Transcript: The Gardener | Jan 04, 2020

A series of award logos appears.

A slate reads "In 2009, at the age of eighty-four, Frank Cabot, the award winning horticulturalist, garden designer and philanthropist, opened his world-renowned 20 acre-garden in La Malbaie, Québec to a film crew. Despite his declining health, he sat for two days of interviews to recall the history of the creation of his garden and the unique life lessons that he has learned along the way. Here is the story of Frank Cabot and his garden, Les Quatre Vents."

Clips show images of Frank's luscious gardens.

A caption reads "Moral essays of the use of riches. Alexander Pope."

Frank says "LET NOT EACH BEAUTY EVERYWHERE
BE SPIED.
"WHERE HALF THE SKILL IS
DECENTLY TO HIDE.
"HE GAINS ALL POINTS, WHO
PLEASINGLY CONFOUNDS.
"SURPRISES, VARIES, AND CONCEALS
THE BOUNDS."
WE HAVE THAT NOW WRITTEN
IN ONE OF OUR STRUCTURES
OF THE GARDEN
AND IN A WAY,
IT'S KIND OF THE...
THE PHILOSOPHY OF THIS GARDEN.

The title of the film reads "The gardener."

A picture of a young couple at their wedding appears with the caption "Frank and Anne Cabot. 1949."

A caption reads "Anne. P. Cabot. Frank Cabot's wife."

Anne is in her late seventies, with short wavy gray hair and wears a patterned blue shirt.

She says WE WERE MARRIED IN 1949,
AND RENTED A HOUSE IN BOSTON
FOR A WHILE, HAD A LITTLE GARDEN
THERE. A PLACE FOR A GARDEN.
AND I DECIDED I'D TRY TO
GARDEN IT.
AND I NEEDED HELP, SO I MADE
HIM HELP ME.
AND HE WASN'T VERY INTERESTED.
AFTER THAT, HE HAD A BUSINESS
FAILURE IN NEW YORK
AND HE WAS SORT OF DISCOURAGED
BY THAT,
AND DECIDED HE'D GET OUT OF THE
BUSINESS WORLD.
AND SO HE CAME OUT HERE, AND,
UM, STARTED DOING GARDENING.

The caption changes to "Colin Cabot. Frank Cabot's son."

Colin is in his late forties, with short wavy graying hair and wears a blue shirt.

He says IN SOME OF WHAT MY FATHER'S AIMS
TO DO WITH THE GARDEN WERE,
RATHER THAN BE DIDACTIC AND
TEACH PEOPLE ABOUT PLANTS,
HE WANTED TO MOVE PEOPLE.
I THINK THAT MY FATHER WAS AN
ARTIST FIRST.

The caption changes to "Penelope Hobhouse. Garden designer, writer and friend."

Penelope is in her late seventies, with short straight gray hair and wears a black jacket and a printed blue scarf.

She says HE AS A SORT OF PATRICIAN
CHARACTER.
VERY MUCH A CABOT.
UPPER CLASS AMERICAN.
ENORMOUS CHARM.
AND ALSO VERY STRONG FRENCH
FEELING,
WHICH PERHAPS DID COME FROM
LIVING IN CANADA.
I DON'T KNOW WHAT A GENIUS
REALLY IS, BUT VERY OFTEN,
GENIUSES ARE A LITTLE MAD,
AS WELL.
AND IF HE HADN'T HAD A LOT
OF MONEY,
YOU MIGHT HAVE SAID HE WAS.

An old map of East Canada and a picture of a Malbaie appear with a caption that reads "La Malbaie, Québec, Canada. Early 20th Century."

Titles read "Presented by Productions Julie Dalbec. A Films Reflektor Production, in collaboration with Peak Media. Produced by Sébastien Chabot, Julie Dalbec, Michael Slack. Written and directed by Sebastien Chabot."

Assisted with a cane, Frank walks down a garden. Frank is in his eighties, with short white hair, and wears beige trousers, a blue sweater, a forest green puffer vest, and a black paperboy hat.

A caption reads "Francis H. Cabot. Creator of the garden at Les Quatre Vents."

