Transcript: Capturing Lee Miller | May 19, 2021

(CAMERA SNAPPING)
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A black and white picture of a young attractive woman facing the camera with an intense stare appears.

A caption reads "Model. Vogue, New York, 1928."

A black and white picture of a naked lady sitting down on one hit appears with the caption "Muse. Man Ray, Paris, 1930."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A woman in a black T-shirt says SHE DID SO MUCH WITH
AN EXTRAORDINARY AMOUNT OF
COURAGE.
(GUNS FIRING RAPIDLY)

The woman says IT'S VERY HARD, I THINK, FOR
WOMEN TODAY TO UNDERSTAND THE
DEGREE OF THE RISKS THAT SHE
TOOK.

A black and white picture of a woman having a bath appears with a caption "Icon. Portrait of Hitler's bathtub. Munich, 1945."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

Supermodel Karen Elson says YOU SEE THAT IN LEE MILLER'S
EYES.
THERE IS A FLAME THERE THAT IS
IGNITED WHEN YOU SEE THOSE
PHOTOGRAPHS.

Karen is in her early forties, with long slightly wavy red hair and wears a polka dotted brown dress.

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

The caption changes to "Photographer."

A woman in a green shirt says SHE WENT FOR IT, WHATEVER
IT WAS.

The caption changes to "Surrealist artist."

(TICKING)

A series of artistic pictures appear.

(TICKING)

The woman in green says SHE DIDN'T LET ANY OF THE
CONVENTIONS OF BEING A WOMAN
HOLD HER BACK.

In animation, a glass shatters.

(GLASS SHATTERING)

War pictures appear with a caption that reads "War Correspondent."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)
(GUNS FIRING RAPIDLY)
(EXPLODING)

Lee says I HOPE NO ONE WILL
EVER FORGET THE SUBJECT MATTER
FOR THOSE PICTURES.
I WON'T.

The name of the film reads "Capturing Lee Miller."

A caption reads "Antony Penrose. Son and biographer."

Antony is in his seventies, with short straight gray hair and wears glasses and a light blue shirt.

He says WHEN I WAS GROWING UP, I KNEW
VIRTUALLY NOTHING OF MY MUM'S
PAST ACHIEVEMENTS.
IT WAS A BOOK THAT SHE HAD
CLOSED.

The caption changes to "Ami Bouhassane. Granddaughter. Director of Lee Miller Archives."

Ami is in her forties, with above the shoulder straight blond hair and wears a blue sweater and a moss green cardigan.

She says PEOPLE WERE TRYING TO
CELEBRATE HER, BUT SHE DIDN'T
WANT IT.
SHE WANTED TO MOVE ON, AND SHE
WANTED TO FORGET.

The caption changes to "Marion Hume. Fashion editor and screenwriter."

Marion is in her fifties, with mid-length straight blond hair and wears glasses, a black shirt, and a black statement necklace.

She says SHE PACKED HER LIFE INTO
BOXES, DAZ AND HEINZ BAKED BEANS
CARDBOARD BOXES.
AND SHE PUT THEM IN THE ATTIC.

Anthony says WELL, MY LATE WIFE,
SUZANNA, FOUND LEE'S PHOTOGRAPHS
IN THE ATTIC OF THIS OLD HOUSE.
MY FIRST REACTION WAS DISBELIEF.

The caption changes to "Georgina Erskine. Family friend."

Georgina is in her seventies, with short slightly wavy white hair and wears a striped shirt.

She says I THINK LEE WAS VERY
MUCH BURYING THE PAST.
AND I THINK IT WAS BECAUSE SHE
WASN'T TERRIBLY HAPPY.
SHE CUT A SOMEWHAT LONELY
FIGURE.

Anthony says I HAD KNOWN MY MUM
AS A USELESS DRUNK, A HYSTERICAL
KIND OF PERSON WHO...
EVEN CATCHING A TRAIN IN LEWES
WAS A MAJOR EPISODE FOR HER.
I COULD NOT BELIEVE THAT SHE WAS
THE SAME PERSON THAT HAD CREATED
THIS MATERIAL.
I FELT THAT THIS WAS A STORY
THAT NEEDED TO BE TOLD.

The caption changes to "New York, 1927."

(CAR HORNS HONKING)
(CROWD CHEERING, APPLAUDING)

Marion says I FEEL, WITH LEE, THAT SHE
KNEW SHE WAS GOING TO BE A STAR.
IF YOU GROW UP IN THE SUBURBS...
I MEAN, POUGHKEEPSIE'S A TRAIN
RIDE FROM NEW YORK-- ALL YOU
WANT IS THE BIG CITY.
(HORNS HONKING)
SO, LEE GOES TO NEW YORK.
SHE HAS YOUTH.
SHE HAS BEAUTY.
SHE'S CONFIDENT.
MEN TAKE HER OUT FOR DINNER,
AND THEN...

(HORNS HONKING)
(TIRES SQUEALING)

Marion says THE STORY IS THAT LEE MILLER
STEPPED OUT IN FRONT OF AN
AUTOMOBILE.
AND AS THE DRIVER SWERVED TO A
HALT, THE MOST POWERFUL MAN IN
FASHION MANAGED TO SCOOP HER UP.
AND THAT MAN WAS CONDÉ NAST,
WHO WAS THE FOUNDER OF AMERICAN
VOGUE.
AND WHAT IS A FACT IS, WITHIN A
VERY SHORT TIME OF MEETING CONDÉ
NAST-- WHO HAD A BIT OF A
CASTING COUCH, APPARENTLY.
BUT VERY SOON AFTER MEETING HIM,
SHE WAS ON THE COVER OF
VOGUE.

A picture of Lee in a silk 1920's style dress appears.

(CAMERA SNAPPING)
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

The caption changes to "Karen Elson. Supermodel and musician."

Karen says WHEN I LOOK AT THE
IMAGES OF LEE MILLER, I SEE A
WOMAN WHO IS ENTIRELY
COMFORTABLE IN HER SKIN,
ENTIRELY COMFORTABLE WITH WHO
SHE IS AS A PERSON, AS A WOMAN.
AND HOW THOROUGHLY MODERN SHE
MUST HAVE BEEN THEN.
HOW BEYOND MODERN.
HOW PROBABLY GROUND-BREAKING
SHE WAS.

Anthony says I KNEW VERY LITTLE
OF HER AS A MODEL.
IT'S NOT SOMETHING THAT SHE EVER
TALKED ABOUT AT ALL.
WELL, SHE NEVER TALKED ABOUT
ANYTHING TO DO WITH THIS.
SHE NEVER SHOWED ME THE
BEAUTIFUL PICTURES IN
VOGUE
OF
HER LOOKING ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS.

A picture of Lee on a chair wearing fancy clothes and a hat appears.

Marion says PART OF THE REASON
THAT LEE MILLER WAS SUCH A GREAT
MODEL IS, SHE'D BEEN MODELING
FROM THE DAY SHE WAS BORN.

A picture of a baby sitting in the toilet appears with a caption that reads "Lee, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1907. Theodor Miller."

Marion says LEE'S FATHER PHOTOGRAPHED HER
ALL THE TIME.

The caption changes to "Carolyn Burke. Biographer."

Carolyn is in her late seventies, with chin length slightly wavy white hair and wears a green shirt and a printed scarf.

Carolyn says THEODORE MILLER WAS
A SERIOUS AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER,
QUITE ADEPT AT THE TECHNIQUES OF
TIME, INCLUDING THE STEREOSCOPIC
CAMERA.
IMAGES WOULD MERGE WITH EACH
OTHER TO GIVE YOU AN ILLUSION
OF DEPTH.

Marion says THEODORE WOULD
PROBABLY HAVE CONSIDERED HIMSELF
AN ARTIST.
AND HE TOOK PICTURES OF HIS
DAUGHTER THAT, TO OUR EYES, ARE
VERY DUBIOUS.

A series of naked pictures of Lee sitting in an armchair appears.

(HINGES SQUEAKING)
(HINGES SQUEAKING)

Anthony says I DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT
THESE PICTURES UNTIL AFTER LEE
DIED.
AND IT WAS PART OF THE STASH
THAT WE FOUND.
I WAS QUITE SHOCKED, ACTUALLY,
BECAUSE I THOUGHT THAT THEY WERE
AN INVASION OF THE NORMAL
FATHER-DAUGHTER RELATIONSHIP.
AND OF COURSE, BY THAT TIME, I'D
GOT MY OWN DAUGHTERS.
AND I COULD NO MORE IMAGINE ME
TAKING THESE KIND OF PICTURES.

