Transcript: PEOPLE PATTERNS - Wilderness!! | Feb 17, 1988

A clip shows a dense forest, and Joan standing by a lake. She is in her fifties, has short curly brown hair, and is wearing a wool coat and a white hat.

Joan says HELLO, I'M JOAN
REED-OLSEN.
LAST YEAR PEOPLE PATTERNS
WAS IN GERALDTON
IN NORTHWESTERN
ONTARIO.
WE MET A GROUP OF YOUNG
PEOPLE FROM THE GERALDTON
CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL
OUTERS CLUB.
THEY'D JUST COME BACK FROM
THREE DAYS' WILDERNESS TRIP.
IT'D BEEN COLD AND
SNOWING AND WINDY;
IT WAS IN OCTOBER.
WE WERE SO IMPRESSED
WITH THEIR ENTHUSIASM
AND THEIR CAPABILITIES
THAT I THOUGHT
IT MIGHT BE A GOOD
IDEA TO COME BACK
DURING THEIR 14-DAY
SPRING TRIP, PICK THEM UP
SOMEWHERE ALONG THE WAY
WITH A FILM CREW
TO DOCUMENT JUST
WHAT HAPPENS
ON A WILDERNESS TRIP.
SO, WE DID.
MONDAY NIGHT WE LEFT
FROM NAKINA BY PLANE,
WHEN INTO STEWART LAKE,
CAMPED OVERNIGHT
WITH THE YOUNG PEOPLE AND
STARTED ON THE NEXT DAY.
NOW, THIS WAS THEIR
SEVENTH DAY OUT AND OUR
FIRST AND THIS DAY TURNED
OUT TO BE THE TOUGHEST DAY
OF THEIR ENTIRE
14-DAY TRIP.
WE HAD SIX, SEVEN PORTAGES
OVER WHICH ALL OF THIS GEAR,
PLUS TWO OTHER CANOES
HAD TO BE CARRIED.
I THINK THE CREW FELT IT
WAS MORE A SURVIVAL TRIP
THAN A WILDERNESS TRIP.

Several clips shows people sitting around a fire, eating, and setting up camp in the forest. A caption on screen reads "Wilderness."

Joan says THE DAY IS JUNE 17,
THE TIME ABOUT 6 A.M.
AND THE TEMPERATURE,
VERY COOL FOR JUNE.
WHILE THE SECOND BRIGADE
OF THE OUTERS CLUB
IS BREAKING CAMP, PREPARING
AND EATING BREAKFAST,
THE FIRST BRIGADE IS
ALREADY PADDLING ACROSS
STEWART LAKE TO
THE KAPIKOTONGWA RIVER
IN THE WAKE OF
SCOUT DOUG KNOTT.
DOUG'S EXPERIENCES IN THE
WILDS OF ONTARIO MAKE THIS
14-DAY WILDERNESS TRIP SAFE,
FUN AND A GREAT ADVENTURE
IN SPITE OF THE LONG,
HARD DAYS OF PADDLING
AND PORTAGING, MAKING
AND BREAKING CAMP.
THE ONLY TROUBLE IS WE
HARDLY EVER GET TO SEE DOUG.
HE'S ALWAYS FAR AHEAD
DETERMINING WHICH RAPIDS
CAN BE ATTEMPTED, WHICH
MUST BE PORTAGED
AND WHERE TO MAKE CAMP.
HIS CHOICE HERE ON STEWART
LAKE WAS A GOOD ONE.
THE BLACK FLIES AND THE
MOSQUITOES THINK SO TOO,
ADDED TO THE USUAL MENU
WAS THE CREW'S FRESH
NEW FLOOD WHICH THEY
CONSUMED WITH GUSTO.
BY THIS TIME, THE
CAMPERS SEEM IMMUNE
TO THE PESKY
INSECTS; NOT US.

A clip shows the campers making soup on the fire, and breaking camp.

Joan says THE CAMPERS ARE JUST
INTO THEIR SECOND WEEK
ON THE SPRING TRIP SO BREAKING
CAMP HAS BECOME ROUTINE;
A ROUTINE THAT
REQUIRES TEAMWORK,
ATTENTION TO DETAIL
AND GOOD HUMOUR.
ALL WORK IS DELEGATED
ACCORDING TO BRIGADE RANK,
AND RANK IS DETERMINED
BY YEARS AND EXPERIENCE
IN THE OUTERS CLUB.
EVERY EFFORT IS MADE TO
MINIMIZE THE AMOUNT OF FOOD
AND EQUIPMENT NEEDED
BUT THERE'S STILL A LOT
OF WEIGHT TO BE
TRANSPORTED.
THE TENTS THEMSELVES
ARE MASSIVE AND HEAVY,
ESPECIALLY IF DAMP.
OVER WATER IS EASY,
OVER PORTAGES;
NOW THAT'S ANOTHER
STORY, THE STORY
WE CAN'T SEEM
TO FORGET.

