Transcript: Eleanor Roosevelt | May 10, 2021

A CNN original series.

A clip from the vintage TV show "What's my line?" rolls.

Missus Eleanor Roosevelt sits by the host.

The host says AND NOW WE COME
TO THE SPECIAL FEATURE
OF OUR PROGRAM, THE APPEARANCE
OF OUR MYSTERY CELEBRITY.
I WOULD TELL YOU
THAT OUR GUEST'S VOICE
IS I THINK SO WELL-KNOWN
THAT I'M GOING TO ANSWER
THE FIRST FEW QUESTIONS...

A caption reads "October, 1953. 'What's my line'?

A blindfolded woman on the panel says WOULD I BE LIKELY
TO RECOGNIZE THIS PERSON'S VOICE
IF IT WAS HEARD ON THE RADIO?

The host says WOULD YOU BE LIKELY
TO RECOGNIZE THIS PERSON'S VOICE
IF IT WAS HEARD ON THE RADIO?
I WOULD THINK YOU MIGHT, YES.

The woman says IS OUR GUEST FAMOUS
FOR TRAVELLING?

The host says I'M NOW GOING TO ASK,
IS OUR GUEST FAMOUS
FOR TRAVELLING?

Eleanor says YES.

The woman says IS SHE ALSO
A NEWSPAPER COLUMNIST?

Eleanor says YES.

The woman chuckles and says DID SHE EVER OCCUPY
THE WHITE HOUSE?

Eleanor chuckles and says YES.

The woman says IS IT
MRS. FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT?

The host says MRS. FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT!
[AUDIENCE APPLAUSE]

Susann Quinn is in her eighties, with short slightly wavy white hair and wears glasses, and a burgundy and black sweater.

She says IT IS EXTRAORDINARY.
SHE WAS LIKE
NO OTHER FIRST LADY.

A black and white clip shows a crowd cheering for Eleanor.

Blanche Weise Cook is in her late seventies, with short wavy white hair and wears glasses, black trousers, a pale blue shirt, a burgundy vest and a purple striped scarf.

Blanche says HER FIRST LOVE,
HER ABIDING LOVE,
IS FOR THE PEOPLE,
PEOPLE IN WANT, IN NEED,
IN TROUBLE.

Anya Luscombe is in her early fifties, with long wavy red hair and wears glasses and a green lace top.

Anya says SHE WAS DRIVEN
BY THIS ENORMOUS BELIEF
IN HUMAN DIGNITY
AND EQUALITY FOR ALL PEOPLE.

Chris Brick is in his forties, bald and with a shadow of a goatee. He wears light gray trousers and a deep gray V neck sweater.

Chris says SHE'S GOING TO REINVENT
THE ROLE OF FIRST LADY
OF THE UNITED STATES
TO SUIT HER OWN NEEDS.

Susan says WHAT SHE WAS INTERESTED IN
WAS, UM, CHANGING THE WORLD.

[THEME MUSIC PLAYS]

A series of picture of American first ladies appear as the theme music plays.

The name of the show reads "First Ladies: Eleanor Roosevelt. Narrated by Robin Wright."

The caption changes to "March 4, 1933.Inauguration Day, D.C."

President Roosevelt says I, FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT,
WILL FAITHFULLY EXECUTE
THE OFFICE
OF PRESIDENT
OF THE UNITED STATES.
[CROWD CHEERING]

The narrator says OF THE THOUSANDS CHEERING
FOR THEIR NEW PRESIDENT,
FEW COULD HAVE IMAGINED
THE ICON AND LEADER
THE PRESIDENT'S WIFE
WOULD BECOME
OVER THE NEXT 12 YEARS.

The caption changes to "Anna Eleanor Roosevelt. Granddaughter of Eleanor Roosevelt."

Anna is in her seventies, with short wavy white hair and wears glasses, black trousers and a burgundy shirt.

Anna says I THINK
YOU CAN DESCRIBE HER AS A PERSON
WHO DIDN'T DO
WHAT WAS EXPECTED OF HER.
I GUESS THAT'S THE WAY
HEROES ARE MADE.

Eleanor says I WAS RATHER
A REBELLIOUS FIRST LADY.
I'M AFRAID I DID SOME THINGS
WHICH WERE NOT USUAL
FOR A LADY IN THE WHITE HOUSE.

The caption changes to "Paul Sparrow, Director, F.D.R. Presidential Library."

Paul is in his sixties, with short straight light brown hair and wears a black blazer, a pale blue shirt, and a striped tie.

He says THE ROLE OF THE FIRST LADY,
TRADITIONALLY,
HAD BEEN SO CONSTRICTED.
IT WAS ABOUT SOCIALIZING
AND BEING A HOSTESS,
AND THAT WAS IT.
AND THAT WAS NOT ELEANOR'S LIFE.

The caption changes to "Allida Black. Flounding editor, Eleanor Roosevelt Papers."

Allida is in her sixties, with short wavy gray hair and wears glasses, a black dress, a black jacket, and an orange statement necklace.

Allida says AT THAT POINT,
SHE WAS ON THE BOARD
OF 17 MAJOR REFORM ORGANIZATIONS
IN NEW YORK STATE.
HAD HER OWN CAREER
AS A JOURNALIST,
AND AS A SOCIAL ACTIVIST.

The caption changes to "Robin Gerber. Author of Leadership the Eleanor Roosevelt Way."

Robin Gerber is in her late sixties, with short wavy white hair and wears a white sweater, a lavender blazer, and a beaded necklace.

Robin says SHE IS
AN ABSOLUTE POWERHOUSE.
SHE IS WRITING FOR
THE WOMEN'S DEMOCRATIC NEWS
AND WORKING
FOR THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY.
SO, LEAVING ALL OF THAT TO COME
TO THE WHITE HOUSE AND DO WHAT?
HOLD TEAS? PICK NEW CHINA?
THIS IS A PRIVILEGE,
NOT TO LIVE IN THE WHITE HOUSE
AND HAVE FANCY DINNERS;
THE PRIVILEGE IS, YOU HAVE
A MEGAPHONE
TO SPEAK TO THE WORLD,
IF YOU CAN FIGURE OUT
HOW TO USE IT.
AND THAT'S WHAT SHE DID.

The narrator says TWO DAYS AFTER
HER HUSBAND'S INAUGURATION,
ELEANOR MAKES HER FIRST MOVE.

[CAMERAS CLICKING]

[REPORTERS CLAMORING]

Allida says ONE OF THE FIRST ACTIONS
ELEANOR TOOK AS FIRST LADY
WAS TO HAVE
HER OWN PRESS CONFERENCES.

Eleanor says THE CALLING
OF JOURNALISM IS ONE...

Robin says SO, SHE'S A LITTLE BIT NERVOUS.
NO FIRST LADY HAD EVER HELD
A PRESS CONFERENCE,
AND SHE PLANS IT FOR TWO DAYS
BEFORE FRANKLIN'S FIRST
PRESS CONFERENCE, BY THE WAY.

Eleanor says QUESTIONS, LADIES?

A reporter says HERE, IN THE BACK.