Ami says IF YOU STEP BACK AND DON'T
THINK THAT THOSE PICTURES ARE OF
A FATHER, OF A DAUGHTER, THEY'RE
ACTUALLY QUITE GOOD FOR AN
AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHER.
BUT THE MINUTE YOU KNOW THAT
THAT'S HER DAD, THEN YOU JUST
CAN'T GET OVER IT.

Anthony says IT'S A TRANSGRESSION OF A
RELATIONSHIP.

Other naked pictures of Lee sitting on a bed in front of a mirror appear.
The caption changes to "Jessie Mann. Artist and Model."

Jessie is in her thirties, with chin length wavy strawberry blond hair and wears a black T-shirt.

She says THEODORE'S PHOTOGRAPHS OF LEE
I SEE AS A COLLABORATION.
I SEE HER AS A PARTICIPANT.
I SEE A LIFE EXPERIENCE SO
SIMILAR TO MY OWN.
WHEN MOM WAS WORKING ON A
PHOTOGRAPH, IT WAS A FAMILY
AFFAIR.

A picture of a naked little girl with her hand in a jar sitting next to a naked woman lying on a deck appears with a caption that reads "Listening to Madonna by the Tadpole Jar, 1990, Sally Mann."

Jessie says I GREW UP IN A FAMILY WHERE WE
WERE VERY COMFORTABLE WITH
NUDITY AND BEING NUDE AROUND
EACH OTHER.
AND IT'S VERY SAD THAT PEOPLE
CANNOT CONCEIVE OF LEE ENGAGING
IN NUDITY AROUND HER FATHER
WITHOUT IT BECOMING SEXUALIZED.

A naked picture of Lee in the tub appears with a caption that reads "lee in bathtub. 1930, Theodor Miller."

Jessie says I THINK WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN
ART, THE ASSUMPTION IS ONE OF
EXPLOITATION.
AND THAT IS NOT WHAT I SEE AT
ALL WITH HER AS A CHILD SUBJECT
OR AS AN ADULT SUBJECT.

A picture of an adult Lee sitting on her father's lap appears with a caption that reads "Lee and Theodore Miller. Man Ray."

Carolyn says HE DID BRING HER UP
AS HIS FAVOURITE MODEL.
AND THIS CONTINUED INTO HER
TEENS AND EARLY 20S, APPARENTLY
WITHOUT ANY DISTRESS OR QUALMS
OR WORRIES ON HER PART, AS FAR
AS WE CAN TELL.
(HORNS HONKING)

Editorial pictures of Lee in fashion clothes appear with the caption "Lee, Vogue USA, 1928. Edward Steichen."

Carolyn HAVING ALREADY LEARNED QUITE A
BIT ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY AT HOME,
SHE COULD TALK PHOTOGRAPHY WITH
THE GREAT PHOTOGRAPHERS, LIKE
STEICHEN, WITH WHOM SHE WORKED.
SHE WAS PROBABLY FORMING THE
IDEA THAT SHE'D LIKE TO TAKE THE
PHOTOGRAPHS HERSELF.
AND I THINK IT WAS STEICHEN WHO
SAID, "WELL, IF YOU WANT TO
STUDY WITH ONE OF THE GREATS,
YOU SHOULD GO TO PARIS AND STUDY
WITH MAN RAY."

(HORN BLOWING, PEOPLE CHEERING)

The caption changes to "Paris, 1930."

(HORN BLOWING)

Marion says PARIS IN THE LATE
'20S WAS THE CENTRE OF THE
WORLD.
PARIS IS PARIS, AND PARIS IS
JAZZ.
AND LEE IS JAZZ.
BEING IN PARIS IN THE '30S FOR
A WOMAN LIKE LEE WAS LITERALLY
ABOUT RIPPING YOUR CORSET OFF,
BECAUSE, YOU KNOW, IT'S WHEN
FASHION CHANGES.
IT'S WHEN THE WORLD CHANGES.
IT'S A MOMENT OF JUST HUGE
POSSIBILITY.

The caption changes to "In Town Tonight. US radio interview, 1946."

The radio host says YOU KNOW, LEE, FIRST,
I THINK WE'D BETTER CLEAR UP
JUST HOW YOU HAPPEN TO BE A
PHOTOGRAPHER IN THE FIRST
PLACE.

Lee says I THOUGHT THE BEST WAY
WAS TO START OUT STUDYING WITH
ONE OF THE GREAT MASTERS IN THE
FIELD, MAN RAY.
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A picture of a naked woman facing back appears with a caption that reads "Le violon d'Ingres, 1924, Man Ray."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A picture of a smiley Lee appears with the caption "Lee Miller, 1931, Man Ray."

Lee says HE WAS IN PARIS AT THAT TIME.
SO I WENT TO HIM AND SAID,
"HELLO.
I'M YOUR NEW STUDENT AND
APPRENTICE."
HE SAID, "OH, NO, YOU'RE NOT.
I DON'T HAVE STUDENTS OR
APPRENTICES."
I SAID, "YOU DO NOW."
(LEE CHUCKLING)

Another picture of Lee appears with the caption "Lee aged 24 with Man Ray, 1930."

Carolyn says AT FIRST, SHE WAS
HIS STUDENT.
SHE WAS ALSO HIS STUDIO
ASSISTANT, BUT THEY ALSO BECAME
LOVERS EARLY ON.

A naked picture of Lee appears with the caption "Lee Miller, Paris, 1930, Man Ray."

Marion says WHY DID LEE MILLER...
GOLDEN, BEAUTIFUL, FASHIONABLE...
FALL FOR A MAN WHO WAS BASICALLY
HALF HER HEIGHT, NOT VERY
GOLDEN?
BECAUSE SHE HAD MUCH TO LEARN,
AND HE WAS A GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER.

Anthony says FOR MAN RAY, I THINK
IT WAS THE INCARNATION OF THE
MOST IMPROBABLE RELATIONSHIP
THAT HE COULD HAVE IMAGINED.
THIS INCREDIBLY BEAUTIFUL WHITE
ANGLO-SAXON PROTESTANT FROM NEW
YORK DROPPING INTO HIS LAP AND
HIS LIFE IN THIS WAY.
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

Karen says THERE'S STILL SO MUCH
THAT MAN RAY DID WITH LEE MILLER
THAT WAS GROUND-BREAKING.
I DON'T THINK ANYONE HAD EVERY
SEEN PHOTOGRAPHY AS THAT SORT OF
DARING.
THIS LEVEL OF ARTISTIC GENIUS
BETWEEN THE PAIR OF THEM, IT
RESONATES IN PHOTOGRAPHY TODAY.
SHE UNDERSTANDS WHAT MAN RAY IS
ASKING OF HER.
FROM MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE,
THERE IS THIS SENSE OF JUST
KNOWING WHAT THE PHOTOGRAPHER
WANTS.
AND MANIPULATING YOURSELF INTO
THESE SORT OF SHAPES AND
POSITIONS.
BUT ALSO BEING ATTUNED TO SORT
OF LOOK INTO THE CAMERA AND
CONVEY LIFE.
IT IS AN ALCHEMY OF TWO PEOPLE:
THE PHOTOGRAPHER, THE MUSE.

Editorial pictures of Karen by photographer Tim Walker appear.

Jessie says TYPICALLY,
HISTORICALLY, THE ARTIST HAS
THEN TAKEN THE PHOTOGRAPHS,
PRODUCED AMAZING WORK, AND
WALKED AWAY, SAYING, "LOOK AT
THIS AMAZING WORK THAT I MADE."
AS OPPOSED TO SAYING, "LOOK AT
THIS GIFT I HAVE BEEN GIVEN AND
THE EXTRAORDINARY MAGIC OF THIS
COLLABORATION."
AND HE DID NOT NEGATE HER IN
RETROSPECT, WHICH I THINK,
AGAIN, SPEAKS VOLUMES ABOUT HER,
THE EXTENT OF THE RESPECT THAT
HE HAD FOR HER.

Carolyn says LEE AND MAN FIT
PERFECTLY INTO THE WORLD OF THE
SURREALISTS IN THE 1930S.
THAT MOVEMENT SEEMED NOT ONLY
VERY UNCONVENTIONAL BUT VERY
FREEING FOR THE WOMEN AS WELL.
TO BE TREATED NOT ONLY AS MUSES
BUT AS MUSES WHO WERE THEMSELVES
ARTISTS AND COULD PARTICIPATE.

A picture of Lee's naked torso appears with a caption that reads "Self portrait, Paris, circa 1930, Lee Miller."