Several clips show the campers breaking camp.

Joan says NOT MUCH CONVERSATION
THESE EARLY HOURS,
WE'RE ALL WONDERING
WHAT LIES AHEAD;
HOW MANY MILES WILL
BE PADDLED TODAY?
HOW MANY PORTAGES IN
OUR IMMEDIATE FUTURE?
TERRAIN MAPS ARE GOOD
BUT THEY CAN
NEVER BE UP TO DATE.
FOR INSTANCE, WHERE ONCE
YOU COULD SHOOT RAPIDS
WITH SAFETY, LOWER WATER
LEVELS MIGHT UNCOVER ROCKS
AND BOULDERS MAKING PORTAGING
THE ONLY ALTERNATIVE.

A clip shows the campers carrying several canoes towards the lake.

A man says WANT TO TAKE
IT DOWN THERE?
WE'RE COMING RIGHT
DOWN THERE, DAVE.
HOLD IT.
EASIER SAID
THAN DONE.
THERE.
OKAY.
ARE ALL LIFEJACKETS
ON AND DONE UP?

A clip shows the campers loading the canoes and rowing in the river. Then, they unload, and walk into the forest.
Ren Craig is in his forties, has a stubble beard, receding brown hair, and is wearing a plaid colourful sweater.

Ren Craig says WE USUALLY
FIND THAT DURING THE FIRST
WEEK OF THE TRIP THE
STUDENTS ARE STRUCK
BY THE NOVELTY OF THE
WHOLE THING AND THEY
JUST LEFT HOME AND THEY'RE
HAVING A GOOD TIME.
AFTER A WHILE, THOUGH,
THE FATIGUE CAUSED BY
THE STRENUOUS EFFORT STARTS
TO GET TO THEM, AND UNLESS
WE CAN GENERATE SOME
KINDS OF ACTIVITIES TO
BRING THEM TOGETHER, THEY
START TO SPLIT APART A BIT.
AND WE TRY VERY HARD TO
GET THEM TO FUNCTION AS
A GROUP, BECAUSE THEY START
OUT LIKING EACH OTHER
A WHOLE LOT AND THAT'S
THE WAY WE WANT
TO FINISH THE TRIP,
AND ALSO LIKING US.
SO YOU MAY HAVE
NOTICED THAT WE DON'T,
WE TRY NOT TO
BE TOO AUTHORITATIVE
WITH THEM; WE KIND OF
ACT LIKE FIFTH BUSINESS,
THINGS HAPPEN, WE'RE IN
THE BACKGROUND AND
THEY SEEM TO HAPPENING
SOMETIMES BECAUSE
WE'RE THERE BUT MOSTLY WE
LIKE THEM TO THINK
THAT THEY'RE HAPPENING BECAUSE
IT'S THEIR EXPERIENCE.
AND MORE THEY
PERCEIVE THAT,
THE MORE THEY GET
INTO THAT EXPERIENCE,
THE MORE THEY
COME TOGETHER.

John Art is in his thirties, with a black full beard, and short black hair, sitting against a tree. He's wearing a brown hat, green scarf, and striped brown sweater

He says THE OUTERS
PROGRAM USED TO BE
AN EXTRACURRICULAR
PROGRAM ONLY.
WE'VE WITHIN THE LAST
TWO YEARS BEEN ABLE TO
GET SECONDARY SCHOOL
CREDIT BASIS FOR IT.
SO THAT WE ARE ABLE TO
GRANT A CREDIT FOR THE
FIRST TWO YEARS IN OUTERS
AND THE SECOND CREDIT
AT A SENIOR LEVEL FOR
THE SENIOR STUDENTS
FOR THEIR THIRD AND FOURTH
YEAR, RESPECTIVELY.
AS SUCH, IT RATES,
TO SOME EXTENT,
AS A COURSE BUT IT
RETAINS A LOT OF
ITS EXTRACURRICULAR
SCOPE AS WELL.
AND OF COURSE, OUR
TWO-WEEK SPRING TRIP
IS THE LARGEST COMPONENT AND
THE MOST SIGNIFICANT PART
OF OUR ANNUAL PROGRAM.
IT ATTRACTS THE
ADVENTUROUS COMPONENT
OF THE STUDENT
BODY, OF COURSE.
AND ON THE WHOLE, WE
HAVE ABOUT THE SAME
MEMBERSHIP EACH YEAR.
IT STARTS AT ABOUT 60 AND
BY THE TIME A NUMBER
OF THE KIDS HAVE TRIED IT,
FIND IT'S NOT THEIR BAG,
WE'RE DOWN TO A
SMALLER NUMBER OF WHICH
YOU SEE THE BEST MEMBERS
ON THIS SPRING TRIP HERE.

