Transcript: Fake or Fortune Series 7 - Episode 1 | Oct 07, 2020

Fast clip shows images of an art auction at Sotheby's.
(dramatic music play)

A Female Auctioneer says AT 42 MILLION...

Fiona says THE ART WORLD,
WHERE PAINTINGS CHANGE HANDS
FOR FORTUNES.

The Auctioneer says SOLD.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Fiona says BUT FOR
EVERY KNOWN MASTERPIECE THERE
MAY BE ANOTHER STILL WAITING
TO BE DISCOVERED.

Philip says THIS IS IT.

Fiona and Philip Mould travel in a car. She is in her forties with shoulder length brown hair in a layered cut. She's wearing a patterned blue summer shirt and a blue and red necklace.
He is in his fifties with short receding gray hair. He's wearing a purple shirt.

Fiona says INTERNATIONAL
ART DEALER, PHILIP MOULD,
AND I HAVE TEAMED UP TO HUNT
FOR LOST WORKS BY GREAT
ARTISTS.
WE USE OLD-FASHIONED DETECTIVE
WORK AND STATE-OF-THE-ART
SCIENCE TO GET TO THE TRUTH.

Philip says SCIENCE CAN ENABLE
US TO SEE BEYOND THE HUMAN EYE.

Fiona says DA-NAH!

An Old Woman says OH WOW!

Fiona says EVERY CASE IS PACKED
WITH SURPRISE AND INTRIGUE.

A man with a mustard and black sweater says IS IT OR ISN'T IT
A FREUD THEN?

Fiona says BUT NOT EVERY
PAINTING IS QUITE WHAT IT
SEEMS.

Philip says TWO ARTISTS RATHER
THAN ONE.

Fiona says IT'S A JOURNEY
THAT END IN JOY...

Fiona reads "THERE IS ENOUGH
TO SUPPORT THE CONCLUSION
THAT IT IS BY TOM ROBERTS"!

A couple hugs.

Fiona says OR BITTER
DISAPPOINTMENT.

A Woman in her fifties says I DON'T THINK
IT'S A WORK BY GAUGUIN.
I'M VERY SORRY.

Fiona says IN THIS EPISODE,
CAN WE PROVE THIS IS
A WORK BY CELEBRATED BRITISH
ARTIST WILLIAM NICHOLSON?

Lyn says I FEEL IT'S
A MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE.

Fiona says A DAMNING RULING
HAS DIVIDED ART WORLD OPINION.

Will says I WAS REALLY SHOCKED.
AS FAR AS I WAS CONCERNED
THIS PAINTING COULDN'T POSSIBLY
BE BY ANYONE ELSE.

Fiona says OUR INVESTIGATION
TAKES US TO THE DARK SIDE
OF THE ART MARKET.

Fiona and Phillip walk into a storage room.

Philip says GOODNESS ME
THIS IS AN ART WORLD
CHAMBER OF HORRORS HERE.

Fiona says DID YOU EVER
FAKE A WILLIAM NICHOLSON?

Myatt says YES.

Fiona says WE LEAVE NO STONE
UNTURNED...

A woman uncovers a painting and says WOW!
LOOK AT THAT.

Fiona says TRAVELLING TO
CANADA TO TRY AND SOLVE
THE MYSTERY.

Philip says WE HAVE
TWO PAINTINGS, ONE INNOCENT
AND ONE GUILTY.

(theme song plays)

The caption "Fake or Fortune?" appears against the grainy orange surface of a painting.

(music plays)

Fiona says WE'RE BEGINNING
OUR INVESTIGATION IN LONDON.
WE'RE MEETING AN OWNER
WHO HAS EXPERIENCED
THE SHIFTING FORTUNES OF
THE ART WORLD TO GREAT
PERSONAL COST.

Philip says HELLO, LYN.

Lyn says HELLO.

Philip says NICE TO SEE YOU.

Fiona says NICE TO SEE YOU.

They walk into a modern house.

Fiona says LYN FUSS GOT IN
CONTACT BECAUSE A PAINTING
SHE OWNS RECENTLY SUFFERED
A FATAL BLOW.
A WORK SHE BOUGHT AS GENUINE
HAS BEEN REJECTED BY
THE AUTHORITY ON THE ARTIST.
IN THE EYES OF THE ART WORLD
IT'S NOW DEEMED A FAKE.

Now, they look at a small light painting.

Philip says SO, GENTLE STILL LIFE
OF A GLASS JUG,
A STACK OF PLATES,
TWO PEARS.

Fiona says IT'S REALLY LOVELY.

WHAT ATTRACTED YOU
TO THE PAINTING?

Lyn is in her early fifties, with red hair in a ponytail. She wears a green sweater over a salmon shirt and a necklace.

Lyn says I THINK
THE DELICATENESS OF IT.

Fiona nods.

Lyn says I'VE ALWAYS LOVED STILL LIFE
AND IT SEEMS SO NATURAL, AS IF
YOU HAD JUST FOUND THIS
ON A TABLE.
IT WAS JUST
A LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT.

Philip says AND AM I RIGHT IN
THINKING YOU BOUGHT THIS AS
A GENUINE WORK BY THE CELEBRATED
ARTIST WILLIAM NICHOLSON?

Lyn says YES, I DIDN'T
HAVE ANY DOUBT.

Philip says WILLIAM NICHOLSON
WAS ONE OF THE LEADING BRITISH
ARTISTS OF HIS GENERATION.
BORN IN 1872,
HE BEGAN HIS CAREER
AS A GRAPHIC ARTIST BEFORE
FORGING SUCCESS AS A PAINTER.
OVER 50 YEARS
HE CREATED NEARLY
900 OIL PAINTINGS
FROM INFORMAL PORTRAITS
TO HAUNTING LANDSCAPES BUT
IT'S HIS EXQUISITE STILL LIFES
WHICH ARE MOST ADMIRED.
IN THE YEARS AFTER HIS DEATH,
WILLIAM NICHOLSON WAS
OVERSHADOWED BY HIS MORE
FAMOUS SON, THE ABSTRACT
ARTIST BEN NICHOLSON.

Fast clip show paintings by the author.

He continues BUT TODAY HIS WORK IS
HIGHLY-PRIZED, OFTEN REACHING
SIX FIGURE SUMS.
SO, WAS LYN'S PICTURE WORTH
SUCH A HEFTY PRICE WHEN
SHE BOUGHT IT BACK IN 2006?
SO, CAN YOU RECALL HOW MUCH YOU
PAID FOR THE PICTURE?

Lyn says 165,000 POUNDS.

Philip says WHICH IS AN APPROPRIATE PRICE
THEN FOR A GOOD WORK BY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON.

Fiona says SO, WELL, WE'RE HERE
TODAY SOMETHING HAS OBVIOUSLY
GONE BADLY WRONG.
WHAT HAPPENED AFTER YOU BOUGHT
IT?

Lyn says WELL WE WERE
TOLD THAT PATRICIA REED,
AN AUTHORITY
ON WILLIAM NICHOLSON,
WAS DOING A CATALOGUE RAISONNE
AND THEN WHEN THE CATALOGUE
CAME OUT
SHE HADN'T PUT THIS PICTURE
IN THE CATALOGUE,
WHICH WAS QUITE A SHOCK.

Philip says SO, SHE WAS
EFFECTIVELY DEEMING IT TO BE
A FAKE.

Lyn says SHE WAS DEFINITELY
QUESTIONING IT.

Philip says BUT THE POINT IS,
IF SHE DOESN'T INCLUDE IT,
THE PICTURE HAS VERY LITTLE LIFE
BEYOND JUST A DECORATIVE IMAGE.
I MEAN IT'S WORTH, WHAT,
A FEW HUNDRED POUNDS.

Fiona says SO, WHERE WE ARE
RIGHT NOW, THAT 165,000 POUNDS
YOU SPENT BACK IN 2006...
WELL, YOU'VE LOST THAT.

Lyn says MM-HM.

Fiona says I MEAN,
FOR A PAINTING YOU LOVE, IT'S...
HARD TO HEAR.

Lyn says MMM. IT IS.
I WAS ACTUALLY HURT,
AND FOR THE PAINTING...

Philip says OF COURSE.

Lyn says I FEEL IT'S
A MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE.

Fiona says PATRICIA REED,
THOUGH, SHE MUST HAVE HER
REASONS.
THERE'S OBVIOUSLY
ANOTHER STORY GOING ON HERE...

Lyn says YES.

Fiona says THAT WE NEED
TO GET TO THE BOTTOM OF.
THERE'S A VERY PERSONAL
DIMENSION TO THIS CASE.
LYN GREW TO LOVE NICHOLSON'S
WORK THROUGH HER AUNT,
LILIAN BROWSE, WHO WAS A LEGEND
IN THE ART WORLD AND ONE OF
THE FIRST FEMALE ART DEALERS.
LYN BOUGHT THE PICTURE
FROM HER AUNT'S GALLERY JUST
A FEW MONTHS AFTER HER DEATH.

A close-up shot of a document reads "165,000 pounds. 28 April 1990."

Fiona says THE FACT THAT YOU BOUGHT THE
PAINT FROM BROWSE and DARBY, MUST
HAVE GIVEN YOU SOME CONFIDENCE.

Lyn says YES.

Fiona says AND THERE'S THE
CONNECTION TO YOUR AUNT LILIAN,
LILIAN BROWSE.

Lyn says ABSOLUTELY.
BECAUSE SHE HAD SHOWN THIS
PICTURE IN HER OWN GALLERY.

Fiona says SO, SHE BELIEVED IN IT.

Lyn says SHE MUST HAVE BELIEVED IN
IT, YES.

Fiona says LILLIAN BROWSE
WAS RENOWNED FOR HER KNOWLEDGE
OF WILLIAM NICHOLSON,
HAVING PUBLISHED THE FIRST
CATALOGUE RAISONNE,
THE OFFICIAL LIST OF ALL
HIS KNOWN WORKS, IN 1956.

Now, Fiona and Lyn sit in front of art books and a photograph album.

Fiona says YOUR AUNT WAS
CONSIDERED THE AUTHORITY
ON WILLIAM NICHOLSON.
SHE WROTE ABOUT HIM,
SHE DEALT IN HIS PAINTINGS.
THERE'S NOW A NEW
CATALOGUE RAISONNE
AND YOUR PAINTING'S NOT IN HERE.
WHAT WOULD LILLIAN MAKE OF IT?

Lyn says AH, I'VE THOUGHT THAT
MYSELF.
I CANNOT IMAGINE SHE WOULD BE
ANYTHING BUT UPSET OR FURIOUS.
I THINK SHE'D BE
INSULTED, ACTUALLY.

Fiona says SHE'D HAVE FOUGHT FOR THE
PICTURE DO YOU THINK?

Lyn says OH, YES, NO DOUBT ABOUT THAT.

Philip says BUT IS THIS
PICTURE WORTH FIGHTING FOR?
I'M TAKING A CLOSER LOOK TO
ASSESS THE PHYSICAL EVIDENCE.

Using a small flashlight, Philip carefully observes the painting.