Anthony says LEE'S RELATIONSHIP
WITH MAN RAY CHANGED HER LIFE IN
THE SENSE THAT IT REALLY MADE
HER INTO A SURREALIST
PHOTOGRAPHER.
SHE COULD ALREADY DO THE FASHION
AND STUFF LIKE THAT.
BUT I THINK MAN RAY REALLY
ENCOURAGED THAT WONDERFUL
ELEMENT IN HER WORK, WHICH IS
THE SURREAL.
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

Another picture appears with the caption "Nude bent forward, Paris, circa 1930, Lee Miller."

Another picture of a woman's head under a bell jar appears with the caption "Tanka Ramm under a bell jar, Paris, 1930, Lee Miller."

Another picture shows the back of 4 rats on a beam with the caption "Untitled (Rat tails) circa 1930, Lee Miller."

Karen says I DO THINK, WITH LEE
MILLER, SHE IS MUCH MORE LAUDED
AS AN ARTIST AND A CREATOR AS
WELL AS A MUSE.
I SEE A WOMAN WHO IS IN CHARGE,
AND SHE'S THE ONE CALLING THE
SHOTS.
AND I JUST LOVE THAT.
(LAUGHING)

A picture of Chaplin under a chandelier appears with the caption "Charlie Chaplin, 1932, Lee Miller."

Ami says PEOPLE FORGET THAT SHE
ACTUALLY HAD HER OWN STUDIO IN
PARIS.
AND SHE WAS WORKING ON DOING HER
OWN COMMISSIONS AND WORKING WITH
HOYNINGEN-HUENE, WHO WAS THE
BOSS OF PARIS
VOGUE
STUDIOS.

A picture of a perfume bottle appears with a caption that reads "Chanel perfume, French Vogue, 1930, Lee Miller."

(TICKING)

Carolyn says HE DID EVERYTHING HE
COULD, ALMOST, TO FURTHER HER
PHOTOGRAPHIC CAREER.
HOWEVER, HE ALSO WANTED TO
CONTROL HER.
(TICKING)

Marion says I THINK WE COULD SEE,
AS THE RELATIONSHIP OF A
MUCH YOUNGER WOMAN WITH A MUCH
OLDER MAN, THAT INITIALLY, THE
POWER LIES WITH THE MAN.
AND THEN THERE'S THE SHIFT, AND
IT LIES WITH THE WOMAN.
AND THE ENDING, REALLY, WITH MAN
RAY IS, SHE PROBABLY-- SHE'D GOT
WHAT SHE WANTED.

Anthony says AND HE STRUGGLED TO
TRY AND POSSESS AND CONTROL THIS
TOTALLY UNCONTROLLABLE WOMAN.
AND THAT'S WHAT BROKE THEM APART
IN THE END, AFTER THREE YEARS.
(GLASS SHATTERING)
(PEOPLE CHEERING, APPLAUDING)

The caption changes to "New York, 1934."

Anthony reads an old marriage announcement on the paper and says "LEE MILLER A BRIDE.
POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK,
SEPTEMBER THE 4TH.
MR. AND MRS. THEODORE H. MILLER
OF THIS CITY TODAY ANNOUNCED THE
MARRIAGE OF THEIR DAUGHTER, LEE
MILLER, TO AZIZ ELOUI BEY OF
CAIRO, EGYPT."
(PEOPLE TALKING INDISTINCTLY)

Marion says WHY DID LEE MILLER
MARRY AN EGYPTIAN BUSINESSMAN
THAT SHE'D MET, I BELIEVE,
SKIING AND MOVE TO CAIRO?
HE IS EXTREMELY WEALTHY.
BUT HE ALSO OFFERS HER A KIND OF
MAGIC CARPET TO THE ARABIAN
NIGHTS, IN HER MIND.
SO THEY GET MARRIED VERY QUICKLY
IN CITY HALL.
AND SHE TELLS HER PARENTS
SOMETHING ALONG THE LINES OF,
"OH, YOU KNOW THAT GUY AZIZ?
WELL, I JUST MARRIED HIM."

A picture of a big house appears with the caption "Home of Lee and Aziz, Cairo, circa 1936."

Carolyn says SHE FOUND IN CAIRO
A VERY LUXURIOUS ESTABLISHMENT
WITH SERVANTS AND COOKS AND ALL
SORTS OF PEOPLE TO LOOK AFTER
HER.
AND FOR A TIME, SHE FOUND A
GREAT CHANGE OF SCENE, WHICH
INTERESTED HER.
FOR SEVERAL YEARS, SHE WAS QUITE
HAPPILY IMMERSED IN HER NEW
LIFE.
BUT IN TIME, THIS, TOO, BECAME
INSUFFICIENT FOR HER.

Marion says LEE REALIZED IT WAS
FULL OF PEOPLE WHO WERE PICKLED
WITH DRINK AND DRIED IN THE SUN.
AND THE WOMEN HAD NOTHING TO DO,
AND I THINK SHE GOT BORED
EXTREMELY QUICKLY.

Anthony says AS AN ANTIDOTE TO
THE BOREDOM OF LIFE, SHE FOUND
HER ROLLEIFLEX AND STARTED
TAKING PICTURES AGAIN.
AND THIS WAS ONE OF THE MOST
EXCITING PHOTOGRAPHIC PERIODS OF
HER CAREER.

A picture of a man in skis on top of a dune appears with the caption "Egypt, 1937, Lee Miller."

Carolyn says SO, SHE BEGAN GOING
ON EXPEDITIONS INTO THE DESERT
TO TAKE VERY UNUSUAL-- AND TO MY
MIND, HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL...
PHOTOGRAPHS THAT HAVE ALMOST A
MORE SPIRITUAL DIMENSION.

A picture from inside a tent in the desert appears with a caption that reads "Portrait of Space, 1937. Published in the London Bulletin."

Anthony says CERTAINLY, THE
PICTURE SHE MADE THROUGH THE
TORN FLY SCREEN, "PORTRAIT OF
SPACE," THAT SHOWS THAT KIND OF
CONJUNCTION OF ALL THE SURREAL
QUALITIES, ALL OF HER INTERNAL
FEELINGS IN THAT ONE SHOT, IN
THAT ONE PLACE.

Carolyn says IT SEEMS ALMOST
MEDITATIVE TO ME.
SHE HAD A STRONG DESIRE TO
ESCAPE INTO SOMETHING ELSE,
AN OTHER PLACE.
AND IT WAS IN EGYPT THAT SHE
COULD EXPLORE THAT.

Ami says WHEN SHE WAS MARRIED TO AZIZ
AND LIVING IN EGYPT, SHE EVEN
WRITES ABOUT IT IN HER LETTERS,
THAT SHE FEELS LIKE SHE NEEDS TO
BE A PROPER WIFE.
AND SHE KNOWS WHAT THE
EXPECTATIONS ARE, BUT SHE JUST
FINDS IT TOO HARD.
(LAUGHING) AND IT JUST DOESN'T
WORK.

Anthony says AZIZ KNEW THAT LEE
WAS UNHAPPY IN CAIRO AND PINING
FOR PARIS.
SO HE BOUGHT HER AN AIRLINE
TICKET.
AND SHE FLEW TO PARIS.
AND ON THE NIGHT SHE ARRIVED,
SHE HEARD THAT THERE WAS THIS
BIG PARTY ON.
AND IT WAS A FANCY DRESS PARTY,
AND ALL OF HER SURREALIST
FRIENDS WAS THERE.
IT MUST HAVE BEEN THE MOST
WONDERFUL REUNION.
AND THAT'S WHERE SHE MET MY DAD,
ROLAND PENROSE.

A picture of 2 men appears with the caption "Roland Penrose and Man Ray. Lee Miller."

Ami says I THINK AZIZ SHOT
HIMSELF IN THE FOOT, REALLY,
DIDN'T HE?
BECAUSE HE WAS SO NICE AND
BOUGHT HER A TICKET TO GO TO
PARIS TO SEE HER FRIENDS.
AND THEN THE SAME NIGHT, SHE
MEETS MY GRANDDAD.
IT'S A BIT LIKE, "DAMN!"
(LAUGHING) IF YOU'D KNOWN, WOULD
YOU HAVE BOUGHT THE TICKET,
AZIZ?

Marion says LEE IS NOW-- I THINK
IT WOULD BE FAIR TO SAY-- IN
LUST WITH ROLAND PENROSE.
AND HE FEELS EXACTLY THE SAME.

The caption changes to "France, 1937."

Marion says THERE IS ONE EXTRAORDINARY
PHOTOGRAPH WHICH KIND OF SUMS UP
1937 IN LEE'S LIFE.
THEY ARE ON THIS HOLIDAY WITH A
GROUP OF PEOPLE TO THE SOUTH OF
FRANCE.

A picture of people at a picnic appears with the caption "Picnic, Ile Sainte-Marguerite, 1937, Lee Miller."