Several clips show people rowing in canoes, in the river.

Ren Craig says OUR
EXPERIENCE IS THAT MANY
PEOPLE KIND OF YOUNG AND
OLDER KIND OF LIVE AT ONLY
HALF THEIR STRENGTH AND
WHEN THESE STUDENTS
ARE OUT HERE, THEY ARE
OPERATING PROBABLY AT
FULL STRENGTH AND SOMETIMES
THEY HAVE TO FIND
THAT EXTRA TEN PERCENT.
AND WHILE WE'RE OUT
ON THIS KIND OF TRIP,
IT'S VERY TIRING, VERY
DEMANDING AND SOMETIMES
I'M SURE THEY SAY TO
THEMSELVES, WHY AM I HERE?
SOMETIMES I SAY THAT
MYSELF, WHY AM I HERE?
BUT WHEN THEY GET
BACK MY EXPERIENCE
IS THAT THERE'S A
TREMENDOUS SENSE OF PRIDE.
THAT THEY'VE DONE IT, THEY
CAN'T BEGIN TO CONVEY
TO THE FOLKS BACK THERE
EXACTLY WHAT THEY'VE DONE,
BUT THERE'S JUST THIS
SENSE, HEY, I'M SPECIAL.
AND THERE'S IS THAT
SENSE THAT THEY'RE
A LOT STRONGER THAN
THEY THOUGHT THEY WERE.
BY THE TIME THESE STUDENTS
GET TO THE MORE SENIOR LEVELS
OF THE OUTERS THEY SORT
OF TAKE IT FOR GRANTED
BUT THEN THEY CAN
HAVE A SPECIAL FEELING
THAT THEY'VE HELPED THE
YOUNGER ONES COME THROUGH.
I RUN THE LEADERSHIP
SEMINARS WHICH WE DO
BEFORE WE COME OUT
ON THE TRIPS AND
ONE OF THE THINGS WE
TALK ABOUT IS THE ROLE
OF THE SENIOR PEOPLE.
AND ONE OF THEIR MAIN
FOCUSES IS WE'RE GOING
TO EXECUTE THAT TRIP PLAN
SAFELY AND THE YOUNGER ONES
ARE GOING TO FEEL LIKE THEY'VE
HAD A GOOD EXPERIENCE.

A clip shows the campers unloading the canoes, and setting up camp.

Joan says AS TEACHER AND
LEADER REN CRAIG SAID,
THERE'S A SOLIDARITY
IN THIS GROUP.
GOOD EXPERIENCES SHARED
AND WE'VE JUST BEEN THROUGH
AN EXPERIENCE THAT
FORGED THE TWO BRIGADES
TO A SOLID,
COMPASSIONATE UNIT.
IT ALL HAPPENED BEFORE
WE REACHED THE CAMP,
WHICH WAS TO BE THE FILM
CREW'S FINAL CAMPSITE.
IN FACT, IT WAS THE
ONLY CAMP SET-UP
THAT WE WERE ABLE
TO DOCUMENT.
THE NIGHT BEFORE, IT WAS
DEEP DUSK BEFORE
THE TENTS WERE UP AND MIDNIGHT
BEFORE WE HAD DINNER.

Several clips show the campers setting up camp and cooking.

Ren Craig says WELL, EVERY
OUTER STARTS OUT USUALLY
IN GRADE NINE AND THEY
HAVE A VERY LOW POSITION
IN TERMS OF STATUS WITHIN
THE GROUP BECAUSE
THEY'RE LEARNING THE
WOODSMEN SKILLS,
THEY'RE LEARNING THE
ASPECTS OF CAMP CRAFT
THAT WE LIKE TO GIVE TO
THEM AND WE SHARE
THAT EXPERIENCE WITH THE
BRIGADE LEADERS WHO
ARE PEOPLE WHO ARE USUALLY,
THEY'VE USUALLY
BEEN IN THE OUTERS FOR
THREE TO FOUR YEARS.
AS FAR AS POSSIBLE, WE
GET THE BRIGADE LEADERS
TO TEACH THE SKILLS TO SEE
TO THE PROPER TECHNIQUES
FOR HANDLING
CRISIS SITUATIONS,
FOR HANDLING THE MORE
MUNDANE THINGS LIKE
SETTING UP THE CAMP.
AS YOU'VE
PROBABLY NOTICED,
EVERYBODY TAKES PART IN
SETTING UP THE TENTS.

Joan sits with three students, talking.

She saysTELL ME SOMETHING ABOUT
THE MOST DIFFICULT
THINGS THAT YOU'VE
ENCOUNTERED ON THIS TRIP, JIM?

Jim is in his teens, has short black hair, and a brown tartan shirt.