Paul says WOMEN WERE NOT ALLOWED
TO COVER THE PRESIDENT'S
PRESS CONFERENCES.
SO, SHE SAID,
"I WILL HAVE PRESS CONFERENCES
TO WHICH ONLY WOMEN CAN COME."
THEREFORE, NEWSPAPERS
HAD TO HIRE WOMEN REPORTERS
TO COVER HER.

Robin says TO JUST INVITE WOMEN REPORTERS,
YOU CAN IMAGINE THIS WAS NOT
GOING TO BE TAKEN VERY WELL.
WELL, THE MEN ARE WATCHING
FROM THE DOOR.
AND THEY SAY, "OH, LOOK AT THEM,
THEY'RE JUST A BUNCH
OF DOCILE NEWS HENS.
THIS ISN'T GONNA LAST A MONTH."

The narrator says ALMOST IMMEDIATELY,
THE FIRST LADY'S ACTIVITIES
AND OPINIONS FILL NEWSPAPERS
ACROSS THE COUNTRY.

The caption changes to "Christopher Brick. Editor, Eleanor Roosevelt Papers."

Chris says THOSE PRESS CONFERENCES
DID NOT JUST DEAL WITH,
"I HAD TEA
WITH THE AMBASSADOR'S WIFE."
UH... [LAUGHS]
THEY WERE FOCUSED ON THE WORK
OF THE NEW ADMINISTRATION:
GENDER PREJUDICE,
THE POOR, AND HER VISION
FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE.

Allida says FDR'S SPEECH WRITER
AND FORMER LAW PARTNER
JOKE WITH ONE ANOTHER
THAT THE FIRST THING
THEY HAVE TO DO
IS GET THE PANTS OFF OF ELEANOR
AND ON TO FRANK.
[CROWD CHEERING]

Anna says YOU KNOW, SOME PEOPLE SAY
THAT GRAND-MÈRE WOULDN'T
HAVE BEEN THE FIRST LADY SHE WAS
WITHOUT THE CHILDHOOD
THAT SHE HAD.

The narrator says ELEANOR WAS BORN IN 1884,
INTO A PROMINENT
AND WEALTHY FAMILY.
THE FIRST CHILD OF ANNA HALL
AND ELLIOT ROOSEVELT,
THE YOUNGER BROTHER
OF PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT.

Eleanor says OH, MY MOTHER WAS VERY BEAUTIFUL
AND SHE WOULD OCCASIONALLY SAY
THAT IN THE HALL FAMILY,
THERE WERE REALLY NO
UGLY DUCKLINGS
AND I WAS THE EXCEPTION.

Susan says ELEANOR DISAPPOINTED HER.
SHE WAS PLAIN.
HER MOTHER CALLED HER "GRANNY,"
WHICH WAS DEEPLY HUMILIATING
FOR HER.
UH... AND, OF COURSE, HER MOTHER
THEN DIED WHEN SHE WAS EIGHT.

Allida says HER CHILDHOOD
IS NOTHING BUT DISAPPOINTMENT.
HER FATHER WHO ADORES HER
IS A DRUNK AND A JUNKIE,
AND GETS SO DRUNK
INSIDE A MEN'S CLUB,
HE FORGETS THAT SHE'S SITTING
ON THE STEPS OUTSIDE.

Blanche says HER FATHER,
WHO SHE LOVED ABOVE ALL,
DIES AT THE AGE OF 34
OF ALCOHOLISM.
AND ONE REALLY NEEDS TO PAUSE.
HOW MUCH DO YOU HAVE TO DRINK
TO DIE AT 34 OF ALCOHOLISM?

A dramatization shows young Eleanor at an orphanage.

A woman says ELEANOR.
[SPEAKING IN FRENCH]

The narrator says ORPHANED AT TEN YEARS OLD,
ELEANOR WAS SENT TO LIVE
WITH HER MATERNAL GRANDMOTHER.

[SPEAKING IN FRENCH]

Susan says IT WAS A VERY LONELY CHILDHOOD.
SHE HAD A FRENCH GOVERNESS
SHE DETESTED,
WHO WAS QUITE SADISTIC, I THINK.
USED TO BRAID HER HAIR
AND PULL IT AT THE SAME TIME.
SHE WAS RAISED, REALLY,
BY SERVANTS, MOSTLY,
SOME OF WHOM
WERE VERY KIND TO HER.
THEY WOULD BRING HER DINNER
IF SHE WAS EXILED TO HER ROOM.

Robin says AND THEN, WHEN SHE'S 14,
WE KNOW THAT THREE LOCKS
SUDDENLY APPEARED ON HER DOOR.
A FRIEND COMES TO VISIT
AND SHE SAYS TO HER,
"WHY ARE THOSE LOCKS
ON YOUR DOOR?"
AND ELEANOR SAYS,
"TO KEEP MY UNCLES OUT."
WAS SHE ABUSED?
WE CAN'T KNOW FOR SURE,
BUT SHE WAS THE CLASSIC TARGET
FOR ABUSE.
SHE WAS SCARED OF EVERYTHING.
SHE WRITES IN HER DIARY,
"I'M SCARED OF THE DARK,
OF MICE, OF OTHER PEOPLE...
OF BEING ALONE."

[BELLS RINGING]

The narrator says HER GRANDMOTHER'S DECISION
TO SEND HER
TO BOARDING SCHOOL IN ENGLAND
WAS ELEANOR'S SALVATION.
ALLENSWOOD WAS NO ORDINARY
LADIES' FINISHING SCHOOL.

Robin says ALLENSWOOD SCHOOL
IS BEING RUN...
BY AN ABSOLUTELY
REMARKABLE WOMAN,
MARIE SOUVESTRE.
SHE WAS PROGRESSIVE POLITICALLY,
AND SHE WAS RUNNING A SCHOOL
THAT WAS GOING TO TURN OUT GIRLS
WHO WOULD BE LEADERS.
NOT JUST TURNING OUT GIRLS
WHO WOULD BE GOOD FOR MEN
TO MARRY...

The teacher says LET US PAUSE HERE...

Robin says BUT SHE WANTED HER GIRLS
TO ACTUALLY GO OUT
AND MAKE CHANGE IN THE WORLD.

The narrator says ELEANOR BECAME
MARIE SOUVESTRE'S
FAVORITE STUDENT,
THE DAUGHTER SHE NEVER HAD.

Blanche says MARIE SOUVESTRE EMBOLDENS HER.
INSPIRES HER.
IT WAS JUST THREE OF
THE HAPPIEST YEARS OF HER LIFE.
[GIGGLING]

The narrator says BUT IT WASN'T ONLY
HER TEACHER WHO ADMIRED ELEANOR.

Robin says WHEN THE GIRLS
APPRECIATED ANOTHER GIRL
FOR DOING SOMETHING FOR THEM,
THEY WOULD BUY THEM VIOLETS
AND LITTLE BOOKS.
ELEANOR WOULD COME BACK
ON SATURDAYS WHEN THEY DID THIS
AND HER BED
WOULD JUST BE COVERED.
ELEANOR LEARNS
THAT SHE CAN MAKE FRIENDS
WHO CAN HELP OTHERS,
AND THIS FEELS VERY GOOD TO HER
AFTER THE KIND OF CHILDHOOD
THAT SHE HAD.
AFTER SHE LEAVES ALLENSWOOD,
MADEMOISELLE WRITES HER LETTERS,
AND SHE SAYS, "DON'T BE
TOO SEDUCED BY THE TEAS
AND THE BALLS
AND THE SOCIAL EVENTS.
REMEMBER WHO YOU ARE
AND WHAT'S TRULY IMPORTANT."

