Transcript: A New Cottage Industry | Dec 28, 1988

Several clips show people in their houses, at a lake, and working. A title at the end reads "People Patterns. A new cottage industry."

Joan is in her fifties, has short curly brown hair, and is wearing a purple shirt.

Joan says TO MOST OF US, HISTORY
MEANS WARS AND DATES,
EXPLORATIONS AND
DISCOVERIES.
BUT TO MANY PEOPLE, IT ALSO
MEANS THE PRESERVATION OF
OLD HOUSES, OLD BUILDINGS,
AND THE DOCUMENTATION OF
REGIONAL HISTORY.
I'M JOAN REED-OLSEN.
IN THE CARLETON PLACE AREA,
WE MET MANY PEOPLE WHOSE
INTERESTS, ENTHUSIASM, WERE
DEVOTED TO PRESERVING
THIS KIND OF HISTORY.

A clip shows a man in his forties sitting with a woman in her seventies by a lake.
He has a short brown moustache, short brown hair, and is wearing a green shirt.
She has short curly white hair, and is wearing a gray dress.
A caption reads "Nicolas Maennling and Gertrude Dickie."

Nicolas says WE HAVE GATHERED TOGETHER
OUR INTEREST OF OLD BUILDINGS
IN CARLETON PLACE BY FORMING
A HISTORICAL SOCIETY.
AND IN 1979, WE HAD AN
EXHIBITION IN THE TOWN HALL.
AND SINCE THEN, WE HAVE BEEN
WORKING TOWARD CREATING A
MUSEUM IN CARLETON PLACE.
WE ARE VERY FORTUNATE TO
HAVE AN EXCELLENT BUILDING.
WE HAVE THE OLD TOWN HALL,
WHICH ACTUALLY SERVED AS THE
TOWN HALL FOR A VERY SHORT
PERIOD OF TIME, BUT IT
SUBSEQUENTLY WAS THE PUBLIC
SCHOOL IN CARLETON PLACE.
WE'VE BEEN WORKING VERY HARD
ON THE COMMITTEE EVER SINCE.
AND TOWARD GETTING A
FEASIBILITY STUDY COMPLETED.
AND, INTERESTINGLY, IN THIS
TOWN, WE WERE ABLE TO OFFSET
TWO-THIRDS OF THE COST OF
THE FEASIBILITY STUDY BY
VOLUNTEER INVOLVEMENT.
AND I ASKED AROUND, AND IT
WAS SOON OBVIOUS WE HAD
MANY PROFESSIONALS IN
RELATED FIELDS, LIVING
IN CARLETON PLACE AND
BECKWITH TOWNSHIP.
SO WE POOLED THESE PEOPLE,
AND INSTEAD OF A COST
PROBABLY IN THE REGION OF
16 OR 17,000 DOLLARS, WE WERE ABLE
TO OFFSET THAT BY 10,000 DOLLARS
OF VOLUNTEER INPUT.
SO WE HAVE PROBABLY THE
LEAST EXPENSIVE, MOST
WONDERFUL FEASIBILITY STUDY PUT
TOGETHER, I THINK, IN ONTARIO.

A short clip shows Nicolas and Gertrude talking to a man outside a large building.

Nicolas says I DON'T KNOW WHEN THIS
VESTIBULE CAME DOWN, BUT
FURTHER RESEARCH WILL
POINT THAT UP, I IMAGINE.
YOU CAN SEE WHERE THESE
WINDOWS WERE BLOCKED IN,
QUITE SKILLFULLY, I THINK.

The man says THIS STEP AND RAILING
IS DEFINITELY NEW.

Nicolas says THAT'S RIGHT.
AND, OF COURSE, WE'VE LOST THE
CUPOLA ON THE VERY TOP OF THIS.
THAT'S RIGHT.

Gertrude says PEOPLE ARE INTERESTED IN THE
THINGS THAT GO ON IN THE
TOWN, AND JUST A LITTLE
SPARK FROM SOMEBODY SETS
A WHOLE TOWN ABLAZE.
THERE HAS BEEN SUCH
INTEREST, AS NICK SAYS, IN
THE MUSEUM, BUT ALSO IN THE
WHOLE PRESERVATION ASPECT
OF THINGS IN THE TOWN
OF CARLETON PLACE.
SUDDENLY, ALL OF THE PEOPLE
ARE LOOKING AT THE TOWN
WITH DIFFERENT EYES.
INSTEAD OF LOOKING AND SAYING,
OH, THAT BUILDING HAS BEEN HERE
FOREVER, THEY'RE LOOKING AND
SAYING, WOW, IT'S BEEN HERE
FOR A HUNDRED YEARS.
LET'S PUT IT
THE WAY IT WAS.
OR LET'S MAKE IT LOOK LIKE
IT WAS, BUT LET'S CONVERT IT
TO TODAY'S USE, AND LET'S
BE PROUD OF OUR HISTORY.
AND THERE'S QUITE A
GROUNDSWELL HERE.
AND IF YOU LOOK DOWN OUR
MAIN STREET, YOU CAN SEE
WHAT WE'VE DONE TO START
THE BEAUTIFICATION PROCESS
AND THE RESTORATION
PROCESS.
WE'VE UPGRADED OUR STREETS.
WE'VE PLANTED SOME TREES.
BECAUSE THIS TOWN HAS ALWAYS
BEEN KNOWN FOR ITS SHADY AREAS.
AND WITHIN THE NEXT COUPLE
OF YEARS, THE BIA, OR
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
AREA OF IT WILL START TO
LOOK AT THE SKYLINE OF
OUR MAIN STREET, WHICH IS
ABSOLUTELY FASCINATING.
AND YOU CAN JUST HEAR ALL OF
THE MERCHANTS OF LONG AGO
HERE SAYING, OH, THEY'RE
DOING MY TOWN AGAIN.
IT REALLY IS VERY,
VERY LOVELY.