Jim says THIS TRIP?
THAT WOULD PROBABLY BE
SOME OF THE PORTAGES.
LIKE, YOU GOT TO, IT TAKES
OFF SOME OF YOUR TIME
TO GET TO CAMP, EH.
YOU'RE ALWAYS
WALKING AND WALKING,
GOT TO MAKE SO MANY
TRIPS BACK AND FORTH.

Joan asks HOW MUCH GEAR
DO YOU CARRY?

Jim says ME, PERSONALLY, I'VE
GOT TWO FOOD PACKS,
MY PACK AND THE CANOE
AND MY BOWMAN'S GOT ONE
FOOD PACK, HIS PACK
AND THE PADDLES
AND THE AXE AND SAW.
SO IT'S QUITE A BIT.

Joan asks HOW LONG DOES IT
TAKE YOU SAY, ON AVERAGE,
OR LET'S SAY THE
LONGEST THE PORTAGE
YOU HAD ON TUESDAY?
IT WAS THE DAY
WE WERE WITH YOU.
HOW LONG DOES THAT TAKE TO
GET ALL THE EQUIPMENT
FOR YOUR BRIGADE ACROSS?

Jim says THE WHOLE BRIGADE?
PROBABLY ABOUT TWO HOURS.

Joan says ONLY TWO HOURS?

Jim says MAYBE ABOUT THAT,
TWO HOURS, YEAH.

Joan says WELL HOW MANY
TRIPS DID YOU HAVE
TO MAKE THERE?

Jim says I MADE THREE.
I THINK EVERYBODY ELSE
MADE THREE, NOT SURE.

Joan asks AND HOW LONG
WAS THE PORTAGE?

Jim says THREE-QUARTER MILE.

Joan says AND IT WASN'T
STRAIGHT WALKING
EITHER AS WE KNOW!
BUT, YVONNE, SOMETIMES
YOU UNLOAD THE CANOES
AND ARE ALL READY TO
GO AND WHAT HAPPENS?
WHAT HAPPENED ON
WEDNESDAY MORNING?

Yvonne is in her teens, has short brown hair, and is wearing a gray tartan shirt.

She says WELL WE HAD THE CANOES
UNLOADED THERE AND I JUST
STARTED TO CROSS THE PORT
AND MR. ARTS HAD COME BACK
FROM CHECKING THE PORT AND
WE FOUND OUT WE COULD WALK
THEM SO, I GUESS HE SAID I
COULD FINISH THE PORT
OR TURN AROUND AND COME BACK
AND RE-LOAD THE CANOE AGAIN.
SO, WE TURNED AND UNLOADED
THE CANOE AGAIN AND GOT WET.
GOING DOWN.

Joan says TELL ME WHAT
YOU MEAN BY WALKING
AND WHAT YOU'RE
WALKING?

Yvonne says YOU HAVE YOUR STUFF
IN THE CANOES LASHED IN
AND YOUR GETTING WET
UP TO YOUR WAIST,
AT LEAST, IN THE WATER
AND YOU'RE WALKING
ON TOP OF THE
ROCKS SO YOU SLIP,
YOU GET WET, YOU'RE
HOLDING ON TO THE CANOES
WITH YOUR BOW AND YOUR
STERN LASHING ROPES,
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

Joan asks DO YOU EVER
GET KNOCKED OVER
BY THE RAPIDS, THE
CURRENTS IN THE RAPIDS?

Yvonne says YEAH, YOU CAN.
JIMMY DID, HE
GOT ALMOST UNDER.

Joan says TELL
ME ABOUT THAT.

Jim says OH THERE WAS THIS
LITTLE LEDGE IN THE RAPIDS
AND I WAS WALKING OVERTOP
OF IT AND I GUESS I
STEPPED ON SOME
ALGAE OR SOMETHING.
I SLIPPED AND WENT RIGHT
UNDER UP TO MY NECK AND
GOT PULLED AROUND BY THE
CURRENT AND ENDED UP
WITH THE STERN GOING DOWN
FIRST AND THE BOW UP STREAM.
GOT TURNED RIGHT
AROUND, PRETTY FUNNY.

Yvonne says IT'S PRETTY SCARY
THOUGH WHEN YOU DO THAT.

Joan says BRUCE, IF YOU'VE
HAD A SITUATION LIKE THAT
AND ALL THE
CLOTHES GET WET,
BECAUSE I SEE CLOTHES
GETTING WET ALL THE TIME
AT LEAST UP TO YOUR
WAIST, WHAT CHANCE
DO YOU HAVE OF
DRYING THEM OUT?

Bruce is in his teens, has short brown hair, and is wearing a brown sweater, and big glasses.