Blanche says MARIE SOUVESTRE
CHANGES
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT'S LIFE.
AFTER ALLENSWOOD,
THE SHY, DAMAGED CHILD IS GONE.
THERE'S SOMEBODY ELSE.

The caption changes to "Nina Gibson Roosevelt. Granddaughter of Eleanor Roosevelt."

Nina is in her eighties, with shoulder-length straight gray hair in a half do and wears glasses, black trousers, a black sweater, a beige blazer and a black and pink printed scarf.

Nina says SHE BEGAN TO BELIEVE IN HERSELF,
AS A WOMAN WITH CONVICTIONS
AND WITH SELF-CONFIDENCE,
TO GO FORWARD AND MAKE HER MARK
IN THE WORLD.
[BIRDS CHIRPING]

The narrator says TWELVE YEARS
BEFORE BECOMING PRESIDENT,
FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT, AGED 39,
CONTRACTED POLIO,
PARALYZING HIM
FROM THE WAIST DOWN.

At an old interview, the host says AFTER THE POLIO ATTACK,
WAS HE ACTUALLY ABLE TO WALK?

Eleanor says HE COULD STAND WITH ME
AND A CANE, AND HIS BRACES,
BUT TO WALK,
HE WOULD HAVE HAD TO HAVE
A STURDIER ARM THAN MINE.

The narrator says ONCE IN THE WHITE HOUSE,
ELEANOR WILL OFTEN STAND IN
FOR THE PRESIDENT.
IT'S A ROLE THAT WILL GIVE HER
MORE INFLUENCE
THAN ANY OTHER FIRST LADY
IN HISTORY.

A reporter says SHE IS SENT ON A TOUR
OF THE COUNTRY BY FDR.
HE WANTS HER TO SERVE
AS HIS EYES AND LEGS.
"TALK TO THE PEOPLE AND TELL ME
WHAT THEY'RE THINKING."

Eleanor says FRANKLIN OFTEN USED ME
TO GET THE REFLECTION
OF OTHER PEOPLE'S THINKING
BECAUSE HE KNEW
I MADE IT A POINT
TO SEE AND TALK
WITH A VARIETY OF PEOPLE.

Robin says PEOPLE DESCRIBE SUCH A SENSE
OF CONNECTION WITH HER.
OVER AND OVER AGAIN, YOU HEAR
PEOPLE TALKING ABOUT MEETING HER
AND IN A VERY FEW MOMENTS
FEELING THAT SHE WAS
TRULY LISTENING
AND TRULY CONNECTED.

Eleanor says I'M VERY GLAD
TO HAVE THIS OPPORTUNITY
OF GREETING THE PEOPLE

Chris says OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.
FRANKLIN COMES TO REALIZE
THAT SHE'S REALLY GOOD AT THIS.
SHE IS THE VOICE
THAT HE TRUSTS MOST.
HE WOULD GO
INTO CABINET MEETINGS
AND SAY, "MY MISSUS SAYS THERE ISN'T ENOUGH MONEY
IN THE BUDGET FOR THAT.
MY MISSUS SAYS THAT THESE RESOURCES
AREN'T GETTING TO THE PLACES
THEY'RE SUPPOSED TO BE
GETTING TO."

Susan says THE MEN
IN THE ROOSEVELT ADMINISTRATION
CAME TO FEEL THEY HAD
TO TAKE HER SERIOUSLY,
SO, IT WAS A DIFFERENT KIND
OF PARTNERSHIP
THAN PEOPLE WERE USED TO.

The narrator says BY THE TIME
THEY REACHED THE WHITE HOUSE,
THEY HAD BEEN TOGETHER
OVER 30 YEARS.
DISTANT COUSINS,
THE COUPLE STARTED COURTING
WHEN ELEANOR WAS ONLY 18.

Robin says THEY FALL IN LOVE
OVER A SERIES OF MEETINGS
AND EVENTS AND BALLS.

Blanche says SHE WAS REALLY ATTRACTED TO FDR,
WHO WAS EXTREMELY CHARMING
AND HANDSOME.

Robin says I THINK THERE WAS
CERTAINLY AN INCREDULITY
ON ELEANOR'S PART
THAT THIS MAN COULD LOVE HER.
PROBABLY THAT ANYONE
COULD LOVE HER LIKE THIS.

Anya says ONE OF THE REASONS
FRANKLIN WAS SO INTRIGUED
BY ELEANOR
WAS BECAUSE OF HER WORK
FOR THE SETTLEMENT MOVEMENT.
AND THIS WAS VERY DIFFERENT
THAN OTHER GIRLS.

Robin says SHE SAYS TO HIM,
"I WANT YOU TO COME
AND MEET ONE OF THE GIRLS
WHO I'M HELPING,
AND COME TO HER HOUSE,
WHICH IS A TENEMENT."
TENEMENTS ARE UNSANITARY,
OVERCROWDED, AIRLESS, SMELLY,
AND SHE TAKES HIM THERE.

Nina says FDR JUST-- HE KNEW THERE WAS
POVERTY AND THAT KIND OF STUFF.
BUT HE HADN'T REALLY SEEN IT.
SHE SHOWED IT TO HIM.

Robin says VERY FAMOUSLY,
FRANKLIN TURNS TO HER AND SAYS,
"MY GOD, I DIDN'T KNOW
PEOPLE LIVE LIKE THAT."
AND TO ME, THIS IS THE MOMENT
WHEN THE GREATEST
POLITICAL PARTNERSHIP
IN AMERICAN HISTORY HAPPENED.

The caption changes to "1934. Washington, D.C."

The narrator says DECADES LATER,
FDR LAUNCHES EMERGENCY MEASURES
TO EASE POVERTY AND HARDSHIP
CAUSED BY THE GREAT DEPRESSION.

The narrator says ELEANOR, ALREADY
AN ESTABLISHED COLUMNIST,
MAKES A PERSONAL APPEAL
TO THE PUBLIC.

Eleanor says I WANT YOU TO WRITE TO ME.

Robin says I LOVE THIS.
"I WANT YOU TO WRITE TO ME."
"I WANT YOU TO WRITE TO ME
AND TELL ME
WHAT YOUR PROBLEMS ARE."

Eleanor says YOUR CONFIDENT...

Robin says "BUT ALSO,
I WANT YOU TO GIVE ME
YOUR IDEAS,
BECAUSE WE DON'T KNOW
EVERYTHING IN WASHINGTON."
WELL, PEOPLE SO RESPONDED
TO THIS.