Several clips show old buildings, some of them for sale.

Nicolas says MANY OF THE MAJOR
PROJECTS IN CARLETON PLACE
ARE INSTIGATED BY PEOPLE
WHO HAVE NOT LIVED HERE
ALL THEIR LIVES.
THEY COME TO TOWN
WITH A FRESH OUTLOOK.
THEY PERCEIVE THE TOWN WITH
THEIR NEW EYES, AND THEY,
PERHAPS, CAN APPRECIATE
CERTAIN ASPECTS OF THE TOWN
THAT LONG-TERM RESIDENTS
TAKE FOR GRANTED.

Gertrude says FOR EXAMPLE, Mr. ALBERT
MOORE, WHO WAS A DIRECT
DESCENDANT OF THE ORIGINAL
Mr. MOORE WHO WAS ONE OF
THE FOUNDERS OF CARLETON
PLACE, LIVED ON THE
ORIGINAL MOORE HOUSE FOR A
LONG, LONG TIME, AND ONLY
PASSED AWAY A FEW YEARS AGO.
AND I WENT TO TALK TO HIS
DAUGHTER ABOUT SOME OF THE
HISTORY, AND WE WERE
THINKING OF PUTTING UP
A MARKER, AND SHE SAID,
TRUDY, I REMEMBER WHEN
I WAS LITTLE, DAD
WOULD START.
I REMEMBER WHEN...
AND DID YOU KNOW...
AND WHEN I WAS A BOY.
AND LIKE ALL YOUNGSTERS, I
JUST THOUGHT THAT DAD WAS
RAMBLING ON, AND I HAD TOO
MANY THINGS TO DO TODAY
TO BE BOTHERED LISTENING.
NOW THAT HE IS GONE, I AM
SORRY I DIDN'T LISTEN
BECAUSE THERE WAS SUCH A
WEALTH OF KNOWLEDGE THERE
AND SUCH A HISTORY.
HIS MEMORY WENT BACK TO HIS
GRANDFATHER, AND FROM HIM
HE HAD TALES OF THE
ORIGINAL Mr. MOORE.
AND SINCE THE FOUNDING OF
THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY
HERE, OF COURSE THERE'S
ENORMOUS RENEWED INTEREST
IN ALL OF THIS, AND THEY'RE
LEFT WITH GREAT GAPS IN
THEIR MEMORY BECAUSE
THEY DIDN'T LISTEN.
AND I'M AN OUTSIDER.
NICK IS AN OUTSIDER.
WE'VE BEEN HERE, WE
CERTAINLY CONSIDER
OURSELVES CARLETON
PLACE PEOPLE.
I'VE BEEN HERE
FOR OVER 20 YEARS.
AND NICK, YOU'VE
BEEN HERE...?

Nicolas says OH, JUST TEN.

Gertrude says JUST TEN.
WELL, HE'S
ALMOST
A RESIDENT.
BUT WE DO LISTEN,
AS NICK SAYS.
HE SAYS THEY LOOK WITH
NEW EYES, BUT WE LISTEN
WITH FRESH EARS.
WE HAVEN'T HEARD THE TALES.
AND IT'S NOT OUR DAD.

A clip shows a man in his eighties walking in a farm.

Joan says PEOPLE DO LISTEN TO
NORMAN PAUL, AND SHARE HIS
VAST KNOWLEDGE OF ANCESTRAL
AND LOCAL HISTORY.
HIS FAMILY, SCHOOL CHILDREN
BY THE HUNDREDS, AND AVID
AMATEUR HISTORIANS.
HIS OWN GRANDCHILDREN ARE
SIXTH GENERATION TO BE BORN
ON THIS LAND.

Norman Paul has a white moustache, has short white hair, and is wearing a pale blue shirt, white cap, and glasses.
A caption reads "Norman Paul."