Frank says I THINK IN PART, THE DESIRE TO
PLUNGE INTO GARDENING
IN MIDDLE AGE WAS THE
CONSEQUENCE
OF HAVING A LOT OF BUSINESS
TROUBLES.
I HAD REVERSES, I'D HAD SOME
SUCCESSES...
I HAD SOME REVERSES.
THE REVERSES WERE PAINFUL ENOUGH
SO THAT THEY WERE...
MADE A MAJOR EFFECT, AND I FELT
THAT I HAD TO PROVE
THAT I COULD DO SOMETHING RIGHT
AFTER THEM.
AND GARDENING SEEMED TO BE
A NATURAL AVENUE TO PURSUE...
SO IT WAS REALLY THAT, I THINK,
THAT GOT ME INTO IT.
I SEE VISITING A GARDEN
AS BASICALLY AN EMOTIONAL
AND SENSUAL EXPERIENCE,
AS WELL AS SOMETHING THAT IS
FILLED WITH SURPRISE.
REALLY, TO VISIT A GARDENS IS A
SPECIAL THING.
IT'S NOT... YOU JUST DON'T GO
THROUGH IT
LOOKING AT WHAT YOU SEE.
YOU REALLY SHOULD DO IT ALONE,
OR WITH MAYBE ONE SYMPATHETIC
FRIEND
WHO DOESN'T TALK TOO MUCH.
IT'S AWFUL TO HAVE PEOPLE
TALKING
WHILE YOU'RE GOING THROUGH A
GARDEN.
IF YOU'RE A REAL GARDEN VISITOR,
AND I MUST SAY,
I'VE LEARNED ABOUT VISITING
GARDENS BY WATCHING PEOPLE
GO THROUGH THIS GARDEN,
AND THE GOOD ONES,
THEY LOOK AT THINGS QUIETLY AND
DRINK THEM IN.
AND THEY THINK ABOUT THEM.
AND THEY BEGIN TO, IN A WAY,
HAVE A CONVERSATION
WITH THE GARDEN, AND THEY LISTEN
TO WHAT IT'S SAYING TO THEM.

A clip shows a series of lavender and pale pink hyssop flowers in the garden.

Frank says I THINK ONE IS ALWAYS ATTACHED
TO THE PLACES
WHERE YOU SPEND YOUR CHILDHOOD
IN THE SUMMERS, AND, UH...
I GREW UP HERE, I WAS BORN
IN 1925,
AND THE NEXT SUMMER I WAS HERE.
I'VE BEEN HERE EVERY SUMMER OF
MY LIFE SINCE THEN.
AS MY PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS,
AND EVEN GREAT-GRANDPARENTS
BEFORE ME.

A picture of Frank's grandparents appears.

Frank says THE FIRST MEMBER OF THE FAMILY
ARRIVED HERE IN 1842
TO ESCAPE AN EPIDEMIC OF CHOLERA
IN QUEBEC
AND SPENT THE SUMMER ON THIS
PLACE, DOWN BY THE BEACH.
AND HE GOT VERY FOND OF IT.
WHEN HE MARRIED, HE CAME AND
LIVED IN POINT AU PIC
IN THE VERY EARLY TOURIST DAYS
OF THE COMMUNITY.
AND THEN ENDED UP
BUILDING A HOUSE
AROUND THE TURN OF THE CENTURY.
ACROSS THE WAY...
AND THEN IN 1902, BOUGHT THIS
PROPERTY.
ANTICOSTI THE ISLAND WAS PUT UP
FOR AUCTION,
AND IT HAD SEVEN SALMON RIVERS
ON IT,
AND HE WAS VERY INTERESTED IN
BUYING THAT SO HE MADE A BID.
BUT HE LOST OUT
TO MR. CHOCOLAT MENIER,
THE CHOCOLATE KING OF FRANCE.

A picture of a bearded man appears with the caption "Henri Menier. 1901."

Frank says AND, UH, WAS VERY UPSET AT THAT.
AND HE WAS IN THE GARRISON
CLUB IN QUEBEC,
DROWNING HIS SORROWS,
WHEN HE RAN INTO HIS CHILDHOOD
FRIEND WHO OWNED THIS PLACE.
AND WHO SAID, "OH, STOP
GRUMBLING.
"YOU CAN BUY MY PLACE FOR
50,000 DOLLARS."
AND IN THOSE DAYS, IT CONSISTED
OF 90 SQUARE MILES
IF YOU CAN BELIEVE IT.
AND SO HIS ELDEST DAUGHTER WAS
GIVEN THE HOUSE
THAT WAS ON THIS PROPERTY.

