Transcript: Fake or Fortune Series 7 - Episode 4 | Oct 28, 2020

Fast clip shows images of an art auction at Christie's.
The auctioneer says AT 42 MILLION...

Fiona says THE ART WORLD,
WHERE PAINTINGS CHANGE HANDS
FOR FORTUNES.

The auctioneer says SOLD!
THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Fiona says BUT FOR EVERY KNOWN
MASTERPIECE, THERE MAY BE
ANOTHER STILL WAITING TO BE
DISCOVERED.

Philip contemplates a painting and says THIS IS IT.

Fiona says INTERNATIONAL ART DEALER
PHILIP MOULD AND I HAVE TEAMED
UP TO HUNT FOR LOST WORKS BY
GREAT ARTISTS.
WE USE OLD-FASHIONED DETECTIVE
WORK AND STATE-OF-THE-ART
SCIENCE TO GET TO THE TRUTH.

Fiona Bruce is in her forties with shoulder length brown hair in a layered cut. She wears a patterned blue chiffon blouse and a long brown and blue necklace.

Philip Mould is in his fifties with short receding gray hair. He's wearing a blue suit and a pale blue shirt.

Philip says SCIENCE CAN ENABLE US TO SEE
BEYOND THE HUMAN EYE.

Fiona says TA-DAH!

A woman says OH, WOW!

Fiona says EVERY CASE IS PACKED WITH
SURPRISE AND INTRIGUE.

A man says IS IT OR ISN'T IT A FREUD
THEN?

Fiona says BUT NOT EVERY PAINTING IS
QUITE WHAT IT SEEMS.

Philip says TWO ARTISTS, RATHER THAN ONE.

Fiona says IT'S A JOURNEY THAT CAN END
IN JOY...
THAT IS ENOUGH TO SUPPORT
THE CONCLUSION THAT IT IS BY
TOM ROBERTS!

A couple smiles and hugs.

Fiona says OR BITTER DISAPPOINTMENT.

A woman says I DON'T THINK IT'S A WORK BY
GAUGUIN.
I'M VERY SORRY.

Fiona says IN THIS EPISODE, TWO VERY
RARE PORTRAITS OFFER A GLIMPSE
INTO THE LIVES OF BLACK BRITONS
IN THE 18TH AND 19TH CENTURIES.

A painting appears of a young black woman in a striped dress holding a book and hugging a younger black girl.

Next to it, another painting appears depicting a white aristocratic lady sitting in a garden and a black woman in fancy clothes behind her.

A black woman says THERE SHE IS, IN ALL OF HER
GLORY, NOT AS A SLAVE, BUT AS
SOMETHING ELSE.
IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT FOR OUR
HISTORY.

Fiona says IN AN ERA WHERE MUCH OF
BRITISH INDUSTRY RELIED ON
SLAVERY, OUR PICTURES ARE
EXCEPTIONAL IN CHALLENGING THE
RACIST CONVENTIONS OF THE TIME.

A picture of 4 white aristocrats and a young black slave child looking at them appears.

Another black woman at a museum says THE FACT THAT WE'RE DEALING
WITH FULLY FINISHED HIGH ARTWORK
OF BLACK SUBJECTS, IT'S
EXTRAORDINARY RARE.

Fiona says BUT THIS IS ALSO A DOUBLE
WHODUNIT.
CAN WE IDENTIFY THE ARTIST
RESPONSIBLE AND SOLVE TWO
SEPARATE FAMILY'S MYSTERIES?

A man wearing glasses says I JUST FEEL THAT THIS IS A
RIDDLE AND IT'S UNFINISHED
BUSINESS.

A woman says WE ACTUALLY DON'T A CLUE
WHO THE ARTIST IS.

Fiona says DO THE ANSWERS LIE
SOMEWHERE WITHIN THIS STATELY
HOME?

Philip says IT'S THE SAME AS OUR TWO
GIRLS.

Fiona says COULD FORENSIC TESTS REVEAL
AN UNLIKELY NEW SUSPECT?
I MEAN, THAT'S ABSOLUTELY GREAT.

A man says IT'S LIKE IT'S BEEN STARING
US IN THE FACE THE WHOLE TIME.

Fiona says AND IS THE EVIDENCE ENOUGH
TO CONVINCE A SCEPTICAL ART
WORLD?

(theme song plays)

The caption "Fake or Fortune?" appears against the grainy orange surface of a painting.

Fiona says FAKE OR FORTUNE
OFTEN LOOKS
AT WORKS OF ART FROM ALL
CORNERS OF THE COUNTRY AND
TODAY, WE ARE IN PERTHSHIRE, IN
SCOTLAND.

Philip says HAVE YOU GOT ANY
SCOTTISH BLOOD, FIONA?

Fiona says PHILIP, HOW LONG HAVE YOU
KNOWN ME?
WITH A NAME LIKE MINE?
ROBERT THE BRUCE.
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Philip says AHH, YOU'VE GOT A POINT
THERE, FIONA.

Fiona says OH GOD, YOU'RE DOING YOUR
ACCENT AGAIN.
I DON'T KNOW IF I CAN BEAR IT.
OUR FIRST INVESTIGATION IN THIS
EPISODE IS TAKING US TO ONE
OF BRITAIN'S OLDEST STATELY
HOMES - SCONE PALACE.
IT HAS A RICH HISTORY.
THE GROUNDS OF THE PALACE WERE
ONCE HOME TO THE STONE OF
SCONE - THE ANCIENT TABLET USED
TO ENTHRONE GENERATIONS OF
SCOTTISH KINGS.
WE'RE MEETING THE OWNER OF
THIS MAGNIFICENT PALACE - LADY
MANSFIELD.
IT'S RECENTLY BEEN REVEALED
THAT A PAINTING THAT HAS BEEN
IN HER FAMILY FOR OVER 200
YEARS HAS BEEN CREDITED TO THE
WRONG ARTIST.
SO, SHE'S ASKED US FOR HELP.

Philip says SCONE PALACE HAS A
MAGNIFICENT COLLECTION OF ART
BY SOME OF THE MOST
ACCOMPLISHED PORTRAIT PAINTERS
TO HAVE WORKED IN BRITAIN,
INCLUDING RAMSEY, VAN LOO AND
VAN DYCK.
BUT WHO PAINTED THE MOST FAMOUS
PORTRAIT IN THE HOUSE IS A
MYSTERY.

Lady Mansfield is in her fifties, with short wavy blond hair and wears a long dark green skirt, brown leather boots, a white blouse, and a woolen knitted vest.

Lady Mansfield says AND WE KEEP THE PICTURE IN
HERE.

Philip says GOSH, IT'S WONDERFUL TO SEE
THIS IN THE FLESH, ISN'T IT?

Fiona says HOW BEAUTIFUL.
JUST A LOVELY IMAGE, ISN'T IT?

Lady Mansfield says YUP.

Philip says THIS IS LADY ELIZABETH
FINCH HATTON AND HER MIXED RACE
COUSIN DIDO BELLE.
THEY ARE THOUGHT TO HAVE BEEN
PAINTED IN THE LATE 1770S OR
EARLY 1780S; A TIME WHEN
BRITAIN WAS STILL HEAVILY
ENGAGED IN THE TRANSATLANTIC
SLAVE TRADE.
SO, THE WAY IT PORTRAYS THE
GIRLS TOGETHER IS HIGHLY
UNUSUAL.
THIS IS SO IMPORTANT.
THIS IS SO SIGNIFICANT IN THE
HISTORY OF BRITISH PORTRAITURE -
A BLACK AND WHITE SUBJECT SHOWN
AS EQUALS IN A FORMAL SETTING.

Fiona says AND YOU WOULDN'T GET
AN IMAGE OF A BLACK PERSON AND
WHITE PERSON TOGETHER LIKE THIS
IN BRITAIN, AT LEAST UNTIL WHAT?
I DON'T KNOW - THE 1960S,
SOMETHING LIKE THAT.
SO, THIS WAS SO AHEAD OF ITS
TIME.

Lady Mansfield says IT'S INCREDIBLY UNUSUAL.

Fiona says DIDO BELLE WAS BORN
INTO SLAVERY.
SHE WAS THE ILLEGITIMATE
DAUGHTER OF JOHN LINDSAY - AN
OFFICER IN THE ROYAL NAVY.
HER MOTHER WAS A SLAVE IN THE
BRITISH WEST INDIES.
AT THE AGE OF FOUR, DIDO BELLE
WAS BROUGHT TO BRITAIN BY
LINDSAY AND ADOPTED BY HIS
UNCLE - WILLIAM MURRAY - THE
FIRST LORD MANSFIELD.
IT WAS MANSFIELD HIMSELF WHO
COMMISSIONED THE PAINTING OF
HIS TWO GREAT NIECES.
AND FOR CURRENT LADY MANSFIELD,
THIS PICTURE IS VERY SPECIAL
AND SHE'S HOPING WE CAN HELP
SOLVE ITS MYSTERY.
YOU MARRIED INTO THIS FAMILY?

Lady Mansfield says ABSOLUTELY.

Fiona says AND THIS PICTURE HAS BECOME
OF YOUR HISTORY NOW.

Lady Mansfield says YES, MY CHILDREN'S HISTORY.

Fiona says DO YOU LOVE IT?

Lady Mansfield says YES.
I MEAN, WE'RE ALL INCREDIBLY
PROUD OF IT.
IF THERE WAS A FIRE, I WOULD
DEFINITELY BE RUNNING INTO THIS
ROOM AND TRYING TO GET IT OFF
THE WALL.

Philip says FOR OVER A CENTURY,
THIS PICTURE HAS BEEN CREDITED
TO JOHAN ZOFFANY, A
GERMAN-BORN PAINTER, WHO
SPECIALISED IN BOTH SOCIETY
PORTRAITS AND THEATRICAL
SUBJECTS.
BUT TODAY, THE ART WORLD IS
CONVINCED THAT THIS ATTRIBUTION
IS NOT CORRECT.

Lady Mansfield says IT'S PRETTY WELL CONFIRMED
THAT IT'S NOT ZOFFANY, BUT WE
ACTUALLY DON'T HAVE A CLUE WHO
THE ARTIST IS.

Philip says WELL, I MEAN THE PROBLEM
IS-- YOU COULD SAY THE
EXCITEMENT IS, THAT THERE'S A
HUGE POOL OF POSSIBILITIES.
THIS IS A GREAT FLURRY MOMENT IN
BRITISH PORTRAIT PAINTING.

Fiona says AND THAT'S NOT THE
ONLY THING BECAUSE THE
INSCRIPTION SAYS "THE LADY
ELIZABETH FINCH HATTON."
THERE IS NO MENTION DIDO BELLE
AT ALL.

Lady Mansfield says ABSOLUTELY.

Philip says WELL, WOULDN'T IT BE
WONDERFUL IF WE COULD NOT ONLY
ADD BELLE'S NAME, BUT THE NAME
OF AN ARTIST ON THAT LABEL AS
WELL?

Lady Mansfield says THAT WOULD BE
FANTASTIC.