Norman says MY GREAT GREAT
GRANDFATHER CAME HERE AND
SETTLED ON THE FIRST
PLACE DOWN THE ROAD.
THEY HAD TEN CHILDREN.
MY GREAT GRANDMOTHER
AND GREAT GRANDFATHER,
THEY HAD TEN CHILDREN
RIGHT HERE ON THE HILL.
MY GRANDFATHER,
HE HAD NINE.
I'M THE ONLY
ONE THAT'S LEFT.
MY GENERATION IS THE LAST
DIRECT LINK WITH THE
ORIGINAL GENERATION.
MY FATHER LIVED WITH MY
GREAT GRANDMOTHER FROM 1866
UNTIL 1897.
AND HE HAD A LOT OF THE
INFORMATION FIRSTHAND
TO PASS ON TO ME.
WELL, THAT JUST CAME
THROUGH ONE GENERATION.
WHEN I GO, THEY ARE GOING
TO ADD ANOTHER GENERATION.
AND THINGS ALWAYS GET SET
BEHIND, LOST, NOT TOLD.

A clip shows a model made of wood and paper, and signed "Norman Paul."

Norman says I MADE A MODEL OF THE FOUR
INDUSTRIES THAT WAS CARRIED
ON AT THE FARM AT HOME.
POTASH, LIME, SUGAR-MAKING,
AND THE FARM YARD AT HOME
AS IT WAS IN 1835.
NOW, I'VE TALKED TO
THOUSANDS OF SCHOOL CHILDREN.
I'VE TALKED TO ALL THE
SCHOOLS IN THE DISTRICT.
I'VE TALKED TO SOME
OF THE OTTAWA SCHOOLS.
AND THE RESPONSE FROM THE
CHILDREN IS JUST TERRIFIC.
THERE IS NOTHING I LIKE
BETTER THAN TO HAVE ABOUT
75 OR 80 SCHOOL CHILDREN
SITTING ON THE FLOOR IN THE
LIBRARY, AND I CAN TALK ON
ANY ONE OF THOSE INDUSTRIES.
TAKES ABOUT 35 MINUTES.
THEN YOU'VE GOT ABOUT 15
MINUTES OF THE AWFULLEST
QUESTIONS YOU EVER HEARD.
AND THAT'S JUST WONDERFUL.
AND I HAVE SO MANY
SCHOOLTEACHERS SAY TO ME
THAT, YES, WE CAN READ THEM
THE SAME THING OUT OF A BOOK,
AND IT'S ENTIRELY DIFFERENT
THAN VISUAL HISTORY.

A clip shows a man and a woman in their fifties sitting at a park table.
He is clean-shaven, has short gray hair, and is wearing a red T-shirt, and green cap.
She has short curly white hair, and is wearing a white shirt.
A caption reads "Eleanor and Frank Paul."

Frank says WELL, I THINK
IT'S A GREAT THING.
BECAUSE WHEN DAD'S GONE,
THERE'S A LOT OF THIS STUFF
GONE, AND HE'S DONE THIS TO
TRY AND PASS IT ON TO ME
AND TO MY FAMILY, AND
THEY'VE REALIZED THIS.
AND IT'S GOOD.
YEAH, I THINK SOME OF THEM
WILL CARRY ON THE FARM, I HOPE.
I'M SURE ONE
OF THEM WILL.

Eleanor says I FEEL, I FEEL, I
HOPE SOMEBODY DOES.
WE HAVE THREE
BOYS AND ONE GIRL.
AND WE TEASE OUR DAUGHTER,
SHE'S THE ONE THAT DOESN'T
WANT TO THINK SHE'D WANT TO
STAY ON THE FARM, AND WE
TEASE HER THAT SHE'LL
PROBABLY MARRY SOME GUY
THAT'S JUST DYING TO HAVE A
FARM, YOU SEE, SO SHE'LL
BE THE ONE THAT
GETS LEFT HERE.
BUT I THINK IT'S GREAT.
AND AS SOMEONE COMING IN TO
THE FAMILY, TO HAVE THIS
CONTINUITY, YOU KNOW, MAYBE
THE NEWCOMER FEELS IT MORE,
I DON'T KNOW, IN SOME WAYS
THAN THE PERSON WHO'S
LIVED THAT WAY.
OUR CHILDREN ARE THE SIXTH
GENERATION, AND THAT, TO ME,
SEEMS REALLY SOMETHING IN
THIS DAY AND AGE OF PEOPLE
TRAVELLING ALL
OVER THE COUNTRY.

Frank says TAKES A WHILE FOR YOU TO
REALIZE THE HISTORY AND TO
APPRECIATE IT, YOU KNOW?
WELL, MAYBE AS A YOUNG
PERSON, YOU DON'T
APPRECIATE IT AS MUCH
AS WHEN YOU GET OLDER.
AS DAD SAYS, SOMETHING
ISN'T HISTORY UNTIL
IT'S AT LEAST 70 YEARS OLD.