(INSECTS BUZZING)

Ami says YOU SEE A LOT OF GUYS
WITH THEIR TOPS ON AND WOMEN
WITH THEIR TOPS OFF IN THE
PICNIC PICTURE, WHICH, IF YOU
EVER WANT ANYTHING TO ENCOMPASS
THE SURREALISTS, IS A GREAT ONE.
ALSO, YOU KNOW, IF YOU ZOOM
CLOSE IN TO ROLAND, YOU CAN SEE
AN ENGLISHMAN WHO'S DESPERATELY
TRYING TO BREAK FREE FROM HIS
VICTORIAN UPBRINGING.
HE'S LOOKING VERY KIND OF, "YES,
I'M STILL DOING LIBERATION
HERE." (CHUCKLING)

Carolyn says SHE WAS THE SORT OF
PERSON THAT HE WANTED TO BE IN
SOME RESPECTS.

Marion says THE DYNAMIC OF THE
SURREALISTS IS A DYNAMIC OF
FREE LOVE.
BUT FREE LOVE WHICH TENDS TO
FAVOUR MEN HAVING THE FREE LOVE
THAT THEY WANT AND NOT SO MUCH
THE WOMEN.
THEN YOU PUT LEE MILLER INTO
THAT MIX.
AND LEE IS DEFINITELY SOMEONE
WHO ALWAYS THINKS, "WELL, I
DON'T SEE WHY MEN SHOULD BE ABLE
TO DO SOMETHING THAT I CAN'T."

Jessie says FOR HER TO OWN THE
POWER OF HER SEXUALITY, TO
HARNESS IT, AND THEN TO ENJOY IT
FOR HERSELF, I MEAN, THAT'S
CRAZY.
I'M SO PROUD OF ALL THE SEX SHE
HAD, RIGHT?
LIKE, WAY TO GO.
IT MAKES ME SO HAPPY, YOU KNOW,
THAT THERE IS A BLIP IN HISTORY
WHERE AT LEAST ONE WOMAN HAD A
GOOD TIME.

Marion says IT'S ONE OF THOSE
MOMENTS WHERE EVERYONE IN THAT
PHOTOGRAPH IS SIGNALLING, "I
COULDN'T BE ANYWHERE ELSE THAN
HERE RIGHT NOW."
IT'S A MOMENT OF EXTRAORDINARY
HAPPINESS AND JOY, BUT MOST OF
ALL, FREEDOM.
AND WHEN WE LOOK AT IT NOW,
OF COURSE, IT'S VERY POIGNANT,
BECAUSE WHAT THEY KNOW-- AND
THEY DO KNOW-- IS THAT WAR IS
COMING.

Ami says THE SUMMER OF 1937 WAS A
WONDERFUL AFFAIR WITH MY
GRANDDAD, BUT SHE DID GO BACK.
SHE WENT BACK TO EGYPT.

The caption changes to "Letter from Roland to Lee, 1937."

A male reader says "DARLING LEE,
THIS IS HELL.
ANOTHER WEEK GONE, AND STILL NO
NEWS OF YOU.
THREE WEEKS NOW SINCE YOUR LAST
LETTER ARRIVED.
I GET MORE AND MORE DEPRESSED
AND WORRIED EVERY DAY."

Ami says IT STILL TAKES HIM TWO
YEARS TO CONVINCE HER THAT HE'S
THE GUY.

The caption changes to "Letter from Lee to Roland, 1937."

A female reader says "WHEN I GOT
MARRIED, I REALLY DID IT FOR
BETTER OR FOR WORSE.
WITH THAT LITTLE IDEA BLOWN TO
HELL BY THIS SUMMER AND YOU, IT
MAKES ME CYNICALLY SUSPICIOUS
OF ANY ATTACHMENT I MIGHT
MAKE.
AZIZ AND I HAD A LONG
CONVERSATION ABOUT YOU AND MY
SITUATION IN GENERAL.
HE DOESN'T WANT TO DIVORCE ME
UNLESS HE'S SURE I'M GOING TO
BE HAPPY AND TAKEN CARE OF
ELSEWHERE."

Anthony says IT WAS INEVITABLE
THAT LEE LEFT HIM, BECAUSE SHE
JUST COULD NOT LIVE WITHOUT THE
ARTISTIC ENVIRONMENT THAT SHE
HAD EXPERIENCED IN PARIS OR
EVEN NEW YORK.

Ami says I DON'T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT,
BY THE WAY, WITH HER MEN.
I DON'T KNOW HOW SHE MANAGES TO
KEEP ALL HER MEN IN LOVE WITH
HER.
RIGHT THE WAY THROUGH HER LIFE,
MAN RAY IS STILL THERE.
AZIZ, SHE TREATS HIM TERRIBLY
AND HAS ALL SORTS OF AFFAIRS
BEHIND...
YOU KNOW, BUT HE KNOWS ABOUT
THEM.
AND HE EVEN SAYS, "IF YOU LEAVE
ME, CAN I BE ONE OF YOUR
LOVERS?"
BUT WHEN SHE LEFT HIM, HE GAVE
HER A PORTFOLIO OF SHARES SO
THAT SHE COULD ALWAYS BE
INDEPENDENT, AND HE...
WHAT AN AMAZING GUY.
(LAUGHING) YOU KNOW?

The caption changes to "London, 1939."

(SIREN WAILING)
(SECOND SIREN WAILING)

A picture of a bombarded bridge appears with the caption "Bridge of Sighs, 1940, Lee Miller."

(EXPLODING)
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A picture of a chapel with its door covered in debris appears with the caption "Nonconformist Chapel, 1940."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

Marion says WHAT BROUGHT LEE
MILLER TO LONDON IS ROLAND
PENROSE.
HE IS ABSOLUTELY LOADED.
BUT LEE'S VERY INDEPENDENT, SO
SHE WANTS HER OWN JOB.
SO, WHAT DOES LEE KNOW?
SHE KNOWS HOW TO MODEL-- NOT
MADLY USEFUL IN A CITY UNDER
BOMBARDMENT.
AND SHE KNOWS HOW TO TAKE
PHOTOGRAPHS.
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A picture of a crashed camera appears with a caption that reads "Remington Silent, 1940."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

Marion says ONE DAY, SHE MEETS THE MOST
DOWDY, UNFASHIONABLE, TWEEDY,
BLUESTOCKING WOMAN.
AND THIS BRITISH WOMAN WHO COULD
NOT BE LESS LIKE GLAMOUROUS,
AMERICAN, SCINTILLATING,
GORGEOUS LEE MILLER IS THE
EDITOR OF
VOGUE.
AND SHE IS AUDREY WITHERS.
AND LEE OFFERS AUDREY EVERYTHING
SHE NEEDS.

Editorial pictures from Vogue Magazine appears.

Marion says VOGUE
IS A FASHION MAGAZINE.
BRITAIN IS A COUNTRY UNDER
RATIONING.
SO WHAT
VOGUE
CELEBRATES IS KIND
OF MAKE DO AND MEND.
AND SO, LEE IS TAKING THE
PICTURES.
I MEAN, SOME OF THE PICTURES ARE
SORT OF HILARIOUS, BECAUSE THE
CLOTHES, OF COURSE, ARE
BORDERLINE HIDEOUS.

The caption changes to "Hilary Roberts. Senior curator, Imperia War Museums."

Hilary is in her late fifties, with chin length straight gray hair and wears a white blouse.

She says AUDREY WITHERS WAS AN
EXTRAORDINARY WOMAN IN HER OWN
RIGHT.
SHE HAD A REAL INTEREST IN
WOMEN'S RIGHTS, IN WOMEN'S
INDEPENDENCE, AND IN THE
CREATIVITY AND CONTRIBUTION THAT
THEY COULD MAKE.
WOMEN'S MAGAZINES WERE KEY,
BECAUSE YOU HAVE TO REMEMBER
THAT MANY BRITISH MEN WERE IN
THE ARMED FORCES AND SERVING
OVERSEAS AND THAT IT WAS WOMEN
WHO WERE NOT ONLY RUNNING THE
HOUSEHOLD BUT ALSO TAKING OVER
MEN'S ROLES.
AND SO IF THE MINISTRY OF
INFORMATION WANTED TO GET A
GENERAL MESSAGE OUT, THEY ALWAYS
FACTORED IN THE WOMEN AND THE
WOMEN'S MAGAZINES IN PARTICULAR.

Clips from the Vogue's printing room from the 1940s roll.

Anthony says LEE'S TRANSITION
FROM BEING A LAPSED FASHION
PHOTOGRAPHER TO SHOOTING FOR
VOGUE
WAS ACTUALLY NOT A HUGE
STEP.
THE BIG STEP WAS WHEN SHE BECAME
A PHOTOJOURNALIST.