(music plays)

Fiona says THIS WHODUNIT COULD
HELP OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE
LIVES OF BLACK BRITONS IN A
TURBULENT TIME IN OUR HISTORY.
BUT BEFORE WE CAN START THE
INVESTIGATION, THERE'S ANOTHER
CASE WE NEED TO TAKE A LOOK
AT.
SO, WE'RE TRAVELLING AN HOUR
DOWN THE ROAD TO EDINBURGH.
WE'VE BEEN ASKED TO LOOK AT A
PAINTING OF TWO BLACK SITTERS,
WHICH ALSO CHALLENGES THE
CONVENTIONS OF THE TIME.
BUT IT'S HAS ONLY BEEN IN THE
FAMILY FOR A SHORT WHILE AND
THEY KNOW ALMOST NOTHING ABOUT
IT.

Charlie and Sarah open the door and say HI.

Sarah says COME IN.

Charlie says COME ON IN.

Fiona says THANK YOU.
OWNERS CHARLIE AND SARAH
MACQUAKER HAVE ASKED US FOR
HELP TO IDENTIFY THE ARTIST WHO
CREATED THEIR PAINTING.

Sarah is in her forties, with above the shoulder brown hair and wears jeans, a white blouse and a blue cardigan sweater.

Charlie is in his forties, with short graying hair and wears glasses, black trousers and a striped shirt.

Philip says THIS IS SO STRIKING.
IT'S SO ARRESTING.

Fiona says I LOVE IT.
IT'S A BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL
PICTURE.

Philip says IT LOOKS TO ME THAT
THIS PAINTING DATES FROM THE
MID-19TH CENTURY.
ALTHOUGH, I CAN'T RECALL SUCH A
HIGH QUALITY WORK, FROM THIS
PERIOD, DEPICTING TWO BLACK
SITTERS, WITH SUCH COMPASSION.
BUT THE GIRLS AREN'T NAMED AND
THERE'S NO TITLE, SO CAN
CHARLIE GIVE US ANY EARLY
CLUES?
WHERE DOES IT COME FROM?

Charlie says WELL, I GOT IT FROM MY UNCLE
IN FRANCE SEVEN OR EIGHT YEARS
AGO WHEN HE PASSED AWAY, AND IT
WAS A PICTURE HE ALWAYS LOVED,
AND NOW I'VE GOT IT, IT'S IN OUR
FAMILY NOW.

Fiona says WHY DOES IT APPEAL TO YOU SO
MUCH?

Sarah says I LOVE THE EXPRESSION ON THE
GIRLS' FACES, JUST THE SERENITY
AND THE THOUGHTFULNESS, AND JUST
THE NATURAL POSE.
IT'S BEAUTIFUL.

Charlie says I JUST THINK THE SHEER
QUALITY OF IT JUST DRAWS YOU IN.

Philip says DID YOUR UNCLE TELL
YOU WHAT IT MIGHT REPRESENT OR
WHO, INDEED, POSSIBLY DID IT?

Charlie says NO.
I'VE GOT A FILE OF HIM TRYING TO
DO SOME HOMEWORK AND RESEARCH,
BUT THERE IS REALLY NOTHING MUCH
ON IT AT ALL.
SO, I DON'T EVEN KNOW WHERE HE
GOT IT AND WE DON'T KNOW THE
SUBJECT, WE DON'T KNOW WHERE
THEY ARE, AND WE DON'T KNOW THE
ARTIST.
SO, IT'S JUST A HUGE MYSTERY.

Fiona says NOT TOO MUCH WORK FOR US,
THEN!
THE PALM TREES SUGGEST A
TROPICAL LANDSCAPE, LIKE THE
CARIBBEAN, WHERE SLAVERY
CONTINUED IN THE BRITISH
COLONIES UNTIL 1834.
SO, COULD THESE GIRLS, IN FACT,
BE SLAVES?
BUT IF THEY ARE, WHY ARE THEY
DRESSED IN SUCH FINE CLOTHES?

Philip says THE LITTLE GIRL ON
THE RIGHT, SHE'S ALMOST TRYING
TO COMMUNICATE SOMETHING.
THERE IS SOMETHING QUITE
ASSERTIVE ABOUT THE WAY SHE...
SHE'S TRYING TO BRING US INTO
THE PICTURE.

Fiona says IT'S A VERY FRANK
GAZE, ISN'T IT?
IT'S LIKE A CHALLENGE - WHO AM
I?

Charlie says MM-HMM.

Philip says I NEED TO TAKE A
CLOSER LOOK.
CAN I SPOT ANY EARLY CLUES,
WHICH COULD HELP US IDENTITY
THE MYSTERY ARTIST?
THE OLDER FIGURE HAS HER EYES
UPWARDS, ALMOST LIKE
HEAVENWARDS.
THE YOUNGER ONE HAS HER ARM ON
HER CHEST, AND UPON THE OLDER
GIRL'S LAP IS A BOOK, A THICK
BOOK.
COULD BE A BIBLE.
SO, IS THIS A PAINTING WITH SOME
SORT OF RELIGIOUS MEANING?

Fiona says AND I WANT TO FIND OUT
IF CHARLIE'S UNCLE DISCOVERED
ANY USEFUL LEADS WHICH COULD
HELP US.
SO, DID YOUR UNCLE DO SOME
RESEARCH THEM HIMSELF ABOUT
THE...?

Charlie says HE DID.
HE FOUND A SMALL SIGNATURE.
THERE'S A SMALL SIGNATURE, WHICH
IS NOT VERY CLEAR.
IT'S HARD TO READ IT.

Philip says I CAN MAKE OUT AN E AND THEN
WHAT LOOKS LIKE A "J-O-N."

Charlie says THERE SEEMS TO BE THREE OR
FOUR POTENTIAL VERSIONS.
HE WROTE TO A GENTLEMAN CALLED
HUGH HONOUR WHO WAS A WELL-KNOWN
ART HISTORIAN.
WELL, THIS IS THE RESPONSE HE
GAVE.

Fiona says "NO PAINTER NAMED E JONIS,
JONUAS, JONCIO, OR TONIAS,
ET CETERA, APPEARS IN THE
LARGEST 37 VOLUME BIOGRAPHICAL
DICTIONARY OF ARTISTS."
RIGHT, OKAY.
SO, THAT SOUNDS FAIRLY
EXHAUSTIVE.
"THE POSSIBLE FORMS OF THE NAME
SUGGEST AN IBERIAN" - SO
SPANISH - "AND TO JUDGE FROM THE
STYLE, THE PICTURE MAY BE LATIN
AMERICAN."
OKAY, SO THAT'S...

Charlie says PART OF A LEAD.

Philip says TO THE RIGHT OF IT IS
ANOTHER WORD, IT'S A LATIN WORD
"FECIT" - "F-E-C-I-T."
IT'S A FANCY WAY OF SAYING THAT
IT WAS PAINTED BY THE PERSON
WHOSE NAME IS MENTIONED NEXT TO
IT AND, BETTER STILL, THERE
APPEARS TO BE A DATE AFTER THAT.
NOW, I CAN MAKE OUT WHAT I THINK
IS A "1-8."
AFTER THAT - I DON'T KNOW -
AN 8 OR A 3.
READ AS A WHOLE IT SEEMS IT
SEEMS TO BE AN EJON WHO PAINTED
IT IN 18-SOMETHING.
IT'S A START.

Fiona says SO, IN THIS EPISODE,
WE NEED TO IDENTIFY THE TWO
ARTISTS RESPONSIBLE FOR THESE
RARE PAINTINGS.
IT'S AN INTRIGUING DOUBLE
WHODUNIT, SO PHILIP AND I ARE
GOING TO SPLIT UP.

Philip says FIRST, I'M GOING TO
LOOK INTO THE FAMOUS PORTRAIT
OF DIDO BELLE AND LADY
ELIZABETH.
TO START THE INVESTIGATION,
I'VE COME TO KENWOOD HOUSE NEAR
HAMPSTEAD HEATH IN LONDON.
DIDO BELLE AND LADY ELIZABETH
LIVED HERE TOGETHER WITH THE
MANSFIELD FAMILY.
AND IT WAS IN THESE GROUNDS
THAT THEY WERE PLACED BY THE
ARTIST.
WHOEVER PAINTED OUR PORTRAIT
WOULD HAVE PROBABLY STOOD AT
THE VERY PLACE WHERE I'M
STANDING.
HE OR SHE WOULD HAVE BEEN
FAMILIAR WITH EVERYTHING AROUND
ME HERE - THIS WONDERFUL GREEN
PASTORAL SETTING INTO WHICH
BELLE AND ELIZABETH, AS FRIENDS,
COULD SIT.
THE BRIDGE AND THAT WONDERFUL
PINK LIT LONDON IN THE
BACKGROUND.
THERE ARE SO FEW 18TH CENTURY
PORTRAITS WHERE YOU CAN ACTUALLY
STAND AND DWELL IN THE PLACE
THAT IT WAS SET.
IT'S THE PRESENCE OF DIDO
BELLE - A MIXED RACE GIRL IN A
18TH CENTURY PORTRAIT OF THE
ARISTOCRACY - WHICH MAKES THIS
PAINTING SO RARE AND IMPORTANT.
I'M FASCINATED BY HER AND
I'M NOT THE ONLY ONE.
DIRECTOR AMMA ASANTE MADE A
FEATURE FILM ABOUT HER.
I'M KEEN TO FIND OUT ABOUT
BELLE'S LIFE HERE AND WHY SHE
HAS BECOME SUCH AN IMPORTANT
FIGURE IN BLACK BRITISH
HISTORY.
SO, AMMA WHAT DOES THIS
PAINTING MEAN TO YOU?

Amma is in her late thirties, with long curly brown hair and wears a floral dress and black swede boots.

She says WELL, MY ORIGINAL INTEREST
WAS TO FIND OUT WHO WE HAVE BEEN
AS PEOPLE OF COLOUR, GOING BACK
IN TIME AND BEFORE THE WIND
RUSH, BEFORE THAT SHIP ARRIVED
IN 1947.
AND THIS IS ONE EXAMPLE OF THAT.
THERE SHE IS IN ALL OF HER
GLORY.
NOT AS A SLAVE, NOT AS WE'RE
USED TO SEEING PEOPLE OF COLOUR
OFTEN IN PAINTINGS, BUT AS
SOMETHING ELSE.
SO, ON THE ONE HAND, IT'S A
SYMBOL, AND ON THE OTHER HAND,
IT'S A DOOR, IT'S A QUESTION,
IT'S A WHOLE SET OF QUESTIONS.

Philip says AND WHAT HAVE YOU DISCOVERED
IN THE PROCESS OF MAKING THIS
FILM ABOUT BELLE HERSELF?

Amma says I DISCOVERED THE COMPLEXITY
OF HER PREDICAMENT AS A
PRIVILEGED WOMAN OF COLOUR IN
THE 18TH CENTURY, GROWING UP IN
KENWOOD HOUSE.
MORE WEALTHY THAN MANY WHITE
PEOPLE, BUT NOT FULLY EQUAL
WITHIN HER OWN FAMILY AND YET,
CLEARLY VERY LOVED.