Philip says IT FEELS AS THOUGH
I'M LOOKING INTO FACE OF
SOMEONE WHO'S JUST BEEN
CHARGED WITH A HEINOUS CRIME.
I MEAN, IS THIS INNOCENT
OR IS IT GUILTY...
IS IT GUILTY OF BEING A FAKE?
THERE ARE UNDOUBTEDLY MANY
CHARACTERISTICS OF NICHOLSON
IN THIS PAINTING BUT EQUALLY
YOU COULD IMAGINE HOW A FAKER
WOULD USE THOSE DEVICES TO
TRICK THE EYE.
NOW, TAKE THAT SCRAPED BACK
PAINT, IT'S ACTUALLY JUST THE
SORT OF THING THAT NICHOLSON
DID.
IN FACT, HE WAS KNOWN TO HAVE
USED A HAIR PIN IN ORDER
TO BE ABLE TO CREATE THIS
SCARIFIED EFFECT,
BUT A FAKER
COULD DO EXACTLY THE SAME.
THOSE LOVELY DAUBS
OF THICK, WHITE IMPASTO...
IT'S NOT BEYOND
THE WIT OF SOMEONE WHO WANTS TO
DUPLICATE THAT APPEARANCE
TO BE ABLE TO THAT...
SPADE IT ON, LET IT DRY.
I MEAN, TO ME THIS PICTURE,
IN MANY RESPECTS, WORKS.
I THINK THERE'S ENOUGH FOR US
TO TRY AND PROVE
THAT THERE HAS BEEN
A MISCARRIAGE OF JUSTICE
BUT IT'S NOT GOING TO BE EASY.
THIS PAINTING HAS BEEN
SENT DOWN VERY RECENTLY
AND TO BE ABLE TO OVERTURN
A VERDICT LIKE THIS
IS AN UPHILL STRUGGLE.

Fiona says WE NEED TO KNOW
WHY LYN'S PICTURE WAS REJECTED
AS A WORK BY NICHOLSON.
SO, I'VE COME TO MAYFAIR,
THE HEART OF LONDON'S ART
MARKET.
LYN'S AUNT, LILIAN BROWSE,
WAS AN ART DEALER HERE
FOR OVER 50 YEARS.
DUBBED 'THE DUCHESS OF
CORK STREET', SHE WAS A
DOYENNE OF THE ART WORLD.
HER GALLERY, BROWSE and DARBY,
IS STILL OPEN FOR BUSINESS
AND I'M MEETING
HER FORMER PARTNER, WILL DARBY,
TO FIND OUT WHY A PAINTING
THEIR GALLERY SOLD SUFFERED
SUCH A FALL FROM GRACE.

Will hands Fiona a picture. He is in his sixties, clean-shaven with receding white hair. He wears a green sweater over a striped shirt.

Will says FIONA, THAT'S
A PICTURE OF LILLIAN TAKEN
ON HER 80TH BIRTHDAY.

Fiona says SHE AS QUITE A WOMAN,
WASN'T SHE?

Will says SHE WAS ABSOLUTELY
FORMIDABLE.
SHE HAD TERRIFIC AUTHORITY.
SHE WAS THE QUEEN OF WILLIAM
NICHOLSON AND SHE WAS A FRIEND
OF THE ARTIST.

Fiona says LILLIAN'S BROWSE'S
CATALOGUE WAS PUBLISHED
60 YEARS AGO AND ONE THING
THAT'S TROUBLING ME IS THAT
LYN'S PICTURE IS NOT LISTED.
SO, CAN WE BE SURE
THAT SHE BELIEVED IN IT?

Will says THIS IS LILLIAN'S
PERSONAL COPY OF THE BOOK
AND OVER THE YEARS, AS MORE
PAINTINGS CAME TO LIGHT,
SHE ADDED THEM IN LONG HAND.

Fiona checks the page and says SO, SHE'S ADDED
THESE IN IN HER HANDWRITING
TO TRY AND COMPLETE THE
CATALOGUE.

Will says YUP.
AND IF YOU LOOK HERE...

Fiona reads "GLASS JUG
WITH PILE OF PLATES
AND TWO PEARS CIRCA 1936."
SO THIS IS OUR PAINTING HERE.

Will says YUP.

Fiona says IT'S NOT ANOTHER ONE THAT
SOUNDS LIKE IT, THIS IS OUR
PAINTING.

Will says NO, ABSOLUTELY

Fiona says WOW.
WELL, THERE IT IS... SO YOU MUST
HAVE BEEN HORRIFIED THEN WHEN
PATRICIA REED DIDN'T INCLUDE IT.

Will says WELL, I WAS SHOCKED.
I WAS REALLY SHOCKED
BECAUSE AS FAR AS
I WAS CONCERNED THIS PAINTING
COULDN'T POSSIBLY BE
BY ANYONE ELSE.

Fiona says DID PATRICIA REED
GIVE YOU A REASON WHY
SHE WOULDN'T INCLUDE IT
IN THE CATALOGUE?

Will says SHE DIDN'T LIKE
THE HANDLE ON THE JUG
OR THE RIM OF THE JUG
AND SHE THOUGHT THE PLATES
WERE BORINGLY PAINTED,
WHICH I FIND ASTONISHING.

Fiona says I RATHER LIKE
THEM ACTUALLY, BUT...
AND WHAT ABOUT PROVENANCE?

Will says PROVENANCE WAS ANOTHER
FACTOR.
PRIOR TO THE EARLY '70S,
THERE'S NONE THAT WE KNOW OF.

Fiona says NONE AT ALL?

Will says NO.

Fiona says I HAVE TO BE HONEST, THE
LACK OF PROVENANCE PRIOR TO
THE 1970S DOES BOTHER ME.

Will says MMM.

Fiona says BUT FROM THAT MOMENT ONWARDS,
IT HAS IMPECCABLE PROVENANCE
DOESN'T IT?

Will says YES, ABSOLUTELY.
IT'S PASSED THROUGH SOME REALLY
REPUTABLE LONDON GALLERIES
AND WE HAVE EXHIBITED
THIS PAINTING TWICE...
FIRST OF ALL IN 1983...

Fiona says YES, I CAN
SEE IT HERE THE GLASS JUG.

Will says AND THEN IN 1990 WE
SHOWED IT AGAIN.

Fiona says THERE'S NO DENYING,
THOUGH, THIS IS A SERIOUS
BODY OF WORK BY PATRICIA REED,
ISN'T IT.
THIS ISN'T SOMETHING
THAT ONE CAN JUST DISMISS.

Will says OH, INDEED, IT'S A VERY
SCHOLARLY BOOK, BUT IT'S
INCOMPLETE.

Fiona says IN YOUR OPINION.

Will says IN MY OPINION.
I PARTICULARLY THINK THIS IS
ONE OF HIS BEST.
I THINK IT'S A STRONG PAINTING

Fiona says IT'S A SHAME PATRICIA
DOESN'T SHARE YOUR VIEW.

Will says WELL, SHE MAY CHANGE
HER MIND, WHO KNOWS.

Fiona says COULD AN INAUTHENTIC
WORK HAVE BEEN IN CIRCULATION
FOR FOUR DECADES PASSING
THROUGH SOME OF THE MOST
RESPECTED ART GALLERIES IN
LONDON?
THE PRESENT AUTHORITY
ON NICHOLSON SEEMS TO THINK SO.
AT PHILIP'S GALLERY
WE'RE GETTING TO GRIPS
WITH THE CHALLENGE AHEAD.

Fiona and Philip look at the painting in a large screen.

Fiona says SO, IT'S QUITE
CLEAR TALKING TO WILL DARBY
THAT THE AUTHOR OF THE
CATALOGUE RAISONNE PATRICIA REED
HAS A FAIRLY LENGTHY LIST
OF PROBLEMS WITH LYN'S PICTURE
FROM THE HANDLING OF THE PAINT
TO DEPICTIONS OF THE JUG
AND THE PLATES.
AND ALSO
SHE POINTS OUT
THAT THERE IS A PAINTING IN
THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA
IN OTTAWA
THAT HAS WHAT SHE CALLS
"CLOSE AND DISQUIETING
SIMILARITIES" TO LYN'S PICTURE.

Philip says YES, IT IS QUITE
UNUSUAL FOR WILLIAM NICHOLSON
TO REPEAT HIS OWN WORK;
IT'S NOT UNHEARD OF,
BUT IT'S UNUSUAL.
SO, WHAT I THINK SHE'S SAYING IS
THAT THIS IS BASICALLY A COPY
OF THE OTTAWA PICTURE,
AND IF SO, IT'S A COPY
WITH SINISTER INTENT BECAUSE
IT'S SIGNED 'N'.
IT'S MEANT TO BE TAKEN
AS A WORK BY NICHOLSON.

Fiona says AND WHAT DOESN'T
HELP THE CLOUD OF SUSPICION
HANGING OVER LYN'S PICTURE IS
THAT THERE IS NO PROVENANCE THAT
GOES BACK EARLIER THAN THE 1970S
SO I THINK THIS ISN'T GOING
TO BE THAT STRAIGHTFORWARD.

Philip says DOESN'T SOUND IT, DOES IT?

Philip walks into a museum.

Philip says IF LYN'S PICTURE
HAS ANY CHANCE OF BEING
ACCEPTED AS A GENUINE WORK
BY NICHOLSON, WE HAVE TO
ADDRESS SOME SERIOUS STYLISTIC
CONCERNS VOICED BY THE
AUTHORITY ON THE ARTIST.
SO, I'VE COME TO THE
FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM IN
CAMBRIDGE.
THIS IMPRESSIVE ART GALLERY
HOLDS A FINE SELECTION
OF WILLIAM NICHOLSON'S
OIL PAINTINGS.
YOU CAN SEE WHY NICHOLSON
HAS EARNED HIS PLACE
AS ONE OF THE MOST ACCOMPLISHED
PAINTERS OF THE 20TH CENTURY.
FOR HIM PAINTING WAS
A SENSUOUS EXPERIENCE.
HE HAD A UNIQUE TOUCH,
A MAGICAL WAY OF MANIPULATING
THE PAINT TO EXPRESS LIGHT,
TEXTURE AND MOOD.
I'M KEEN TO SEE IF
THE BRUSH STROKES IN THESE
GENUINE WORKS ARE SIMILAR
TO THOSE IN LYN'S PICTURE.

Philip stops to look at a warm-colored still life in an ornate golden frame.

Philip says THIS IS A SINGULARLY
LOVELY EXAMPLE OF
WHAT HE CAN DO IN STILL LIFE.
IT'S CALLED BEGONIAS.
IT WAS DONE IN 1940
IN HIS BEDROOM AFTER DINNER
BY LAMPLIGHT
AND THE LIGHT SUFFUSES
THE PAINTING,
IT SORT OF MARINATES IT
IN THIS WONDERFUL HUE
THAT BRINGS EVERYTHING TOGETHER.
YOU'VE GOT THAT SOFT,
TISSUEY QUALITY OF THE PETALS
OF THE BEGONIAS THEMSELVES
CONTRASTING WITH THE SMOOTH,
MILLED QUALITY OF THE NOTEBOOK
NEXT TO THEM
AND THEN THERE'S THAT BOTTLE
REFLECTING,
IN THAT FANTASTIC WAY,
THAT HE CAN DO
EVERYTHING AROUND HIM,
BUT YOU FEEL ALSO THE FRAGILE,
BRITTLE QUALITY
OF THE MATERIALS.
BUT THERE'S
SOMETHING ELSE AT WORK HERE
BECAUSE NOT ONLY IS THIS
A TECHNICAL GENIUS,
THIS IS SOMEONE
WHO IS A POET AS WELL.
AND THE WAY HE'S CHOSEN
THESE OBJECTS,
THESE RANDOM DOMESTIC OBJECTS
AROUND HIM
AND PUT THEM TOGETHER,
HAS CHARGED THEM WITH SOME
SORT OF ENERGY AND MEANING
AND THIS IS WHY HE'S SO CLEVER.
SO, THE QUESTION IS,
CAN ONE SEE IN LYN'S PAINTING
SOME OF THE
SAME CHARACTERISTICS?
AND MY FEELINGS ARE
THAT THERE IS AN OVERLAP,
THAT THERE ARE SIMILARITIES.
I MEAN, WE'VE GOT
A LONG WAY TO GO
BUT I FEEL THIS IS
A COMFORTING START.