Bruce says WELL, IT DEPENDS
MOSTLY ON THE DAY.
IF IT'S, WELL, A DAY LIKE
TODAY IT'S PARTLY CLOUDY,
YOU COULD GET A FEW
CLOTHES DRIED BUT IF IT KEEPS
RAINING YOU'RE GOING
TO HAVE DAMP CLOTHES
NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO.

Joan asks HOW LONG
IS THIS WHOLE TRIP?
AND WHERE DID
IT START?

Bruce says WELL, WE STARTED FROM
MARSHALL LAKE AND
WE HOPE TO BE FINISHING ON
STEWART - NO, ABAMASAGI.
AND WELL, WE GUESSED
THAT AT ABOUT TWO WEEKS,
WE'RE OUT HERE FOR
ABOUT TWO WEEKS EH.

Joan asks WHAT HAVE YOU
GOT AHEAD OF YOU NOW?

Jim says TOMORROW WE
HAVE TWO PORTS.

Yvonne says THREE, I THINK.

Jim says TWO.
THERE'S TWO Mr. ARTS KNOWS
OF AND WE GOT TO PADDLE
ACROSS KAPIKOTONGWA
LAKE AND THEN DOWN
INTO MELCHETT AND THEN
WE CAMP THERE.
AND FROM THERE
I DON'T KNOW.

Joan says AND OF COURSE, LET'S
SAY, FOR CITY PEOPLE
OR PEOPLE LIVING IN
SOUTHERN ONTARIO,
MAYBE A LOT OF
PEOPLE DON'T REALIZE
WHY YOU HAVE
TO PORTAGE.
TELL ME WHY YOU
HAVE TO PORTAGE.

Bruce says WELL, YOU GET RAPIDS OR
SWIFTS OR WHATEVER AND
THE WATER'S EITHER TOO FAST
OR WHAT THEY SAY WHITE WATER
OR SHALLOW AND ALL THIS
AND LOTS OF BOULDERS.
YOU'D WRECK YOUR CANOE UP,
EH, SO IF YOU SHOOT EM,
YOU'RE BOUND TO GET
SERIOUSLY HURT AND
SWAMP AND LOSE A FEW
THINGS AND THIS, EH.
THE PORT IS JUST A SORT OF
DETOUR AROUND TO KEEP
YOURSELF OUT OF TROUBLE.
BUT MOST OF THE TIMES YOU
STILL KEEP THE TROUBLE SO.
WELL, LIKE, WE SAY
IF THERE'S A BAD PORT
AND YOU CAN'T SHOOT
THE RAPIDS,
YOU CAN WALK, AS
YVONNE WAS SAYING.
ONE WAY OR ANOTHER, YOU'RE
BOUND TO GET AROUND THEM.

Joan says NOW, ANOTHER
TIME THEY CALLED IT
LINING THE CANOES DOWN.
EXPLAIN WHAT LINING IS.

Jim says WELL, YOU'VE GOT
YOUR BOW PERSON TAKES THE
BOW ROPE AND YOU TAKE THE
STERN AND YOU PUSH
THE CANOE OUT INTO THE CURRENT
AND YOU STAY ON THE SHORE,
WELL, TRY TO ANYWAY.
AND THEN YOU MANEUVER THE
CANOE OUT AND AWAY FROM
BOULDERS AND ROCKS TO GET
HER DOWN TO THE BOTTOM
OF THE RAPIDS WITHOUT
SHOOTING THEM OR PORTING
THEM OR WALKING THEM.
YOU REASONABLY STAY
DRY, SOMETIMES.

Joan asks WOULD YOU PREFER
TO SHOOT THE RAPIDS?

Jim says YES.

Bruce says IT'S EASIER.

Joan asks BUT YOU
UNDERSTAND WHY YOU CAN'T?

They all say YEAH.

Jim says IT'S GETTING PRETTY
FRUSTRATING
WHEN YOU SEE RAPIDS AND
YOU THINK THEY'RE OKAY
BUT THEN THE STAFF KNOWS
MORE ABOUT IT, EH,
BECAUSE THEY SURVEYED
THE RAPIDS AND
CHECKED THEM OUT
WHETHER WE CAN.
BUT WE'RE JUST WORRIED
ABOUT GETTING ACROSS.
WE DON'T REALLY
CHECK IT OUT.

Joan asks WHEN YOU GET BACK,
DO YOU ALL STAY
CLOSE FRIENDS AFTER A
TRIP LIKE THIS?

Jim says WHEN WE GET BACK WE ALL
HANG AROUND EACH OTHER
AND WE'RE ALL FRIENDS.
LIKE, WE'RE NOT JUST
ON TRIPS FOR FRIENDS,
WE HANG AROUND LIKE
WE'RE FULL-TIME FRIENDS,
YOU COULD SAY.

A clip shows the campers sitting by the fire, in a camp by the river.

Yvonne says WHAT?

A boy says YOU LOOK
BEAUTIFUL TODAY.