Marion says AND THEN ONE DAY, SHE
MEETS A YOUNG
LIFE
MAGAZINE
PHOTOGRAPHER CALLED DAVY
SCHERMAN.
AND EACH HAS WHAT THE OTHER
NEEDS.
(CAMERA SNAPPING, EXPLODING)
(BOMBS WHISTLING)
DAVID SCHERMAN IS A REALLY VERY,
VERY GOOD PHOTOGRAPHER WHO IS
ALREADY, YOU KNOW, COMPLETELY
BLOODIED IN WAR.
(FIRING)
HE'S QUITE HEROIC, ACTUALLY.

Hilary says DAVID SCHERMAN WAS
BEFRIENDED BY LEE.
AND THEY STRUCK UP AN
EXTRAORDINARILY CLOSE
FRIENDSHIP.

Anthony says AND ROLAND INVITED
SCHERMAN TO COME AND LIVE WITH
THEM.
IT WAS A MÉNAGE À TROIS.

Ami says THEY WERE HAVING A JOLLY GOOD
TIME, THOSE THREE.
(LAUGHING)

Hilary says DAVID SCHERMAN TAUGHT
HER THE ART OF NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY.
AND IN ORDER TO DO WHAT SHE
WANTED TO DO-- WHICH WAS TAKE
PHOTOGRAPHS THAT MATTERED, THAT
WERE RELEVANT TO THE WAR
EFFORT-- AND NOT SIMPLY BE
CONFINED TO FASHION, SHE HAD TO
BECOME AN OFFICIAL WAR
CORRESPONDENT.

The caption changes to "David Scherman. Filmed in 1985."

David has gray hair and a beard and wears glasses, a plaid shirt, and a black paper boy's hat.

He says I EXPLAINED TO LEE, "YOU
KNOW, YOU'RE AN AMERICAN.
WHY DON'T YOU JUST GET A UNIFORM
AND GET ACCREDITED TO THE
AMERICAN ARMY?"
AND SHE SAID, "THAT'S A GOOD
IDEA."
SO SHE PROMPTLY BOUGHT A UNIFORM
IN SAVILLE ROW, HAD IT SPECIALLY
MADE.
SHE TOOK IT VERY SERIOUSLY AND
DECIDED THAT SHE WOULD BE A WAR
PHOTOGRAPHER.

Marion says AUDREY WANTS
LEE TO COVER THE WAR.
LEE DESPERATELY WANTS TO COVER
THE WAR.
LEE ALWAYS SEES AN OPPORTUNITY.
SO, WAR IS OPPORTUNITY, AND
JUST GOES... "I COULD DO THAT."

The caption changes to "Saint Malo. Northern France, August 1944."

Marion says LEE MILLER GETS DUMPED INTO THIS
TOWN THAT'S PACIFIED TO DO A
STORY ON WOMEN.
AND SUDDENLY, SHE'S UNDER SNIPER
FIRE.
AND ONE CAN ONLY IMAGINE THAT
SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN UTTERLY
TERRIFIED BUT THEN SLIGHTLY
EXHILARATED.

Clips from the wall roll.

Lee's pictures from the war appear.

(EXPLODING)

Hilary says THE STORY WAS ONE OF
MISTAKEN INTELLIGENCE.
SHE WAS ABLE TO GO THERE BECAUSE
IT WAS THOUGHT THAT ST. MALO HAD
ALREADY FALLEN, THAT THE BATTLE
WAS OVER.
IN FACT, IT WAS PRETTY MUCH JUST
BEGINNING.

The caption changes to "Lee Miller, Vogue dispatch, 1944."

A female reader says "FROM OUTSIDE
THE TOWN, WE HEARD BOMBERS
APPROACHING OVER OUR SHOULDER.
THERE WERE THREE GROUPS OF
B-26S.
THEY PASSED, AND WE COULD SEE
THE BOMBS AWAY BY THEIR
ATTITUDE, IF NOTHING ELSE."
(SIREN WAILING)
"I HAD THE CLOTHES I WAS
STANDING IN, A COUPLE OF DOZEN
FILMS, AND AN EIDERDOWN BLANKET
ROLL.
I WAS THE ONLY PHOTOGRAPHER FOR
MILES AROUND, AND I NOW OWNED A
PRIVATE WAR."

Hilary says REMEMBER THAT SHE
HAD NO TRAINING FOR THIS SORT OF
WORK.
NO PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AS A
PHOTOGRAPHER HAD PREPARED HER
FOR THIS SORT OF WORK.
IT WAS WORK IT OUT AS YOU GO
ALONG.
(EXPLODING)

A female reader says "DEADLY HIT.
FOR A MOMENT, I COULD SEE WHERE
AND HOW.
THEN IT WAS SWALLOWED IN SMOKE,
BELCHING, MUSHROOMING, AND
COLUMN-ING, TOWERING UP BLACK
AND WHITE."
"OUR HOUSE SHUDDERED, AND STUFF
FLEW IN THE WINDOW.
MORE BOMBS CRASHING,
THUNDERING, FLASHING LIKE
VESUVIUS."

Anthony says THE DIFFICULT BIT
WAS BECOMING A WRITER.
SHE'D NEVER WRITTEN ANYTHING
BEFORE.
BUT NOW, SUDDENLY, SHE WAS
HAVING TO PUT WORDS TO PICTURES.
(EXPLODING)
(GUNS FIRING RAPIDLY)
(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A female reader says "I SHELTERED
IN A KRAUT DUGOUT, SQUATTING
UNDER THE RAMPARTS.
MY HEEL GROUND INTO A DEAD,
DETACHED HAND.
AND I CURSED THE GERMANS FOR
THE SORDID, UGLY DESTRUCTION
THEY HAD CONJURED UP IN THIS
ONCE BEAUTIFUL TOWN.
I PICKED UP THE HAND AND HURLED
IT ACROSS THE STREET AND RAN
BACK THE WAY I'D COME, BRUISING
MY FEET AND CRASHING INTO THE
UNSTEADY PILES OF STONE AND
SLIPPING IN BLOOD.
CHRIST, IT WAS AWFUL."

The caption changes to "Lynsey Addario. Photojournalist and author."

Linsey is in her mid-forties, with long wavy brown hair and wears a black dress.

She says AS A WAR PHOTOGRAPHER,
I THINK IT'S ACTUALLY IMPORTANT
TO HAVE FEAR BUT TO KNOW HOW TO
MANAGE IT.

A war picture appears with the caption Afghanistan, 2007, Lynsey Addario."

Lynsey says BECAUSE THAT WILL ALSO KEEP YOU
ALIVE, YOU KNOW.
I THINK IF YOU'RE FEARLESS,
YOU'RE LIKELY TO GET KILLED
PRETTY QUICKLY.
AT ONE POINT, I HAD TO RUN
THROUGH SNIPER FIRE.
AND YOU KNOW, ISIS WAS 150
METRES WAY.
I MEAN, THAT'S NOTHING.
AND I MEAN, THE FEAR OF THAT,
YOU KNOW, JUST LEADING UP THAT
RUN BETWEEN BUILDINGS, YOU KNOW,
WAS LIKE, "WILL THIS BE MY LAST,
YOU KNOW, RUN?
WILL I DIE?
WILL I GET SHOT?"
THERE'S AN ADRENALINE RUSH, OF
COURSE, THAT GETS YOU THROUGH.
DEFINITELY, WOMEN LIKE HER
BLAZED A TRAIL.
I THINK THERE IS A TYPE OF WOMAN
THAT GOES INTO THIS WORK.
WOMEN WHO ARE TOUGH BUT FUNNY,
IRREVERENT, WHO REALLY REJECTED
ALL THE NORMS OF WHAT WOMEN'S
LIVES SHOULD HAVE BEEN AT THAT
TIME.

Hilary says THERE WERE NO BRITISH FEMALE
PHOTOGRAPHERS WHO DID WHAT LEE
MILLER DID.
FOR THE AMERICANS, THEY HAD A
MORE OPEN POLICY.
BUT THE FACT THAT THERE WERE
ONLY FOUR WOMEN PHOTOGRAPHERS
WHO WERE ACCREDITED IN THAT
RESPECT GIVES YOU AN IDEA OF HOW
RARE IT STILL WAS.
THE WHOLE BODY OF WORK FROM ST.
MALO IS FASCINATING, BECAUSE IT
SHOWS AN EVOLUTION IN LEE
MILLER'S THINKING.
THE TONE AND THE MOOD DARKENS.
AND I WOULD SAY THAT THAT IS
ALMOST A TURNING POINT IN LEE
MILLER'S WAR, BECAUSE THIS IS
WHERE, IF YOU LIKE, SHE HAD HER
BAPTISM OF FIRE.
AND FROM HERE ON IN, UNTIL THE
VERY END OF HER TIME AS A WAR
CORRESPONDENT, THIS DARKER NOTE
NEVER QUITE LEAVES HER
PHOTOGRAPHY.