A picture appears with the caption "Frank Cabot's grandmother with her two sons."

Colin says I THINK EVERYBODY IN MY FAMILY,
SINCE 1842,
HAS FELT CONNECTED IN SOME WAY
TO THIS PLACE IN CHARLEVOIX,
THE ORIGINAL SEIGNEURIE FARM, OF
THE MT. MURRAY SEIGNEURY.

The caption changes to "Jean des Gagniers. Writer and historian."

Jean is in his eighties, with short straight brown hair and wears a pale pink sweater.
}
Jean says "At the time the Cabots settled here, it was 1932, when the seigneury had been purchased by Georges Bonner. It was rural countryside. The population was made up of artisans of course: woodworkers, carpenters, blacksmiths, farmers, sailors, loggers. All of these people obviously lived much simpler lives than we do now. Steamboats began to travel the river in the mid-19th century. That's how, for example, in 1890, William Howard Taft, who would later become President of the United States, came with Missus Taft to visit the Saguenay River. He stopped at La Malbaie or at Pointe-au-Pic, was seduced by the region and dedicated to return. It is obvious that the arrival of someone that important would encourage other people to follow. That is one of the reasons that a sort of American vacation colony was established in La Malbaie."

A picture of President Taft surrounded by his family appears.

A picture of a house with a large front porch up on a hill appears with a caption that reads "Manoir Richelieu, Pointe-au-pic. Circa 1920."

Frank says THE ORIGINAL HOUSE WAS BUILT
IN 1928.
UH, IT BURNED DOWN THREE MONTHS
AFTER MY FATHER'S DEATH IN 1956.
IT WAS HIT BY A STROKE OF
LIGHTNING.
AND HE HAD RAISED THE INSURANCE
ON THE HOUSE FROM 50,000
TO 100,000 CANADIAN DOLLARS,
SIX MONTHS BEFORE HIS DEATH.
SO I'VE ALWAYS THOUGHT, WELL, HE
WAS GIVING MY MOTHER
SOMETHING TO DO.
SO SHE HAD A BALL,
SHE DECIDED TO HAVE A MUCH
GRANDER HOUSE
THAN IT WAS ORIGINALLY.

A picture of an elegant lady in a power suit and a hat appears with the caption "Frank Cabot's mother, Currie Mathews Cabot."

Frank says AND ENDED UP WITH THIS RATHER
PRETENTIOUS FRENCH HOUSE
THAT WE HAVE NOW, WHICH WE WOULD
NEVER HAVE BUILT BY OURSELVES,
BUT WHICH IS A JOY TO LIVE IN.
AND SO SHE PUT A GARDEN RIGHT IN
FRONT OF THE HOUSE,
BETWEEN THE HOUSE AND THE VIEW.
AND SHE HAD A BROTHER WHO WAS AN
ARCHITECT.
AND HE CAME UP TO STAY FOR THE
FIRST TIME, AND HE SAID
"WELL, YOU'VE DONE
THE WRONG THING.
"YOU NEVER SHOULD PUT A GARDEN
BETWEEN YOU AND THE VIEW."
SO THAT WAS AN IMPORTANT LESSON.

Jean says "In those days, the primary concern of people building their villa was to find an exceptional view. That is why these homes are often perched high on a cliff looking out over a river. At the same time, these people wished to remain a bit isolated. Their villas were often surrounded by woods and frequently included a garden. It is obvious that the garden at Les Quatre Vents is something absolutely special. It is not a simple villa garden. It is one of the most beautiful gardens in the world and it is regarded as such."

The caption changes to "The Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson. Former Governor General of Canada and friend."

Adrienne is in her seventies, with short wavy gray hair and wears dark gray trousers and a double breasted raspberry jacket.

She says FOR ME, FRANK CABOT WAS ALWAYS
SOMEBODY WHOSE GARDEN
I WANTED TO SEE, AND I NEVER GOT
A CHANCE TO DO SO.
UNTIL ABOUT 15 OR 16 YEARS AGO
WHEN I MET SOME PEOPLE
WHO KNEW HIM QUITE WELL,
AND THEY SAID
"WELL, WE'LL INTRODUCE YOU TO
FRANK CABOT,
"AND YOU CAN LOOK AT THE
GARDEN."
WHEN YOU FIRST COME TO THIS
GARDEN...
YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY KNOCKED OUT
BY THE WAY IN WHICH
HE'S USED THE OVER 20 ACRES
THAT HE HAS.