(piano music plays)

Philip says NEXT WE NEED
TO FOCUS ON
THE SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION.
IS THERE SOMETHING BURIED
WITHIN THE PAINTING ITSELF
THAT AROUSED SUSPICION
AND CONDEMNED IT.
LYN HAS AGREED TO TAKE
HER PICTURE TO THE
COURTAULD INSTITUTE IN LONDON
FOR FORENSIC ANALYSIS.
PROFESSOR AVIVA BURNSTOCK
IS ONE OF THE WORLD'S
LEADING AUTHORITIES IN
THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF ART.
HER RESEARCH COULD PROVIDE
VITAL EVIDENCE TO UNCOVER
WHETHER LYN PAINTING
IS A GENUINE WORK BY NICHOLSON
OR AN IMPOSTER BY ANOTHER HAND.

Philip places the painting on a blue surface. Lyn and Aviva stand next to him.

Philip says I MEAN, THE PROBLEM, FROM MY
POINT OF VIEW, HAS BEEN THAT
WE CAN'T GET A FEEL FOR IT
UNTIL WE GET A CLOSER LOOK
AND IT SEEMS TO BE ALMOST
HERMETICALLY SEALED IN
THIS FRAME.
HAVE YOU ACTUALLY SEEN
THE BACK AT ALL...

Lyn says NO I HAVE NOT SEEN THE BACK.

Aviva is in her forties, with shoulder-length brown wavy hair. She wears a black blazer and a green necklace.

Aviva says OH, I THINK IT WOULD
BE REALLY INTERESTING.
SHALL WE OPEN THE FRAME,
WOULD THAT BE OKAY?

Lyn says YES.

Aviva says OKAY.
AHH...
YEAH, WE'LL TRY
AND LIFT OUT THIS SHEET...
OKAY.
WOW, LOOK AT THAT.

Philip says WELL, IT'S
FASCINATING.

Lyn says I CAN SEE A NUMBER,
I CAN SEE A BEAUTIFUL COLOUR...
GREEN, RED AS IF SOME OIL
HAS BEEN DROPPED HERE.
A LITTLE LABEL, THE GLASS JUG,
IT SAYS, IN BEAUTIFUL WRITING.
VERY EXCITING.

Philip says I MEAN, IT LOOKS
AS THOUGH IT'S PROPERLY
BEEN IN A STUDIO SOMEWHERE,
DOESN'T IT, SOME TIME AGO.
IT'S A PLEASANT SURPRISE,
WOULDN'T YOU AGREE?

Lyn says YEAH, ABSOLUTELY I
WAS DREADING SEEING A BLANK
PIECE OF CANVAS OR A BOARD.

Philip says SO, THE QUESTION IS
WHOSE HANDWRITING IS THAT?

Aviva says IT WOULD BE
GOOD TO USE SOME
IMAGING TECHNIQUES, PERHAPS
LOOKING IN INFRARED TO SEE IF
WE CAN READ IT MORE EASILY.

Philip says THE BACK OF THIS IS
SPLATTERED,
BIT LIKE A CRIME SCENE,
WITH CLUES THERE MUST,
SURELY MUST,
BE SOME ANSWERS HERE.

Fiona says I'M HOPING
NICHOLSON'S FAMILY MIGHT BE
ABLE TO SHED SOME LIGHT ON THE
AUTHENTICITY OF LYN'S PICTURE.
I'VE COME TO MEET
WILLIAM NICHOLSON'S GRANDSON,
DESMOND BANKS.
NICE TO SEE YOU.

Desmond says DO COME IN.

Fiona says THANK YOU.
HE'S INHERITED A TREASURE TROVE
OF MATERIAL RELATED TO HIS
GRANDFATHER AND HAS INTIMATE
INSIGHT INTO HIS WORKS.

Fiona stands in a white living room filled with paintings.

Fiona says OH, WOW.
I LOVE THESE WOODCUTS,
YOU'VE GOT SO MANY OF THEM.
AND YOU'VE GOT QUEEN VICTORIA
THERE.

Desmond is in his fifties, with a goatee and receding white hair. He wears a black jacket over a striped blue shirt.

Desmond says YES, THAT CAUSED
QUITE A STIR IN THE LATE 1890S.

Fiona says BECAUSE IT'S SO
UN-MAGISTERIAL, PRESUMABLY?

Desmond says WELL, IT IS YES.
SHE WAS A-- I THINK A SHORT
AND STOUT WOMAN BY THAT TIME.

Fiona says SHE WAS... AND...
YOU GOT RUDYARD KIPLING
OVER THERE...

Desmond says WELL, KIPLING WAS
A FRIEND OF NICHOLSON'S AND
WROTE THE VERSES FOR SOME OF
NICHOLSON'S BOOKS OF WOODCUTS.

Fiona says SO, HE MIXED IN
PRETTY WONDERFUL CIRCLES.
DESMOND HAS ALSO
INHERITED A SELECTION OF HIS
GRANDFATHER'S OIL PAINTINGS
LEFT IN HIS STUDIO AFTER
HIS DEATH IN 1949.
PAINTING WAS SOMETHING THAT
NICHOLSON FELT A PARTICULARLY
CLOSE ATTACHMENT TO, DIDN'T HE?

Desmond says FOR HIM
IT WAS SENSUOUS ACTIVITY,
FOR HIM THE PAINT WAS SUCCULENT.
A PARTICULARLY
DELICIOUS STROKE,
MY MOTHER USED TO SAY
HIS MOUTH WOULD WATER
AND IT REALLY APPEALED TO
ALL OF HIS SENSES.

Fiona says SINCE NICHOLSON'S
DEATH, THE VALUE OF HIS WORK
HAS RISEN STEADILY.
AND ATTEMPTS HAVE BEEN MADE
TO PASS OFF INAUTHENTIC
PICTURES AS GENUINE.
DESMOND KEEPS HIS EYES PEELED
FOR ROGUE NICHOLSONS.

Now, they sit looking at pictures on a computer.

Desmond says THIS IS THE
DUSTBIN, WHICH I LIKE TO SHOW
YOU MY NICHOLSON DUSTBIN.
AND IT CONTAINS ALL OF
THE PICTURES THAT HAVE
NOT BEEN AUTHENTICATED
AS BEING BY WILLIAM NICHOLSON.
SOME MAY BE FORGERIES,
SOME MAYBE COPIES.

Fiona says OKAY. LET'S HAVE A LOOK.

Desmond says THERE WE'VE GOT A
NICE STILL LIFE WITH LUSTRE JUG.
I DON'T THINK THE LUSTRE
IS HANDLED AT ALL AS
NICHOLSON WOULD HAVE HANDLED
IT SO I'M NOT VERY HAPPY
WITH THAT.
THIS ONE HERE...IT VAGUELY LOOKS LIKE
A WILLIAM NICHOLSON.
ON THE BACK IS WHAT APPEARS TO
BE NICHOLSON'S OWN SIGNATURE,
NICHOLSON AND THEN A DATE,
THAT DOESN'T LOOK LIKE
HIS HANDWRITING TO ME.

Fiona says SO, THAT'S SOMEONE
PRETENDING TO DO NICHOLSON'S
HANDWRITING THEN?

Desmond says IT IS...

Fiona says SO, SOMEONE HAS
DELIBERATELY TRIED TO PASS THIS
OFF AS A GENUINE WORK BY
NICHOLSON?

Desmond says I BELIEVE THEY HAVE, YES.
I FOUND THIS OFFERED FOR SALE
ON A WEBSITE AS A WILLIAM
NICHOLSON.

A painting of three flowers in a glass appears.

Desmond says THIS WAS A PAINTING THAT WAS
MADE TO ORDER IN PANAMA.
THEY'VE GOT TEAMS OF ARTISTS
PAINTING ANY ARTIST THAT
YOU WANT AND THIS WAS THEIR
ATTEMPT AT WILLIAM NICHOLSON.

Fiona says WOW...

Desmond says AND THERE'S
THIS ONE HERE THAT WAS...

Fiona says HANG ON, HANG ON.
THIS IS OUR PAINTING.

Desmond says IS IT REALLY?
GOOD HEAVENS, WELL...

Fiona says THIS IS OUR PAINTING IN YOUR
DUSTBIN?

Desmond says IT IS.

Fiona says DESMOND'S BEEN IN
THE DARK ABOUT WHICH PAINTING
WE'RE INVESTIGATING.
SO I'M A RATHER TAKEN ABACK
THAT IT'S BEEN DUMPED
IN HIS DUSTBIN.
YOU DON'T THINK THIS IS GENUINE?

Desmond says I'M NOT A JUDGE OF IT.
I DO NOT HOLD MYSELF OUT AS
AN EXPERT.
ALL I CAN SAY ABOUT IT IS
THAT PATRICIA REED
DOESN'T ACCEPT IT AS GENUINE.

Fiona says WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Desmond says I'M LOOKING AT
THE N IN THE BOTTOM
LEFT HAND CORNER...IT'S VERY DIFFERENT FROM WHAT
I'M FAMILIAR WITH BUT NICHOLSON
DIDN'T ALWAYS USE THE SAME
SIGNATURE, THERE'S A TREMENDOUS
VARIETY OF HIS SIGNATURES.

Fiona sighs and says GOD.
HERE WE ARE IN YOUR HOME
SURROUNDED BY ALL THESE
GENUINE WILLIAM NICHOLSON WORKS
AND YOU'VE GOT OUR PAINTING
IN YOUR DUSTBIN.

Desmond says OF ALL OF
THE PAINTINGS IN MY DUSTBIN...

Fiona says I'M BEGINNING TO REALLY NOT
LIKE THAT PHRASE.
She chuckles and YES?

Desmond says THIS IS THE ONE WHICH I THINK
IS THE BEST AND THE BEST
CANDIDATE FOR ACCEPTANCE.

Fiona says FOR COMING OUT
OF THE DUSTBIN...

Desmond says BUT I'M NOT THE PERSON TO
MAKE A FINAL JUDGEMENT ON IT.