Paul says THERE WERE THOUSANDS,
TENS OF THOUSANDS OF LETTERS
THAT CAME TO THE WHITE HOUSE
ADDRESSED TO HER EVERY MONTH.
SHE HAD SUCH A RAPPORT
WITH THE AMERICAN PEOPLE
THAT THEY FELT
THAT THEY COULD WRITE TO HER.
IT'S A DIFFERENT RELATIONSHIP
THAN ANY FIRST LADY
HAD EVER HAD.
HERE'S A LETTER
FROM A YOUNG GIRL.
"DEAR MRS. ROOSEVELT,
I'M A VERY POOR GIRL.
I'M NOT ABLE TO WORK.
I HAVEN'T GOT ANY FATHER.
WOULD YOU PLEASE SEND ME
AN OVERCOAT FOR THE WINTER?"
"DEAR MRS. PRESIDENT."
"DEAR MRS. ROOSEVELT."
"DEAR MRS. PRESIDENT,
WOULD YOU HELP MY DADDY
GET A GOOD HOUSE TO LIVE IN,
'CAUSE RIGHT NOW, WE ARE LIVING
IN AN OLD SHACK."
AND OF COURSE, ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
WOULD OFTEN WRITE RESPONSES.
SHE WOULD OCCASIONALLY PUT
A CHECK IN
OR TRY TO HELP PEOPLE.
THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA
REALLY BELIEVED
THAT THE ROOSEVELTS WERE REALLY
GOING TO TRY HELP THEM.
BUT PARTICULARLY
THAT ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
WAS GOING TO HELP THEM.

The caption changes to "Val-Kill, New York."

The narrator says ELEANOR'S COUNTRY RETREAT
PROVIDES REFUGE FROM WASHINGTON,
BUT NOT FROM WORK.

Nina walks in the main room and says IT'S JUST SUCH A WONDERFUL ROOM.
THIS ROOM HAS
SO MANY WONDERFUL MEMORIES.
IN HERE, WE'D PLAY GAMES,
HAVE PILLOW FIGHTS WITH
THE PILLOWS FROM THE COUCHES,
AND GRANDMA WOULD BE WORKING
AWAY AT HER DESK,
AND IT WAS LOVELY.
SHE'D TURN HER HEARING AIDS OFF
SO SHE COULDN'T HEAR US,
SO WE COULD MAKE
ALL THE NOISE WE WANTED.
SHE DID HAVE A LOT OF WORK TO DO
AND SHE'D ANSWER ALL HER
CORRESPONDENCE FROM THIS DESK.

Anya says WHERE SHE GOT
THE ENERGY OR THE TIME FROM
TO ANSWER ALL THESE LETTERS,
TO GO ON ALL THESE TRAVELS,
TO GIVE ALL THESE SPEECHES...
HOW THERE WERE ENOUGH HOURS
IN A DAY

A reporter says SHE SEEMS TO BE
PERPETUALLY ON THE MOVE.
WRITES THE WEARY REPORTER
TRAVELLING WITH HER,
"PLEASE MAKE ELEANOR TIRED,
JUST FOR ONE DAY."

The narrator says IN THE FIRST
FOUR MONTHS AS FIRST LADY,
ELEANOR RECEIVES
300,000 LETTERS.
SHE IS ESPECIALLY OUTRAGED
BY THE SUFFERING
IN A MINING TOWN
IN WEST VIRGINIA.

Allida says THE MINERS
HAD BEEN UNEMPLOYED
FOR 20 YEARS.
THERE'S MALNOURISHMENT
LIKE YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN.
IT IS POVERTY
THAT IS UNIMAGINABLE
IN THE UNITED STATES.

Chris says SHE REALIZES THAT SHE'S SOMEONE
WHO HAS ACCESS
TO THE MOST ELITE,
MOST POWERFUL
POLICY-MAKING CIRCLES THERE ARE,
AND THAT SHE HAS THE ABILITY
TO MOLD PUBLIC POLICY.

The narrator says ELEANOR PUSHES FRANKLIN
TO PUT FEDERAL FUNDS
INTO AN EXPERIMENTAL REHOUSING
PROJECT CALLED ARTHURDALE.

Allida says SHE THROWS EVERYTHING SHE HAS
INTO HELPING REBUILD
THIS COMMUNITY.

Eleanor says ALREADY BUILT HOMES...
SHE DEVOTES ALL
HER POLITICAL CAPITAL TO THIS.
SHE GETS FEDERAL FUNDS
LOCATED THERE.

Susan says NOBODY EXPECTED A FIRST LADY
TO HAVE THE KIND OF INFLUENCE
SHE HAD, POLITICALLY.

Allida says HAROLD ICKES,
WHO IS
SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR,
IS BALLISTIC.

Blanche says "DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR WIFE
IS DOING DOWN THERE?
SHE IS SPENDING MONEY
LIKE A DRUNKEN SAILOR."

Allida says "WHY ARE WE
GIVING PEOPLE REFRIGERATORS?"

Blanche says "HOW ARE WE GOING
TO TELL THE RICH FROM THE POOR?"
AND WHEN FDR REPEATS THAT
TO ELEANOR ROOSEVELT,
SHE SAYS, "WELL, IN MATTERS
OF SUCH SIMPLE DIGNITY
AND DECENCY,
LIKE INDOOR PLUMBING,
WE SHOULD NOT HAVE TO TELL
THE RICH FROM THE POOR."

Allida says PEOPLE LOOK AT HER FAILURE
TO BRING INDUSTRY TO ARTHURDALE
AND SAY, "OH, MY GOD,
THIS IS THE PERFECT EXAMPLE
OF A LIBERAL IMAGINATION
RUN AMOK."
AND I...
THAT IS SO SHORTSIGHTED.
THE COMMUNITY THAT COMES
OUT OF THIS...
HAS HOUSES, SCHOOLS,
MEDICAL CLINICS
THAT ARE STILL IN USE TODAY.

Susan says ARTHURDALE WAS THE FIRST
OF HUNDREDS AND HUNDREDS
OF COMMUNITIES
THAT WERE BUILT
ALL OVER THE COUNTRY.
IT WAS LIFESAVING
AND LIFE-TRANSFORMING.

The narrator says ELEANOR IS BEGINNING
TO APPRECIATE
HOW MUCH SHE CAN ACHIEVE
AS FIRST LADY.

Anya says ELEANOR CARED ABOUT THE WORLD
AND THAT WAS HER DRIVING FORCE.
AND IF SHE WASN'T GOING
TO DO IT, THEN WHO WOULD?

The caption changes to "November 3, 193. Franklin wins a second term."

A reporter says AN EVENING OF TRIUMPH.
IN TIMES SQUARE, THE CELEBRATION
WENT ON THROUGH THE NIGHT
AS TENS OF THOUSANDS
SCREAMED THEMSELVES HOARSE.
THEY WERE CROWDED AROUND...

The narrator says ON THE ARM OF HIS SON,
WITH ELEANOR BY HIS SIDE,
FDR WINS A SECOND TERM
BY A LANDSLIDE.

Paul says MANY PEOPLE
THINK OF ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
AS THE CONSCIENCE
OF THE ROOSEVELT ADMINISTRATION.
SHE WAS THE IDEALIST,
HE WAS THE PRAGMATIST.
AS A POLITICAL TEAM,
THEY WERE UNSTOPPABLE.

The narrator says MARRIED IN 1905,
THE COUPLE HAVE ONE DAUGHTER
AND FIVE SONS,
ONE OF WHOM TRAGICALLY DIED
IN INFANCY.
BUT THE ROOSEVELT PARTNERSHIP
ALMOST FELL APART.
IN 1918, FRANKLIN RETURNED
FROM A EUROPEAN TRIP
GRAVELY ILL.