Jim says YOUR HAIR
LOOKS PRETTY GREASY

A girl says SPEAKING OF WHICH.
DO YOU WANT
MORE WOOD?

A boy says YES.
COULD YOU GUYS PASS THE
SUGAR AND COFFEE MATE
AFTER YOU'RE DONE?
PLEASE?
PLEASE, PLEASE.

Joan says BREAKFAST
PLANNING SESSION TODAY
INVOLVES THE PROBLEMS
WHICH ARISE WHEN
THE BOWMAN IN ONE OF
THE CANOES IS LEFT
WITHOUT HER STERNMAN.

Ren Craig says I DIDN'T HAVE ANY
TROUBLE TAKING CARE OF
THAT CANOE ACROSS IN
THE WIND BUT REALLY
I DON'T THINK I SHOULD
HAVE TO HANDLE IT.

A boy asks THE BOW?

Ren Craig says YES.

A girl says IT WOULD GO CROSSWAYS
TO THE WAVES, EH.
FELT LIKE I WAS IN THE
ATLANTIC OR SOMETHING,
IT WAS ALWAYS ROCKING.

Ren Craig says WAS IT BETTER WHEN YOU
GOT ON YOUR KNEES
ON THE FLOOR OF
THE CANOE?

The girl says YEAH.
CAUSE I WAS LIKE
LOWER EH.

Ren Craig says WELL, JUST IN CASE WE
CAN'T BRING IN A PADDLER
TO GET IT OUT,
WHAT DO YOU THINK?
LEAVE IT AT MELCHETT
LAKE LANDING, OR?

The girl says WELL, I DON'T HAVE ANY
PROBLEMS STERNING IT.
THERE WAS NO
WAY JOHN OR I
OR JONATHAN COULD TAKE
IT ACROSS THE LAKE.

Ren Craig says YEAH.
WELL.
IT'S NOT A BIG
PROBLEM ON THE RIVER
BUT WE'VE GOT TWO
LAKES TO CROSS.
WE'VE GOT TO GO ACROSS
KAPIKOTONGWA AND
WE'VE GOT TO GO
ACROSS MELCHETT LAKE.
SO.
IF I'M TOWING THAT
CANOE I THINK THAT GARY,
YOU'VE GOT TO TAKE EXTRA
SORT OF CAUTION IN TERMS
OF WATCHING THE OTHER
PADDLERS BECAUSE
I'LL BE MANOEUVERING.

Gary says I'LL BE MORE OR LESS
BRINGING UP THE REAR
BECAUSE HE'S GOING TO BE
AT THE REAR ANYWAY AND
MAYBE DAVID WILL BE AT THE
FRONT THEN LEADING THEM.

A girl asks IF HE DOESN'T BRING
IN THAT OTHER PADDLER,
WHERE DO I GO?
WHAT HAPPENS TO ME?

A boy asks AND WHAT HAPPENS
TO THE PACKS?
YEAH.

Ren Craig says WE'LL JUST HAVE
TO TALK THAT OVER.

Gary says IF HE BRINGS IN THE
OTHER PADDLER, OUR PROBLEMS
ARE SOLVED BECAUSE HE
CAN STERN NUMBER FOUR.

Ren Craig says BUT IF HE DOESN'T, THEN
WE'VE GOT TO DECIDE
AND THAT INCLUDES ALL OF US,
WHO'S GOING TO TAKE
THE EXTRA PACKS AND
WHO'S GOING TO TAKE,
WHO'D BE DOING THE EXTRA
WORK ON THE PORTAGING.

A girl says BUT WE'RE
CONDENSING TODAY.

A boy says YEAH, WE'RE GOING TO
CONDENSE FOOD PACKS TODAY.
OKAY.

John Arts says NO MATTER WHAT
YOUR PREPARATIONS ARE,
YOU CERTAINLY HAVE
TO BE VERY CAREFUL.
THERE IS NO COMPLETE
DOCUMENTATION AS SUCH.
WE HAVE TRAVELLED SOME OF
OUR ROUTES BEFORE AND
HAVE DOCUMENTED THEM AS
WELL AS POSSIBLE.
BUT AS YOU'VE SEEN IN
TRAVELLING WITH US,
WE'VE COME UP AGAINST
CHANGING WATER LEVELS,
CHANGES IN SCHEDULE THAT
ARE CAUSED BY UNFORESEEN
CIRCUMSTANCES AND THE BEST
OF PAPERWORK PLANNING
CAN BE LEAD ASTRAY IN A
HURRY WHEN YOU'RE UP
AGAINST NATURE AND
VARIOUS UNFORESEEN
CIRCUMSTANCES OF COURSE.