Philip says I'VE HIT THE ROAD
ON THE TRAIL OF A UNIQUE
PIECE OF EVIDENCE THAT
COULD HELP OUR INVESTIGATION.
I'VE COME TO CHARTWELL IN KENT,
HOME NICHOLSON'S MOST FAMOUS
FRIEND AND PUPIL,
SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL.
DURING THE 1930S CHURCHILL
WAS OUT OF OFFICE, WHICH
LEFT HIM FREE TO PURSUE A
PASSION FAR-REMOVED FROM
POLITICS... PAINTING.
CHURCHILL SOUGHT HELP
FROM THE MOST CELEBRATED
ARTISTS OF THE DAY,
BUT HE SAID "THE PERSON WHO
TAUGHT ME MOST ABOUT PAINTING
WAS WILLIAM NICHOLSON."
THEY PAINTED SIDE-BY-SIDE.
CHURCHILL WAS AN EAGER STUDENT
AND NICHOLSON WAS ONLY TOO
HAPPY TO SHARE HIS KNOWLEDGE
OF TECHNIQUES AND PIGMENTS.

Similar paintings appear in split screens. A caption reads "Churchill. Nicholson."

He continues AND THERE'S ONE ARTIFACT FROM
THEIR FRIENDSHIP THAT REVEALS
MUCH ABOUT NICHOLSON'S METHODS.
THIS IS A REALLY FASCINATING
DOCUMENT.
IT'S FROM THE CHURCHILL ARCHIVE
AND IT'S A CATALOGUE OF
COLOURS FROM A COLOURMAN,
A PAINT SUPPLIER,

Using purple disposable gloves, he points to an old document and says CALLED
LECHERTIER BARBE.
LECHERTIER BARBE SUPPLIED NONE
OTHER THAN WILLIAM NICHOLSON,
CHURCHILL'S TEACHER.
IN FACT, AND IF ONE NEEDS
ANY CLARIFICATION
IT'S ON THE BACK, SIGNED
BY WILLIAM NICHOLSON,
"I HAVE MARKED
THE COLOURS I USE."
AND IF YOU START
FLICKING THROUGH THE BOOK
HE'S MARKED THEM FOR WINSTON.
SO, THIS IS
A CATALOGUE, EFFECTIVELY,
WILLIAM NICHOLSON'S
COLOURS ALSO.
YOU CAN SEE THIS, THEREFORE, AS
NICHOLSON'S COOKERY BOOK,
THE INGREDIENTS
FOR HIS PAINTINGS.

Fiona says CAN I SEE THE BACK
OF THAT ONE TO BEGIN WITH?

Desmond removes a painting from the wall.

Fiona says BACK AT DESMOND'S
HOUSE I'M ALSO GATHERING
EVIDENCE...
LET ME JUST TAKE A PICTURE
OF THAT.
IS THAT ALL RIGHT?
HE'S AGREED TO LET ME HAVE
A CLOSER LOOK AT HIS
GRANDFATHER'S PAINTINGS TO
SEE IF I CAN FIND ANY CLUES
THAT MIGHT LINK THESE GENUINE
WORKS TO LYN'S PICTURE.
WE'RE ON THE DETECTIVE TRAIL.
CAN I HAVE A LOOK AT THAT ONE?
OH THERE ARE LOTS ON
THE BACK OF HERE...
SO, LECHERTIER BARBE HERE.
WILLIAM NICHOLSON,
APPLE TREE YARD.

Desmond says THAT'S IN
HIS HANDWRITING.

Fiona says IS IT, OH, I'D LIKE
TO TAKE A PICTURE OF THAT.
IN AN OLD CHEST THERE ARE
PRECIOUS RELICS...
NICHOLSON'S OLD CLOTHES.
OH, I RECOGNIZE THESE.
PROPS FROM HIS PAINTINGS.

Fiona takes a pair of red boots out of Desmond's chest.

Desmond says HERE'S HIS PAINTING
SMOCK.

Fiona says AND LOOK AT ALL
THE HOLES.
WHAT A TATTY THING IT WAS...
AND DIGGING DEEPER,
WE STRIKE GOLD.

Desmond says HAVE A LOOK AT THIS.
AND THIS IS HIS PAINTING BOX
THAT HE USED TO TAKE WITH HIM.

Fiona says LOOK AT THIS.
OH, MY GOODNESS
ALL HIS PAINTS ARE HERE.

Desmond says THAT'S THEM.

Fiona says I CAN'T BELIEVE
YOU'VE STILL GOT THIS
AFTER ALL THESE YEARS.
I MEAN, HIS BRUSH
TOUCHED THESE PIGMENTS.
DID HIS BRUSH TOUCH
THE PIGMENTS ON OUR PAINTING?

Philip says BACK AT THE GALLERY
WE'RE GATHERING WITH LYN
TO HAVE A CLOSER LOOK AT
THE TECHNICAL IMAGES
OF THE PICTURE.

Philip slides digital paintings on a large screen.

Philip says SO, LYN THIS IS AN INFRARED
IMAGE OF THE BACK.
AND IN THE MIDDLE OF IT
APPEARS TO BE THE TITLE
GLASS JUG.

Fiona says I MEAN, WHAT INTRIGUES ME
ABOUT THIS IS THE HANDWRITING.
I THOUGHT ABOUT COMPARING THAT
TO THE WRITING ON THE BACK OF
SOME OF THE KNOWN NICHOLSON
PAINTINGS OWNED BY HIS GRANDSON.
SO, HERE'S THE WRITING ON
ONE OF THOSE PICTURES.
NOW THIS IS DEFINITELY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON'S HANDWRITING.
CAN YOU SEE ANY SIMILARITIES?

Lyn says THERE ARE
DEFINITELY SOME.

Fiona says THE J HERE ON JUG
AND THE J ON JAMES'S.
I MEAN IT'S NOT AN AWFUL LOT TO
GO ON BUT IT DOESN'T LOOK LIKE
A DIFFERENT HAND, IT LOOKS
LIKE IT COULD BE SIMILAR...

Philip says YEP, BUT I DON'T
WANT TO RAIN ON YOU'RE A PARADE,
WHICH YOU KNOW I HATE DOING...

Fiona says WHICH YOU LOVE DOING.

Lyn chuckles.

Philip says BUT IF I'M A FAKER
THE FIRST THING I'D DO
IS GET THE HANDWRITING RIGHT.
NOW IF WE ARE GONNA MAKE
A CASE FOR THIS WE'VE
GOING TO FIND A LOT MORE
TO COMPARE IT WITH.

Fiona says OF COURSE, BUT LET'S
NOT LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN
THE MOUTH.
THERE'S LOADS OF WRITING
OF THE BACK OF THIS PAINTING.
BECAUSE THIS LOOKS LIKE A
JOTTINGS ON A NOTEPAD DOESN'T
IT?

Philip says IT'S SOMETHING TO
LOOK INTO, ISN'T IT?
THIS IS BECOMING A LOT MORE
AGATHA CHRISTIE THAN WE'RE
USED TO.

Lyn says YES.

Fiona types in a computer.

Fiona says I'M GETTING
TO WORK ON THE PROVENANCE
OF LYN'S PICTURE.
ONE OF THE MAJOR PROBLEMS
IS THAT THERE'S NO RECORD OF
THE WORK BEFORE THE MID-1970S,
SO I'VE BEEN TRYING TO DIG
DEEPER INTO ITS PAST BUT I'VE
STUMBLED ACROSS SOMETHING THAT
MIGHT BE CAUSE FOR CONCERN.
ACCORDING TO BROWSE and DARBY,
WHO SOLD THE PAINTING TO LYN,
THE PAINTING FIRST APPEARS
WITH THE HANOVER GALLERY,
WHICH IS ANOTHER GALLERY IN
LONDON.
IT CLOSED IN 1973 BUT, A QUICK
SEARCH ONLINE SHOWS THAT ITS
RECORDS ARE KEPT AT THE TATE.
BUT THESE RECORDS COME WITH
A MAJOR HEALTH WARNING.
Looking at the screen, she says IT SAYS, "BEFORE THEY WERE
CATALOGUED SOME OF THESE
RECORDS WERE CONSULTED BY A
MAN WHO SUBSEQUENTLY FACED
CRIMINAL CHARGES FOR PRODUCING
FALSE PROVENANCES FOR FORGED
WORKS OF ART."
NOW, I KNOW THIS CASE.
I KNOW WHO THEY'RE TALKING
ABOUT.
AND WHAT WE MAY HAVE STUMBLED
INTO HERE IS ONE OF THE GREAT
ART FORGERIES OF THE 20TH
CENTURY.

The caption changes to "BBC News. February 12 1999."

A Female Anchor says THE MASTERMIND
BEHIND A MASSIVE ART FRAUD
HAS BEEN CONVICTED AFTER
A TRIAL LASTING 5 MONTHS...
JOHN DREWE FAKED ARCHIVE
MATERIAL TO GIVE FORGED
PICTURE A BOGUS HISTORY...
HE'LL BE SENTENCED ON MONDAY
ALONG WITH JOHN MYATT,
AN ARTIST WHO
ADMITTED CONSPIRACY TO DEFRAUD.
A THIRD MAN WAS ACQUITTED.

Fiona says THIS WAS THE CRIME
THAT ROCKED THE ART WORLD.
COULD LYN'S PICTURE BE
CAUGHT UP IN IT?
WE'VE COME TO A SECRET ART
STORE TO MEET FORMER HEAD OF
THE ART AND ANTIQUES SQUAD,
DICK ELLIS.
HE WAS INVOLVED IN THE ARREST
OF CONMAN JOHN DREWE
WHO CORRUPTED ARCHIVES
WITH FORGED PROVENANCE
IN ORDER TO PASS OFF HUNDREDS
OF FAKES PAINTED BY
HIS ACCOMPLICE, JOHN MYATT.
BOTH MEN WERE SENT DOWN
FOR WHAT SCOTLAND YARD CALLED,
"THE BIGGEST ART FRAUD
OF THE 20TH CENTURY."

Fiona, Philip and Dick walk into a storage room with paintings.

Philip says GOODNESS ME, THIS IS AN ART
WORLD CHAMBER OF HORRORS HERE.

Fiona says WOW.
WOW, WHAT IS-- LOWRY HERE.
SUTHERLAND, IS THAT?

Philip says LOOKS LIKE
GRAHAM SUTHERLAND.
GEORGE BRAQUE.

Fiona says GIACOMETTI.

Philip says WE'VE GOT
BEN NICHOLSON, WILLIAM'S SON!

Fiona says YES, THAT'S
A BIT CLOSE TO HOME.

Dick is in his early sixties, clean-shaven wit receding white hair. He wears a jacket over an open-necked white shirt.

Dick says THE DE STAEL IS VERY
INTERESTING BECAUSE IT SHOWS
JOHN MYATT'S TECHNIQUE.
HE USED MODERN HOUSEHOLD
EMULSION MIXED WITH A KY JELLY
TO GIVE IT THAT TEXTURE
OF OIL PAINT.

Fiona says SO, THE PAINT
YOU'D USE ON THE WALL,
HE'D CREATE HIS FAKES WITH THAT?

Dick says EXACTLY.

Philip says BUT EVEN MORE
AUDACIOUS IN THEIR DECEPTION
IS THE BACK OF THESE FAKES.
He turns around a painting and says AH, TWO LABELS.
THESE ARE ALMOST CLEVERER
THAN THE FRONT.
LOOK, YOU'VE GOT THE
SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM.
NICE SORT OF, YOU KNOW,
'50S-LOOKING TEXT.
AND THEN, THE WILLARD GALLERY
AND BOTH OF THEM ARE
SLIGHTLY CRUMPLED.

Fiona says SO, THIS IS DREWE FAKING
THESE LABELS, STICKING THEM
ON THE BACK.

