRINTED.
WHAT IS HAPPENING IN TWEED
IS OF INTEREST TO
THE NEIGHBOURING COMMUNITY,
AND TO EX-PATRIOTS
WHO WISH TO MAINTAIN CLOSE
TIES WITH THEIR HOMETOWN.

The papers pile up inside a van. The camera zooms out and shows a pile of newspapers in a newsstand. A man grabs a newspaper. The camera zooms in. A picture showing People Patterns' crew appears on screen.

The end credits roll.

Camera Assistant, Ryan McMaster

Sound recordist, Steve Joles

Telecine Transfer, Guy Nason

Videotape editor, David Bevan

Unit manager, Rodger G. Lawson

Production assistant, Mary Louise Lynde

Producer-director, Joan Reed Olsen.

Dance sequence music by The Chieftants

A production of TVOntario, copyright The Ontario Educational Communications Authority 1983.

Watch: Survival One