Philip says WHILE THE GIRLS WERE LIVING
HERE, THE TRANSATLANTIC SLAVE
TRADE WAS AT ITS PEAK, SO A
FRIENDSHIP LIKE THEIRS WOULD
HAVE BEEN HIGHLY UNUSUAL.
THE ARTIST CAPTURES THEIR CLOSE
BOND, BUT THE PROPS THEY HOLD
REVEAL DIFFERENCES IN THEIR
STATUS WITHIN THE FAMILY.
LADY ELIZABETH HAS A BOOK,
SIGNALLING SHE'S EDUCATED,
WHILE DIDO BELLE HAS A BOWL OF
FRUIT, FIRMLY SUGGESTING THAT
SHE'S SEEN AS AN EXOTIC FIGURE.

Amma says SHE MUST HAVE UNDERSTOOD WHAT
HER PRIVILEGE WAS AND, AT THE
SAME TIME, SHE MUST HAVE
UNDERSTOOD THAT THERE WERE MANY,
MANY PEOPLE WHO LOOKED LIKE HER
THAT WERE HAVING EXTREMELY
DIFFICULT LIVES AT THE TIME
BECAUSE OF THE SLAVE TRADE AND
ITS RAMIFICATIONS.

Philip says AND WHILE DIDO BELLE LIVED
HERE, LORD MANSFIELD BECAME AN
IMPORTANT FIGURE IN THE LEGAL
DEBATE ABOUT SLAVERY.
HE WAS THE COUNTRY'S TOP JUDGE
AND, IN 1783, MADE A LANDMARK
DECISION AGAINST THE SLAVE
TRADE.
MANSFIELD RULED AGAINST
THE OWNERS OF A SLAVE SHIP -
THE ZONG - WHOSE CAPTAIN THREW
OVER A HUNDRED SLAVES INTO THE
SEA, IN AN ATTEMPT TO CLAIM
COMPENSATION.
PERHAPS IT'S NOT SURPRISING
THEN THAT HE TOOK SPECIAL CARE
OF DIDO BELLE.
BUT IT WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN FAR
FROM SAFE FOR HER LEAVE KENWOOD
HOUSE ON HER OWN.

Amma says THE REALITY OF HER LIFE WAS
THAT SHE HAD TO BE PROTECTED BY
HER FAMILY.
IF SHE STEPPED OUT OF HER
HOUSE ALONE, SHE COULD HAVE BEEN
CAPTURED BY SLAVE CATCHERS WHO
WOULDN'T HAVE THOUGHT FOR A
MINUTE ABOUT QUESTIONING WHO SHE
WAS, WHO SHE BELONGED TO, BUT
WOULD HAVE ZAPPED HER AWAY IN A
HEARTBEAT.
IT'S VERY INTERESTING TO KNOW
THAT WHEN LORD MANSFIELD DIED,
HE LEFT HER IN HIS WILL, HER
FREEDOM.
UM, THE INTERESTING THING WAS
THAT SHE-- HE HADN'T LEFT HER
THAT PRIOR TO HIS DEATH AND I
IMAGINE THAT WAS PROBABLY
BECAUSE SHE WAS SAFER UNDER HIS
PROTECTION AND BELONGING TO
HIS FAMILY, THAN SHE WAS SIMPLY
HAVING FREE PAPERS.
BUT THEN, ONCE-- ONCE HE PASSED
AWAY, ALL HE COULD LEAVE HER
WITH, REALLY, UM, WERE THOSE
PAPERS AND HOPE, HOPE THAT SHE
WOULD BE SAFE.

Philip says AFTER LORD MANSFIELD DIED
IN 1793, DIDO BELLE LEFT
KENWOOD HOUSE, MARRIED A
MR. DAVINIER AND HAD THREE
CHILDREN.
SHE DIED IN LONDON IN 1804,
AGED 42.
WERE IT NOT FOR THIS PICTURE,
SHE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE
BEEN FORGOTTEN, BUT IT REMAINS
ONE OF THE EARLIEST POSITIVE
PORTRAYALS OF A BLACK PERSON IN
BRITISH ART.

Amma says THERE'S SOMETHING VERY
FREE, CONFIDENT, SOFT AND EASY
ABOUT THE WAY SHE PRESENTS
HERSELF.
AND FOR ME THAT, YOU KNOW, SORT
OF FINGER ON HER CHEEK, TO ME
SAYS, "I AM HERE, I EXISTED,"
YOU KNOW.
AND I'M VERY MOVED BY THAT.

Philip says AFTER DIDO BELLE DIED, THE
PAINTING REMAINED HERE UNTIL
1922, WHEN THE MANSFIELD FAMILY
SOLD THE HOUSE AND MOVED ALL
THEIR POSSESSIONS TO SCONE
PALACE.
SO, IN ORDER TO SEARCH FOR
CLUES AS TO THE IDENTITY OF THE
ARTIST, I NEED TO HEAD BACK TO
SCOTLAND.

(music plays)

Fiona says MEANWHILE, I'M LEADING
THE INVESTIGATION INTO
CHARLIE'S PICTURE.
I'VE ARRANGED TO BRING THE
PAINTING TO LONDON.
HERE, THERE ARE ARCHIVES WE CAN
RESEARCH AND FORENSIC TESTS WE
CAN CARRY OUT.
BUT FIRST, I'M MEETING AN
EXPERT IN BLACK PORTRAITURE.
CAN PROFESSOR CHARMAINE NELSON
FROM HARVARD UNIVERSITY HELP
ME GET CLOSER TO THE ARTIST?
CHARMAINE, THIS IS THE FIRST
TIME YOU'VE SEEN THE PAINTING.
WHAT STRIKES YOU ABOUT IT
INITIALLY?

Charmaine is in her forties, with long brown hair in dreadlocks and wears black trousers and a dark gray woolen coat.

She says SO, FIRST OF ALL, TO HAVE
BLACKS SITTERS BE THE FOCAL
POINTS IS QUITE INCREDIBLE.
THERE IS A WHOLE TRADITION OF
BLACK AND SLAVE SUBJECTS BEING
INCLUDED IN HIGH ART PORTRAITS
WHERE WHITE PEOPLE ARE AT THE
CENTRE OF IMAGES.
IN THOSE SITUATIONS, THE BLACK
AND SLAVE SUBJECT IS
DELIBERATELY COMPOSITIONALLY
PERIPHERAL - THEY ARE ON THE
OUTSKIRTS OF THE SCENE AND THE
PORTRAITS ARE NOT ABOUT THEM.
HERE, THERE'S NO ONE ELSE BUT
THEM, SO THIS IS EXTRAORDINARY.

Fiona says SO, THIS SUGGESTS AN ARTIST
WHO WAS DOING SOMETHING QUITE
RADICAL FOR THE TIME.
AND CHARMAINE HAS ALSO SPOTTED
SOME UNUSUAL STYLISTIC TRAITS
IN HOW THE GIRLS HAVE BEEN
PAINTED.

Charmaine says THE OTHER THING
THAT'S EXTRAORDINARY IS THE
ATTEMPT BY THE ARTIST TO CAPTURE
THE DEEPLY CURLED TEXTURE OF
AFRICAN HAIR.
A LOT OF ARTISTS IN THIS PERIOD
STRAIGHTENED THE HAIR TO MAKE IT
LOOK MORE LIKE EUROPEAN HAIR.
ALSO HERE, WHAT'S REALLY
DRAMATIC AND INTERESTING IS THAT
THERE'S A BOOK BECAUSE, IF WE'RE
DEALING WITH THE PERIOD OF
TRANSATLANTIC SLAVERY, ENSLAVED
PEOPLE WERE NOT ALLOWED TO LEARN
TO READ AND WRITE.

Fiona says AND I'M ASSUMING,
BECAUSE OF THE WAY THAT SHE'S
LOOKING HEAVENWARDS, THAT THIS
IS A BIBLE.

Charmaine says THAT WOULD BE MY GUESS, TOO.
FOR WHITE SITTERS OF HIGH ART,
THIS IS A STANDARD TROPE OF "I
CAN READ BECAUSE I'M OF A
CERTAIN STATUS."
THAT'S THE SAME THING THAT THIS
ARTIST IS BESTOWING UPON THIS,
THE OLDER FEMALE SUBJECT HERE.
IT'S EXTRAORDINARY.

Fiona says THE DETAILS OF THE HAIR AND
BOOK ARE REMARKABLE, GIVEN THAT
IN 19TH CENTURY BRITAIN, BLACK
PEOPLE WERE OFTEN PORTRAYED AS
GROTESQUE CARICATURES.
BUT THESE STEREOTYPES WERE
BEING CHALLENGED BY AN
INCREASINGLY POPULAR CAMPAIGN
TO ABOLISH SLAVERY.
SO, COULD IT BE THAT OUR ARTIST
IS CONNECTED TO THIS POLITICAL
MOVEMENT?
THE FACT THAT THESE GIRLS ARE
BEING TREATED WITH DIGNITY AND
RESPECT, UNLIKE SO MANY OF THE
CARICATURES WE SAW IN THE EARLY
19TH CENTURY, WHAT DO YOU THINK
IS HAPPENING HERE?
IS THIS A MESSAGE ABOUT THE
ABOLITIONIST MOVEMENT?
IS IT SIMPLY AN ARTIST WHO
HAPPENS TO FIND PAINTING BLACK
SITTERS INTERESTING?
WHAT DO YOU THINK IS HAPPENING?

Charmaine says I THINK THE RENDERING OF THE
SITTERS AND THEIR INTIMACY, THE
USE OF THE BOOK AND THE
IMPLICATION THAT THE ONES THAT
THE ONE SITTER AT LEAST, IF NOT
BOTH, ARE LITERATE IS A DECISION
ON THE PART OF THE ARTIST TO
ELICIT EMPATHY OR SYMPATHY FROM
THE VIEWER.
YOU KNOW, TO ACTUALLY SEE THEM,
NOT AS OBJECTS, BUT AS
INDIVIDUALS, AS HUMAN BEINGS.
THAT, TO ME, SPEAKS TO AN
ABOLITIONIST TENDENCY, IF NOT
OUTRIGHT PROPAGANDA.

Fiona says SO, THIS PAINTING IS VERY
SIGNIFICANT AND VERY RARE THEN.

Charmaine says ABSOLUTELY.
IT'S A VERY, VERY POWERFUL,
IMPORTANT PAINTING.

Fiona says THIS ARTIST CLEARLY HAD A
VERY RADICAL VIEW OF HOW BLACK
PEOPLE SHOULD BE PORTRAYED IN
ART.
THIS IS INCREASINGLY BECOMING A
POLITICAL PAINTING AND THAT, OF
COURSE, TO ME, IS REALLY
FASCINATING.

(music plays)

Philip says BACK IN SCOTLAND, I'M
ON THE TRAIL OF WHO PAINTED
DIDO BELLE.
AT SCONE PALACE, THE MANSFIELD
FAMILY HAVE AN EXTENSIVE
ARCHIVE, SO I'M KEEN TO SEARCH
FOR EVIDENCE HERE.
ARCHIVIST SARAH ADAMS OVERSEES
THE FAMILY'S PRIVATE PAPERS,
WHICH DATE BACK TO THE LATE
1700S, WHEN DIDO BELLE AND
THE PAINTING WERE AT KENWOOD
HOUSE IN LONDON.
SHE'S BEEN LOOKING FOR ANY
RECORD OF THE PAINTING.
SARAH, THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR
BURROWING THROUGH THE ARCHIVES.
NOW, WHAT'S THE EARLIEST
REFERENCE TO THIS PICTURE?