Dick says FAKING THE LABELS AND I'VE
GOT HERE SOME EXAMPLES OF
THE OTHER FORGED PROVENANCE
THAT WAS CREATED FOR THE MYATT
PAINTINGS.

He hands her a folder.

Fiona says SO, THIS IS A FAKE
RECEIPT FROM THE HANOVER GALLERY
AND LOOK, PAINTINGS BY VUILLARD,
PORTRAIT BY GIACOMETTI.

Philip says THIS IS VERY
CONVINCING LOOKING.

Fiona says YOU'VE GOT
BEAUX ARTS GALLERY RECEIPTS,
PAINTINGS BY GIACOMETTI.
WE'RE NOT GOING TO FIND
ANY OF YOUR GALLERY RECEIPTS
IN HERE, ARE WE, PHILIP?

Philip says SHAME ON YOU.

She chuckles.

Fiona says JOHN DREWE WAS BRAZEN
IN HIS DECEPTION.
INFILTRATING THE ARCHIVES OF
THE BIG INSTITUTIONS;
THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY
ART, THE VICTORIA AND ALBERT
MUSEUM AND THE TATE GALLERY,
PLACING HIS FORGED DOCUMENTS
AMONG THEIR RECORDS
TO PASS OFF MYATT'S FAKES.
THIS CATALOGUE, PURPORTING
TO BE FROM THE HANOVER GALLERY,
IS A FAKE DREWE PRODUCED
AND SWAPPED WITH
THE ORIGINAL CATALOGUE
IN THE NATIONAL ART LIBRARY.

Philip says HERE IS A PHOTOGRAPH
OF THIS PICTURE, SO HE HAS
LEGITIMIZED THIS FAKE.

Dick says AND THIS PARTICULAR PICTURE
WAS RECOVERED FROM AN EMINENT
NEW YORK DEALER WHO'D PAID
SEVERAL HUNDREDS OF
THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS FOR IT.

Fiona says OOH, OUCH.
I'M CONCERNED TO SEE
SEVERAL FAKE BEN NICHOLSONS.
WHICH MAKES ME WONDER IF MYATT
FORGED FATHER AS WELL AS SON.
HAS JOHN MYATT EVER PAINTED
A WILLIAM NICHOLSON, DO WE KNOW?

Dick says I THINK ONLY JOHN MYATT
CAN ANSWER THAT QUESTION.

Philip says WITH OUR
INVESTIGATION TAKING A
SINISTER TURN, I'VE RETURNED
TO THE COURTAULD INSTITUTE.
I'M HOPING AVIVA CAN FIND
SOME ANSWERS LOCKED WITHIN
THE EVIDENCE FIONA AND
I GATHERED FOR HER.
HELLO, AVIVA.

Aviva says HELLO.

Philip says WELL, I CAN SEE YOU'VE GOT
ENOUGH TO KEEP YOURSELF BUSY
HERE AND THE PAINT BOX HAS
ARRIVED.

Aviva says IT HAS, AND IT MAKES
ALL THE DIFFERENCE TO
THE STUDY OF THIS PAINTING.

She opens the paint box and continues WE CAN TAKE SAMPLES FROM THESE
TUBES BECAUSE THERE'S ALWAYS
BITS OF PAINT ON THE OUTSIDE.
I CAN ANALYZE THAT TO SEE
WHETHER THEY'RE SIMILAR TO
WHAT WAS USED IN THE PICTURE.

Philip says EXCELLENT.

Aviva says AND I'VE DISCOVERED
ONE OTHER EXCITING THING
AND THAT IS, THE PALATE
FITS IN LIKE THIS...
AND YOU SEE THE PAINTING,
WHICH IS ON THE EASEL HERE,
WHICH IS A COMMERCIALLY-PRIMED
ARTIST BOARD,
SLOTS PERFECTLY
INTO THIS BOX.
YOU SEE IT'S EXACTLY
THE RIGHT SIZE.

Philip says YEAH,
IT'S A SNUG FIT.

Aviva says IT'S A SNUG FIT.
BUT WHEN IT WAS CLOSED
THE BACK WOULD BE IN CONTACT
WITH THE PALATE, LIKE THAT.
AND I THINK THAT EXPLAINS WHY
THERE ARE SPLODGES OF PALETTE
PAINT ON THE BACK OF
THE ACTUAL SUPPORT.

Philip says I MEAN, THAT IS
AN UTTERLY BRILLIANT SUGGESTION.

Aviva says IN FACT IF YOU HAVE
A LOOK AT THESE IMAGES,
THEY'RE AT THE BACKS OF
OTHER PICTURES THAT HE MADE
YOU CAN SEE THERE ARE BITS
OF PAINT ON THE BACK TOO.

Philip says SO, LYN'S PICTURE
FITS IN NICHOLSON'S BOX
AND SHOWS THE SIGNS OF
A NICHOLSON WAY
OF TREATING THEM.
IT'S BEAUTIFULLY NEAT, ISN'T IT?

Aviva says IT IS NEAT
AND OF COURSE IT'S A BOX MADE
FOR ARTISTS AND LOTS OF ARTISTS
MIGHT HAVE BEEN DOING EXACTLY
THE SAME THING AT THIS TIME
BUT IT DOES SEEM LIKE A VERY
INTERESTING COINCIDENCE.

Philip says AVIVA IS
TAKING SAMPLES FROM THE TUBES
IN NICHOLSON'S PAINT BOX.
SHE CAN COMPARE THESE WITH
THE PIGMENTS IN LYN'S PICTURE
TO SEE IF THERE ARE
ANY SIMILARITIES
WITH THOSE NICHOLSON USED.

Aviva checks the samples under a microscope.

Fiona says WITH THE ORIGINS
OF LYN'S PICTURE STILL A
MYSTERY, I NEED RULE OUT
FOUL PLAY.
COULD FORGER JOHN MYATT
HAVE HAD ANY HAND IN THIS WORK?
MYATT SERVED HIS TIME.
TODAY HE'S A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST
IN HIS OWN RIGHT.
I'VE MET HIM BEFORE AND HE'S
ALWAYS REFUSED TO REVEAL WHERE
WORKS HIS FAKE PAINTINGS
ENDED UP, BUT THIS TIME I'M
HOPING HE'LL SPILL THE BEANS.

Fiona and John meet at a pub. He is in his sixties, clean-shaven with receding white hair. He wears a white shirt under a blue vest and a pattered tie.

Fiona says HI, JOHN.

John says FIONA, HELLO.

Fiona says YOU HAVE, OF COURSE,
PAINTED A LOT OF FAKES
IN THE PAST.
UM...
SOME OF THEM ARE
STILL OUT THERE?

John says YES.

Fiona says HOW MANY WOULD YOU SAY?

John says I BELIEVE ABOUT 120 ARE
UNACCOUNTED FOR.

Fiona says SO, QUITE A LOT.

John says QUITE A LOT.

Fiona says AND YOU'VE NEVER SAID WHERE
THEY ARE.

John says NO.

Fiona says WHY IS THAT?

John says I DON'T INTEND TO.
I THINK IT'S-- THIS LATE IN THE
DAY IT WOULD JUST BE
TAKING MONEY AWAY FROM
PEOPLE WHO HAVE INVESTED FUNDS
IN AN ITEM THEY THOUGHT WAS
COMPLETELY OKAY
AND FOR ME TO COME ALONG
AND SAY IT WAS BY ME,
I THINK IT, AT THIS POINT,
IT IS ALMOST IMMORAL.

Fiona says WELL, THE OWNER OF
THE PAINTING WE'RE LOOKING AT
IS ALREADY OUT OF POCKET
TO THE TUNE OF SOME 165,000
POUNDS, SO I HAVE TO ASK YOU
DID YOU EVER FAKE ANY PAINTINGS
BY WILLIAM NICHOLSON?

John says YES.

Fiona says HOW MANY?

John smiles and says ONE.

Fiona says JUST ONE?

John says JUST ONE.
A STILL LIFE.

Fiona raises her eyebrows.

Fiona says WELL, I'M GONNA SHOW
YOU THE PAINTING WE'RE LOOKING
AT AND I WANT YOU TO TELL ME
IF THIS IS YOURS.
THERE IT IS.

John says WELL IT'S
A LOVELY BIT OF WORK
I CAN TELL YOU THAT.
AND IT'S DEFINITELY NOT BY ME.

Fiona says PHEW.
She chuckles and says THAT IS A RELIEF.

John says WELL, IT'S A LOVELY
PAINTING.
YOU CAN TELL BY LOOKING AT THIS
THAT IT IS OF CONSIDERABLE AGE,
I MEAN, IT'S NOT SOMETHING
THAT HAS BEEN DONE OVER
THE LAST TEN MINUTES.

Fiona says DO YOU REMEMBER
THE PAINTING YOU DID?

John says YES, I DO ACTUALLY...
YOU SEE, I'M GOING TO START
SAYING THINGS AWAY ABOUT
THE PAINTING I DID PAINT.

Fiona says WELL, ALL I WANT
TO KNOW...

John says MINE WAS A CERAMIC JUG.

Fiona says BUT THIS IS
NOT YOURS.

John says THAT IS
ABSOLUTELY DEFINITELY
'KNIFE, FORK, SPOON AND MUG'
IS NOT BY ME.

Fiona says WELL, LYN, WHO OWNS THIS
PAINTING WILL BE VERY PLEASED
TO HEAR THAT.

Philip says BACK AT THE
COURTAULD INSTITUTE, AVIVA
HAS USED X-RAY PHOTOGRAPHY
TO PENETRATE DEEP INTO
THE PAINT LAYERS TO SEE IF
SHE CAN FIND ANY CLUES TO THE
GENESIS OF LYN'S PICTURE.
AND SHE'S FOUND SOMETHING
QUITE UNEXPECTED.
HOW EXTRAORDINARY.
IT LOOKS LIKE A VASE OF FLOWERS.

Aviva says ABSOLUTELY AND IT'S
ONE OF THE CLEAREST X-RAYS
OF AN UNDERLYING PAINTING
I'VE SEEN IN A LONG TIME...

Philip says ISN'T THAT
TERRIFIC...

Aviva says I THINK THE BOARD
THAT IT WAS ORIGINALLY
BEEN PAINTED ON HAS BEEN SCRAPED
AND THEN ANOTHER IMAGE
HAS THEN BEEN PUT ON TOP
AND YOU CAN SEE THOSE
SCRAPE MARKS IN THE X-RAY,
THERE ARE A LOT OF THEM.
QUITE A LOT OF ARTISTS RE-USED
THEIR SUPPORTS EITHER FROM
ECONOMIC NECESSITY OR
FOR OTHER REASONS AND THIS IS
CERTAINLY AN EXAMPLE OF THAT.

Philip says BUT BY WHAT THIS
ARTISTS HAS THROWN AWAY,
BY WHAT THIS ARTIST
HAS ABANDONED, IT'S QUITE
POSSIBLE THAT WE CAN TELL
MORE ABOUT WHO HE
OR SHE MAY BE.

Fiona says THIS REMARKABLE
DISCOVERY HAS GIVEN US NEW
LEADS THAT COULD HELP US LINK
LYN'S PICTURE TO WILLIAM
NICHOLSON.

Philip says WE X-RAYED
YOUR PAINTING AND FOUND THIS
BENEATH...

Lyn says OH, MY GOODNESS.