Robin says HE HAS DOUBLE PNEUMONIA,
HE IS REALLY CLOSE TO DEATH.
THEY WHISK HIM OFF TO THE HOUSE
AND ELEANOR IS LEFT
TO UNPACK HIS TRUNK.
AND WHEN SHE OPENS HIS TRUNK,
THERE IS A PACKET OF LETTERS,
AND OF COURSE, SHE RECOGNIZES
THE HANDWRITING.

The narrator says THE LETTERS REVEAL
A LONGSTANDING AFFAIR
BETWEEN FRANKLIN AND ELEANOR'S
OWN SECRETARY, LUCY MERCER.

Robin says WHEN WE THINK ABOUT THIS GIRL
WHO HAS HAD SO LITTLE LOVE
IN HER LIFE...
AND THOUGHT SHE HAD
FINALLY FOUND LOVE AND SECURITY,
AND HERE SHE SEES
THAT HE IS LOVING
AND HE IS IN LOVE WITH LUCY.

Anna says I MEAN, THE WHOLE THING
READS LIKE A PLAY.
I MEAN, HOW SHOCKING
THAT MUST HAVE BEEN.
MY GRANDMOTHER WAS TOTALLY TAKEN
BY SURPRISE.
OF COURSE, THAT'S GOING TO HURT.

Robin says HE PROMISES THAT
HE WILL NEVER SEE LUCY AGAIN...
AND THEY STAY MARRIED.
BUT SHE WAS TERRIBLY DEPRESSED.
AS SHE SAID, THE BOTTOM
HAD FALLEN OUT OF HER WORLD.

Nina says AFTER THE AFFAIR, I DO BELIEVE
THEY WERE ALWAYS
IN SEPARATE BEDROOMS.
I CAN REMEMBER HER SAYING,
"YOU KNOW, YOU FORGIVE.
YOU DON'T NECESSARILY FORGET,
BUT YOU CAN FORGIVE."
FROM THEN ON,
THEIR MARRIAGE
BECAME A PARTNERSHIP,
IN A WAY THAT FREED HER UP...
TO BECOME THE WOMAN SHE BECAME.
SO, THROUGH ADVERSITY SOMETIMES
WE RISE
AND BECOME THINGS THAT WE
NEVER THOUGHT WE MIGHT BECOME.
[INDISTINCT CHATTER]

The narrator says OVER THE DECADES,
ELEANOR TURNED TO HER FRIENDS
FOR SUPPORT.
CLOSEST AMONG THEM
IS LORENA HICKOK.

Allida says HICK WAS
A WICKED SMART JOURNALIST,
WICKED SMART.
SHE WAS THE ONLY WOMAN REPORTER
IN THE COUNTRY
WHO HAD HER OWN BY-LINE
ON THE FRONT PAGE,
AND SHE DID POLITICS,
FOR PETE'S SAKE!

The narrator says FDR HIRES HICK
TO REPORT ON PROGRESS
OF THE NEW DEAL.
SHE IS MOVED INTO A SMALL ROOM
NEAR ELEANOR'S QUARTERS
IN THE WHITE HOUSE.

Chris says SHE WAS
A VERY PROVOCATIVE PERSONALITY.
SHE WORE MEN'S CLOTHING.
SHE SMOKED CIGARS.
SHE PLAYED CARDS.
SHE DRANK BOURBON.

Allida says EVERYBODY KNEW
THAT HICK WAS GAY.

The narrator says THE WOMEN'S FRIENDSHIP
GREW OVER THE YEARS
THEY SPENT TOURING THE COUNTRY
AS FDR'S EYES AND EARS.

Susan says HICK GAVE HER A LOT OF IDEAS
AND SUPPORT
IN TERMS OF FINDING A WAY
TO BE A NEW KIND OF FIRST LADY.

Blanche says IT'S HICK WHO SAYS,
"LOOK AT ALL THESE
DAILY ACTIVITIES
YOU'RE TELLING ME ABOUT.
THE WHOLE COUNTRY WANTS TO KNOW
HOW YOU SPEND YOUR DAY."
AND IT'S HICK'S SUGGESTION
THAT RESULTS
IN ELEANOR ROOSEVELT'S
"MY DAY" COLUMN.

Paul says SHE HAD A STYLE OF WRITING
THAT WAS VERY PERSONAL
AND VERY INFORMAL,
AND SHE COULD TALK
ABOUT ANYTHING,
FROM A MEETING WITH
THE KING AND QUEEN OF ENGLAND,
TO LITERALLY WHAT SHE HAD
FOR BREAKFAST THAT DAY.
SO, SHE WAS THE ORIGINAL
BLOGGER.

The narrator says BY 1938, ELEANOR'S
DAILY COLUMN IS WILDLY POPULAR,
WITH A READERSHIP
OF OVER FOUR MILLION AMERICANS.

Chris says IF ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
WAS ALIVE RIGHT NOW
SHE'D BE TWEETING,
FACEBOOKING, YOUTUBING,
BECAUSE EVERY SINGLE MEDIUM
THAT EXISTED AT THE TIME,
SHE MOBILIZED,
AND HER PUBLIC LIFE COMES
TO PROMINENCE
AT THE VERY BEGINNING
OF THE RADIO AGE.

A radio presenter says FOR THE SHAVE
YOU'VE ALWAYS WANTED,
REACH FOR THE REMINGTON... THIS IS LEON PEARSON...

Another radio presenter says MILLIONS
LISTENING THROUGHOUT...

Anya says THERE WERE
VERY FEW WOMEN ON THE RADIO.
WOMEN WERE ALLOWED TO DO
PROGRAMS ABOUT HOUSEKEEPING
OR EDUCATION,
OR THEY WOULD BE ALLOWED
TO SING.
[SINGING]

Anya says BUT ELEANOR IS BROADCASTING
IN THE EARLY 1930S.

A radio presenter says MRS. ELEANOR ROOSEVELT.

Eleanor says GOOD DAY,
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN.
[CLEARS THROAT]
I ATTENDED LAST NIGHT...

Paul says PEOPLE WOULD SIT
AROUND THEIR LIVING ROOM
AND IT WAS LIKE THE FIRST LADY
WAS TALKING TO YOU.

Eleanor says I WANT TO TALK TO YOU
ABOUT THE GENERAL QUESTION
OF HOUSING.

Paul says IT WAS LIKE
SHE WAS SITTING WITH YOU
IN YOUR LIVING ROOM
WITH YOUR LITTLE VICTROLA
IN THE CORNER.
AND HER VOICE WAS THERE.

Susan says ELEANOR ROOSEVELT CONNECTED
WITH ORDINARY AMERICANS,
AND IT WAS A REMARKABLE THING
AND THAT REALLY GREW OUT
OF HER RELATIONSHIP WITH HICK.
[WOMEN GIGGLING]

Allida says HICK FALLS DEEPLY,
DEEPLY IN LOVE WITH ELEANOR.

The narrator says OVER THEIR LIFETIME,
THEY WRITE ALMOST 3,000 LETTERS
TO ONE ANOTHER.