A view of the river appears with the caption "The Saint-Lawrence River and Isle-Aux-Coudres."

Adrienne says AND THIS AREA, AFTER ALL, WAS
CREATED FOR EVERYWHERE
FROM LES EBOULEMENTS TO HERE,
WAS CREATED BY AN ASTEROID.
THAT'S WHAT CAUSED THE HILLS TO
COME UP, AND SO ON.
AND I THINK WE HAVE THAT MAGIC
FEELING
THAT THIS WAS CREATED OUT OF
TIME AND SPACE.

Frank says THE FIRST BLOSSOMS IN ANY
GARDEN, OF COURSE,
ARE THE EARLY SPRING BULBS.
AND THIS IS AN IDEAL SPOT
FOR THEM.
AND SO WE HAVE NARCISSUS, THE
DAFFODILS, WHICH ARE LOVELY,
AND ONCE THEY'RE OVER, YOU GET A
FORM OF THE THERMOPSIS.
MAYBE THERMOPSIS CAROLINIANA,
A WONDERFUL YELLOW.
TALL YELLOW BLOOMING... PRAIRIE
PLANT. OR FIELD PLANT.
AND OF COURSE THE APOTHEOSIS OF
THE WHOLE EFFECT IS WHEN
THE LUPIN COME UP, AND YOU GET
ALL THESE VARIED COLOURS.
SO YOU HAVE A PERIOD FROM THE
END OF APRIL
TO THE END OF JUNE, REALLY, WHEN
THE PLACE JUST BLOWS YOUR MIND.
AND VERY FEW PEOPLE SEE IT IN
THE EARLY STAGES,
BUT IT'S LOVELY. LOVELY PART OF
THE GARDEN.

Adrienne says THE APPLE ORCHARD, FOR INSTANCE,
IN THE SPRING,
IS FILLED WITH 10,000 BULBS.
SO YOU KNOW, YOU HAVE THE APPLE
TREES IN BLOSSOM,
AND YOU HAVE THE GRAPE HYACINTHS
FOLLOWED BY THE DAFFODILS,
YOU KNOW, FOLLOWED BY TULIPS...
IN THE ORCHARD.
SO ALL AROUND IS
THE BOUNTY OF NATURE,
AND THEN THERE IS WHAT A HUMAN
BEING CAN CREATE
OUT OF THAT NATURE, AND WHAT THE
PLANTS HAVE BECOME
WHEN THEY BECOME DOMESTICATED.

An area of the garden covered in white tulips appears.

Frank says MY GRANDMOTHER WAS AN AVID
GARDENER,
AND SO WAS MY MOTHER.
AND SO SPENDING MY SUMMERS UP
HERE OVER TIME,
I WAS EXPOSED TO GARDENS IN A
BIG WAY.
AND WHEN WE GOT UP HERE IN '65
AND IT WAS TO BECOME OUR PLACE,
UM, WE DIDN'T DO ANYTHING FOR
TEN YEARS, REALLY.
MY MOTHER HAD STARTED A GARDEN
HERE IN THE EARLY 1930S.

Anne says AND THEN WE INHERITED THE HOUSE,
AND I THOUGHT-- THE PLACE, I
SHOULD SAY...

THAT WE WOULD NOT KEEP IT,
BECAUSE WE HAD A HOUSE
IN NEW YORK, SO I THOUGHT
HE'D SELL IT.
AND I WAS MISTAKEN.
THE NEXT THING I KNEW,
LOCK, STOCK, AND BARREL, WE ALL
MOVED UP HERE FOR THE SUMMER.
NO, I REMEMBER MY MOTHER SAYING
"WITHER THOU GOEST,
"I WILL GO," AND THAT'S WHAT YOU
DO WITH YOUR HUSBAND.
I HAD HORSES, AND SO HE SAID
"WELL, LET'S BRING THE
HORSES UP."
AND THEN THERE WERE VERY FEW
PLACES TO RIDE.
WE JUST HAD A BIG TRAIL AROUND
THE WOODS.
AND SO I SAID TO FRANK, "WOULD
YOU MAKE SOME TRAILS?"
AND SO HE STARTED MAKING TRAILS.
AND HE LOVED DOING THAT.
AND SO THAT'S WHAT HAPPENED FOR
MANY YEARS
BEFORE HE GOT INTO THE GARDEN.