Fiona says WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT IS?

Lyn says FLOWERS.
FREESIAS.

Philip says FREESIAS IT IS.
AND FREESIAS IS SOMETHING
TO WHICH NICHOLSON RETURNED
TIME AND TIME AGAIN AND
CATALOGUED BY PATRICIA REED,
IN THE CATALOGUE RAISONNE,
ARE A NUMBER OF WORKS
OF FREESIAS.

Lyn says OH, MY GOODNESS
THAT IS A...
AN EXCITING SURPRISE.

Fiona says INTRIGUINGLY,
IN ADDITION TO THE FIVE
FREESIA PAINTINGS IDENTIFIED
IN THE CATALOGUE RAISONNE,
A SIXTH IS LISTED AS LOST.

A black painting with a question mark appears.

She continues WE KNOW NICHOLSON PAINTED IT
BECAUSE IT'S MENTIONED
IN A LETTER TO COUNTESS
SPENCER THE GRANDMOTHER
OF PRINCESS DIANA,
WHILE HE WAS MAKING PLANS
TO PAINT A FAMILY PORTRAIT.

They continue looking at pictures on a screen.

Fiona says AND HERE'S THE LETTER, DATED
1930... AND HE'S APOLOGIZING
FOR NOT BEING ABLE TO COME
ALONG THAT WEEKEND.
HE SAYS, "MAY I COME NEXT
WEEKEND?"
BUT THE BEST LINE IS AT THE END.
HE SAYS, "I AM FINISHING
THE FREESIAS."

Philip says NOW THE QUESTION IS,
IS THAT THE IMAGE THAT LIES
BENEATH YOUR PICTURE?

Lyn says OH, MY GOODNESS.

Lyn chuckles.

Fiona says COULD IT BE YOURS?

Lyn says YES, IT COULD!

Fiona says SO, WHAT WE MIGHT DO
IS SOLVE TWO MYSTERIES
AT ONCE HERE.
IS YOUR PAINTING BY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON
AND IS THE PAINTING
UNDERNEATH THE LOST
WILLIAM NICHOLSON OF FREESIAS?

Lyn says THAT IS INCREDIBLE,
I HAVE TO SAY.
I WOULD NEVER, EVER THOUGHT
YOU'D HAVE SOMETHING
LIKE THAT TO BRING ME.

(soft music plays)

Fiona says BACK ON THE
PROVENANCE TRAIL, I'VE BEEN
SEARCHING FOR ANY RECORD
OF LYN'S PICTURE BEFORE THE
MID-'70S.
WE'VE IDENTIFIED THAT
A LABEL ON THE BACK BELONGS
TO A LEADING MAYFAIR GALLERY
CALLED REID AND LEFEVRE,
ONE OF SEVERAL THE PICTURE
PASSED THROUGH.
THE GALLERY NOW OPERATES
AS LEFEVRE FINE ART
AND THEY'VE AGREED,
ON THIS OCCASION, TO LOOK
BACK INTO THEIR RECORDS.
I'M HEADING TO SEE LYN
WITH SOME EXCITING NEWS.
LYN, THE REASON I'VE COME
TO SEE YOU TODAY IS I'VE NOW
FOUND OUT WHO OWNED YOUR PICTURE
BEFORE 1976.

Lyn says BEFORE '76.
OKAY.

Fiona says RIGHT.
SO, IT'S THIS MAN, GEORGE PRINS,
NOW HE WAS A DIAMOND BROKER.

Lyn says RIGHT.

Fiona says AND HE WAS
A WEALTHY MAN.
HE LIVED IN THIS HOUSE
IN HAMPSTEAD IN NORTH LONDON.

Lyn says IT LOOKS LIKE
A HAMPSTEAD HOUSE.

Fiona shows Lyn black and white pictures.

Fiona says LATER INHABITED BY
NON-OTHER THAN GEORGE MICHAEL.
JUST FOR A BIT OF INTEREST.
(both laughing)
AND IN THIS HOUSE WHEN
GEORGE PRINS LIVED THERE
WE KNOW FROM SALES RECORDS
THAT HE HAD
AN EXTENSIVE ART COLLECTION...
PICASSO, RENOIR, BONNARD,
VUILLARD...
AND OF COURSE NICHOLSON.
AND HE WAS
COLLECTING ART FROM
THE MID-1930S TO THE MID-1950S
SO I THINK IT'S SAFE TO ASSUME
THAT HE WOULD HAVE BOUGHT YOUR
PAINTING SOMEWHERE IN THAT
PERIOD.

Lyn says GOODNESS...

Fiona says HE DOESN'T SOUND LIKE THE
KIND OF MAN WHO WOULD HAVE BEEN
DUPED BY A FAKE, DOES HE?

Lyn says I WAS THINKING ABOUT THAT.
NO, HE DOESN'T.

Fiona says THE OBVIOUS QUESTION NOW,
LYN, IS WHO DID GEORGE PRINS
BUY THE PAINTING FROM...
MAYBE HE BOUGHT IT
FROM NICHOLSON, WHO KNOWS?
BUT THAT'S THE ONE THING WE
HAVEN'T BEEN ABLE TO FIND OUT...
WHERE DID GEORGE PRINS
BUY THE PICTURE.
I CAN'T TAKE IT BACK ANY
FURTHER.

Lyn says YOU CAN'T TAKE IT BACK
FURTHER.

Fiona says NO.

Philip says WE HAVE THE MAKINGS
OF A PROMISING CASE,
BUT WE'VE JUST RECEIVED
SOME INFORMATION FROM
PATRICIA REED THAT RAISES
SOME SERIOUS QUESTIONS.
SO, WE'VE ESTABLISHED THAT
LYN'S PICTURE IS PAINTED
ON A USED ARTIST'S BOARD.
HOPEFULLY NICHOLSON'S BOARD.
BUT HERE WE'VE GOT A CONCERN
BECAUSE PATRICIA REED CLAIMS
THAT SOME OF NICHOLSON'S
OLD BOARDS WERE BEING
USED BY OTHER ARTISTS.
AND NICHOLSON DIDN'T JUST
TEACH WINSTON CHURCHILL,
THERE WERE OTHERS.
AND THIS PICTURE,
THE GENUINE NICHOLSON HANGING IN
THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA,
IS FUELLING SUSPICION.

Fiona says SO, THE IDEA IS THEN,
ACCORDING TO PATRICIA REED,
THAT WHILE WILLIAM NICHOLSON
WAS PAINTING THIS GENUINE WORK,
SOMEONE ELSE WAS REUSING
ONE OF HIS OLD BOARDS,
PAINTING SIDE BY SIDE,
CREATING LYN'S PICTURE.

Philip says THAT'S WHAT
SHE APPEARS TO BE CLAIMING.
SO, THE ONLY WAY THAT WE CAN
ESTABLISH THAT LYN'S PICTURE IS
NOT AN IMPOSTER IS TO PUT THE
TWO TOGETHER AND EXAMINE
THEM FORENSICALLY...
MAKE THE COMPARISON,
FIND OUT THAT WAY.

Philip and Aviva walk into an impressive national gallery.

Philip says AVIVA AND I HAVE
FLOWN ACROSS THE POND TO
OTTAWA.
WE'RE HOPING TO FIND OUT
ONCE AND FOR ALL
IF LYN'S PICTURE IS A ROGUE
VERSION OF A GENUINE WORK
THAT IS HELD IN
THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA.
THIS IS A WORLD-CLASS GALLERY
WITH AN IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION.
IT HOLDS SOME OF THE BIGGEST
NAMES IN BRITISH ART,
INCLUDING SEVERAL WORKS
BY WILLIAM NICHOLSON.
WE'RE MEETING DIRECTOR OF
CONSERVATION, STEPHEN GRITT.

Stephen is in his forties, with a white goatee and bald. He wears a dark blue T-shirt over a shirt.

Stephen says HI.

Aviva says HELLO.

Philip says VERY NICE TO MEET YOU.

Stephen says WELCOME, WELCOME.
THIS IS MY STUDIO, COME ON IN.

Philip says HE'S AGREED TO LET
US TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT
THE GENUINE WORK THAT'S
AROUSED SUCH SUSPICION
AROUND LYN'S PICTURE.
SO, FINALLY, WE'VE GOT THE
TWO WORKS TOGETHER.
ONE, A FULLY AUTHENTIC
WORK BY NICHOLSON...
AND THEN LYN'S PICTURE.
PATRICIA REED BELIEVES THIS
TO BE BY ANOTHER HAND.
I MEAN, AT FIRST GLANCE THEY...
THEY'RE VERY SIMILAR,
AREN'T THEY, BUT, YOURS,
STEPHEN, IS MORE ABSTRACT BOTH
IN THE COLOURS AND ALSO THE
LINES.

Stephen says THAT'S QUITE RIGHT.
IT'S WIDELY REGARDED AS
HIS MOST ABSTRACTED PAINTING,
HE'S REALLY
FLATTENING THE SPACE.

Philip says YEAH, AND IT'S
PARTICULARLY TRUE OF THE
PEARS, ISN'T IT?

Stephen says THEY'RE VERY FLAT
AND THEY HAVE QUITE A PUZZLING
SHAPE.
SO... HE'S EXPERIMENTING HERE.

Aviva says ALTHOUGH YOU'RE ABSOLUTELY
RIGHT THIS IS MORE ABSTRACT THAN
THIS VERSION THERE ARE SOME
QUITE CLOSE SIMILARITIES THAT
REALLY STAND OUT.
IT'S REALLY... THE WAY THE
SHADOWS HAVE BEEN DONE,
THE BACKGROUND IS DRAWN OVER
IN BOTH CASES IN AN IDENTICAL
WAY.
AND THEN THERE'S ALSO THE
APPLICATION OF THIS WHITE
IMPASTO, WHICH IS VERY SPECIFIC
AND VERY TEXTURED IN EXACTLY
THE SAME WAY IN BOTH PICTURES.
IT'S QUITE STRIKING.

Philip says IT'S SORT OF
ALMOST SCULPTURAL, DOESN'T IT?

Stephen says SO, I'M REALLY INTERESTED IN
LOOKING AT THE SIGNATURE MARK,
THE MONOGRAM, WHICH IN MY
PAINTING IS THIS CHARACTERISTIC,
SLIGHTLY CURLICUED,
LEANING OVER N, AND YOUR N
IS A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT.

Philip says YEAH,
IT'S AN UPRIGHT N WITH DOTS
AROUND IT.
I HAVE TO SAY IT IS QUITE
DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT.

Fiona says THESE DIFFERENCES
IN SIGNATURE COULD BE
CAUSE FOR CONCERN
SO, BACK IN LONDON, LYN AND
I ARE HEADING TO THE TATE
ARCHIVES.
HANDWRITING ANALYST ADAM BRAND
HAS BEEN STUDYING
THE COLLECTION OF NICHOLSON'S
LETTERS HELD HERE, AS WELL
THE MONOGRAMS ON HIS WORKS.

Fiona, Lyn and Adam sit behind a desk with two laptops in a storage room.

Fiona says SO, ADAM, LET'S START WITH
THE N ON THE FRONT.

Adam is in his seventies, clean-shaven and receding white hair. He wears glasses and a black suit.

Adam says RIGHT.

Fiona says WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN ABLE
TO MAKE OF THAT?