Susan says THEY WRITE
ABOUT MISSING EACH OTHER.
YOU GET THE FEELING OF THIS
DEEP CARING BETWEEN THEM,
AND THEN THERE WILL BE
SPECIFIC THINGS
LIKE, YOU KNOW,
"I LOOKED AT YOUR PHOTOGRAPH
AND I KISSED YOU
IN THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER
OF YOUR MOUTH.
THERE IS SOME DEBATE ABOUT
WHETHER IT WAS PHYSICAL OR NOT,
BUT I DON'T THINK
ANYONE CAN DENY
THAT IT WAS A DEEP LOVE.

Allida says AS A LESBIAN,
NOTHING WOULD MAKE MY LITTLE
POLITICAL SOUL HAPPIER...
THAN TO THINK THAT ELEANOR
AND HICK HAD THIS GREAT,
PASSIONATE AFFAIR.
AS A HISTORIAN, I DON'T CARE.
I AM GRATEFUL FOR LORENA HICKOK.
ELEANOR LOVED
AND WAS LOVED IN RETURN,
AND SHE WAS EMPOWERED
BY THAT RELATIONSHIP.

A reporter says MRS. ROOSEVELT
IS GREETED BY MICROPHONES,
REPORTERS...

The caption changes to "Patricia Bell-Scott. Author of The Fireband and the First Lady."

Patricia is in her late sixties, with straight brown hair in a bob cut and wears a deep purple blouse and a pendant necklace.

Patricia says EVEN THOUGH ELEANOR
FREQUENTLY SAID THAT SHE
WAS REALLY NOT A POLITICIAN,
SHE HAD
GOOD POLITICAL INSTINCTS,
AND AT THE TOP OF THAT AGENDA
WAS CIVIL RIGHTS.

The narrator says IN THE LATE 1930S,
TO ELEANOR'S SHAME,
AFRICAN AMERICAN CITIZENS
ARE STILL SEGREGATED BY LAW,
OFTEN DENIED BASIC RIGHTS
SUCH AS JOBS, HOUSING
AND THE VOTE.

Patricia says SHE WAS VERY MUCH INVOLVED
IN THE STRUGGLE TO GET CONGRESS
AND THE PRESIDENT
TO MOVE FOR PASSING
ANTI-LYNCHING LEGISLATION.

Robin says ELEANOR COMES
TO TRULY UNDERSTAND
HOW UNDERMINING
OF OUR DEMOCRACY IS THIS IDEA
THAT EVERYONE
IS NOT BEING TREATED EQUALLY.

Chris says SO, ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
GOES TO GREAT LENGTHS
TO OPEN THE DOORS
OF THE ROOSEVELT WHITE HOUSE
VERY WIDE TO PEOPLE OF COLOR.
I MEAN, YOU SEE ELEANOR BOUNDING
DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE DRIVEWAY,
VERY MUCH IN PUBLIC VIEW...
TO GREET FEMALE
CIVIL RIGHTS ADVOCATE,
MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE,
IN A WAY THAT ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
DOESN'T GREET ROYALTY.

Patricia says ELEANOR ROOSEVELT WAS A LEADER
WILLING TO TAKE A STAND,
AND SHE DID SOMETHING
THAT REALLY CAUGHT
THE ATTENTION OF THE NATION.

The narrator says IN 1938,
DEFYING THE SECRET SERVICE,
SHE TRAVELS
TO A CIVIL RIGHTS MEETING
IN BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA
WITH HER FRIEND,
MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE.

Allida says ELEANOR GOES
INTO THIS MEETING,
WHICH IS SEGREGATED.
WHITES ON THIS SIDE,
BLACKS ON THIS SIDE.
SHE JUST
TRUCKS DOWN THAT AISLE
AND BOOP! RIGHT BY BETHUNE.

A lady at a dramatization says SHE CAN'T SIT THERE!

The officer says MS. ROOSEVELT...

Allida says AND ASKS HER TO MOVE.
THE LEGEND IS TRUE.
ELEANOR DOES GET A CHAIR,
SITS IN THE MIDDLE
OF THE AISLE...
AND STRADDLES SEGREGATION.
[APPLAUSE]

Allida says ONE FOOT IN BLACK,
ONE FOOT IN WHITE.

Patricia says LOCAL PAPERS PICKED IT UP.
BLACK PRINT PRESS
WAS JUST DELIGHTED.
WHITE PRESS AND SOUTHERN PRESS
WAS REALLY UPSET.

A newspaper article appears with a headline that reads "Eleanor demands equality for negroes in address."

Allida says OTHER
FIRST LADIES HAD BEEN CRITICIZED
BUT NOBODY FACED
THE INTENSE VENOM
IN SUCH A CONSISTENT,
PERSISTENT WAY AS ELEANOR.

Robin says THE KU KLUX KLAN,
THEY EVENTUALLY PUT A PRICE
ON HER HEAD.
25,000 DOLLARS IF YOU COULD KILL
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT.
SO, THIS WAS CRITICISM
ON STEROIDS.

A black and white clip shows former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover say WE ASK EVERY
CITIZEN TO IMMEDIATELY REPORT
ANY INFORMATION
REGARDING ESPIONAGE...

The narrator says BUT ELEANOR'S
MOST POWERFUL OPPONENT
IS THE HEAD OF THE FBI.

Blanche says THE FIRST
ENTRY INTO HER FBI FILE
BY J EDGAR HOOVER,
WHO HATED HER GUTS,
IS HER SUPPORT FOR CIVIL RIGHTS.
THAT FOR HIM
IS THE MOST UN-AMERICAN.

Chris says THE FILE
IS ABOUT 3,500 PAGES LONG,
IT COULD FILL A WHOLE
FILE CABINET TOP TO BOTTOM.
THE EARLIEST DOCUMENT IN IT
IS FROM 1924.

Blanche says EVERY WORD ON BEHALF OF JUSTICE
FOR BLACK PEOPLE
WAS CONSIDERED COMMUNIST.

Chris says J. EDGAR HOOVER
SEES ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
THE WAY A LOT OF PEOPLE
IN CONSERVATIVE WHITE AMERICA
SEE ELEANOR ROOSEVELT.
WHY CAN'T SHE JUST SHUT UP?
WHY CAN'T SHE
JUST NOT ROCK THE BOAT?
[TYPEWRITER CLICKING]

Eleanor says YOU HAD
AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEAD...

The narrator says BUT THE FIRST LADY
REFUSES TO TOE THE LINE ON RACE.
WHEN AFRICAN AMERICAN
OPERA-SINGER MARIAN ANDERSON
IS BANNED FROM PERFORMING
AT A CONCERT-HALL
OWNED BY THE DAUGHTERS
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION,
ELEANOR ONCE AGAIN SPRINGS
INTO ACTION.

Robin says ELEANOR
IS QUITE UPSET ABOUT THIS.
FIRST OF ALL, SHE'S A MEMBER
OF THE DAR.
SO, SHE WRITES A LETTER.

Paul says IT IS A-- A CLASSIC
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT LETTER.

He reads the letter and says "I'M AFRAID I HAVE NEVER BEEN
A VERY USEFUL MEMBER
OF THE DAUGHTERS
OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.
I KNOW IT WILL MAKE
VERY LITTLE DIFFERENCE TO YOU
WHETHER I RESIGN
OR WHETHER I CONTINUE..."

Eleanor says I'M IN COMPLETE
DISAGREEMENT
WITH THE ATTITUDE TAKEN...