Norman says I'VE LIVED THE MOST
INTERESTING PERIOD.
I'VE SAID TO DIFFERENT
PEOPLE THAT I'VE ONE LIFE
TO LIVE, AND IF I HAD TO
LIVE IT ALL OVER AGAIN,
I'D WANT TO LIVE IT IN THE
SAME PERIOD I LIVED IT IN.
BECAUSE I HAVE SEEN
EVERYTHING GO FROM STEAM
POWER, THE FIRST OF THE
GASOLINE POWER, AND IT WAS
ALL HORSEPOWER.
NOW, WE BOUGHT OUR FIRST
TRACTOR HERE IN 1941.
AND THAT WAS THE FIRST
TRACTOR IN THIS IMMEDIATE
NEIGHBOURHOOD
FOR A FEW YEARS.
I SAW THE RURAL
MAIL COME IN.
I SAW THE HYDRO COME IN.
THOSE THINGS OF ALL MADE
A TREMENDOUS DIFFERENCE
IN OUR FARM LIVING.
BUT IT'S BEEN A TERRIBLY
INTERESTING PERIOD TO LIVE.
I LIVED THROUGH TWO WARS
AND THE BIG DEPRESSION.
I KNOW FROM BOTH ENDS.
THEY THINK THEY'RE IN A
DEPRESSION AT THE PRESENT TIME.
THAT'S ONLY A LITTLE BIT OF
DUST COMPARED TO THE '30s.

A clip shows a man in his thirties standing in a garden, with an old building in the background. He is clean-shaven, has short black hair, and is wearing a white shirt and gray tie.
A caption reads "John Edwards."

He says WELL I, THIS YEAR, HAVE BEEN
NOMINATED TO BE CHAIRMAN OF
THE LOCAL LACAC
IN CARLETON PLACE.
THAT STANDS FOR LOCAL
ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEE.
AND THAT'S A GROUP THAT
IS A COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL.
AND THAT TYPE OF GROUP
EXISTS IN MANY ONTARIO
TOWNS, AND IT IS CHARGED
WITH RECOMMENDING TO
COUNCIL WHICH PROPERTIES ARE
OF SIGNIFICANCE IN THE TOWN.
AS AN EXAMPLE OF BUILDINGS
THAT ARE VERY IMPORTANT FOR
THE COMMUNITY AND GOOD
EXAMPLES OF THAT TYPE IN
CARLETON PLACE, IS THIS
BUILDING HERE, WHICH WAS
BUILT IN 1914.
IT IS THE PUMP HOUSE
IN CARLETON PLACE.
AND STILL IS THE PUMP
HOUSE IN CARLETON PLACE.
AND IS AN EXAMPLE OF
NEOCLASSICAL INDUSTRIAL
ARCHITECTURE, AND ONE OF THE
VERY FEW EXAMPLES THAT WE HAVE
IN THE COMMUNITY WITH
PILASTERS, CAPITALS,
AND CORNICE.
IT'S A VERY FINE EXAMPLE
OF THAT STYLE, AND VERY
WELL-PROPORTIONED, AND VERY
IDYLLIC, IN A SENSE, IN THAT
IT SITS IN A BEAUTIFUL
LANDSCAPE NEXT TO THE RIVER.
PERSONALLY, I'VE ALSO GOTTEN
INTO THIS ACT BECAUSE I THINK
THERE ARE JUST MARVELLOUS
ADVANTAGES AND INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITY TAKING ADVANTAGE
OF THESE BUILDINGS.
IT'S BEEN DONE IN TORONTO,
IT'S BEEN DONE IN OTTAWA.
THE REALIZATION HAS TO
COME IN THE COMMUNITY.
SO I'VE JUMPED INTO THE ACT
AS WELL, AND I HAVE BOUGHT
A HOUSE, JUST SLIGHTLY
OUTSIDE THE TOWN, AND WAS A
PLACE WHERE WINOS LIVED AND
NO ONE THOUGHT IT WAS WORTH
ANYTHING AT ALL.
I LITERALLY GOT IT FOR
THE PRICE OF THE LAND.
I FOUND OUT SINCE THAT
IT'S 130 YEARS OLD.
IT'S A BUILDING THAT IS
WORTHY OF BEING IN
UPPER CANADA VILLAGE.

A clip shows John inside an old wooden house.