Joan says LEADER AND
TEACHER JOHN ARTS
HAD A SPECIFIC, UNFORESEEN
CIRCUMSTANCE IN MIND:
THE ACCIDENT SUFFERED
BY DOUGLAS LEGARDE -
AFFECTIONATELY
KNOWN AS MOOSE.
OVER SIX FEET, 240 POUNDS
OF STRENGTH AND GOOD HUMOUR.

A clip shows Gary and another man helping Douglas sit on a canoe. Douglas has his left leg bandaged.

Douglas says OH, MY
GOODNESS.
WHERE AM I GOING,
Mr. CRAIG'S CANOE?

Gary says YEAH.

Douglas says WHOA!

Gary says JUST SIT
DOWN HERE.
ALRIGHT.
DO YOU WANNA
SIT DOWN?
REST, REST.

Douglas says IS Mr. CRAIG COMING BACK
AND TAKING ME DOWN?
YEAH, I NEED A
KEYHOLE.
THERE'S MY BOAT
WAY DOWN THERE.

Gary says BRUCE?

Bruce says YEAH.

Gary says I WANT YOU TO
HOLD THE FRONT,
THE BOW OF THE
CANOE, RIGHT.
OKAY, YOU'RE GOING TO
SIT ON THE SEAT HERE.
YEAH.

Douglas sits in the canoe and says OH!

Gary says NICE, EH?

Douglas says VERY NICE.

Gary says WATCH THOSE
BRANCHES.

Douglas says SIR, ARE WE GOING
TO SHOOT THEM?
OH, MY GOD!

Joan says A FREAK ACCIDENT
ALMOST SEVERED MOOSE'S
LITTLE TOE AS HE WAS
CLEARING A PORTAGE.
AN IMPRESSIVE CHAIN OF
EVENTS FOLLOWED WHICH
GOT HIM TO HOSPITAL IN
GERALDTON ABOUT
30 HOURS LATER.
REMEMBER, THIS
IS WILDERNESS.
AFTER ADMINISTERING TO
MOOSE'S MOST ACUTE NEEDS,
REN CRAIG RENDEZVOUSED
WITH THE SCOUT, DOUG KNOTT,
SO HE COULD GO AHEAD TO
THE NEXT LAKE AND SIGNAL
A PLANE TO HAVE A MOTORBOAT
AT THE BOTTOM OF THE FINAL
SET OF RAPIDS WHICH COULD
THEN TRANSPORT THIS YOUNG
GIANT TO LAKE TENNANT TO
BE PICKED UP BY A PLANE.
WHILE THE SCOUT
HEADED OUT,
CRAIG PADDLED TO THE
OTHER BRIGADE IN ORDER
TO AMALGAMATE FORCES.
THE ACCIDENT HAPPENED AT
2:30 IN THE AFTERNOON AND
IN ABOUT TWO HOURS THE
BRIGADES HAD MET
AND THE FIRST
PORTAGE COMPLETED.
BUT THIS WAS JUST THE
BEGINNING OF A LONG EVENING
OF PADDLING AND PORTAGING
AND SETTING UP CAMP.
AND A SECOND DAY OF
PADDLING AND PORTAGING.
THE PORTAGES WERE TORTURE
FOR MOOSE BUT HIS FRIENDS
WORKED MIRACLES IN
CLEARING THEM OF BRUSH,
CHOPPING AND SAWING
FALLEN TREES,
BUILDING BRIDGES OVER
SWAMPY SECTIONS TO BRING HIM,
FINALLY, IN SIGHT OF
THE WAITING MOTORBOAT
AND THE LAST LAP
OF HIS JOURNEY.

A clip shows Douglas sitting in a canoe, and another man rowing.

A man says OKAY, THAT'S ALL
FOR A MINUTE.
WE'RE JUST GOING TO
WAIT HERE FOR A MINUTE.

Ren Craig says IF THERE'S A CRISIS
SITUATION LIKE THE ONE
WHEN DOUGLAS CUT HIS
FOOT, THAT IS WHERE
THE INSTRUCTORS START TO PLAY
A MORE SIGNIFICANT ROLE.
WE GET IN IT, WE GET
DIRECTLY INVOLVED AND
OUR FOCUS BECOMES THE ONE
OF HANDLING THAT PROBLEM
AS EFFICIENTLY AND
EFFECTIVELY AS POSSIBLE.
WE'LL SHARE DECISION
MAKING AS MUCH AS WE CAN
WITH THE KIDS AND THEY'RE
VERY READY TO TAKE IT ON.
THEY'LL DO ANYTHING FOR US
BUT IF THERE IS A CRISIS,
WE'RE THE ONES WHO
ULTIMATELY ARE RESPONSIBLE
FOR HANDLING IT.
WHAT TENDS TO HAPPEN IN
A CASE LIKE THAT THOUGH,
WITH DOUGLAS, YOU SAW THAT
THE KIDS WERE READY
TO TAKE ON ANY KIND
OF PHYSICAL BURDEN.
THEY WOULD CARRY THIS
CANOE, THEY WOULD'VE
CARRIED HIM
ACROSS THE PORT.
GENERALLY, IT'S JUST A
VERY HUMAN REACTION.
ANYTHING THAT THEY CAN DO
TO HELP THEY WILL DO
AND WE DO DRAW ON THAT.