Robin says SHE SENDS IT
TO NEWSPAPERS
ALL OVER THE COUNTRY.
SOON, THERE'S INTERNATIONAL
RECOGNITION ABOUT THIS.

Paul says "AND I FEEL OBLIGED
TO SEND INTO YOU
MY RESIGNATION.
YOU HAD AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEAD
IN AN ENLIGHTENED WAY,
AND IT SEEMS TO ME THAT
YOUR ORGANIZATION HAS FAILED."
HER RESIGNATION WAS HUGE NEWS,
IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT,
AND IT PUT ENORMOUS PRESSURE
ON NOT JUST THE DAUGHTERS
OF THE REVOLUTION
BUT ALL ORGANIZATIONS
TO CONFRONT
THEIR RACIST POLICIES.

The narrator says THE WORLD IS WATCHING,
AND ELEANOR HELPS ORGANIZE
A NEW VENUE FOR THE CONCERT...
IN THE PLACE
THAT MOST SYMBOLIZES FREEDOM.

The caption changes to "Easter Sunday, 1939. The Lincoln Memorial."

[CHEERING]

President Roosevelt addresses the crowd and says IN THIS GREAT AUDITORIUM
UNDER THE SKY,
ALL OF US ARE FREE.

Robin says MARIAN ANDERSON
IS STANDING THERE,
AND IN FRONT OF HER
ARE 75,000 PEOPLE,
BLACK AND WHITE TOGETHER.

Blanche says THIS WAS THE FIRST PUBLIC EVENT
THAT WAS DE-SEGREGATED.

Patricia says EVERYBODY
THERE COULD FREELY MINGLE
AND SIT NEXT TO EACH OTHER
WITHOUT REGARD TO RACE,
CREED OR COLOR.
IT WAS JUST SIMPLY

A reporter says SPECTATORS INCLUDE
SUPREME COURT JUSTICE BLACK,
NEW YORK SENATOR
ROBERT WAGNER,
AND A HOST OF NOTABLES,
HERE TO LISTEN THE VOICE OF...

Robin says ELEANOR
DIDN'T GO TO THE CONCERT.
SHE WANTED THAT MOMENT
IN HISTORY
TO BELONG TO MARIAN ANDERSON.

A clip shows Marian singing to the crowd.

[SINGS "AMERICA:
MY COUNTRY, 'TIS OF THEE"]

Patricia says PEOPLE
IN THE AUDIENCE SILENTLY WEPT...
AS A WAVE OF EMOTION WASHED
OVER THE THRONG.

Robin says "MY COUNTRY TIS OF THEE,
SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY,
TO THEE WE SING."

Patricia says ELEANOR ROOSEVELT DEFIED
THE CONVENTIONS OF HER ROLE
AS FIRST LADY,
A WOMAN IN ARMS
WITH AFRICAN AMERICANS.

[CHEERING AND APPLAUSE]

Blanche says THIS WAS THE FIRST STEP
IN THE GREAT JOURNEY TO FREEDOM.

A clip shows images of the bombing of Pearl Harbour with a caption that reads "December 7, 1941. Pearl Harbour, Hawaii."

A reporter says WE HAVE WITNESSED
THIS MORNING
SEVERE BOMBING OF PEARL HARBOR
BY ENEMY PLANES.

The narrator says WITH WORLD WAR TWO
RAGING ACROSS EUROPE,
AMERICAN NEUTRALITY IS SHATTERED
WHEN THE JAPANESE LAUNCH
A SURPRISE ATTACK
ON THE PACIFIC FLEET.

A newscaster says WE INTERRUPT THIS PROGRAM
TO BRING YOU
A SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN.
THE JAPANESE HAVE ATTACKED
PEARL HARBOR, HAWAII BY AIR,
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT
HAS JUST ANNOUNCED.

Anya says AMERICANS WOULD HAVE BEEN
LISTENING TO THE NEWS
PROBABLY ALL DAY,
WAITING FOR AN UPDATE.
FRANKLIN IS BUSY
WITH HIS CABINET,
DETERMINING WHAT ACTION
THE UNITED STATES SHOULD TAKE.

A newscaster says SECRETARY EARLY
INFORMED ALL CORRESPONDENTS
AND THEN RUSHED
TO THE WHITE HOUSE
TO BE WITH PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT.

Anya says ELEANOR IS SCHEDULED
TO GO ON AIR THAT EVENING
AS PART OF
ONE OF HER REGULAR BROADCASTS,
SO, SHE SETS
ABOUT REWRITING THE SCRIPT.

A reporter says THAT THE 50 PLANES
ATTACKED THE ISLAND...

The narrator says SPEAKING ON BEHALF
OF THE ADMINISTRATION,
THE FIRST VOICE THE NATION
WILL HEAR IS ELEANOR'S.
IT'S AN UNPRECEDENTED MOMENT
FOR A FIRST LADY.

Eleanor says GOOD EVENING,
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN.
[CLEARS THROAT]
I AM SPEAKING TO YOU TONIGHT
AT A VERY SERIOUS MOMENT
IN OUR HISTORY.
MANY OF YOU
ALL OVER THIS COUNTRY
HAVE BOYS IN THE SERVICES
WHO WILL NOW BE CALLED UPON
TO GO INTO ACTION.
YOU CANNOT ESCAPE ANXIETY.
YOU CANNOT ESCAPE THE CLUTCH
OF FEAR AT YOUR HEART.
I HAVE A BOY AT SEA
ON A DESTROYER.
FOR ALL I KNOW HE MAY BE
ON HIS WAY TO THE PACIFIC.
TWO OF MY CHILDREN ARE IN
COAST CITIES ON THE PACIFIC.
WHATEVER IS ASKED OF US,
I AM SURE WE CAN ACCOMPLISH IT.
I HAVE FAITH IN YOU.

Anya says IT'S AS IF
SHE IS THE PRESIDENT SPEAKING
WHEN SHE TRIES
TO UNITE THE COUNTRY,
TRIES TO PUT PEOPLE'S MINDS
AT REST,
AND AT THE SAME TIME MAKE SURE
THAT THEY ARE READY FOR ACTION.

Eleanor says WE ARE THE FREE
AND UNCONQUERABLE PEOPLE
OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
IF THAT ISN'T PRESIDENTIAL,
THEN I DON'T KNOW WHAT IS.

The narrator says THE NEXT DAY,
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT
DECLARES WAR.

Robin says ALL FOUR OF HER SONS
WERE FIGHTING IN THE WAR.
YOU CAN IMAGINE LIKE ANY MOTHER,
ANY MILITARY MOTHER,
HOW SHE FELT.

Nina says SHE WAS NOT ONE
WHO THOUGHT WAR WAS GLORIOUS.
BUT HER DUTY TO HER COUNTRY
AND TO HER HUSBAND
REALLY CAME FIRST.

The narrator says SO, WHEN FRANKLIN ASKS ELEANOR
TO MAKE A PERILOUS TRIP
TO THE SOUTH PACIFIC,
SHE PUTS PERSONAL FEELINGS
ASIDE.

A reporter says TRAVELLING
UNDER THE CODE NAME "ROVER,"
SHE VISITS COMBAT AREAS
AND MAKES IT A POINT
TO STOP AT EVERY HOSPITAL.