Sarah is in her thirties, with mid-length straight brown hair with bangs in a low ponytail. She wears glasses, a floral skirt and an off-white sweater.

She says THE EARLIEST REFERENCE WE
MANAGED TO FIND WAS 1796, SO
THAT WAS JUST THREE YEARS AFTER
LORD MANSFIELD, DIED AND THAT'S
IN AN INVENTORY.
IT'S LISTED AMONGST SOME ITEMS
IN A ROOM, WHICH IS CALLED THE
GROUND FLOOR AT KENWOOD.
WE CAN SEE THE REFERENCE TO THE
PICTURE HERE.
IT SAYS LADY ELIZABETH AND MRS.
DAVINIER...

Philip says OKAY, SO, MRS. DAVINIER BEING
DIDO BELLE'S MARRIED NAME.

Sarah says THAT'S HER MARRIED NAME
BECAUSE, AT THIS POINT, SHE WAS
MARRIED.

Philip says SO, THIS IS DEFINITELY OUR
PAINTING, BUT THERE'S NO
MENTION OF AN ARTIST.
AND WHY IS IT WITHOUT A FRAME?

Sarah says WHEN WE LOOK AT THE
OTHER ITEMS THAT ARE IN THE
ROOM, IT SOUNDS LIKE A BIT OF A
MUDDLE.
THERE'S OTHER PICTURES, THERE'S
AN OLD BATHTUB AND THEN THERE'S
SOME BROKEN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
SO, IT WOULD SUGGEST THAT, AT
THIS POINT, JUST THREE YEARS
AFTER LORD MANSFIELD DIED, THE
PAINTING WAS AT KENWOOD, BUT IT
WAS PERHAPS IN STORAGE.

Philip says FEELS ALMOST AS THOUGH IT'S
BEEN SIDE-LINED .
SO, IT SOUNDS LIKE THE
PAINTING WAS NO LONGER ON
DISPLAY AND WITH NO EFFORT MADE
TO ATTRIBUTE THE WORK.
AND LATER RECORDS REVEAL THAT
EVEN MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE
PAINTING HAVE BECOME LOST IN
THE PASSAGE OF TIME.

Sarah says WE CAN FIND THE PAINTING
STILL AT KENWOOD, ERR, IN AN
INVENTORY THAT WAS MADE IN 1904.
"PORTRAIT OF LADY FINCH HATTON
SEATED IN A GARDEN WITH AN OPEN
BOOK AND A NEGRESS ATTENDANT."
SO, AT THIS POINT, THEY DIDN'T
KNOW WHO DIDO WAS.

Philip says I MEAN, WHAT A
CHILLING THOUGHT.
I MEAN, DIDO WAS ONE OF THE
FAMILY.
IN THE COURSE OF A CENTURY,
SHE'S JUST LOST HER IDENTITY,
SHE'S JUST BECOME A SORT OF ADD
ON, A DECORATIVE ADD ON IN THE
PICTURE.

Sarah says YEAH.
AND THEN, IN THE 1910
INVENTORY, SHE'S NOT MENTIONED
AT ALL.
IT'S JUST DESCRIBED AS A
PORTRAIT OF LADY ELIZABETH.

Philip says NO NAME?

Sarah says NO NAME.

Philip says HOW TELLING IS IT THAT
ALTHOUGH LADY ELIZABETH
REMAINED IDENTIFIED, DIDO BELLE
HAD BEEN FORGOTTEN?
BUT I'VE ALSO ASKED SARAH
TO LOOK INTO LORD MANSFIELD'S
PRIVATE ACCOUNT BOOKS FROM THE
LATE 18TH CENTURY, WHEN HE
COMMISSIONED THE PAINTING.
DID HE RECORD PAYMENTS TO ANY
ARTISTS?

Sarah says HERE WE GO.
SO, WE CAN SEE THAT IN 1776, IN
OCTOBER, HE PAID DAVID MARTIN
200 POUNDS.

Philip says DAVID MARTIN - THE SCOTTISH
PORTRAIT PAINTER.

Sarah says YES.

Philip says BORN IN 1737 IN FIFE, DAVID
MARTIN WAS A HIGHLY REGARDED
ARTIST, POPULAR WITH THE
ARISTOCRACY.
HE STUDIED UNDER FELLOW SCOT
ALAN RAMSEY AND HIS PAINTING OF
AMERICAN POLITICIAN BENJAMIN
FRANKLIN IS ON DISPLAY IN THE
WHITE HOUSE.
BUT, SADLY, LORD MANSFIELD
DOESN'T RECORD WHAT HE PAID
MARTIN FOR, SO IT DOESN'T TIE
HIM DIRECTLY TO THE PAINTING.

Sarah says THEN, A LITTLE BIT LATER, IN
1785, 105 POUNDS WAS PAID TO JOSHUA
REYNOLDS.

Philip says JOSHUA REYNOLDS THE PRESIDENT
OF THE ROYAL ACADEMY, THE
TOWERING FIGURE OF 18TH CENTURY
PORTRAITURE.
BUT AGAIN, MANSFIELD DOESN'T
RECORD WHAT HE COMMISSIONED
JOSHUA REYNOLDS FOR, SO IT
DOESN'T CONNECT HIM DIRECTLY TO
THE PAINTING EITHER.
HOWEVER, REYNOLDS DID PAINT
THIS UNFINISHED PORTRAIT OF A
BLACK BRITISH SUBJECT - FRANCIS
BARBER IN OR AROUND 1770.
COULD THIS HAVE INSPIRED
MANSFIELD TO ASK REYNOLDS TO
PAINT DIDO BELLE?
WE NOW HAVE TWO PRIME
SUSPECTS - JOSHUA REYNOLDS AND
DAVID MARTIN.
I NEED NOW TO NARROW THIS DOWN
FURTHER - TO HAVE A LOOK AT
THE STYLISTIC EVIDENCE.
SEE IF I CAN PIN ONE OF THESE
ARTISTS TO OUR PAINTING.

(music plays)

Fiona says BACK IN LONDON, WE'VE
SENT CHARLIE'S PICTURE TO AVIVA
BURNSTOCK - HEAD OF
CONSERVATION AT THE COURTAULD
INSTITUTE - TO RUN SOME
FORENSIC TESTS.
WE THINK THE MYSTERY ARTIST
WAS TRYING TO MAKE A POLITICAL
STATEMENT ABOUT SLAVERY.
CAN WE FIND ANY EVIDENCE TO
BACK THIS UP?
WE'RE ALSO KEEN TO SEE IF THE
MISSING LETTERS FROM THE
SIGNATURE AND DATE CAN BE
REVEALED.
ARE WE LOOKING FOR A SOUTH
AMERICAN OR SPANISH NAME, AS
CHARLIE'S UNCLE SUSPECTED?
BUT FIRST, AVIVA WANTS TO
SHOW US SOMETHING SURPRISING,
WHICH HAS APPEARED UNDER X-RAY.

Aviva is in her forties, with above the shoulder wavy brown hair and wears a black top, a plaid blazer and a necklace.

Aviva says SO, THIS IS X-RAY OF
THE PAINTING, WHICH I DID.
UM, THE X-RAYS ARE PENETRATING
ALL THE WAY THROUGH THE
PAINTING.
IT ACTUALLY TELLS YOU THE
ARTIST HAS DECIDED TO CHANGE THE
COMPOSITION.

Fiona says SO, THIS IS THE ARTIST
WORKING OUT WHAT HE OR SHE IS
DOING AS THEY GO ALONG.

Aviva says YES, YEAH.
THE ONE THING THAT'S VERY
CLEAR HERE, I THINK, IS THAT THE
POSITION OF THIS GIRL'S ARM HAS
CHANGED, SO YOU CAN SEE SEVERAL
POSITIONS WHERE IT WAS.
BUT I THINK HER HANDS WERE
ACTUALLY IN A V-SHAPE, SHE WAS
EITHER HOLDING A BOOK OR PERHAPS
PRAYING AT AN EARLIER STAGE OF
THE COMPOSITION.
THIS IS A CHANGE IN THE T-DRESS
WORN BY THE LEFT-HAND GIRL.
BUT SHE AND ALSO, I THINK, THE
OTHER GIRL WERE, AT AN EARLIER
STAGE, WEARING MUCH MORE UP TO
THE NECK COSTUMES.
YOU CAN SEE HERE THAT THERE IS A
COSTUME WHICH IS HIGHER.
AND THEN, LATER ON, IT WAS
CHANGED TO A LOWER NECKLINE,
THESE REALLY NICE SORT OF
T-DRESSES THAT THEY ARE BOTH
WEARING.

Fiona says THE CHANGES REVEALED BY THE
X-RAY SUGGEST THE ARTIST SPENT
SOME TIME CONSIDERING THE
STYLE OF THE DRESSES THE GIRLS
WORE AND THE POSES THEY STRUCK.
GIVEN THE NEGATIVE ATTITUDES TO
BLACK PEOPLE AT THE TIME, THE
CARE TAKEN WITH THIS UNUSUAL
PORTRAYAL STRENGTHENS OUR
THEORY THAT IT COULD BE
CONNECTED TO THE ANTI-SLAVERY
MOVEMENT.
AND I ALSO WANT TO SEE WHAT
AVIVA DISCOVERED WHEN SHE PUT
THE SIGNATURE AND DATE UNDER
ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT.

Aviva says OKAY, SO, THIS IS AN
ULTRAVIOLET, FLORESCENT IMAGE OF
THE WHOLE PAINTING.
THE MOST EXCITING THING, OF
COURSE, IS THE INSCRIPTION,
WHICH WE CAN READ MUCH MORE
CLEARLY.
OKAY, SO, NOW I THINK YOU CAN
SEE VERY CLEARLY.

Fiona says CHARLIE, CAN YOU READ
THAT?
BECAUSE I CAN.

Charlie says IF ANYTHING, IT
LOOKS LIKE "E JONES."

Fiona says YEAH.
"E JONES" AND THEN IS, IS THIS
"FECIT"?

Aviva says YEAH.
I READ IT AS "E JONES, FECIT."
AND THEN, THERE IS A DATE, WHICH
IS VERY CLEARLY 1831.

Fiona says WHOA.

Charlie says IT'S INTERESTING THAT IT'S
"JONES" BECAUSE WE WERE LED ON A
WILD GOOSE CHASE AND THOUGHT IT
COULD BE "JONXI" OR ONE OF THOSE
LATIN AMERICAN...

Fiona says OR "JONAS"-- I DON'T KNOW HOW
TO PRONOUNCE THOSE NAMES.

Charlie says AND IT MIGHT JUST BE "JONES."

Fiona says IT'S A FANTASTIC
BREAKTHROUGH, THIS.
I MEAN, THAT'S ABSOLUTELY GREAT.

Charlie says JUST IMAGINE IT'S BEEN
STARING AT US IN THE FACE THE
WHOLE TIME.

Fiona says GOD, GREAT WORK, AVIVA.
THANK YOU.

Aviva says PLEASURE.