A clip of a cheering crowd rolls with the caption "Paris liberated, August 1944."

(MANY PEOPLE SHOUTING)
(TYPEWRITER DINGING, CLACKING)

A female reader says "DEAR AUDREY,
I WON'T BE THE FIRST WOMAN
JOURNALIST IN PARIS.
BUT I'LL BE THE FIRST DAME
PHOTOGRAPHER, I THINK, UNLESS
SOMEONE PARACHUTES IN.
IT IS BITTER TO ME TO GO TO
PARIS, NOW THAT I HAVE A TASTE
FOR GUNPOWDER.
COULD YOU ARRANGE THAT ROLAND
PENROSE COULD READ MY PIECE
SOON?
AS I HAVEN'T WRITTEN HIM OR
ANYONE YET.

A picture of Lee at a desk in a hotel room appears with the caption "Lee Miller, Hotel Scribe, Paris 1944. David Scherman."

David says LEE HAD FANTASTIC
STAMINA.
I WOULD SIMPLY GO TO SLEEP,
WAKE UP ABOUT SIX OR EIGHT HOURS
LATER.
AND SHE WAS STILL THERE,
KNOCKING, KNOCKING, TAPPING AWAY
AT THE TYPEWRITER.
(PEOPLE SHOUTING, TYPEWRITER
CLACKING)

The caption changes to "Vogue dispatch, Paris 1944."

A female reader says "OUR BOYS WERE
KISSED AND CHEERED AND SHOWERED
WITH PRESENTS.
THEY BATTLED IN ONE SQUARE AND
CELEBRATED IN THE NEXT."

A picture of Lee in uniform by a truck appears with the caption "Lee Miller, Alsace, 1944. David Scherman."

David says WE WERE THE FIRST
PHOTOGRAPHERS IN MANY PLACES.
IN FACT, IT GOT TO BE SORT OF A
JOKE.
I REMEMBER MARGUERITE HIGGINS OF
THE NEW YORK
HERALD TRIBUNE
WOULD CONTINUALLY ARRIVE AT A
SPOT AND SAY, "HOW DOES IT
HAPPEN THAT WHEN I'M JUST
ARRIVING AT SOME SPOT, LEE
MILLER AND DAVE SCHERMAN ARE
JUST LEAVING?"

A picture of two women sitting on a park bench at a city in ruins appears with the caption "Cologne, 1945."

A picture of a dead German officer on a bed appears with the caption "Luftwaffe HQ, 1945."

Carolyn says AS SHE MOVED
EASTWARD WITH DAVID SCHERMAN,
HER HATRED FOR THE GERMANS
INCREASED DRAMATICALLY AS SHE
SAW THE RESULTS OF THE WAR.

The caption changes to "Leipzig, Germany. April, 1945."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A picture of a female officer lying dead on a sofa appears with the caption "Regina Lisso, Leipzig, 1945. Lee Miller."

(CAMERA SNAPPING)

A female reader says "THE LOVE OF
DEATH, WHICH IS THE
UNDER-PATTERN OF THE GERMAN
LIVING, CAUGHT UP WITH THE HIGH
OFFICIALS OF THE REGIME.
AND THEY GAVE A GREAT PARTY,
TOASTED DEATH AND HITLER, AND
POISONED THEMSELVES.
LEANING BACK ON THE SOFA IS A
GIRL WITH EXTRAORDINARILY
PRETTY TEETH, WAXEN AND DUSTY."

Lynsey says I THINK THE POWER OF
THAT IMAGE IS SORT OF HOW
QUIETLY BEAUTIFUL IT IS.
I THINK THE LIGHT IS VERY SOFT,
AND I THINK THE COMPOSITION IS
BEAUTIFUL.
AND I THINK THAT'S VERY EERIE,
OF COURSE, GIVEN THE CONTEXT AND
GIVEN WHAT HAD JUST HAPPENED.
BUT TO ME, THAT'S REALLY THE
POWER OF A GOOD PHOTOGRAPH, IS
THAT, A, IT EVOKES EMOTIONS THAT
ARE UNEXPECTED.
BUT, B, IT MAKES YOU ASK
QUESTIONS.
AND I THINK THAT THAT'S EXACTLY
WHAT THAT IMAGE DOES.

(CHURCH BELL RINGING, BIRDS
CHIRPING)
(INSECT BUZZING)

A female reader says "GERMANY IS A
BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPE DOTTED WITH
JEWEL-LIKE VILLAGES, BLOTCHED
WITH RUINED CITIES.
THE CHILDREN HAVE STILTS AND
MARBLES AND TOPS AND HOOPS,
AND THEY PLAY WITH DOLLS.
MOTHERS SEW AND SWEEP AND BAKE,
AND FARMERS PLOW AND HARROW,
ALL JUST LIKE REAL PEOPLE.
BUT THEY AREN'T.
THEY ARE THE ENEMY.
THIS IS GERMANY, AND IT IS
SPRING.
(CHURCH BELL RINGING)

A picture shows soldier loading a train with dead bodies.

The caption changes to "Dachau. Concentration Camp, April 1945."

Carolyn says LEE'S ARRIVAL WITH DAVE
SCHERMAN AT DACHAU IS ONE OF THE
CENTRAL TIMES IN HER STORY.
THEY CAME JUST IN THE VERY
PROCESS OF THE LIBERATION OF
DACHAU.
SHE FELT IT TO BE A DEEP MORAL
CALLING TO REVEAL THE TRUTH AS
SHE UNDERSTOOD IT.

David says WELL, WE HAD TO JUST
SORT OF STEEL OURSELVES FOR IT,
LIKE A SURGEON GOING INTO A
OPERATING ROOM OR LIKE A POLICE
EXAMINER GOING INTO A MORGUE TO
DO A POST-MORTEM.
IF YOU STARTED WORRYING ABOUT
IT, YOU'D GO TO POT RIGHT AWAY.
YOU'D JUST COME APART AT THE
SEAMS.
IF YOU HAVE A CAMERA IN YOUR
HAND, YOU SUDDENLY THINK ABOUT
IT ONLY AND ITS BEING A JOB.
AND YOU SIMPLY STEEL YOURSELF TO
THE HORRORS OF THE THING.
(HEART BEATING)

The caption changes to "Cable to Audrey Withers, 1945."

A female reader says "I IMPLORE YOU
TO BELIEVE THIS IS TRUE.
I USUALLY DON'T TAKE PICTURES
OF HORRORS.
BUT DON'T THINK THAT EVERY TOWN
IN EVERY AREA ISN'T RICH WITH
THEM.
I HOPE
VOGUE
WILL FEEL THAT IT
CAN PUBLISH THESE PICTURES."

Hilary says AUDREY WITHERS AND AMERICAN
VOGUE
AGREED TO PUBLISH THIS
WORK.
I THINK THAT COVERAGE IS THE
MOST GRAPHIC AND DIFFICULT THAT
VOGUE
MAGAZINE HAS EVER
CARRIED.

The Vogue article shows a picture of tens of dead bodies entangled with a title that reads "Believe it."

Lynsey says THE PICTURES FROM
DACHAU ARE INCREDIBLE.
I DON'T KNOW IF THIS DAY AND AGE
OF PEOPLE WOULD PUBLISH THEM AS
MUCH, BECAUSE IRONICALLY, THE
MORE VIOLENCE WE SEE AND THE
MORE WE'RE INUNDATED WITH
IMAGES, THE MORE KIND OF PRUDE
WE GET.
THOSE IMAGES OF BODIES STACKED
ON TOP OF EACH OTHER, YOU DON'T
SEE THOSE, AND THAT'S HAPPENING.
I MEAN, THERE ARE MASS GRAVES
BEING UNEARTHED IN SYRIA NOW,
YOU KNOW.
BUT WE DON'T SEE THOSE IMAGES.

A picture of a dead officer in the water appears with the caption "Dead SS guard, Dachau, April 1945."

Hilary says I HAVE MET NOBODY WHO HAS
SEEN THOSE SCENES IN ANY
CONCENTRATION CAMP WHO HAS
TALKED ABOUT THEM WILLINGLY OR
HAS BEEN ABLE TO WALK AWAY FROM
THEM.