Paul says NAVAL COMMANDERS
WERE OPPOSED TO THIS IDEA
MACARTHUR AND NIMITZ,
THEY THOUGHT
THIS WAS A TERRIBLE IDEA.
"WE DO NOT WANT THE FIRST LADY
TRAIPSING THROUGH OUR WAR ZONE,
WHAT A DISASTER
THIS IS GONNA BE."
YOU KNOW,
SHE COULD HAVE BEEN KILLED
AND SHOT DOWN AT ANY POINT.

The reporter says WATCHING THE FACES
OF THOSE KIDS LIGHT UP
WHEN SHE TALKED TO THEM
MADE YOU KNOW
THAT SHE WAS THE BEST MEDICINE
THEY COULD HAVE HAD.

Paul says BUT AT THE END,
ADMIRAL HALSEY SAID SHE HAD
A GREATER IMPACT ON THE PEOPLE
IN THE FIELD THAN ANY PERSON
WHO EVER VISITED
THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WAR.

Blanche says SHE
VISITED EVERY SINGLE HOSPITAL
AND SPOKE TO EVERY SINGLE GI JOE
WHO WAS WOUNDED...
AND TOOK THEIR FAMILY NAMES
AND WHEN SHE GOT BACK,
SHE CALLED THEIR PARENTS
AND THEIR LOVED ONES.

Allida says THE WAR HAUNTS ELEANOR.
HER ANGER OVER THE SLAUGHTER
THAT SHE SAW
WAS THE SINGLE MOTIVATING FACTOR
FOR THE REST OF HER LIFE.

The caption changes to "April 12, 1945. Washington, DC."

A reporter says OVER THE WHITE HOUSE
AT WASHINGTON,
THE FLAG FLIES AT HALF-MAST
AS A GRIEF-STRICKEN NATION
MOURNS THE DEATH
OF FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT,
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

The narrator says THREE MONTHS
INTO ROOSEVELT'S FOURTH TERM,
THE LONGEST PRESIDENCY
IN AMERICAN HISTORY IS OVER.

Patricia says FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT'S DEATH
REALLY SHOCKED THE NATION.
IT WAS A DOUBLE LOSS
BECAUSE ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
WAS LEAVING AS FIRST LADY,
AND FOR MANY AFRICAN AMERICANS,
SHE WAS
THE UNOFFICIAL PRESIDENT.

Anya says I THINK THAT SHE
WAS VERY CONCERNED
THAT UNDER PRESIDENT TRUMAN,
EVERYTHING THAT SHE AND FRANKLIN
TOGETHER HAD FOUGHT FOR,
DOMESTICALLY AND GLOBALLY,
WOULD NOW SOMEHOW BE FORGOTTEN.
AND SHE WANTED TO SECURE
THAT LEGACY.

The narrator says SO, WHEN
PRESIDENT TRUMAN ASKS ELEANOR
TO JOIN THE FIRST
AMERICAN DELEGATION
TO THE NEWLY FORMED
UNITED NATIONS,
SHE JUMPS AT THE CHANCE.

A reporter says BY FAR
THE MOST INTERESTING THE ARRIVAL
WAS THAT OF MRS. ROOSEVELT,
WIDOW OF THE LATE PRESIDENT.

Blanche says THE UN IS CREATED
TO MAKE A FORUM FOR DISCUSSION
SO WE NEVER HAVE
TO GO TO WAR AGAIN.

Robin says NOW, THIS WAS THE GREAT DREAM
OF THE ROOSEVELTS.
A UNITED NATIONS
THAT WOULD ENSURE PEACE
IN THE WORLD.

A reporter says 2,000 DELEGATES
ARE ATTENDING THE MEETING.
FROM ALL THE CORNERS
OF THE EARTH THEY CAME.
SECRETARY OF STATE MARSHALL
GREETS A FELLOW DELEGATE,
MRS. ROOSEVELT.

The narrator says ELEANOR
IS UNANIMOUSLY ELECTED
CHAIR OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE
CHARGED WITH DRAFTING
THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION
OF HUMAN RIGHTS.

Allida says SHE HAS TO NEGOTIATE
WITH 18 COUNTRIES.
THEY DON'T AGREE ON ANYTHING.
THEY DON'T AGREE
WHETHER GOD EXISTS!

Robin says IT TOOK ALMOST TWO YEARS.
IT WAS ABSOLUTELY GRUELING.

A reporter says THE SOVIET UNION INSISTS...

Allida says HER ABILITY TO NAVIGATE
THE HUNDREDS OF MEETINGS
THAT IT TOOK...
TO CRAFT THE DECLARATION.
IT WAS BRILLIANT NEGOTIATION
STRATEGY.

Chris says HER WHOLE PUBLIC LIFE
AND HER LIFE IN THE WHITE HOUSE
HAD HELPED HER
TO EXCEED IN THAT ROLE,
BECAUSE SHE'S FIGURED OUT
DECADES AGO
THAT YOU CAN GET
A TREMENDOUS AMOUNT DONE
IF YOU DON'T CARE
ABOUT TAKING CREDIT FOR IT.

Eleanor says THIS UNIVERSAL DECLARATION
OF HUMAN RIGHTS...
MAY WELL BECOME
THE INTERNATIONAL MAGNA CARTA
OF ALL MEN EVERYWHERE.

The narrator says ELEANOR'S PRESENTATION
CAPS A LIFETIME
OF CHAMPIONING HUMAN RIGHTS.

Eleanor says THE PROCLAMATION
OF THE DECLARATION...

Allida says IT'S THE MOST
IMPORTANT DOCUMENT
OF THE LAST 100 YEARS.
ALL HUMAN BEINGS ARE BORN FREE
AND EQUAL,
IN DIGNITY AND IN RIGHTS.
ALL HUMAN BEINGS.
IT'S THE FIRST TIME
IN THE HISTORY
OF THE FLIPPING WORLD
THAT WE SAY THAT.

A delegate says AND I MUST
CONGRATULATE THE PERSON...
WHO HAS BEEN THE LEADER
IN THIS MOVEMENT.
THE PERSON WHO HAS RAISED
TO EVEN GREATER HONOR,
SO GREAT A NAME, AND I REFER,
OF COURSE, TO MRS. ROOSEVELT,
THE DELEGATE
OF THE UNITED STATES.
[APPLAUSE]

The narrator says THE LONGEST SERVING
FIRST LADY IN AMERICAN HISTORY,
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
EXEMPLIFIES GREATNESS,
AND HER ACHIEVEMENTS
STILL RESONATE TODAY.

Another clip from the show "What's my line?" rolls.

The host says THIS A BETTER DAY
FOR WHAT'S MY LINE?
WE WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER
VERY FONDLY
THAT YOU HONORED US BY BEING
OUR MYSTERY GUEST,
AND I'M SURE THAT THE PANEL
WOULD LOVE VERY MUCH
TO SHAKE YOUR HAND.

Eleanor says THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

The host says THANK YOU, MRS. ROOSEVELT.
[APPLAUSE]

Blanche says SHE'S JUST NOT A FIRST LADY.
SHE'S A FIRST WOMAN,
A FIRST ACTIVIST,
WAY BEYOND FIRST LADYHOOD.
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT
WAS LADY BIG HEART.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

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