Frank says DURING THAT PERIOD, WE HAD A
CHANCE TO VISIT THE GARDENS
OF EUROPE, AND ENGLAND,
PARTICULARLY.
AND SUDDENLY BEGAN TO REALIZE
WHAT THE POTENTIAL WAS.
IN PART THIS WAS-- IT WAS THE
FACT THAT WE WERE PROTECTED,
THE LAND WAS LARGE ENOUGH AROUND
US TO PROTECT US.
NO ONE COULD BUILD SOMETHING
RIGHT NEXT DOOR.
AND THAT MEANT THAT THE
LANDSCAPE WAS INTACT
AND IT WOULDN'T CHANGE, WHICH
WAS VERY IMPORTANT.
SO WE BEGAN TO THINK WE COULD
HAVE A MORE INTERESTING GARDEN.
AND ALSO THE TOPOGRAPHY WAS
LOVELY, THE VIEWS WERE LOVELY.
THE CLIMATE IS MARVELLOUS FOR
HORTICULTURE HERE.
MOST PEOPLE DON'T REALIZE THAT,
'CAUSE WE'RE WAY UP IN ZONE 4.
AND PEOPLE THINK YOU'RE
TOO FAR NORTH,
BUT BEING BY THE ST. LAWRENCE,
YOU HAVE A WONDERFUL SNOW COVER,
AND RAIN, AND IT'S NEVER
TOO HOT.
AND PERENNIALS LOVE THAT.
ANOTHER FEATURE THAT MAKES IT
INTERESTING
IS THAT THEY ALL BLOOM AT THE
SAME TIME.
WHICH MAKES YOU LOOK BRILLIANT,
BECAUSE YOU PLANT IT,
AND THE NEXT THING YOU KNOW,
EVERYTHING LOOKS WONDERFUL.
AND WE BEGAN IN ABOUT 1975 TO
ENLARGE THE GARDEN
IN A SERIES OF STEPS, WITHOUT
ANY REAL SENSE
OF WHERE IT WAS GOING.
I MEAN, WE JUST HAD AN
IDEA AT A TIME.
THE FRENCH HAVE A SAYING,
"LA NUIT PORTE CONSEIL."
YOU GO TO BED WITH A-- WRESTLING
WITH A PROBLEM,
AND WHEN YOU WAKE UP
THE NEXT MORNING,
YOU OFTEN HAVE THE ANSWER.
SO I FELT THAT...
YOU COULD SAY FOR THIS PLACE,
THE SITE TELLS YOU WHAT TO DO,
IF YOU LISTEN.
AND THE IMPORTANT THING IS TO
LISTEN.

Penelope says IT'S THE FIRST THING YOU SEE,
IS HOW IT FITS INTO THE
LANDSCAPE.
AND YOU WOULD DESIGN COMPLETELY
DIFFERENT GARDENS
DEPENDING ON WHAT THE
SURROUNDINGS WERE.
AND OF COURSE, THE SOIL, THE
CLIMATE, EVERYTHING,
ALL COMES INTO IT.

Adrienne says WHAT I THINK IS SPECIAL ABOUT
THIS IS IT'S ONE MAN'S VISION.
IT'S ONE PERSON'S VISION.
IT'S ONE SOUL, AND THAT MAKES IT
VERY, VERY SPECIAL.
BUT THIS KIND OF CREAT...
CREATING OF BEAUTY, UH,
THAT THEY HAVE DONE HERE AT
LES QUATRE VENTS,
IS TO MAKE YOU FEEL THAT YOU
ARE PLUNGED INTO THE HEART
OF EVERYTHING THAT COULD
POSSIBLY BE GROWN.
AND I THINK THAT'S WHAT MAKES
THE GARDEN UNIQUE,
BECAUSE OF THE GARDENER'S
SENSIBILITY BEHIND IT.