(music plays)

Fiona says WELL, I THINK WE'VE JUST HAD
QUITE A BREAKTHROUGH.
WE CAN FORGET ALL THOSE STRANGE
JONAS, JUANAS.
I'M NOT EVEN SURE HOW TO
PRONOUNCE THEM.
IT'S JUST PLAIN OLD JONES.
THE ARTIST IS E JONES.
SO, NOW, WE NEED TO FIND OUT WHO
THAT IS.

Philip says BACK AT SCONE PALACE,
WE'RE NOW LOOKING AT THE TWO
PRIME SUSPECTS - JOSHUA
REYNOLDS AND DAVID MARTIN.
WE'VE FOUND EVIDENCE THAT THEY
WERE WORKING FOR LORD MANSFIELD
AT THE TIME HE COMMISSIONED THE
PORTRAIT OF HIS GREAT NIECES
DIDO BELLE AND LADY ELIZABETH.
THERE ARE SEVERAL OF THEIR
WORKS HERE; SO CAN I SPOT ANY
WITH STYLISTIC SIMILARITIES?
I'M STARTING IN THE DINING
ROOM, WHERE I FIND JOSHUA
REYNOLDS MAGNIFICENT PORTRAIT
OF LORD MANSFIELD HIMSELF.
REYNOLDS WAS IN LOVE WITH
CLASSICAL ART.
OFTEN WITH HIS PORTRAITS,
THERE'S A CRAGGY, STATUESQUE
QUALITY, LIKE SCULPTURE THAT'S
COME TO LIFE.
AND ONE OF THE THINGS THAT
CHARACTERISES HIS WORK IS THE
INTELLIGENCE WITH WHICH HE
PORTRAYED HIS SUBJECTS.
THIS IS A LAWMAKER; THIS IS A
MAN WITH COMPASSION AS WELL.
I MEAN, IT'S HIGHLY
SOPHISTICATED.
ONE OF HIS NICKNAMES WAS SIR
SPLOTCHUA BECAUSE OF THE
VIOLENT, EXPRESSIVE BRUSHSTROKES
THAT HE WAS QUITE CAPABLE OF
WITH A BIG BRUSH, AND IF YOU
LOOK AT THAT CUFF OF THE
JUDGE'S CLOAK, YOU CAN SEE A
WHIRLWIND OF ACTIVITY, YOU KNOW,
THE MOVEMENT OF THE STROKES.
NOW, OUR PICTURE IS GOOD, BUT
DOES IT QUITE HAVE THAT DEGREE
OF COMPLEXITY.
I WOULD ARGUE PROBABLY NOT.
STYLISTICALLY AND IN TERMS OF
THE APPROACH TO THE SUBJECT, I
DON'T THINK REYNOLDS IS OUR MAN.
I NOW NEED TO SEE A WORK BY
DAVID MARTIN.
THERE ARE SEVERAL OF HIS
PAINTINGS ON DISPLAY TO THE
PUBLIC HERE.
THERE'S ONE IN PARTICULAR I'M
KEEN TO EXAMINE.
BUT IT'S KEPT IN THE
MANSFIELD'S PRIVATE QUARTERS,
IN THE FAMILY'S DRAWING ROOM.
THIS IS LADY MARJORY, PAINTED
BY DAVID MARTIN IN THE 1760S.
I WANT TO SHOW LADY MANSFIELD
WHAT I THINK COULD BE SOME
PROMISING CLUES.
SO, SOPHIE, THIS WOULD HAVE
BEEN DONE, I THINK, PROBABLY TEN
YEARS BEFORE DIDO AND ELIZABETH,
BUT THERE ARE CHARACTERISTICS
WHICH, I THINK, ONE CAN SEE WITH
YOUR TWO GIRLS.

Lady Mansfield says THAT'S SO INTERESTING.

Philip says NOW, WHAT ABOUT THE FLOWERS
IN THEIR HAIR?

Lady Mansfield says ABSOLUTELY SPOT ON, FLOWERS
IN THE HAIR.

Philip says WELL, I MEAN, YES, OF COURSE,
MARJORIE MIGHT HAVE LIKED
FLOWERS, BUT EQUALLY, PORTRAIT
PAINTERS, I FIND, WILL SOMETIMES
IMPOSE THEIR OWN IDEAS AS TO HOW
SOMEONE SHOULD LOOK AND I THINK
THAT'S WHAT WE ARE DEALING WITH
HERE AND FLOWERS IN THE HAIR -
LOVELY BIT OF COLOUR, CATCHING
THE LIGHT - ARE SOMETHING THAT,
CLEARLY, DAVID MARTIN ENJOYS.

Lady Mansfield says I DEFINITELY BUY INTO
THAT THEORY.

Philip says NOW, WHAT ABOUT THE
CLOTHES?

Lady Mansfield says THAT INDIAN SORT OF GAUZE IS
IN THE OTHER PICTURE.

Philip says IT IS, ISN'T IT?
WITH THAT BEAUTIFUL GOLD
EMBROIDERY.
YOU SEE, ONE OF MARTIN'S PARTY
TRICKS WAS TO ALLOW ONE COLOUR
TO SHINE THROUGH ANOTHER AND NOT
EVERYONE COULD PULL THAT ONE
OFF.
AND I THINK ANY OPPORTUNITY TO
USE IT, AND HE'S DONE IT WITH
MARJORY, AND WHY SHOULDN'T HE BE
DOING IT WITH YOUR DOUBLE
PORTRAIT?
I'M ALSO STRUCK BY THE WAY
MARTIN HAS COMPOSED HIS FEMALE
SUBJECTS.
BOTH LADY MARJORY AND LADY
ELIZABETH HAVE BEEN PAINTED
WITH BRIGHT RED, RUBY LIPS,
ALMOST ALUMINOUS.
AND THE HEADS OF ALL THREE
WOMEN HAVE AN ELONGATED,
LOZENGE SHAPE TO THEM.
AND MOST OBVIOUS OF ALL IS THE
FINGER RAISED TO THE FACE, A
GESTURE STRUCK BY BOTH LADY
MARJORY AND DIDO BELLE.

Lady Mansfield says GOSH, WHY DIDN'T I NOTICE
THAT BEFORE?
WHY HAVEN'T-- ALL THESE YEARS, I
HADN'T EVEN CLICKED THAT THE
FABRICS WERE SO SIMILAR AND
THE HAND AND THE FACT THAT SHE'S
WEARING PEARLS TOO, AND BIG ONES
JUST LIKE DIDO.

Philip says WELL, NEXT, WE NEED TO TAKE
THIS FURTHER WITH FORENSICS AND
SEE IF IT IT'S THE SAME HAND IN
BOTH PICTURE.

Lady Mansfield says WE'VE ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW
WHO PAINTED DIDO AND ELIZABETH,
AND IF WE COULD FIND OUT, IT
WOULD BE A FAMILY GOAL.

(music plays)

Fiona says MEANWHILE, FORENSIC
TESTS HAVE REVEALED A SIGNATURE
AND DATE ON CHARLIE'S PAINTING.
BUT JUST WHO IS THE MYSTERIOUS
E. JONES?
BACK IN LONDON, WE'RE KEEN TO
FIND OUT, SO CHARLIE AND I ARE
ON OUR WAY TO THE ROYAL
ACADEMY - BRITAIN'S OLDEST ART
SCHOOL, ESTABLISHED IN 1769.
MARK POMEROY OVERSEES THEIR
UNIQUE ARCHIVE, WHICH LISTS
EVERY ARTIST WHO HAS EVER
EXHIBITED HERE, SO WE'VE ASKED
HIM FOR HELP.
MARK, I'M JUST WONDERING IF
YOU'VE GOT ANYTHING ABOUT AN
ARTIST - E. JONES?

Mark is in his forties, bald and clean-shaven and wears glasses and a dark gray blazer.

He says THE FIRST PLACE WE COULD TRY
IS AN INDEX TO THE SUMMER
EXHIBITIONS OF THE ROYAL
ACADEMY.
IF E. JONES HAD ANY INVOLVEMENT
WITH THE ROYAL ACADEMY, THIS IS
WHERE IT'S GOING TO BE.

Fiona says RIGHT.
AND HOPEFULLY, THERE AREN'T TOO
MANY E. JONES?

Charlie says I KNOW, THERE COULD BE LOTS
OF THEM.

Mark says 250 YEARS, THERE MAY BE A
FEW.

Fiona says OH, RIGHT, OKAY. SO...
OKAY, JONES E.
WELL, THAT'S EASY - ARCHITECT -
SO LET'S ASSUME IT'S NOT THAT
ONE.
THERE ARE EIGHT ARTISTS NAMED
E. JONES WHO HAVE EXHIBITED AT
THE ROYAL ACADEMY, BUT WE CAN
RULE OUT SOME IMMEDIATELY -
THEY WERE EITHER WORKING IN
WRONG DISCIPLINE OR THE WRONG
PERIOD.
SO, LET'S NARROW IT DOWN.
WE'VE GOT JONES, MISS E - 1833.

Charlie says SHREWSBURY.

Fiona says PORTRAIT OF MONSIEUR FAUCHER
OF THE KING'S THEATRE.
BUT JONES, MISS EMMA LOOKS
MUCH MORE PROMISING...

Charlie says YES.

Fiona says I WOULD SAY.
1832 - GIRL GOING TO MARKET.
1833 - WILLY AND HIS DOG.
1834 - CHILDHOOD.
THESE ARE THE KIND OF PAINTINGS,
PORTRAIT, GENRE PAINTING,
TELLING A STORY, LIKE YOURS.

Charlie says AND THE RIGHT TIME.

Mark says HMM...

Fiona says UNFORTUNATELY, THERE'S
NOTHING HERE THAT SOUNDS LIKE
IT COULD BE CHARLIE'S PAINTING.
BUT CAN MARK SHED ANY MORE
LIGHT ON EMMA JONES?

Mark says THIS IS A DICTIONARY OF
ARTISTS PUBLISHED IN 1874.
SO, IF WE GO TO THE JONES'...

Fiona says "JONES, EMMA."
OH, MADAME SOYER, AS IT
OBVIOUSLY IS.
"BORN IN LONDON 1813, SHE IS
REPUTED TO HAVE DRAWN LIKENESSES
WITH GREAT FIDELITY BEFORE THE
AGE OF 13 YEARS.
SHE PAINTED PORTRAITS AND GROUPS
OF CHILDREN..."

Charlie says SOUNDS RIGHT.

Fiona says SO, THIS BIOGRAPHY REVEALS
EMMA JONES WAS BORN IN LONDON
IN 1813, WHICH MEANS SHE WOULD
HAVE BEEN JUST 18 IF SHE
PAINTED CHARLIE'S PICTURE.
AND WE NOW KNOW SHE MARRIED AND
BECAME MADAME SOYER.
IT'S SO UNUSUAL TO FIND A
WOMAN WORKING FROM SUCH A YOUNG
AGE AND EXHIBITING AT THE ROYAL
ACADEMY WHEN THE ART WORLD IN
THE 19TH CENTURY WAS DOMINATED
BY MEN.
WHEN I SAW THE NAME E. JONES
ON CHARLIE'S PAINTING, IT NEVER
OCCURRED TO ME WE MIGHT BE
LOOKING AT A FEMALE ARTIST
BECAUSE THAT'S PRETTY RARE.
BUT I THINK SHE'S LOOKING VERY
PROMISING.