Adam says THE THING THAT'S
INTERESTING ABOUT THIS IS
IT'S GOT AND UP AND A DOWN
AND AN UP BUT IT LOOKS AS IF
AN EXTRA LEG HAS BEEN ADDED.
IF YOU LOOK AT THE OTHER N'S
THEY TEND TO HAVE QUITE A LOT
OF FLUENCY, DO YOU SEE THAT?
DO YOU SEE ALSO THAT THEY TEND
TO HAVE MORE OF A RIGHT SLANT.

Lyn says YES.

Fiona says SO, THAT LOOKS
LIKE A BIT OF A WORRY.

Adam says IT'S NOT A TOTAL CONCERN,
BECAUSE ACTUALLY YOU CAN
SEE SOME OF THE PAINTINGS
WHERE THAT SLANT IS UPRIGHT.
SO, THOUGH I HAVE SOME CONCERNS
ABOUT THE N, IT'S NOT COMPLETELY
DISMISSED AS BEING NOT HIS.

Philip says BACK IN OTTAWA,
WE'RE ALSO TAKING
A CLOSER LOOK AT THAT 'N'.
STEPHEN HAS POINTED OUT THAT,
DURING THE 1930S,
NICHOLSON BEGAN ADDING
A UNIQUELY PERSONAL
TOUCH TO HIS MONOGRAM.

Stephen points at the lower end of his painting.

Stephen says ON THE OTTAWA
PAINTING OUR 'N' IS SITTING
ON TOP OF A PALE BLUE BLOB
LIKELY APPLIED WITH A THUMB.

Philip says SO, IT'S LIKE
A PERSONAL SEAL FROM
HIS OWN BODY AND THEN
HE PUTS THE N ON TOP.

Stephen says THAT'S THE IDEA, I THINK.

Aviva says NOW YOU MENTION IT, LOOKS
LIKE THERE'S A ROUND
CIRCLE UNDERNEATH THIS N.

Philip says I DO SEE WHAT
YOU MEAN, YEAH, ABSOLUTELY.

Aviva says I THINK WE SHOULD
HAVE A CLOSER LOOK AT THAT.

Philip says STEPHEN CLOSELY
EXAMINES THE APPLICATION
OF PAINT ON THE MONOGRAM
OF LYN'S PICTURE.
COULD IT HAVE BEEN APPLIED
USING THE SAME QUIRKY TECHNIQUE
THAT WE KNOW NICHOLSON USED?

Stephen says WELL THIS IS INTERESTING.
I CAN SEE A DAUB OF PALE GREY
PAINT INTO WHICH THE SHAPE
OF THE N IS WORKED WHILE THAT
PALE GREY PAINT IS STILL WET.
AND THAT'S INTERESTING TO ME,
BECAUSE IT MATCHES THE
METHODOLOGY OF THE LAYING DOWN
OF THE MONOGRAM OF THE OTTAWA
PAINTING.

Philip says THIS IS SOUNDING EXCITING.

Stephen says I THINK SO.

Aviva says YEP, I SEE WHAT YOU MEAN.
IT'S AN OPTICAL, BLUISH PAINT,
PALE BLUE, AND THEN
THE SIGNATURE'S ON TOP...
THAT'S ABSOLUTELY CLEAR.

Philip says BUT THIS IS WHAT
WE'RE LOOKING FOR, THIS HIGHLY
IDIOSYNCRATIC TECHNIQUE
THAT NICHOLSON USES...
BANGING DOWN A BIT OF PAINT...
A THUMBPRINT IF YOU WANT
AND THEN AN INITIAL ON TOP.

Philip says WITH COMPELLING
SIMILARITIES ON THE FRONT
OF BOTH PICTURES,
HOW DO THE BACKS COMPARE?

Aviva and Stephen turn the paintings around.

Philip says OH, GOODNESS ME.

Aviva says YOU CAN SEE
THE BLOBS OF PAINT THAT WE SAW,
THEY'RE EXACTLY THE SAME BLOBS
OF PAINT ON THE BACK
OF THIS PICTURE.

Philip says IT'S THE SAME MESS ISN'T?

Stephen says SO, THERE'S LOTS
OF WRITING ON THE BACK
AND SQUIGGLES AND NOTATIONS
BUT MOST IMPORTANTLY WE'VE GOT
'GLASS AND FRUIT' WHICH IS
PRESUMABLY THE EARLY TITLE
OF OUR WORK AND YOU HAVE
GLASS JUG AND WHAT'S COMMON HERE
IS THIS VERY FLAMBOYANT
G ON THE WORD 'GLASS'.

Philip says WE'VE GOT
A HANDWRITING EXPERT WORKING ON
WHETHER OR NOT THIS IS
WILLIAM NICHOLSON'S HAND.

Adam points at laptop screen and says LOOK AT THAT G HERE
AND HOW SIMILAR IT IS
TO A KNOWN NICHOLSON G.
NOW, THAT IS QUITE AN
INDIVIDUALISTIC STRUCTURE FROM
A GRAPHOLOGICAL HANDWRITING
POINT OF VIEW THEY'RE QUITE
SIMILAR.
DO YOU SEE THAT PART?
NOW, IF WE MOVE ON TO THE
SPACING.
YOU'VE GOT 'GL' BREAK,
YOU'VE GOT 'A' BREAK, BREAK.
NOW, IF YOU LOOK AT ONE OF HIS
LETTERS, THAT'S VERY SIMILAR.
DO YOU SEE THAT?

Fiona says IS THAT NOT SOMETHING
SOMEONE COULD EASILY COPY?

Adam says NO, IT'S IS THE MOST
DIFFICULT THING TO DO BECAUSE
IT'S AN UNCONSCIOUS MOVEMENT.
THAT MOVEMENT IS ACTUALLY
MANY WAYS MORE SIGNIFICANT
THAN THE LETTER SHAPE.

Lyn says IT'S SO INTERESTING.
IT'S ABSOLUTELY FASCINATING

Adam says AND EVEN AT
THE BOTTOM, YOU SEE THE S'S,
EXACTLY THE SAME AS THE S'S
ON THE BACK OF THE PICTURE.
NOW WHEN YOU'VE GOT
ALL THESE SIGNIFICANT
CHARACTERISTICS COMING TOGETHER,
I AM 100 percent
CONVINCED THAT THE WRITING
ON THE BACK OF THIS PAINTING
WAS DONE
BY SIR WILLIAM NICHOLSON.

Lyn says REALLY?

Adam says YES.

Fiona says WOW.
YOU'VE NEVER GIVEN US A
PERCENTAGE BEFORE.

Lyn says THAT IS VERY EXCITING.

Fiona says AND THAT'S THE MOST
CATEGORICAL I'VE EVER HEARD
YOU, ADAM.

Adam smiles.

Fiona says YOU SEE WHAT THIS MEANS
THOUGH, LYN, BECAUSE SURELY
IF WILLIAM NICHOLSON WROTE THIS
ON THE BACK OF THE PICTURE
DESCRIBING WHAT'S ON THE FRONT,
HE MUST HAVE PAINTED THE FRONT.
WHY WOULD HE WRITE ON THE
BACK OF SOMEONE ELSE'S PICTURE?
THIS IS A MASSIVE STEP
FORWARD FOR US.
WITH THE HANDWRITING
AUTHENTICATED AS NICHOLSON'S,
THIS GIVES HUGE WEIGHT
TO WHAT'S ACTUALLY WRITTEN.
AND A HASTILY SCRIBBLED NOTE
COULD HELP US DATE
LYN'S PICTURE...
DO REMEMBER THIS 'PAD...
WIN' WITH THE NUMBERS.

Lyn says YES.

Fiona says WE THOUGHT IT MIGHT
BE A RAILWAY TIMETABLE.
WE SENT OUR RESEARCHER TO THE
NATIONAL RAILWAY MUSEUM IN YORK
AND HE SPENT TWO DAYS
GOING THROUGH YEARS AND
YEARS OF RAILWAY TIMETABLES.

Fiona browses trough a magazine.

Lyn says SOMEBODY FASTIDIOUS.

Fiona says AND WHAT WE FOUND
IS THAT BETWEEN SEPTEMBER 1931
AND SEPTEMBER 1939
THERE IS A TRAIN
THAT LEFT FROM PADDINGTON,
AND THERE'S THE TIME, 9:20.
AND THIS WIN...
WINDSOR,
AND HERE WE GO,
3:32 ON THE PAINTING,
3:32 ON THE TIMETABLE.
THERE IT IS.
BUT THIS, AGAIN, YOU BELIEVE
IS NICHOLSON'S HANDWRITING,
DON'T YOU?

Adam says YES, INDEED.

Lyn says 100 percent.

Adam says 100 percent.

They chuckle.

Fiona says NOW THIS TIMETABLE
CHANGED AFTER SEPTEMBER '39
BECAUSE OF THE OUTBREAK OF WAR.
SO, WHAT WE CAN BE SURE ABOUT
IS THAT THIS WAS WRITTEN
ON THE BACK OF THIS PICTURE
BETWEEN SEPTEMBER 1931
AND SEPTEMBER 1939.

Lyn says I'VE GOT
GOOSE BUMPS NOW.

Philip says SO, WE CAN DATE
THE BACK OF THE BOARD TO WELL
WITHIN NICHOLSON'S LIFETIME.
IN FACT, TO THE SAME PERIOD AS
HE PAINTED THE OTTAWA PICTURE
WHICH IS DATED TO AROUND 1938.
BUT HANDWRITING ALONE
WON'T BE ENOUGH TO PROVE THE
AUTHENTICITY OF LYN'S PICTURE.
IT'S WHAT'S ON THE FRONT
THAT MATTERS MOST.
WE NEED TO COMPARE
THE PIGMENTS USED TO
PAINT THE GENUINE NICHOLSON
WITH THOSE IN LYN'S PICTURE.
SCIENTISTS AT THE CANADIAN
CONSERVATION INSTITUTE,
A LEADING ART RESEARCH
FACILITY, HAVE AGREED TO
CONDUCT RIGOROUS ANALYSIS.
MINUTE PAINT SAMPLES
1000TH THE SIZE OF A GRAIN OF
SAND ARE RUN THROUGH A SERIES
OF ANALYTICAL PROCESSES
WHICH CAN IDENTIFY THE
PRECISE CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
OF THE PIGMENTS.
THE RESULTS CAN BE COMPARED
WITH AVIVA'S ANALYSIS
OF LYN'S PICTURE.
IF THE MATERIALS ARE WILDLY
DIFFERENT, THEN IT'S MUCH LESS
LIKELY TO BE THE WORK OF
NICHOLSON.
BACK AT STEPHEN'S STUDIO,
THE RESULTS ARE COMING IN.
WELL, AS IT STANDS
WE HAVE TWO PICTURES,
ONE OF THEM INNOCENT,
THE OTHER GUILTY.
NOW HAVE YOU DISCOVERED ANYTHING
THAT MIGHT HELP LYN'S PICTURE?

Aviva says WELL, I'LL SHOW YOU.
HERE WE ARE.

A three-column table appears on a laptop screen.

Philip says GOODNESS ME,
IT'S A ROW OF YESES,
A GLOWING SCHOOL REPORT.

Aviva says WHAT THIS SHOWS
IS THAT THERE ARE A NUMBER OF
PIGMENTS THAT WERE USED IN
COMMON FOR BOTH PICTURES.