(MEOWING)

Frank says WHEN WE STARTED,
THERE WAS A 180-DEGREE VIEW
FROM THE HOUSE
TOWARDS THE WEST.
AND YOU COULD SEE EVERYTHING,
YOU COULD SEE THE WHOLE
CORDILLERA OF THE LAURENTIANS
IN THE BACKGROUND.
WE THOUGHT, "WELL, LET'S
HIDE THE DISTANT FIELDS,
"AND MAKE IT MORE INTIMATE
AND MAKE ROOMS."
AND THE FIRST THING WE DID
WAS PUT A KIND OF HERB GARDEN
FACING THE KITCHEN.
AND THEN WE THOUGHT,
"WELL, THE CUSTOM UP HERE
"IN THIS PART OF QUEBEC
IN CHARLEVOIX COUNTY
"IS TO HAVE THESE WONDERFUL
CLAY BREAD OVENS."
AND WE HAD ONE OF THOSE ON
THE PLACE, SO WE THOUGHT,
"WELL, WHY NOT STICK THAT
OPPOSITE THE DINING ROOM
"SO YOU COULD LOOK OUT AT IT?"
AND FINALLY THE NEXT ONE WAS
OPPOSITE THE GUEST ROOMS,
SO WE THOUGHT WE'D HAVE
A GUEST GARDEN.
SO WE CREATED A KIND
OF LIVING ROOM,
OF FURNITURE.
AND THERE'S A LITTLE CUP GARDEN
IN ONE CORNER OF IT,
AROUND A LITTLE
ROCHE PLEUREUSE,
A ROCK WITH WATER
COMING OUT THROUGH IT,
AND MOSS IN A LITTLE ROUND POOL.
AND THERE'S A BANQUETTE,
A PRETEND BANQUETTE,
WHERE YOU CAN SIT AND HAVE
COCKTAILS IF YOU NEED IT.

Colin says WHEN YOU'RE IN
THE GUEST BEDROOM,
THERE'S THE ROCHE PLEUREUSE
THE WEEPING ROCK.
AND IT IS A FANTASTIC PLACE TO
SHED THE CARES OF THE WORLD.
IF YOU CONCENTRATE ON
THE SLIGHTLY MOVING WATER,
THE REFLECTION OF THE SUN,
THE WORLD WASHES AWAY
AND GOES DOWN TO NOTHING.
UM, AND YOU BECOME
FOCUSED IN THE GARDEN.
BUT THE MINUTE YOU GET OUT
ONTO THE TAPIS VERT,
ALL OF A SUDDEN,
IT'S AS IF THE CURTAIN WENT UP,
AND YOU HAD A-- A HUGE
EXPERIENCE WAITING FOR YOU,
INCLUDING THE LAURENTIANS
AND THE CATTLE AND THE VIEW
AND EVERYTHING ELSE.

The caption changes to "Tim Richardson. Garden columnist, London Daily Telegraph."
Tim is in his forties, with short wavy gray hair and wears glasses, a printed shirt and a black jacket.

Tim says SO YOU HAVE A VERY SUDDEN
EPISODIC STRUCTURE
TO THE GARDEN, WHERE YOU GO
FROM ONE SPACE TO THE NEXT,
VERY SUDDENLY,
WITH VERY LITTLE TRANSITION.
AND THIS PROVIDES
A REAL FRISSON OF DELIGHT,
SURPRISE, VARIETY,
IN THE VISITOR.
AND I THINK THAT'S WHAT
HE ENJOYED.

Colin says AND I THINK THAT THOSE...
PALATE CLEANSERS,
IF YOU WILL,
THE GREEN RONDELLE,
AFTER THE GOOSE ALLEY
AND BEFORE THE WATERCOURSE
AND THE RIGIDITY OF THE THUYA
CONES EVERYWHERE,
THAT THOSE WERE REALLY
INTENTIONAL,
SORT OF, ENTRACTES,
IF YOU WILL,
BETWEEN THE VARIOUS SET-PIECES
THAT WERE THEATRICALLY INTENDED
TO PROVIDE A LOT OF VARIETY.

The caption changes to "Shute House Garden, Dorset, England."