(music plays)

Philip says BACK IN SCOTLAND AT
SCONE PALACE, WE'VE CALLED IN
SPECIALIST CONSERVATORS FROM
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTHUMBRIA.
WE'RE SEARCHING FOR SCIENTIFIC
EVIDENCE TO CONNECT DAVID
MARTIN TO THE PICTURE OF DIDO
BELLE AND LADY ELIZABETH.
THE FORENSIC EXPERTS ARE TAKING
MINUTE PAINT SAMPLES FROM BOTH
PORTRAITS - LADY MARJORY...
AND DIDO BELLE AND LADY
ELIZABETH.
THEY ARE ALSO USING AN XRF
SPECTROMETER TO SEND X-RAYS TO
IDENTIFY ANY COMMON ELEMENTS IN
THE PAINTINGS.
THEY'LL BE LOOKING FOR ANY
CHEMICAL LINK BETWEEN THE
PORTRAITS.
THEY NEED TO PROCESS THE
RESULTS AT THEIR LAB IN
NEWCASTLE, SO I'M HEADING BACK
TO LONDON TO CATCH UP WITH
FIONA, WHO HAS SOME NEWS ABOUT
CHARLIE'S PAINTING.

Fiona says I THINK I'VE FOUND OUR
PAINTER.
THIS IS EMMA JONES.
THIS IS A SELF PORTRAIT, WHICH
IS RATHER BEAUTIFUL, ISN'T IT?

Philip says IT'S HIGHLY ACCOMPLISHED.
I MEAN, THE TECHNIQUE IN THE
FACE, THAT STIPPLING IS LIKE A
REALLY PROFESSIONAL MINIATURIST.

Fiona says WELL, SHE WAS A CHILD
PRODIGY.
SO, SHE EXHIBITED AT THE ROYAL
ACADEMY, WHICH, AS A WOMAN, WAS
HARD ENOUGH.
BUT HER FIRST PAINTING WAS HUNG
THERE WHEN SHE WAS TEN.
TEN YEARS OLD.
NOW, HOW DOES SHE FOSTER THIS
PRODIGIOUS TALENT THAT SHE HAD?
HER STEPFATHER WAS A BELGIAN
ARTIST, WELL-KNOWN ARTIST CALLED
FRANÇOIS SIMONAU.
SO, ONE ASSUMES THAT SHE LEARNT
UNDER HIS TUTORAGE.

Philip says SHE GOT IT FIRST-HAND.

Fiona says SHE DID.
SHE WENT TO PAINT THE PORTRAIT
OF A CELEBRITY CHEF AT THE TIME,
A FRENCHMAN CALLED ALEXIS SOYER.
HE SAW HER, THEY FELL IN LOVE
AND THEY MARRIED.
THIS IS ALEXIS SOYER'S BEAST
OF A KITCHEN.
I JUST LOVE THIS PICTURE.

Philip says IT'S LIKE A FACTORY,
ISN'T IT?

Fiona says I MEAN, LOOK AT THE DETAIL,
ALL THESE PEOPLE RUSHING AROUND.
HE WAS FAMOUS IN LONDON AT THE
TIME.
HE PRODUCED COOKBOOKS, BOTTLED
SAUCES.
HERE HE IS, SHOWING PEOPLE
AROUND HIS KITCHEN.
AND LOOK IN THIS CORNER HERE, IN
HIS KITCHEN, WHAT DO YOU SEE?

Philip says FOOD AND ART.

Fiona says NOT JUST ANY ART, THESE ARE
EMMA'S PAINTINGS.
ALEXIS WAS KNOWN FOR PROUDLY
DISPLAYING HER WORK IN HIS
KITCHEN.

Philip says I DON'T THINK I CAN SEE OURS,
BUT THERE ARE SOME SIMILAR
LOOKING THINGS.
SO, WHERE WAS THIS?

Fiona says THIS WAS JUST OVER THE ROAD
AT THE REFORM CLUB.

Philip says OH, DON'T BE RIDICULOUS.

Fiona says JUST THERE.

Philip says WHAT, THERE?

Fiona says RIGHT UNDER YOUR NOSE.

Philip says ALL THE TIME?

Fiona says ALL THE TIME.

Philip says WHAT I NEED TO DO IS FIND OUT
WHETHER THE CLUB STILL HAS ANY
OF THE WORKS THERE.
I'D LOVE TO BE ABLE TO GET TO
GRIPS WITH HER STYLE AND COMPARE
IT TO OURS.

Fiona says WELL, THE REFORM CLUB IS ONE
OF LONDON'S MOST PRESTIGIOUS
CLUBS.
IT HAS A DRESS CODE AND THIS
WILL NOT CUT THE MUSTARD, I'M
AFRAID.

Philip says WHAT DO YOU TAKE ME FOR?
I'M AN ART DEALER; I HAVE THE
CLOTHES.
SUITED AND BOOTED - AND
HOPEFULLY UP TO FIONA'S
STANDARDS - I'VE ARRANGED A
VISIT TO THE REFORM CLUB.
ESTABLISHED IN 1836, THIS
GRAND CLUB FOR PRIVATE MEMBERS
WAS SET UP AS AN EXCLUSIVE
PRESERVE FOR WELL-CONNECTED AND
POLITICALLY LIBERAL, ELITE
GENTLEMEN.
THE CLUB HAVE CONFIRMED THAT
THEY DO STILL HAVE ONE ORIGINAL
WORK BY EMMA JONES.
AND, PERHAPS UNSURPRISINGLY,
IT'S A PAINTING SHE COMPOSED OF
HER HUSBAND IN 1841 -
THE CLUB'S FIRST EVER CHEF.
CAN I SPOT ANY STYLISTIC
SIMILARITIES TO CHARLIE'S
PAINTING?
SO, HERE IS ALEXIS SOYER,
LOOKING, I HAVE TO SAY, EVERY
INCH LIKE WHAT HE IS - THE
CELEBRITY CHEF.
IN FACT, HE'S POINTING TO HIS
SIGNATURE DISH - BREADED LAMB
CUTLETS, WHICH APPARENTLY ARE
STILL ON THE MENU TODAY,
ALTHOUGH, THEY DON'T LOOK HUGELY
EDIBLE TO ME.
WHEN YOU GET UP CLOSE, THERE IS
SOMETHING VERY THICK AND RICH
ABOUT THE HANDLING OF THE PAINT.
THIS IS NOT TRANSPARENT AND
GLAZY; THIS IS QUITE BUILT UP.
THE HANDS ALSO QUITE ROBUSTLY
PAINTED.
I GET A SORT OF MEMORY OF
SOMETHING RATHER SIMILAR WITH
OUR TWO GIRLS IN THAT SETTING.
I'VE ALSO NOTICED THAT THE
PAINTING HAS RATHER UNUSUAL
MEASUREMENTS.
IT'S 36 X 28 INCHES.
I DON'T NEED TO MEASURE IT.
IT'S CALLED THE KITKAT PORTRAIT.
IT'S SOMETHING THAT WAS
DEVELOPED IN THE EARLY 18TH
CENTURY.
IT ALLOWED A FACE AND HANDS,
LITTLE BIT ELSE GOING ON,
AND IT WAS BIGGER THAN JUST YOUR
NORMAL BUST PORTRAIT, WHICH IS
30X25.
NOW, BY THE MID 19TH CENTURY,
ALTHOUGH IT WAS USED A LITTLE
BIT BY SOME ARTISTS, THIS WAS
BECOMING OLD-FASHIONED.
SO, IT'S SOMETHING THAT IS QUITE
NOTICEABLE ABOUT THIS PAINTING
AND IT'S THE SAME AS OUR TWO
GIRLS.
EMMA JONES MARRIED ALEXIS IN
1837 AND SO HAS SIGNED HER NAME
SOYER ON THIS PORTRAIT.
BUT SHE'S RETAINED A
DISTINCTIVE TRAIT, WHICH IS
ALSO ON CHARLIE'S PAINTING.
"EMMA SAWYER FECIT 1841."
FECIT!
FECIT!
THIS IS THE SAME TERM THAT IS
USED - THIS SLIGHTLY
ANACHRONISTIC, OLD-FASHIONED
TERM USED A LOT IN THE 18TH
CENTURY - THAT WE'VE GOT IN OUR
TWO GIRLS.
"FECIT" - HE OR SHE MADE IT.
THIS IS A QUIRK, A QUIRK THAT WE
SEE IN BOTH WORKS.

(music plays)

Fiona says I'VE DISCOVERED THAT
MANY OF EMMA'S PAINTINGS
INCLUDE CHILDREN, JUST LIKE
CHARLIE'S PICTURE.
BUT SHE DIDN'T NAME THE
SUBJECTS.
LIKE THIS SCENE TITLED
AN OLD
WOMAN AND SPINNING WHEEL.
THIS MEANS IT MIGHT BE
IMPOSSIBLE TO IDENTIFY THE
GIRLS IN CHARLIE'S PICTURE.
BUT I'VE ALSO NOTICED THAT
EMMA SEEMED TO FAVOUR INTIMATE
AND SYMPATHETIC PORTRAYALS OF
THOSE ON THE MARGINS OF
VICTORIAN SOCIETY.
SO, COULD SHE ALSO HAVE BEEN
A SUPPORTER OF BRITAIN'S
ANTI-SLAVERY MOVEMENT?
IN 1831 - THE DATE THE PICTURE
WAS PAINTED - THE ABOLITIONIST
CAMPAIGN WAS AT ITS PEAK.
AND ITS MOST VOCAL AND RADICAL
SUPPORTERS IN BRITAIN WERE
WOMEN, WHO FORMED THEIR OWN
SOCIETIES CALLING FOR THE
IMMEDIATE END TO SLAVERY.

An old newspaper article headline reads "Ladies' petition for the immediate abolition of West India slavery."

Fiona says TO SEARCH FOR EVIDENCE OF A
CONNECTION TO THESE POLITICAL
GROUPS, CHARLIE AND I ARE
HEADING TO KINGS COLLEGE
LONDON.
WE'RE MEETING HISTORIAN
DR. IMAOBONG UMOREN, WHO'S BEEN
LOOKING THROUGH THE
UNIVERSITY'S ARCHIVE THAT HOLDS
RECORDS DETAILING THE
ACTIVITIES OF WOMEN'S
ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES.
CAN SHE HELP US LINK EMMA JONES
TO THE CAMPAIGN TO END SLAVERY?
WHEN I FIRST SAW THE PAINTING ON
YOUR WALL, I THOUGHT, WE'VE GOT
THESE TWO BLACK GIRLS, NICELY
DRESSED, WITH A BOOK, WHICH WE
ASSUME IS THE BIBLE.
WHY ARE THEY DRESSED SO FINELY?
WHY ARE THEY READING A BOOK?
WHY IS ONE OF THE GIRLS LOOKING
HEAVENWARD AS A SIGN OF HER
FAITH?
WHAT LIGHT CAN YOU SHED ON THAT?

Imaobong is in her thirties, with long braided brown hair in a bun and wears a polka dotted shirt and an off white cardigan sweater.