He says THIS ROOM WAS ORIGINALLY
THE WORKING KITCHEN AND THE
EATING AREA OF THE HOME
WITH A PANTRY IN BEHIND.
WHAT WE'RE GOING TO DO WITH
IT IS TURN THE PANTRY INTO
THE FUNCTIONING KITCHEN,
PUTTING ALL THE MODERN
THINGS IN THERE.
AND THIS WILL BE THE OTTAWA
VALLEY KITCHEN WITH THE
COUCHES AND
TABLE AND CHAIRS.
IT'S A VERY INTERESTING
CONSTRUCTION THROUGHOUT THE
HOUSE, IN THAT THIS
IS HAND-SPLIT LATH.
THE WALLS WERE COVERED WITH
WRITING AND GRAFFITI AND
WHATNOT, AND UNDERNEATH
THIS, WE FOUND THIS LATH,
WHICH IS HAND-SPLIT LATH,
OR COMMONLY KNOWN AS
ACCORDION LATH.
IT CAME IN LONG SHEETS, OR
THIN SHEETS OF PINE, AND WAS
SPLIT AT EITHER END,
STRETCHED APART AND THEN
NAILED UP ON THE WALLS
WITH SQUARE NAILS.
THAT'S WHERE THIS LATH, THIS
TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY CAME FROM.
AND IS INDICATIVE
OF A VERY EARLY HOUSE.
BECAUSE A HOUSE THAT WAS
BUILT BEFORE SAW MILLS WERE
CONSTRUCTED IN THIS AREA.
NOW, I'LL JUST GO THROUGH TO
THE NEXT ROOM OF THE HOUSE,
THROUGH THE HALL,
AND INTO THE PARLOUR.
THIS IS THE PARLOUR
OF THE HOME.
AND IN THIS AREA WAS THE
BEST WOOD WORK IN THE
HOUSE, AND VERY, VERY FINE
PROPORTIONS WHICH WERE
FOUND THROUGHOUT THE HOUSE.
ONE OF THE BEST INDICATORS
OF THAT FINE PROPORTION
WERE THE SIZE OF THE
WINDOWS IN RELATIONSHIP
TO THE ROOM.
IT HAS A VERY EARLY FEELING
TO IT BECAUSE OF THE VERY
LARGE EXPANSE OF GLASS, THE
AMOUNT OF LIGHT COMING INTO
THE SPACE, WHICH IS
DIFFERENT THAN A
19th CENTURY HOME WHICH WOULD
HAVE SMALLER WINDOWS AND
LOTS OF DRAPES WHICH WOULD
MAKE IT VERY DARK AND DINGY.
WE FOUND ORIGINAL TRACES OF
COLOURING ON THE WOODWORK,
AS WELL, WHICH IS VERY
SIMILAR TO COLOUR CHIPS
THAT I FOUND FROM UPPER
CANADA VILLAGE, WHICH IS
VERY INTERESTING, AS WELL.
HELPED US TO DATE THE HOME.
REALLY, MY FEELINGS ABOUT
THIS HOUSE WERE THAT THEY WERE
VERY WELL-EDUCATED PEOPLE,
AND THOSE HAVE SINCE BEEN
PROVED TRUE, AS I'VE DONE A
LITTLE BIT OF RESEARCH ON
THE MAN AND WIFE THAT BUILT
THIS HOME IN THE 1840s.

He walks into another room.

He says HERE WE ARE ON THE SECOND
FLOOR OF THE HOUSE, AND YOU
CAN SEE WE'VE JUST KNOCKED
DOWN THE LOOSE PLASTER.
IN FACT, WE'VE KNOCKED
DOWN QUITE A BIT OF IT.
BUT YOU CAN STILL SEE THE
SIMPLE TRIM ON THE SECOND
FLOOR OF THE HOUSE, WHICH
IS QUITE DIFFERENT THAN
THE GROUND FLOOR.
THIS WAS NOT A PLACE WHERE
ENTERTAINMENT WENT ON.
AND ALSO, THE CLOSETS WHICH
WE DISCOVERED IN THE WALL,
THEY'D BEEN PAPERED
AND PLASTERED OVER.
AND WE ALSO FOUND THEY'RE
ABOUT 22 INCHES DEEP, AND
THE SHELVES ARE ONE PIECE
OF PINE WITH NO SEAMS.
THE SIDES, AS WELL.
TREMENDOUS PIECES OF WOOD
THAT WERE USED IN THE
CONSTRUCTION OF THE HOUSE.
UNFORTUNATELY, THERE'S
JUST NOT ENOUGH STORAGE AND
CLOSET SPACE FOR THE MODERN
FAMILY, SO WE WILL HAVE TO
BUILD NEW CLOSET SPACE,
HANGING CLOSET SPACE,
IN THIS ROOM.
WE'RE GOING TO TRY TO BE AS
SYMPATHETIC AS POSSIBLE.

Several clips show the different rooms of the house.
Then, a clip shows people sitting in a park by the river.

Joan says IN THE SPIRIT OF
RESTORATION, ONE OF THE PET
PROJECTS OF THE CARLETON
PLACE TOWN COUNCIL HAS BEEN
TO GIVE EASY PUBLIC ACCESS
TO THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER.
SOME DERELICT OLD BUILDINGS
AND ABANDONED FACTORIES
HAVE BEEN DEMOLISHED, LAND
HAS BEEN CLEARED, AND THE
TOWN HAS OBTAINED VALUABLE
PROPERTY TO DEVELOP
PARKLAND AND A WILD
BIRD SANCTUARY.
THE 90-YEAR-OLD CARLETON
PLACE CANOE CLUB IS A
BEAUTIFUL WATERWAY ON WHICH
TO PRACTICE AND COMPETE.
BUT THE TOWN'S PRIME
RESTORATION PROJECT REMAINS
THE BEAUTIFUL TOWN
HALL BUILT IN 1896.