Philip says SO, EVERY ONE OF
THOSE PIGMENTS THAT YOU HAVE
FOUND IN THE OTTAWA PICTURE
YOU'VE FOUND IN LYN'S.

Aviva says THAT'S RIGHT
AND I'VE ALSO FOUND THAT
THE PIGMENTS IN BOTH PICTURES
ARE CLOSELY SIMILAR TO
THE TUBES OF PAINT
IN NICHOLSON'S PAINT BOX.
ALTHOUGH IT'S POSSIBLE
TO ARGUE THAT
MANUFACTURED PIGMENTS
COULD BE USED BY ANYONE,
THERE ARE SUCH CLOSE
SIMILARITIES FOR SO MANY
PIGMENTS USED HERE,
THAT IT WOULD SEEM UNLIKELY.
BUT BEYOND THAT THE TECHNIQUE
USED FOR THE PICTURES
IS CLOSELY SIMILAR TOO.
THE WAY THE PAINT'S ACTUALLY
APPLIED REALLY IS SO SPECIFIC
AND SO SIMILAR THAT IT
WOULD BE VERY, VERY HARD
TO IMITATE THAT, IN MY OPINION.

Philip says WHAT DO YOU THINK,
STEPHEN?

Stephen says I THINK THE RESULTS ARE
REALLY GOOD AND REALLY CLEAR
AND THERE ARE SO MANY
COMPELLING SIMILARITIES
THAT THE INESCAPABLE CONCLUSION
REALLY IS THAT THE OTTAWA
PAINTING IS BY NICHOLSON
AND LYN'S PAINTING IS BY
NICHOLSON.

Philip says SO, THE ONLY WAY
THAT LYN'S PAINTING
COULD NOT BE BY NICHOLSON
IS IF SOMEONE
HAD GOT HOLD OF ONE OF
NICHOLSON'S OLD ARTIST'S BOARDS,
HAD DONE THE SAME SUBJECT
USING EXACTLY THE SAME PAINTS,
EXACTLY THE SAME PIGMENTS
AND THEN GOT NICHOLSON
TO INSCRIBE IT ON THE BACK,
"GLASS JUG."
I MEAN, WHAT ARE THE CHANCES OF
THIS?

Fiona says BACK IN LONDON,
WE'VE SENT OUR DOSSIER
OF EVIDENCE TO THE AUTHOR OF
THE CATALOGUE RAISONNE AND
WE'RE WAITING FOR A DECISION.
I THINK OUR EVIDENCE IS REALLY
STRONG, I MEAN, JUST THINK
WHAT WE'VE GOT.
A HANDWRITING EXPERT WHO
BELIEVES 100 percent THAT THE WRITING
ON THE BACK IS BY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON, INCLUDING
THOSE WORDS GLASS JUG.
AND THEN THANKS TO OLD TRAIN
TIMETABLES, WE CAN DATE SOME
OF THAT WRITING BETWEEN
1931 AND 1939 WHICH IS THE
RIGHT PERIOD FOR OUR PICTURE.
AS FOR THE PROVENANCE WE'VE
TAKEN IT FURTHER BACK FROM
THE MID-1970S TO GEORGE PRINS,
DIAMOND BROKER, SERIOUS ART
COLLECTOR.
WHAT WE HAVEN'T DONE THOUGH
IS TAKE IT FURTHER BACK STILL
TO WILLIAM NICHOLSON HIMSELF,
SO THAT IS A GAP
AND THAT'S A WORRY.

Philip says THIS HAS TO BE
ONE OF THE MOST CONVINCING
TECHNICAL INVESTIGATIONS
THAT WE'VE DONE ON A PICTURE.
WE KNOW THAT BENEATH THE SURFACE
LIES A PAINTING OF FREESIAS.
WE KNOW THAT NICHOLSON
PAINTED FREESIAS.
WE KNOW THAT THE PAINT IS
THE SAME AS THAT THAT'S FOUND
IN HIS PAINT BOX AND ALSO
IN THE GENUINE WORK AT OTTAWA.

Philip says NOW SURELY,
SURELY WE'VE DONE ENOUGH
TO ERASE THE STAIN ON THIS
PAINTING.

Fiona says PATRICIA REED
DECLINED OUR INVITATION
TO DELIVER THE VERDICT
IN PERSON, SO SHE'S SENT
HER DECISION BY LETTER.
LYN IS ON HER WAY TO
THE GALLERY AND WE'RE ALL
ABOUT TO DISCOVER WHETHER
OR NOT HER PAINTING HAS
BEEN ACCEPTED AS A GENUINE WORK
BY WILLIAM NICHOLSON.

Lyn says HELLO.

Philip says HELLO, LYN.

Fiona says HI, LYN.
HOW ARE YOU DOING?

Lyn says A LITTLE BIT ANXIOUS TODAY.

Fiona chuckles and says I CAN SEE THAT.

Lyn says YEAH.

Fiona says WELL, WE'RE PRETTY ANXIOUS
AS WELL, TO BE HONEST.

Philip says DEFINITELY.

Fiona says SO, AS IT STANDS,
YOUR PAINTING, WHICH YOU BOUGHT
FOR 165,000 POUNDS, IS NOT
ACCEPTED AS A WILLIAM NICHOLSON
AND YOU MAY WELL HAVE LOST
THAT MONEY.
I MEAN, JUST REMIND US
WHAT'S AT STAKE, PHILIP.

Philip says WELL IF WE COULD
RE-ESTABLISH THIS AS
AN AUTHENTIC WORK BY
WILLIAM NICHOLSON, IT WOULD BE
A GREAT GAIN FOR ART HISTORY AND
THE PRICE CONSEQUENCE OF THAT
WOULD BE THAT WELL IT WOULD BE
WORTH WHAT YOU PAID FOR IT
AND SOME, IT COULD BE WORTH
A COUPLE OF HUNDRED THOUSAND
POUNDS BUT AS A NON-NICHOLSON
IT'S A FEW HUNDRED, ISN'T IT.

Fiona says IT'S HARD
NOT TO WINCE WHEN YOU HEAR THAT,
BUT I KNOW IT'S MUCH MORE TO YOU
THAN JUST ABOUT THE MONEY,
ISN'T IT?

Lyn says IT REALLY IS.
IT'S AN EMOTIONAL
SITUATION FOR ME.
I FEEL FOR THE PICTURE.
IT WAS A PAINTER I WAS
INTRODUCED TO BY LILLIAN,
YOU KNOW IT'S BEEN
THROUGH HER GALLERY.

Fiona says BECAUSE AUNT LILIAN
ABSOLUTELY BELIEVED THIS
WAS A WILLIAM NICHOLSON.

Lyn says OH, MY GOSH YES.

Fiona says SO, IT'S JUSTICE FOR HER
AS WELL.

Lyn says YES, ABSOLUTELY YES.

Fiona says WELL, THIS IS
THE MOMENT WHEN WE FIND OUT
IF YOUR PAINTING WILL GO INTO
THE CATALOGUE RAISONNE OR NOT.
WE DON'T KNOW WHAT'S IN HERE
NO MORE THAN YOU DO...

Lyn says OPEN IT UP QUICKLY.

Fiona says ARE YOU READY?
COME ON THEN.

Fiona opens an envelope.

Fiona reads "I REGRET TO INFORM
YOU THAT I DO NOT FIND
THERE IS SUFFICIENT EVIDENCE
TO ATTRIBUTE THIS WORK
TO WILLIAM NICHOLSON."

OH, LYN.

Lyn says OH.

Philip says I AM SORRY.

Fiona reads "ALTHOUGH THERE ARE
A NUMBER OF ASPECTS OF
THE PAINTING THAT LINK
THE PHYSICAL BOARD AND PAINT
WITH WILLIAM NICHOLSON
AND HIS STUDIO, THERE IS NOTHING
THAT GIVES ANY DIRECT EVIDENCE
THAT HE ACTUALLY EXECUTED
THE WORK HIMSELF."

Fiona says OH, LYN,
I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO SAY...

Lyn says WELL, ISN'T IT STRANGE,
I WAS ACTUALLY EXPECTING,
I DON'T KNOW WHY, GOOD NEWS.

Fiona says SO WAS I.

Lyn says SO, I AM AMAZED THAT
UNLESS THERE'S ENOUGH
REASON WHY...

Fiona says SHE SAYS, "THERE WAS
A GROUP OF AMATEUR PAINTERS,
INCLUDING WINSTON CHURCHILL,
WHO WERE TUTORED INDIVIDUALLY
BY NICHOLSON IN HIS STUDIO
AND ELSEWHERE DURING THE 1930S.
THIS WORK COULD HAVE BEEN
EXECUTED BY ONE OF THEM UNDER
WILLIAM NICHOLSON'S SUPERVISION.
SO, SHE'S SAYING IT WAS HIS
BOARD BUT HE LET THEM PAINT
ON IT.

Philip says BUT WHAT THIS COMES
DOWN TO IS SOMETHING THAT'S
REALLY DIFFICULT TO ARGUE WITH
AND THAT IS DESPITE ALL THE
EVIDENCE THAT WE'VE BEEN ABLE
TO ESTABLISH, ALL THE FACTS
AROUND THIS PICTURE,
IN THE END PATRICIA REED FEELS
THAT THIS IS NOT BY THE ARTIST
SHE KNOWS.
SHE BELIEVES THAT THOSE AREN'T
HIS STROKES.

Fiona says I'M SLIGHTLY LOST
FOR WORDS TO BE HONEST.
I THOUGHT THE CASE
WAS SO STRONG, SO STRONG.
I MEAN, DOES IT AFFECT
HOW YOU FEEL ABOUT IT?

Lyn says ERR...
MMM.
I SAY NO, BUT PROBABLY YES.
I DON'T KNOW. UM...
I FEEL A BIT SORE
THAT SOMEBODY WOULD SAY
SUCH A THING ABOUT
THIS LOVELY PICTURE.
BUT...

Fiona says SORRY.

Lyn says THIS TOO WILL PASS,
AS THEY SAY.
OH, SORRY, PAINTING.
I STILL BELIEVE
IT'S HIS PAINTING.

Fiona says I'M SHOCKED.
I'M GENUINELY SHOCKED
BY THAT VERDICT,
I DIDN'T EXPECT IT.
I MEAN ULTIMATELY, OF COURSE,
IT IS UP TO PATRICIA REED.

Philip says IF THE EXPERT IN
QUESTION FEELS THAT IT'S NOT
BY THAT ARTIST, IF VISUALLY
THEY DON'T RESPOND TO IT,
THEN EVIDENCE AND INTRICATE
ARGUMENT CAN JUST BE REBUFFED
AND THIS IS WHAT'S HAPPENED.
IF THEY DON'T LIKE
THE LOOK OF IT,
THEY DON'T LIKE
THE LOOK OF IT, THAT'S IT.

Fiona says AND THAT'S HER JOB,
BUT IT'S BRUTAL.

(theme music plays)

The end credits roll against the grainy orange surface of a painting.

Presented by Fiona Bruce and Philip Mould.

Executive Producer, Judith Winnan.

Series Producer, Lucy Swingler.

Produced and Directed by Nicky Illis.

BBC Studios.

Copyright, BBC 2018.

All3Media International.

Watch: Fake or Fortune Series 7 - Episode 1