She says I THINK THAT REALLY LINKS
INTO A REALLY INTERESTING
ORGANISATION CALLED THE LADY
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING THE EARLY
EDUCATION OF THE CHILDREN OF THE
NEGROES.
AND THIS GROUP'S MAIN GOAL WAS
TO SPREAD CHRISTIANITY IN THE
CARIBBEAN, BUT ALSO TO REALLY
PROMOTE, UM, AND IMPROVE THE
EDUCATION OF ENSLAVED CHILDREN.
NOW, THEY DID THIS THROUGH
SENDING CLOTHES, MONEY, BOOKS.
IN 1831, THERE'S A REPORT THAT
TALKS ABOUT THE KIND OF IMPACT
OF CLOTHES, OF BOOKS, THAT I
THINK REALLY DO PICK UP ON SOME
OF THE THEMES IN THE PAINTING
THAT WE HAVE.
AND IT NOTES, FOR INSTANCE, THE
CHILDREN'S CLOTHING AND
APPEARANCE HAD IMPROVED AS A
RESULT OF EUROPEANS SENDING
CLOTHES TO THE CARIBBEAN.
"TO HAVE WITNESSED THEIR ORDERLY
BEHAVIOUR, NEAT, CIVILISED
APPEARANCE AND INTELLIGENT
FACES, WOULD HAVE GRATIFIED
THEIR KIND FRIENDS IN EUROPE."
LATER ON, THE REPORT NOTES THAT
THE CHILDREN WERE CONTINUALLY
ASKING FOR MORE AND MORE BOOKS,
AND I THINK THE IMAGE ITSELF,
THE CHILDREN, THE BOOKS, THE
WAYS IN WHICH THEY ARE SO
BEAUTIFULLY DRESSED IS A
REFLECTION OF WHAT'S GOING ON
IN THIS REPORT.

Fiona says I MEAN, THAT'S FASCINATING,
ISN'T IT?

Charlie says IT'S INCREDIBLE.
I MEAN IT'S SO...
AT THAT PARTICULAR TIME, IT
WOULDN'T HAVE BEEN COMPLETELY
EXTRAORDINARY FOR CHILDREN TO BE
WEARING SUCH FINE DRESSES OR
HAVE BOOKS, WHAT WOULD BE NOW
DESCRIBED AS AID SUPPLIES, IN A
WAY.

Imaobong says YES, DEFINITELY.

Fiona says AND DO WE KNOW IF EMMA JONES
WAS INVOLVED DIRECTLY IN THESE
GROUPS.

Imaobong says UNFORTUNATELY, WE DON'T.
WE DON'T KNOW DIRECTLY IF SHE
WAS INVOLVED, BUT GIVEN HER OWN
EXPERIENCE OF PAINTING
DISENFRANCHISED SUBJECTS, WE CAN
IMAGINE THAT SHE ATTENDED,
PERHAPS, SOME OF THESE
ORGANISATIONS AND EVENTS.
SHE HAD FRIENDS WITH PEOPLE WHO
ALSO WERE DIRECTLY LINKED TO
ORGANISATIONS SUCH AS THIS.
I THINK THAT MAY HAVE INFLUENCED
HER DECISION TO PAINT THE
BEAUTIFUL PICTURE THAT SHE DID.

Fiona says SO, THAT ANSWERS A FEW
QUESTIONS THEN, DOESN'T IT?

Charlie says OH, COMPLETELY.

Fiona says THIS IS JUST SO BRILLIANT,
ISN'T IT?

Charlie says IT BRINGS IT TOGETHER.

Fiona says IT REALLY DOES.

Charlie says AND THERE ARE ALSO SO MANY
LAYERS TO IT THAT I HADN'T
APPRECIATED.

Fiona says THAT'S SO INTERESTING.
THANK YOU SO MUCH.
I THINK THAT FEELS LIKE A
BREAKTHROUGH.

Charlie says COMPLETELY.
THAT WAS FASCINATING.

Fiona says THIS REPORT WAS PUBLISHED
IN LONDON IN 1831 - THE VERY
SAME YEAR OF CHARLIE'S
PAINTING.
SO, IT SEEMS THAT THIS IS THE
MOST LIKELY EXPLANATION FOR OUR
PICTURE.
AN ABOLITIONIST WORK INSPIRED
BY A CAMPAIGN RUN BY BRITISH
WOMEN TO SEND CLOTHES AND BOOKS
TO SLAVES IN BRITAIN'S
COLONIES.
JUST TWO YEARS LATER, IN 1833,
PARLIAMENT FINALLY PASSED AN
ACT ABOLISHING SLAVERY IN THE
BRITISH EMPIRE.
BUT TRAGICALLY, LESS THAN A
DECADE LATER, IN 1842,
EMMA JONES DIED IN CHILDBIRTH.
SHE WAS JUST 29.
AFTER HER DEATH, HER HUSBAND,
ALEXIS SOYER, ORGANISED A
CHARITY EXHIBITION OF HER WORKS
WITH THE PROCEEDS GOING TO HELP
LONDON'S POOR.
IT WAS A FITTING TRIBUTE FOR A
REMARKABLE YOUNG ARTIST.

Philip says MEANWHILE, THE
RESULTS FROM THE TESTS FROM
SCONE PALACE HAVE BEEN
PROCESSED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF
NORTHUMBRIA IN NEWCASTLE.
SO, LADY MANSFIELD AND I ARE
ON OUR WAY TO FIND OUT IF
SCIENCE CAN CONNECT DAVID
MARTIN TO ONE OF THE EARLIEST
AND MOST IMPORTANT PAINTINGS OF
A BLACK SUBJECT IN BRITISH ART.
THIS COULD BE A SIGNIFICANT
BREAKTHROUGH.
MARTIN IS A LEADING FIGURE IN
SCOTTISH PORTRAITURE AND SOME
OF HIS WORKS ARE HELD IN THE
NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY IN
EDINBURGH.
BUT WILL MY HUNCH ABOUT MARTIN
BE BACKED UP BY THE FORENSICS?
TO FIND OUT, WE'RE MEETING
DR. KATE NICHOLSON.
SO, KATE, HAVE YOU FOUND
ANYTHING THAT COULD GIVE US
COMFORT THAT THEY MIGHT BE BY
THE SAME ARTIST?

Kate is in her thirties, with long, slightly wavy burgundy hair and wears black trousers, a black sweater and a gray leather jacket.

She shows them a graph and says WELL, WE'VE DONE SOME
COMPARISONS AND WE'RE LOOKING
AT THE WHITE SAMPLE TAKEN FROM
LADY MARJORIE, WHICH WE KNOW IS
BY DAVID MARTIN AND WHAT THE
PARTICULAR CHEMICAL MAKEUP OF IT
IS.
SO, WE CAN SEE THAT WHITE
PIGMENT HE USED WAS LEAD WHITE
AND WE CAN SEE A MIXTURE OF
BINDING OILS THAT HE USED TO MIX
THE PAINT.

Philip says OKAY, SO, THERE'S BINDING
OILS IS-- IS WHAT?

Kate says WHAT HOLDS THE PIGMENT
TOGETHER AND MAKES IT INTO A
PAINT.
THE PIGMENT YOU WOULD JUST BUY
AS A POWDER.
IF WE LOOK AT THE SAMPLE TAKEN
FROM ELIZABETH AND BELLE, IT
MIRRORS PERFECTLY.

Lady Mansfield says OH, GOODNESS, THAT'S
EXTRAORDINARY!
IT'S LIKE A COPY.
YOU KNOW, YOU COULD JUST...
IT'S ABSOLUTELY EXTRAORDINARY.

Kate says IF WE LOOK AT THE MAKEUP OF
THE BINDING OIL ITSELF, WE CAN
SEE THE RATIO USED IN BOTH OF
THESE PAINTING IS THE SAME.

Philip says SO, IT'S THE SAME GRAVY, AS
IT WERE?

Kate says SAME GRAVY, SAME SAUCE MIX.

Philip says THAT'S EXCITING - THE WHITE
PAINT USED ON BOTH PAINTINGS IS
AN EXACT MATCH.
BUT WHAT HAVE THE TESTS
REVEALED ABOUT THOSE
DISTINCTIVE RED LIPS I SPOTTED
ON LADY ELIZABETH AND LADY
MARJORY?

Kate says WE SEE THIS PARTICULAR GRAPH
SHOWS A STEEP RISE AND THAT
SAYS, IN LADY MARJORIE'S LIPS,
THE PIGMENT WAS VERMILION.
COMPARE LADY MARJORIE TO LADY
ELIZABETH - NOT ONLY DO WE SEE
IT'S VERMILION, BUT IF WE DO
FURTHER ANALYSIS, WE SEE, EVEN
DOWN TO THE TRACE ELEMENTS, THE
TWO ARE A MATCH.

Philip says I MEAN, THE CHANCES OF THOSE
BEING DIFFERENT ARTISTS IS
PRETTY REMOTE, LET'S FACE IT?

Kate says IT'S VERY SLIM.

Philip says SOPHIE, THAT'S A MATCH.

Lady Mansfield says YUP.
IT'S EXTRAORDINARY.
I MEAN, IT'S ABSOLUTELY
EXTRAORDINARY.
I MEAN, THERE IT ALL IS, IN
FRONT OF OUR EYES.

Philip says SO, THE FORENSIC RESULTS
BACK UP OUR THEORY THAT DAVID
MARTIN COMPOSED THIS PAINTING.
BUT TO SECURE A NEW OFFICIAL
ATTRIBUTION, WE'LL HAVE TO
CONVINCE THE ART AUTHORITIES,
WHO WILL NEED TO VIEW ALL OUR
EVIDENCE BACK AT SCONE PALACE.

Fiona says BUT FIRST, PHILIP AND
I HAVE RETURNED TO EDINBURGH
BECAUSE I THINK I'VE MADE AN
IMPORTANT DISCOVERY ABOUT
CHARLIE'S PAINTING.
ALL THE EVIDENCE SO FAR HAS
POINTED TO EMMA JONES BEING OUR
ARTIST - FROM THE SIGNATURE TO
THE STYLISTIC SIMILARITIES WITH
HER OTHER WORK.
AND NOW, WE'RE HERE TO SHARE
THE FINAL REVELATION WITH
OWNERS CHARLIE AND SARAH.
AS YOU KNOW, WE THINK YOUR
PAINTING IS BY THE ARTIST EMMA
JONES.
SHE MARRIED THE CELEBRITY CHEF,
ALEXIS SOYER.
HE DIED IN 1858, AND AFTER HIS
DEATH, THERE WAS A SALE OF
PAINTINGS AND I BELIEVE, THERE,
I FOUND YOUR PAINTING.

Charlie says OH, WOW.

Fiona says SO, LET ME SHOW YOU.
AND HERE AT NUMBER 96 -
"TWO NEGRO CHILDREN WITH A
BOOK."

Charlie says THAT'S INCREDIBLE.

Fiona says NOW, THE TITLE, CLEARLY, IN
OUR TIMES, IS A VERY
UNATTRACTIVE ONE.
THAT'S NOT A WORD WE USE ANY
MORE.
BUT IN THOSE DAYS, IN VICTORIAN
SOCIETY, THAT WAS A WORD THEY
USED FREELY.
THIS, I BELIEVE, IS YOUR
PAINTING.