Bruce says WELL, I THINK THE
HARDEST THING I FOUND
IS PORTING THE CANOE.
LIKE, LAST YEAR AS A
GRADE 9 STUDENT,
AS A PEON, I DIDN'T HAVE
TO DO THAT STUFF AND THIS,
BEING TWO WEEKS
OF SOLID WORK,
IT'S HARD TO
BREAK INTO IT.
IT'S PRETTY HARD SO
I FIND IT WEARS ME
DOWN QUITE A LOT.
BECAUSE A LOT OF THE
PORTS LIKE THEY'RE HILLY,
ARE SWAMPY AND YOU'VE
GOT LOGS YOU'VE
GOT TO CLIMB OVER.
IF IT'S A 50 FOOT PORTAGE
OR A 500 FOOT PORTAGE,
YOU STILL HAVE TO GET
EVERYTHING OUT AND
CARRY EVERYTHING OVER
AND PUT IT BACK IN.
WE'VE HAD ABOUT BETWEEN 20
AND 30 PORTS UP TO NOW
I'D SAY, CLOSE TO
ABOUT 25 PORTS.
AND WE AVERAGE ABOUT TWO
OR THREE PORTS A DAY.
WE'VE ONLY HAD I THINK ONE
DAY WITHOUT ANY PORTS.

Ren Craig says AS YOU KNOW,
WE GET A LOT OF HUNTERS
AND FISHERMAN UP IN OUR
AREA AND SOME OF THEM
ARE HERE FOR THE FIRST
TIME AND SOME OF THEM
HAVE BEEN COMING UP
HERE FOR YEARS.
BUT DOESN'T MATTER HOW
MUCH EXPERIENCE YOU'VE GOT
UP HERE, YOU CAN GET
YOURSELF INTO TROUBLE
AND WE HAVE HAD, ON A
NUMBER OF OCCASIONS,
REQUESTS FROM THE
AUTHORITIES IN OUR AREA
TO SEND OUR OUTERS OUT TO
BRING IN A LOST HUNTER
OR A LOST FISHERMAN.
AND IN EVERY CASE, WE SEND
OUT BRIGADE LEADERS
WHO'VE HAD EXPERIENCE
AND THEY PERFORM
AN EXCEEDINGLY
GOOD JOB.
IT'S ONE OF THE REWARDS
OF THIS PROGRAM.
WE KIND OF HAVE THE
FEELING THAT THESE FOLKS
WILL DO ANYTHING THAT
WE ASK THEM TO DO
AND THEY'LL DO IT WELL.
AND THEY HAVE A VERY
SHARP PERCEPTION OF
WHAT IS SERIOUS.
THEY CAN KID AROUND, THEY
CAN LAUGH AND THEY
CAN FOOL AROUND BUT WHEN A
SITUATION IS SERIOUS,
THEY GET IN THERE,
THEY PITCH IN.
THEY'VE DONE EVERYTHING
FROM BEATING THE BUSH
TO FIND A LOST HUNTER, TO
PREPARING HELICOPTER PADS
SO THAT THE HELICOPTERS
CAN COME IN TO TAKE OUT
A LOST HUNTER WHO'S BEEN
HURT IN SOME WAY OR OTHER.
I THINK THAT IN
MY EXPERIENCE,
THEY'VE DONE IT ABOUT
TWO OR THREE TIMES.
OF COURSE IT'S A GREAT
SOURCE OF PRIDE
FOR THEM TOO.

Several clips show the campers, loading the canoes, and rowing along the river.

John Arts says WELL, WHAT
THESE YOUNG PEOPLE
ARE DOING IS SOMETHING
THAT EVERYBODY SHOULD DO.
BECAUSE THEY'RE
CLEANING THEIR GARBAGE
BEHIND THEM, THEY'RE
NOT LEAVING ANY MESS,
THEY'RE COMING
INTO A CAMPSITE,
LEAVING IT EXACTLY
THE WAY IT WAS WHEN
THEY FOUND IT,
MAYBE BETTER.
THEY'RE CLEANING UP
BEHIND A LOT OF PEOPLE.
AND EVERYBODY
SHOULD DO THIS.

The end credits roll.

Producer/Director, Joan Reed-Olsen.

A production of TVOntario. Copyright 1981, The Ontario Educational Communications Authority.

Watch: PEOPLE PATTERNS - Wilderness!!