Frank says I SAW A PICTURE OF A...
A WATERCOURSE IN A...
NEXT TO-- IN A FAMOUS
GARDEN IN ENGLAND,
DONE BY A FAMOUS LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECT
CALLED GEOFFREY JELLICOE.
WHERE WATER STEPS DOWN,
VERY SLOWLY,
IN A SERIES OF BASINS.
AND IT WAS JUST AN INSPIRING
KIND OF FEELING.
I THOUGHT, "WELL, THIS IS...
THIS IS A GENTLE SLOPE
"DOWN TOWARD THE LAKE, AND THIS
WOULD BE A GOOD PLACE FOR IT."
IT EMANATES AT THE TOP OF THE...
SORT OF THE THUJA ALLEY,
AND THEN STEPS DOWN,
GRADUALLY, IN BASINS,
UNTIL IT ENDS IN A LITTLE LAKE.
WELL, YOU KNOW,
WATER ANIMATES A GARDEN
IT'S THAT ELEMENT WHICH JUST
GIVES IT SO MUCH MORE INTEREST,
THERE'S JUST SOMETHING HAPPENING
ALL THE TIME.
THERE'S SOUND...
(STREAM GURGLING)

Frank says WHEN WE STARTED
THE WHOLE GARDEN
THAT CONSISTS OF THE RONDELLE
AND THE GREAT THUJA ALLEY
AND EVERYTHING,
THE INTERESTING THING IS
THAT WE ELECTED TO
TOP THE TREES AS THEY DESCENDED
THE SLOPE OF THE SAME LEVEL,
SO YOU GOT A LEVEL LINE
AS THESE TREES
GO DOWN THE SLOPE.
AND I THINK THAT
HELPS THE WHOLE...
THAT ENHANCES THE VISTA,
AND YOUR EYE IS CARRIED DOWN
THROUGH THIS LINE OF TALL
CEDARS, SHAPED CEDARS,
TO THE LITTLE LAKE,
TO A SOD BRIDGE,
WHICH CROSSES THE LAKE
AND WHICH IS RIGHT ON AXIS
AND THEN UP THROUGH THE ARCH
TO THE VIEW.
AS WE DID THESE STEPS AND
THEN WENT ON TO BUILD...
CREATE WHAT IS KNOWN AS
THE STREAM GARDEN,
I SAW A PHOTO IN A CALENDAR
OF AN ARCH
IN THE ROYAL MUGHAL GARDENS IN
THE GOVERNORS PALACE
IN NEW DELHI.
AND SO I THOUGHT, "WELL WHY
WOULDN'T THAT BE A GOOD THING
TO DO HERE?"
THE TROUBLE WAS THAT WE WERE
JUST BUILDING...
WE'D JUST FINISHED BUILDING
THE STREAM GARDEN AND NONE OF
THE TREES WHERE MORE THAN
FOUR OR FIVE FEET HIGH.
AND THIS THING WAS LIKE,
30 SOMETHING FEET HIGH.
SO IT STUCK OUT IN
A TERRIBLE WAY.
IT UPSET MY WIFE TERRIBLY.

Anne says I THOUGHT IT WAS A BIT MUCH.
WHAT WAS HE DOING THAT FOR?
IT JUST DIDN'T SEEM TO MAKE
ANY SENSE.

Penelope says SO HE'S NOT A PERFECT DESIGNER
BUT IT POSSIBLY THAT BECAUSE
HE WASN'T A TRAINED DESIGNER
THAT'S MADE IT SO EXCITING.
BECAUSE IF IT IS OBVIOUS AND
VERY WELL DESIGNED
LIKE A FRENCH GARDEN IT'S
IN A WAY QUITE BORING TOO.
I'M NOT TRYING TO DETRACT FROM
HIS GENIUS AT ALL
JUST THAT IT'S MADE IT
A LITTLE BIT ECCENTRIC
WHICH HE WAS, AN ECCENTRIC,
I THINK IT IS REALLY TRUE,
YOU KNOW,
AND A GENIUS,
OR NEARLY A GENIUS.

Frank says ALLEYS AND FOCAL POINTS ARE
A CLASSIC GARDEN FEATURE
USED OVER THE AGES IN ALL
CIVILIZATIONS.
AND THEY SERVE IN A SENSE TO
SHUT OUT PART OF THE VIEW,
SO TO CHANNEL THE VIEW TOWARDS A
SPECIFIC SPOT
SO YOU CAN KEEP HAVING THEM
OVER AND OVER
AS YOU SEE
DIFFERENT VIEWS.
THEY GIVE GREAT STRENGTH TO
THE GARDEN.