Sarah says YES.

Philip says AND WHAT I'M DELIGHTED TO SAY
IS THAT WE CAN ADD TO THAT
BECAUSE THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT
GALLERY IN LONDON HAS KINDLY
FURNISHED US WITH A LETTER.

He hands in the letter to Charlie and says SO, THIS LETTER IS A
CONFIRMATION THAT THEY BELIEVE,
AFTER CONSIDERATION, THAT THIS
IS BY EMMA JONES.
I CAN'T TELL YOU HOW HELPFUL
THAT IS.

Charlie says THAT'S FANTASTIC.

Sarah says IT'S LIKE A CERTIFICATE OF
AUTHENTICITY.

Charlie says GOSH, THAT'S FANTASTIC.

Sarah says WONDERFUL.

Philip says THIS IS SO EXCITING, REALLY,
BECAUSE YOU'VE NOW GOT A
FULLY ATTRIBUTED PICTURE.
IT'S VALUE - I CAN EASILY SEE IT
BEING WORTH 60,000 POUNDS PROBABLY
MORE.

Sarah says GOSH.
OH, WOW.

Philip says BUT LET'S JUST THINK WHAT YOU
HAVE GOT.
I MEAN, THERE ARE SO MANY
COLLECTIONS OUT THERE, MUSEUM
COLLECTIONS IN THIS COUNTRY AND
ABROAD, WHO WOULD LOVE A
PAINTING THAT THIS REPRESENTS.
THIS IS A DOUBLE WHAMMY; IT'S A
FEMALE ARTIST - WHICH IS RARE -
AND IT'S A SUBJECT MATTER THAT
WE BADLY NEED IN ORDER TO
BALANCE THE SOCIAL HISTORY
CONTENT OF COLLECTIONS.

Fiona says I HAVE TO SAY, FOR ME, I'VE
FOUND THIS ONE OF THE MOST
FASCINATING JOURNEYS I'VE BEEN
ON IN
FAKE OR FORTUNE.
WHAT I WANTED TO DO WAS FIND OUT
WHO THE CHILDREN ARE.
THAT'S WHERE I'VE FALLEN SHORT.
BECAUSE WHEN YOU LOOK AT ALL THE
OTHER PAINTINGS HERE,
HEAD OF
CHILD, HEAD OF A GENTLEMAN, TWO
CHILDREN WITH RABBITS,
SHE
DIDN'T NAME THEM.
SHE DIDN'T NAME THEM, I'M
AFRAID.

Charlie says IT'S A BIT VAGUE, ISN'T IT?

Fiona says BUT EVEN THOUGH WE DON'T KNOW
WHO THESE TWO GIRLS ARE, WHAT
THEIR NAMES ARE, WE HAVE A SENSE
NOW OF THE KIND OF LIVES THEY
WOULD HAVE BEEN LIVING, THE
CONTEXT IN WHICH THEY WERE
LIVING AND THE MESSAGE THAT EMMA
JONES WAS TRYING TO GET ACROSS.

Charlie says I FIND THAT THE POWER OF THE
FEMALE VOICE WITH THE
ABOLITIONIST MOVEMENT, PRE THE
SUFFRAGETTE MOVEMENT, I FIND
THAT REALLY, REALLY INTERESTING.

Sarah says IT'S BEEN A FASCINATING
PROCESS AND I THINK YOU'VE DONE
TREMENDOUSLY WELL TO-- TO FIND
THIS OUT.
WE COULDN'T HAVE DONE IT ON
OUR OWN.
(LAUGHING)

Fiona says BUT WE STILL NEED TO
SOLVE THE MYSTERY OF WHO
PAINTED DIDO BELLE AND LADY
ELIZABETH, SO WE'RE ON OUR WAY
BACK TO SCONE PALACE.
THE LEADING SCOTTISH ARTIST
DAVID MARTIN HAS EMERGED AS OUR
PRIME SUSPECT.
THE CASE HAS BECOME MORE THAN
AN INTRIGUING FAMILY MYSTERY.
BECAUSE OF THE STORY OF DIDO
BELLE - A FORMER SLAVE WHO
BECAME A MEMBER OF AN
ARISTOCRATIC FAMILY - THE
PAINTING IS NOW A WORK OF
NATIONAL IMPORTANCE.

Philip says WHAT AGITATES ME ABOUT THIS
PICTURE IS THAT IT'S SO HIGH
PROFILE AND THEREFORE THE STAKES
ARE SO MUCH HIGHER.
AND AS WE KNOW, THE ART WORLD
CAN BE SO TOUGH TO CONVINCE.

Fiona says WELL, TODAY, WE FIND OUT IF
WE'VE DONE ENOUGH.
WE'VE PRESENTED OUR EVIDENCE TO
DR. BRIAN ALLEN - AN EXPERT IN
18TH CENTURY BRITISH
PORTRAITURE.
HE'S AGREED TO DELIVER AN
OFFICIAL VERDICT.
BUT IS OUR CASE COMPELLING
ENOUGH?

Brian is in his sixties, with short straight gray hair and wears glasses, a black 3-piece suit, a white shirt and a purple tie.

Fiona, Philip and Lady Mansfield say HI, BRIAN.

Fiona says BRIAN, IT'S-- IT'S THE MOMENT
OF TRUTH.
YOU'VE SEEN OUR DOSSIER; YOU'VE
CONSIDERED OUR EVIDENCE.
WHAT'S YOUR VERDICT ON THE
PAINTING?

Brian says WELL, I'M ENTIRELY CONVINCED
THAT THIS IS BY DAVID MARTIN.
THIS SEEMS ENTIRELY CONSISTENT
WITH ALL ELEMENTS OF HIS STYLE
AND I FEEL REALLY CONFIDENT
THAT WE CAN SAY THAT WITHOUT
DOUBT.

Philip says WELL, THAT'S TERRIFIC.
WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Lady Mansfield says THAT'S VER-- IT'S EXCELLENT.
I KNOW THE FAMILY WILL BE
ABSOLUTELY THRILLED THAT WE'VE
FOUND AN ARTIST AT LAST.

Philip says AND THIS IS A PICTURE YOU'VE
ALWAYS LOVED, ISN'T IT, LADY
MANSFIELD?
BUT THERE'S ALWAYS BEEN THIS
MYSTERY ABOUT IT.

Lady Mansfield says ABSOLUTELY.
I MEAN, IT'S MY FAVOURITE; IT'S
MY FAVOURITE IN THE COLLECTION
AND IT'S MARVELLOUS NOW THAT
WE'VE SOLVED THE MYSTERY.

Fiona says SO, THE MYSTERY IS RESOLVED.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH.
WHAT WAS IT ABOUT THE PAINTING
THAT CONVINCED YOU IN
PARTICULAR?

Brian says IN PARTICULAR, FOR ME, IT'S
THE WAY HE PAINTS SILKS AND
SATINS AND MUSLINS, HIS
PARTICULAR STYLE THAT HE LEARNT
AT THE FEET OF HIS TEACHER ALAN
RAMSEY - THE GREAT SCOTTISH 18TH
CENTURY PAINTER - AND WE CAN SEE
THE HALLMARK OF HIS PERIOD OF
LEARNING WITH RAMSEY IN THIS
PICTURE, I THINK.

Fiona says NOW THAT WE KNOW THAT THIS IS
DEFINITELY BY DAVID MARTIN,
HOW DOES THAT AFFECT THE VALUE,
WOULD YOU SAY?

Philip says IT'S ENORMOUSLY HELPFUL TO
HAVE A NAME.
THERE ARE SO MANY INSTITUTIONS
WORLDWIDE AND-- AND IN THIS
COUNTRY WHO WOULD LOVE A
PAINTING LIKE THIS.
I MEAN, THIS IS A
GROUND-BREAKER; THIS IS
SOCIOLOGICALLY SO SIGNIFICANT.
AND IT'S ALSO A PICTURE THAT
DELIVERS VISUALLY.
IT'S A BEAUTIFUL IMAGE.

Lady Mansfield says YES, IT IS BEAUTIFUL.

Philip says I MEAN, I CAN SEE IT BEING
WORTH 600,000 POUNDS PROBABLY MORE.

Fiona says SO, WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS,
THEN, LADY MANSFIELD?

Lady Mansfield says UM, TO KEEP IT HERE, AND TO
KEEP IT HERE AT THE PALACE.
IT'S A FAMILY HEIRLOOM.
YOU KNOW, WE'RE REALLY, REALLY
PROUD OF IT.
IT WILL BE A LOVELY STORY TO
TELL OUR VISITORS FROM ALL
AROUND THE WORLD AND WE CAN SHOW
THEM SOME OF THE OTHER DAVID
MARTINS WE HAVE HERE AT THE
COLLECTION AND IT'S HERE TO
STAY.

Fiona says AND IT'S SUCH AN INTIMATE,
TENDER PAINTING, I THINK, WHEN
YOU THINK ABOUT THE LOVE THAT
LORD MANSFIELD MUST HAVE HAD TO
COMMISSION IT AND NOW, IT NOW
HAS A VERY DIFFERENT MESSAGE, I
THINK.
IT'S A MESSAGE ABOUT TWO YOUNG
GIRLS, A MESSAGE ABOUT
EQUALITY, AS WELL AS LORD
MANSFIELD'S PRIVATE FEELINGS
ABOUT HIS TWO GREAT NIECES.
IT'S TRANSFORMED IT, I THINK.

Philip says YES.

Lady Mansfield says TOTALLY.

(music plays)

Fiona says AND NOW, A NEW PLAQUE
CAN BE MADE CORRECTLY
ATTRIBUTING DAVID MARTIN...
AND ALSO RESTORING DIDO BELLE'S
NAME.
SO, WE'VE SOLVED THIS
INTRIGUING DOUBLE WHODUNIT.
BUT THESE INVESTIGATIONS HAVE
BECOME MORE THAN THAT - THEY'VE
TRANSPORTED US INTO THE
EXTRAORDINARY LIVES OF BLACK
BRITONS IN A DIFFICULT CHAPTER
IN OUR HISTORY.
THESE PAINTINGS SHOW BRITAIN
AT A CROSSROADS.
SLAVERY WAS DIVIDING THE NATION
AND THESE PICTURES ARE RADICAL.
AND, FOR ME, THEY REPRESENT HOPE
WITH INTIMATE DEPICTIONS OF
BLACK BRITONS.

Philip says AND WE'VE IDENTIFIED THE TWO
ARTISTS, THE TWO BRITISH
PAINTERS WHO MADE THESE
REMARKABLE IMAGES HAPPEN.
WE'VE GIVEN THEM BACK THEIR
STATUS.
AND NOW, SURELY, THEY CAN BE
PROPERLY APPRECIATED FOR THE
WONDERFUL IMAGES THAT THEY ARE.

(theme music plays)

The end credits roll against the grainy orange surface of a painting.

Presented by Fiona Bruce and Philip Mould.

Executive Producer, Judith Winnan.

Series Producer, Lucy Swingler.

Produced and directed by Francis Welch.

Logo: BBC Studios.

Logo: All3Media International.

Copyright 2018, BBC.

Watch: Fake or Fortune Series 7 - Episode 4