Anthony says I HAD SEEN NOTHING.
SHE KEPT EVERYTHING AWAY FROM
ME.
I THINK THAT LEE DEFINITELY DID
NOT WANT TO REVISIT THAT
EXPERIENCE BY TALKING ABOUT IT.

Lynsey says YOU KNOW, WE'RE ALL VERY,
VERY DIFFERENT.
AND WE ALL PROCESS TRAUMA AND
THESE SCENES IN A VERY DIFFERENT
WAY.
SO I CAN'T POSSIBLY KNOW HOW SHE
FELT AND WHAT SHE WALKED AWAY
FEELING.
BUT I DO KNOW FROM MYSELF, YOU
KNOW, IT'S IMPORTANT WHEN I WALK
AWAY FROM A SCENE LIKE THAT TO
REVISIT IT AND TO TALK ABOUT IT
A LOT.
AND THAT'S SORT OF HOW I DEAL
WITH MY OWN TRAUMA.
A LOT OF PEOPLE WITH PTSD, THEY
NEVER DEAL WITH IT, AND THEY
JUST SHUT DOWN.
AND IT DOESN'T GO AWAY, AND IN
FACT, IT'S BEEN PROVEN THAT IT
GETS WORSE OVER TIME.

A picture of Lee resting on her back on a garden bench appears with the caption "Lee Miller at home, 1953."

Carolyn says I INTERVIEWED
SEVERAL FRIENDS WHO WERE VERY
YOUNG WOMEN AT THE TIME WHEN
THEY VISITED LEE AT FARLEY FARM
WHO SAID THAT SOMETIMES, LATE AT
NIGHT, AT 3AM, IF THEY STAYED UP
WITH LEE AND DRANK WITH HER...
BECAUSE SHE WOULD DRINK A GREAT
DEAL-- SHE WOULD BREAK DOWN AND
SOMETIMES CRY AND TELL THEM,
"YOU HAVE TO BE CAREFUL ABOUT
WHAT YOU LET YOURSELF IN FOR."
AND SHE WOULD ALLUDE, SOMETIMES,
BRIEFLY, TO THOSE MOMENTS IN THE
CONCENTRATION CAMPS.
IT WAS STILL WITH HER.
IF YOU TAKE PHOTOGRAPHS LIKE
THAT, THEY REMAIN IMPRINTED ON
YOUR BRAIN.

Marion says SO, LEE'S ONLY IN DACHAU FOR
ACTUALLY A FEW HOURS.
WHAT HAPPENS NEXT IS THAT SHE
GOES TO HITLER'S APARTMENT.

Hilary says THIS IS AN EXAMPLE OF THE
WORKING PARTNERSHIP OF LEE AND
DAVID, THE REALLY EFFICIENT
NEWS-GATHERING PARTNERSHIP,
WHICH MEANS THAT YOU FIND A GOAL
AND YOU HEAD FOR IT.
AND IF YOU'RE LUCKY, YOU SCOOP
THE OPPOSITION.

An audio plays.

Lee says I'D BEEN CARRYING
HITLER'S MUNICH ADDRESS AROUND
IN MY POCKET FOR YEARS.
AND FINALLY, I HAD A CHANCE TO
USE IT, BUT MEIN HOST WASN'T
HOME.

David says WE WOUND UP IN
HITLER'S HOME ON 27 REGENT
STREET, WHICH A BUNCH OF GIS HAD
SIMPLY TAKEN OVER AS A PLACE TO
CRASH.
AND THAT WAS THE SPOT THAT WE
GOT SOME GIS TO READ A COPY OF
HITLER'S
MEIN KAMPF
WITH THEIR
FEET UP ON HITLER'S BED, LYING
ON HITLER'S PILLOW.

Lee says I TOOK SOME PICTURES OF
THE PLACE, AND I ALSO GOT A
GOOD NIGHT'S SLEEP IN HITLER'S
BED.
I EVEN WASHED THE DIRT OF
DACHAU OFF IN HIS OWN TUB.

David says WE HADN'T SEEN A
BATHTUB FOR WEEKS.
SO LEE IMMEDIATELY JUMPED INTO
THE BATHTUB, AND I PHOTOGRAPHED
HER.
AND I LOCKED THE DOOR SO WE
WOULDN'T BE DISTURBED.
AND SUDDENLY, THERE WAS THIS
TREMENDOUS BANGING ON THE DOOR.
THE LIEUTENANT WAS DYING TO GET
IN AND SHAVE.
AND HE SAID, YOU KNOW, "GET OUT
OF THERE, YOU KNOW, WHOEVER YOU
ARE.
YOU'VE BEEN IN THERE TOO LONG."
IT WAS SORT OF THE LAST OF THE
HITLER MYTH RIGHT THERE IN THAT
SPOT THAT NIGHT.

Hilary says THE STORY OF LEE
MILLER IN HITLER'S BATHTUB HAS
SPREAD AROUND THE WORLD.
AND IT'S THE ONE WITH WHICH
SHE'S MOST IDENTIFIED.
IT'S GOT ALL THE ELEMENTS: A
BEAUTIFUL WOMAN SITTING IN A
BATH WITH NO CLOTHES ON.
THERE IS AN EQUIVALENT
PHOTOGRAPH BY LEE OF DAVID
SCHERMAN IN THE BATH.
AND NOBODY IS VERY INTERESTED IN
LOOKING AT THAT ONE.
THAT PHOTOGRAPH, FOR MANY YEARS
AFTER THE WAR, WAS ACTUALLY
COMPLETELY FORGOTTEN.
AND IT WAS REALLY ONLY AFTER HER
DEATH THAT IT BECAME AS WELL
KNOWN AS IT CURRENTLY IS TODAY.
SO, INITIALLY, THE IDEA WAS JUST
TO HAVE A BATH.
AND THEN THEY REALIZED WHAT THE
CIRCUMSTANCES WERE.
AND BETWEEN THEM, THEY MADE AN
ENDURING STORY OUT OF IT.

Anthony says THEY PLACED THE
PHOTOGRAPH OF HITLER BY HEINRICH
HOFFMANN, HITLER'S PET
PHOTOGRAPHER.
AND IT WAS ACTUALLY A KIND OF
VANITY SHOT.
BUT THE KEY TO THE SHOT IS THE
BOOTS, BECAUSE THOSE BOOTS
CARRIED LEE AROUND DACHAU THAT
MORNING.
AND NOW, SHE'S GRINDING THE
FILTH OF THAT PLACE INTO
HITLER'S NICE, CLEAN BATHMAT.
AND OF COURSE, WHAT NEITHER OF
THEM KNEW IN THAT MOMENT WAS,
WAY ACROSS GERMANY, IN BERLIN AT
4:45 THAT AFTERNOON, HITLER AND
EVA BRAUN HAD KILLED THEMSELVES.
AND SO THERE'S THIS KIND OF
INCREDIBLE CLOSING OF A CIRCLE
IN THAT IMAGE AS WELL AS THAT
DEFIANCE OF STAMPING THE FILTH
INTO HITLER'S BATHMAT.
(GUN FIRING)

The caption changes to "London, 1946."

A reporter says A STRANGE-LOOKING
CARVING BY THE MODERN SCULPTOR
HENRY MOORE WATCHES THE
ARRIVAL OF A YOUNG LADY WHOSE
COMINGS AND GOINGS MAKE NEWS.
THE NAME IS LEE MILLER, PRESS
PHOTOGRAPHER, JUST BACK FROM
GATHERING SCOOPS ON THE
CONTINENT.
ROLAND PENROSE, SURREALIST
ARTIST, WELCOMES HER BACK AND
HELPS HER TO GET RID OF THE
BAGGAGE SHE'S HAD TO HUMP ROUND
ON HER NEWS-GETTING JOBS.

Anthony says THE END OF THE WAR
IS, I THINK, THE MOST DIFFICULT
THING THAT LEE FACED.
AND SHE REALLY GOT LOST.
I THINK, IN A WAY, SHE
RECOGNIZED THAT SHE WAS BEATEN.

David says SURE, SHE WAS A PEACETIME
CASUALTY IN MANY WAYS.
HER OBJECTIVES HAD BEEN TAKEN
AWAY FROM HER.
HER RAISON D'ÊTRE WAS TAKEN AWAY
FROM HER.
ROLAND, BY THIS TIME, HAD SORT
OF GIVEN UP ON HER.
SHE WAS NOT ANSWERING HIS
LETTERS.
HE'D TAKEN UP WITH SOMEONE ELSE
IN LONDON.
AND I SAW LEE'S POSITION AS
BEING BADLY THREATENED.

Anthony says EVENTUALLY, IT WAS
SCHERMAN WHO SAID, "GO HOME."