A clip shows a large stone building by the river.
A man in his late forties appears. He is clean-shaven, has short receding brown hair, and is wearing a black suit, white shirt, and black spotted tie.
A caption reads "Ronald Roe."

He says THERE'S A VERY REAL MOOD IN
FAVOUR OF MAINTAINING THIS
BUILDING, AND CERTAINLY
RESTORING IT TO NOT ENTIRELY
TO WHAT IT WAS, BUT KEEPING
THE SALIENT ASPECTS OF IT THE
WAY THEY WERE, AND YET STILL
PROVIDING A PRACTICABLE AND
USABLE WORKING SPACE
FOR OUR TOWN STAFF.
BUT WE ALSO WANT TO KEEP
THE ARCHITECTURAL TREASURES
THAT WE HAVE.
THE STAINED GLASS WINDOWS,
THE CARVED FURNITURE THAT
WE HAVE FOR THE
MAYOR'S CHAIR.
THE BANISTERS LEADING UP
TO THE AUDITORIUM ON THE
SECOND FLOOR.
THE PRESSED METAL CEILING
THAT YOU SEE BOTH IN THE
COUNCIL CHAMBER AND
UPSTAIRS IN THE AUDITORIUM.
CERTAINLY, THE EXTERIOR PART
OF THE BUILDING SHOULD BE
MAINTAINED AS IT IS.
I THINK OVER THE TIME, OVER
THE PAST FEW YEARS, WE'VE
TENDED TO THROW THINGS OUT
BECAUSE THEY WERE OLD, AND
WE DON'T NEED THEM ANYMORE.
AND I THINK THAT IS WRONG.
NOW, I'M NOT SAYING WE
SHOULD KEEP EVERY OLD PIECE
OF JUNK JUST BECAUSE IT'S
90 YEARS OLD, BUT CERTAINLY
THE THINGS THAT HAVE
SIGNIFICANCE SHOULD BE KEPT.
THINGS THAT SHOW THE WAY OF
LIFE, HOW THE INDIVIDUALS
LIVED, HOW THE MUNICIPALITY
OPERATED, HOW INDIVIDUALS
WORKED TOGETHER IN THE
MUNICIPALITY TO MAKE IT
FUNCTION AS A MUNICIPALITY.

Joan says AND WHAT ABOUT
THE WORD SMITHS WHOSE
PAINSTAKING, INTENSIVE, AND
DETAILED RESEARCH PROVIDES US,
AND POSTERITY, WITH THE
WRITTEN, AND IN SOME CASES
THE PICTORIAL RECORD
OF LOCAL HISTORY?

A clip shows a man in his seventies sitting on an armchair. He is clean-shaven, has short white hair, and is wearing a striped white polo shirt.
A caption reads "Howard M. Brown."

He says I HAPPEN TO LIVE BESIDE
Dr. KAYE LAMB, THE HEAD OF
THE CANADIAN ARCHIVES, AND HIS
WIFE'S A FRIEND OF MY WIFE.
AND HE CAME OVER ONE DAY AND
SAID HOWARD, WE'VE GOT A
GREAT BOOK ABOUT YOUR AREA,
A MANUSCRIPT, YOU SHOULD
COME DOWN AND LOOK AT IT.
AND I SAID, OH, YES,
KAYE, I'LL DO THAT.
NO INTENTION.
BUT A YEAR OR TWO LATER,
WENT DOWN AND LOOKED AT
THAT, AND THAT WAS
THE FATEFUL LOOK.
I WAS HOOKED.
SO THAT'S WHAT STARTED
ME, I WOULD SAY.

A clip shows a woman in her seventies sitting on a couch. She has short curly gray hair, and is wearing a white blazer over a blue shirt, and glasses.
A caption reads "Mabel Ringereide."

She says WE BECAME VERY ATTACHED
TO CARLETON PLACE AS A
FRIENDLY TOWN.
THEN WE WENT BACK TO TOWN
AFTER WE HAD DISCOVERED AN
OLD STONE HOUSE AND DECIDED
THAT'S WHAT WE WANTED,
SO WE CAME BACK, BOUGHT IT,
RESTORED IT, AND LIVED IN
IT FOR SOME YEARS BEFORE
WE WENT DOWN TO QUEBEC.
BUT IN LIVING IN THE
HOUSE, MY HUSBAND DID THE
RESTORATION, AND
I DID THE HISTORY.

A clip shows a man in his forties, clean-shaven, with short side parted brown hair, and wearing a black suit, white shirt, and striped black tie.
A caption reads "W. Brian Costello."

He says IN THE GREAT WAR OF 1914
TO 1918, THE SMALL TOWN OF
CARLETON PLACE PUT FORTH
MORE FIGHTER PILOTS INTO
THE WAR THAN ANY
OTHER TOWN ITS SIZE.
WE HAD OVER 15.
AND THERE WAS THREE
SETS OF BROTHERS.
AND EACH BROTHER
LOST A BROTHER.
THERE WERE FOUR ACES.
ONE OF WHOM LATER BECOME THE
AIR CHIEF MARSHALL OF THE
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE.
ONE WAS CREDITED WITH
SHOOTING DOWN RICHTOFEN.
ONE BECAME THE FIRST
FATALITY OF ANY KIND IN
THE LATER FORMED
CANADIAN AIR FORCE.
SO THERE'S A TREMENDOUS
STORY, YOU KNOW, IN THAT
THAT ALL OF THEM
WERE ATHLETES.
ALL OF THEM HAD TO HAVE THE
MONEY TO BECOME AVIATORS
IN THE FIRST PLACE.
AND THERE'S A WHOLE STORY
THAT COULD BE DEVELOPED.
AND FOR A GOOD NUMBER OF
YEARS, THEN, I ATTEMPTED TO
COMPILE SOME OF THE STORY
JUST AS AN INTEREST OF THE
AVIATORS OF CARLETON PLACE.

A clip shows a man in his thirties, with a brown full beard, short brown hair, and wearing a white shirt.
A caption reads "Glenn J. Lockwood."

He says I SUPPOSE I BECAME
INTERESTED IN LOCAL HISTORY
BECAUSE I HAD THE GOOD
FORTUNE TO GROW UP IN AN AREA
WHERE WE HAD THIS PANOPLY
OF LOCAL COLOURFUL FIGURES.
WE HAD PEOPLE COMING FROM
OUR COMMUNITY SUCH AS THE
FIRST WOMAN ELECTED TO A
LEGISLATURE, IN AS THEY THEN
CALLED IT, THE
BRITISH
EMPIRE.
WE ALSO HAD ANOTHER WOMAN
WHO WAS KNOWN LOCALLY AS
THE WITCH OF PLUM HOLLOW.
A VERY SUCCESSFUL FORTUNE
TELLER, IF WE CAN BELIEVE
OUR LOCAL MYTHOLOGY, WHOM IT
IS REPUTED EVEN SIR JOHN A.
MACDONALD CONSULTED WHEN
THEY WERE TRYING TO DECIDE
WHERE CANADA'S CAPITAL
WOULD FINALLY BE LOCATED.
AND SHE REPUTEDLY, AGAIN, IS
SUPPOSED TO HAVE SELECTED
OTTAWA.

Mabel says IN DOING THE HISTORY OF THE
PLACE, I CAME ACROSS A LOT
OF THINGS THAT NEEDED TO BE
DOCUMENTED IN A SMALL WAY
TO ESTABLISH THIS MINISTER
HAD BEEN THERE FOR 19 YEARS.
SO I COLLECTED MATERIAL,
DID RESEARCH IN CANADA AND
SCOTLAND, AND WROTE A BOOK
CALLED
THE FLOURISHING TREE
OF THE MINISTER AND THE
MANSE, AND HIS SISTERS
WHO CAME WITH HIM.
AND I THINK, ACTUALLY, THE
TOMBSTONE OF THIS MINISTER
WAS THE ONLY THING LEFT
OF HIM IN THE COMMUNITY.
AND I FOLLOWED THROUGH FROM
THE TOMBSTONE, ABLE TO
LOCATE WHERE HE LIVED IN
SCOTLAND, AND WENT THERE
AND DID MY RESEARCH.

Glenn says I COME INTO THIS RESEARCHING
IN LOCAL HISTORY WITH A
PARTICULAR INTEREST IN
VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE.
THAT IS ARCHITECTURE THAT
DOESN'T NECESSARILY HAVE ANY
OVERT ARCHITECTURAL
INFLUENCES FROM THE
EUROPEAN PAST THAT IS MORE
OR LESS DEVELOPED ON ITS OWN.
AND BECKWITH TOWNSHIP, AS I
HAVE DISCOVERED, SEEMS TO
HAVE TWO PARTICULAR
TREASURES IN GENERAL,
IF YOU CAN TALK ABOUT
SOMETHING IN PARTICULAR
BEING IN GENERAL.
THE FIRST THING IS THE GREAT
DENSITY OF LOG STRUCTURES
IN THIS TOWNSHIP THAT
SURVIVE IN VERY GOOD SHAPE.
IT TRULY IS IMPRESSIVE.
IN FACT, DURING THE PAST
WEEK, I HAVE BEEN BICYCLING
AROUND THE TOWNSHIP,
PHOTOGRAPHING THE OLDER
STRUCTURES, AND I'VE USED
OVER 700 FRAMES JUST TO
GET SOME OF THE
OLDER BUILDINGS.

Several clips show log houses and buildings.

Glenn continues THE OTHER THING IS THE HIGH
INCIDENTS OF STONE HOUSES,
IN PARTICULAR, THAT WERE
BUILT IN THIS TOWNSHIP.
FOR AN AREA THAT WAS LESS
THAN 100 SQUARE MILES,
I BELIEVE THE 1861 CENSUS
SAID THERE WAS SOMETHING
LIKE 140 STONE HOUSES.