David says AND IT WAS, I GUESS,
WITH A BIG SIGH THAT SHE DID
DECIDE, FINALLY, TO KNOCK IT OFF
AND GO BACK HOME.

Anthony says IT IS AS IF SHE
OPENS THE DOOR, WALKS BACK INTO
HER LIFE WITH ROLAND, AND
NOTHING HAS CHANGED.
IT COULDN'T BE FURTHER FROM THE
TRUTH.
HE HAD TO LEARN AFRESH HOW IT
WAS TO HAVE THIS DEEPLY DAMAGED
AND DISTURBED PERSON WHO HE
LOVED.
HE HAD TO COPE WITH ALL OF THAT.

Ami says SHE TRIED TO GO BACK
INTO FASHION, TAKING PICTURES OF
HATS AND HANDBAGS.
AND TRIED TO KIND OF GO BACK TO
HOW THINGS WERE BEFORE THE WAR.
BUT WHEN YOU'VE WATCHED SUCH
LIFE-CHANGING THINGS, THEN IT'S
VERY HARD TO ADJUST.

Marion says SHE'S TOLD BY, YOU
KNOW, DOCTORS SHE GOES TO SEE TO
PULL HERSELF TOGETHER.
SHE IS ALSO A RAGING ALCOHOLIC
BY THIS POINT.
SHE THEN HAS LOST HER LOOKS.
SO THE BIGGEST POWER THAT SHE
HAS ALWAYS PLAYED ON HAS GONE.
THEN WE ADD THAT SHE GETS
PREGNANT.
THEN SHE MAY WELL HAVE HAD
POSTNATAL DEPRESSION.
SHE DIDN'T FIND IT VERY EASY TO
BE A MOTHER.
AND THEN ROLAND PENROSE, WHO
SEES THE WOMAN OF HIS LIFE JUST
BEING ABSOLUTELY DESTROYED,
COMES UP WITH A BRIGHT IDEA...
BECAUSE HE'S VERY TIN-EARED,
ROLAND-- TO MOVE THIS WOMAN...
WHO IS COMPLETELY URBAN, WHO
LOVES CONNECTING WITH PEOPLE...
TO A LONELY FARM IN THE COUNTRY,
WHERE SHE KNOWS NOBODY, WITH A
NEWBORN BABY.
IT'S ASTONISHING TO ME THAT SHE
ACTUALLY SURVIVED.

Georgina says I THINK "LOST" IS A
GOOD WAY TO DESCRIBE HER AT
FARLEY FARM.
I THINK LEE WAS SUCH A
COMPLICATED PERSON.
ALL WE COULD SEE IS, YOU KNOW,
TONY AND I, GROWING UP, WAS
SOMEBODY WHO WAS JUST DIFFICULT.

Anthony says I GET A SENSE THAT
SHE WAS DISSOCIATED.
IT'S SOMETHING THAT SHE USED
EFFECTIVELY.
AND AS A MODEL, SHE COULD JUST
DISCONNECT FROM HER
SURROUNDINGS, DISCONNECT FROM
EVERYTHING, AND JUST BE THIS
BEAUTIFUL OBJECT.
AND LATER, WHEN SHE BECAME THE
COMBAT PHOTOGRAPHER AND WAS IN
THIS TERRIBLE DANGER, WITNESSING
AWFUL THINGS, I THINK SHE USED
THAT SENSE OF DISSOCIATION TO
DETACH FROM THE HORROR THAT
SURROUNDED HER.
BUT I THINK THAT SENSE OF
DISSOCIATION, THAT SENSE OF
DISCONNECT BETWEEN HER EMOTIONAL
SIDE AND HER PHYSICAL SIDE,
INEVITABLY CAME FROM HER
CHILDHOOD TRAUMA.

Carolyn says THE STORY OF WHAT HAPPENED TO
LEE WHEN SHE WAS SEVEN YEARS OLD
IS HARD TO CLARIFY.
SHE WAS STAYING WITH FRIENDS OF
THE FAMILY, VERY GOOD FRIENDS,
IN, I BELIEVE, BROOKLYN, FOR A
SORT OF HOLIDAY.
THESE FRIENDS LEFT THE LITTLE
GIRL IN THE CARE OF A YOUNG MAN
WHO WAS EITHER A BOARDER OR A
RELATIVE.
AND WHAT WE KNOW IS THAT HE TOOK
ADVANTAGE OF THIS TIME, AND HE
DID INDEED RAPE THE LITTLE GIRL.
AFTER THE RAPE, SHE WAS RUSHED
HOME.
SHE WAS SUBJECTED TO THE MOST
PAINFUL, HUMILIATING TREATMENT
AVAILABLE AT THE TIME, BECAUSE
SHE DEVELOPED A SEXUALLY
TRANSMITTED DISEASE.
HER MOTHER, WHO WAS A NURSE, HAD
TO ADMINISTER THIS
EXTRAORDINARILY PAINFUL
TREATMENT EVERY DAY.
HER BROTHER HEARD HIS SISTER
SCREAMING IN THE BATHROOM.
AND THE WHOLE THING WAS, OF
COURSE, HUSH-HUSH, BECAUSE THIS
WAS A HUGE SCANDAL.
AND NO ONE WANTED IT TO BE KNOWN
THAT THIS HAD HAPPENED TO LITTLE
ELIZABETH MILLER.

Anthony says IT WAS THE FINAL
PIECE IN THE PUZZLE.
I COULD NEVER REALLY UNDERSTAND
WHY SHE WAS SO SECRETIVE.
BUT AS A CHILD, SHE HAD LEARNED
TO KEEP SECRETS.
AND THAT WAS IMPORTANT FOR HER
SURVIVAL, AND SHE WAS GOOD AT
IT.

Carolyn says WHY SHE BURIED THE
PAST AND ALL OF THOSE
PHOTOGRAPHS IN BOXES IN THE
ATTIC...
PERHAPS SHE WANTED TO PUT IT
BEHIND HER, NOT DWELL ON THESE
MOST PAINFUL TIMES AND IMAGES
AND MOMENTS, RATHER THAN ADDRESS
THEM HEAD-ON.

Captions read "Lee eventually conquered her demons. Cooking became her next great passion. Her dinner parties were legendary."

Anthony says WHEN SHE DIED, EMOTIONALLY,
IT AFFECTED ME PERSONALLY VERY
LITTLE.
AND I DIDN'T REALLY SHED TEARS
FOR HER UNTIL I BEGAN WRITING
HER BIOGRAPHY.
AND THAT'S WHEN I BEGAN TO
REALLY UNDERSTAND HER.
AND THAT'S WHEN I PRACTICALLY
DROWNED MY WORD PROCESSOR,
BECAUSE I REALIZED HOW MUCH I'D
MISSED.
THERE WAS SO MUCH I WISH I HAD
KNOWN ABOUT HER AND UNDERSTOOD.
YES, IT'S BEEN AN EXTRAORDINARY
VOYAGE OF UNDERSTANDING.

The caption changes to "Lee Miller. 1907-1977."

David says WHEN LEE DIED, I WANTED TO
WRITE AN OBIT FOR AMERICAN
VOGUE,
BECAUSE SHE DIED TOTALLY
UNRECOGNIZED.
I WANTED TO WRITE AN OBIT, AND
I GOT TO THINKING ABOUT WHAT
FORM THE OBIT WOULD TAKE.
SHE LED SIX, EIGHT, 10 DISCRETE,
TOTALLY DIFFERENT LIVES.
SHE WAS AN AMAZING, UNUSUAL
PERSON, EXASPERATING PERSON,
LOVABLE PERSON, BEAUTIFUL
PERSON, UGLY PERSON.
SHE WAS ALL OF THESE DIFFERENT
THINGS.
THOSE WERE HER DIFFERENT LIVES.

Jessie says THE TEMPTATION IS TO
SEEK WOMEN THAT AREN'T QUITE SO
CHALLENGING.
BUT WHAT WE NEED ARE EXAMPLES
LIKE LEE MILLER.
WE NEED WOMEN THAT ARE
COMPLICATED AND FULLY
THREE-DIMENSIONAL.

Karen says WHEN I THINK ABOUT LEE
MILLER, IT WASN'T THAT SHE WAS
LEANING IN TO BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY
BY THE MEN.
SHE DIDN'T EVEN CARE.
SHE'S JUST A WOMAN WHO DID NOT
APOLOGIZE FOR WHO SHE WAS.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Executive producer, Angus McQueen.

Producer, Rachel Hooper.

Director, Teresa Griffiths.

A co-production with ZDF in cooperation with ARTE for BBC.

Copyright 2020, Erica Starling Production and Ronachan Films.

Watch: Capturing Lee Miller