A clip shows a river, and a ruined building.

Joan says THE PICTURESQUE BUT
SAD REMAINS OF THE ORIGINAL
WOOLEN MILL AT
NEARBY APPLETON.
THE COLLIE FAMILY REBUILT
32 YEARS AGO AND ARE STILL
IN OPERATION.

A man in his late thirties appears. He is clean-shaven, has curly brown hair, and is wearing a white suit, pale blue shirt, and red tie.
A caption reads "James S. Collie."

He says WE SWITCHED FROM WOOLENS
TO SYNTHETICS IN THE LATE
'60s, AND I THINK IT WAS
JUST A SIGN OF THE TIMES
WITH THE TECHNOLOGICAL
ADVANCES AND THE MODERN
FABRICS, THE MAN-MADE
FABRICS, AND THE
CONVENIENCE, AND BEING ABLE
TO WASH AND DRY AT HOME,
RATHER THAN DRY CLEAN, AS
WOOL WOULD HAVE TO BE DONE.
AND I THINK IT'S JUST
A SIGN OF THE TIMES.
THE WOOLEN BUSINESS USED
TO BE THE MAJOR CONCERN,
BUT THEY'VE PRETTY
WELL ALL FADED OUT NOW,
AND EVERYBODY'S
INTO SYNTHETICS.
THE CHANGEOVER FROM WOOL TO
SYNTHETICS WAS VERY EASY
FOR US IN THAT IT'S
BASICALLY THE SAME
PROCESSES WE'RE USING NOW.
IT GOES FROM BLENDING
TO CARDING TO KNITTING.
THE ONLY CHANGES, WE USED
TO BE A WEAVING MILL WITH
WOOL, BUT NOW WE'RE A
KNITTING MILL, USING
SYNTHETICS, BUT THE
CHANGEOVER WAS VERY EASY.
APPLETON, BELIEVE IT OR
NOT, AT ONE TIME WAS A VERY
THRIVING COMMUNITY.
I BELIEVE WE HAD SEVERAL
HOTELS, A GRISTMILL, AND
SAWMILL, AND WHATNOT, AND THE
TEXTILE MILL WAS ALWAYS HERE,
OF COURSE.
AND THE IMPORTANCE OF THE
MILL BEING HERE NOW IS NOT
SO MUCH AS IT WAS IN THE
PAST BECAUSE A LOT OF
PEOPLE THAT LIVE HERE NOW
ARE COMMUTING BACK AND FORTH
INTO OTTAWA.
AND QUITE A FEW OF THE
VILLAGE PEOPLE STILL WORK
FOR US.

Several clips show houses and building by the river.

Joan says THE MISSISSIPPI
RIVER LINKS APPLETON TO
CARLETON PLACE.
19th CENTURY LIVING IS
A THING OF THE PAST.
BUT IN CARLETON PLACE, WE
KNOW SOME PEOPLE WANT THE
19th CENTURY LOOK RESTORED.
CARLETON PLACE IS
A MARVELLOUS TOWN.

John says CARLETON PLACE WAS SETTLED
IN 1819, BUT ITS STRONGEST
PERIOD OF GROWTH WAS IN
THE LATE 19th CENTURY.
SO IT'S REALLY A 19th
CENTURY LANDSCAPE WE HAVE
HERE WITH VERY LITTLE
CHANGE FROM THE SECOND
WORLD WAR ON.
SOMETIMES IT'S VERY
DIFFICULT TO TELL SOMEONE
THAT A BUILDING IS
IMPORTANT WHEN THEY CAN
REMEMBER IT BEING BUILT.
NOT JUST THE BUILDINGS THAT
ARE A HUNDRED YEARS OLD,
FOR INSTANCE, BUT SOMETIMES
IT'S THE BUILDINGS THAT ARE
40 YEARS OLD, THEY ARE
MARVELLOUS EXAMPLES OF
ART DECO STYLE,
FOR INSTANCE.

Nicolas says WE'D LIKE TO SEE BUILDINGS
USED FOR THE ORIGINAL
PURPOSE FOR WHICH
THEY WERE BUILT.

John says WE IN CARLETON PLACE HAVE TO
GO THROUGH AN EDUCATIONAL
PROCESS IN EXPLAINING TO
PEOPLE THE IMPORTANCE OF
BUILDINGS THAT THEY HAVE.
IN TELLING THEM IT'S NO
MORE SILLY TO TEAR DOWN
A BUILDING AS YOU
WOULD TO BURN BOOKS.
BUILDINGS ARE AN EXPLANATION
OF YOUR HISTORY.

Gertrude says PEOPLE ARE INTERESTED IN THE
THINGS THAT GO ON IN THE
TOWN, AND JUST A LITTLE
SPARK FROM SOMEBODY SETS
A WHOLE TOWN ABLAZE.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Producer and Director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 1983, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: A New Cottage Industry