Penelope says AND THAT MEANT THAT YOU WENT
FROM POINT TO POINT
AND USUALLY THERE WAS
SOMETHING TO SEE,
AND VERY OFTEN THERE WAS
A VIEW OUT INTO
THE MUCH WILDER LANDSCAPE,
AND OF COURSE,
CONTRAST IS WONDERFUL.
I CAN'T REALLY THINK OF ANOTHER
AMERICAN GARDEN THAT CONTAINS
THE FEELING OF WILDNESS WHICH
FRANK MANAGED TO KEEP
I THINK BY HAVING
THESE VIEWS THROUGH.

Frank says THE STREAM GARDEN IS
A STROLL GARDEN.
YOU GO UP...
WALK UP ONE SIDE OF THE STREAM
AND THEN YOU WALK DOWN
THE OTHER SIDE.
ACROSS THE WAY
WHEN YOU'RE AT THE TREES,
YOU LOOK AND YOU SEE
THE FIRST GLIMPSE OF
A WONDERFUL PLANT THAT WE USE
A LOT IN THE GARDEN CALLED
PETASITES JAPONICUS,
JAPANESE BUTTERBUR GIGANTEUS.
AND IT'S THEIR
DRAMATIC BIG LEAVES
AND SO WE USED THEM THROUGHOUT
THE GARDEN.
AND ON YOUR RIGHT, SUDDENLY YOU
SEE A CHINESE MOON BRIDGE.
WHICH IS VERY DECORATIVE
AND IS PARTICULARLY INTERESTING
AT DIFFERENT TIME OF THE YEAR.
AND IT IS A MOON BRIDGE BECAUSE
IT MAKES A PERFECT CIRCLE
IN ITS REFLECTION IN THE WATER.

Penelope says I LOVE THE CHINESE BRIDGE BUT
OF COURSE AGAIN,
IT WAS ISOLATED THERE ABOVE THE
STREAM, IT WAS ONE THEME
AND THEN THAT WAS FINISHED.
YOU CAN TURN IT UPSIDE DOWN,
THE REFLECTION IS SO PERFECT
IN THE POOL BELOW.
WHICH HE DESIGNED THE POOL
AND THAT WAS PART OF HIS AIM
TO DO THAT
AND ENORMOUSLY EFFECTIVE.

Adrienne says THE GREATEST QUALITY FRANK
BRINGS TO A GARDEN
IS HIS ABILITY TO VISUALIZE
WHAT IT WILL BE LIKE.
AND THAT'S, I THINK,
WHAT MAKES A GARDENER...
WHAT SEPARATES A GARDENER,
A REAL GARDENER,
FROM JUST SOMEBODY WHO CAN
USE A GARDEN
OR WOULD LIKE TO HAVE
A PRETTY DECOR.
THAT IS NOT WHAT FRANK'S
GARDEN'S ABOUT.
IT IS NOT ABOUT
A PRETTY DECOR.
IT IS ABOUT A WHOLE WAY OF BEING
AND EXPRESSING THROUGH NATURE.
AND YOU GET TO A PLACE WHERE
PEOPLE...
QUARTET CAN PLAY MUSIC TOGETHER
IN A GAZEBO.
AND THEN BEYOND IT YOU SEE
FIELDS AND MOUNTAINS
AND YOU SEE THE BEAUTY OF
CHARLEVOIX.

Frank says GARDENS HAVE TO DO WITH
SENSUALITY.
ALL OF OUR SENSES ARE INVOLVED.
THEY PLAY A VERY IMPORTANT ROLE
IN ONE'S REACTION TO A GARDEN.
AND SO THE BREEZE IN THE LEAVES,
YOU HEAR THE LEAVES SHAKING
AND YOU SMELL THE FRAGRANCE OF
THE FLOWERS
AND YOU GET TURNED ON BY ALL
THESE THINGS HAPPENING.
SO I THINK YOU CAN'T GO WRONG IF
YOU EMPHASIZE
THE SENSUAL ELEMENTS
IN YOUR GARDEN WHEN YOU MAKE IT.

Tim says THERE IS THIS SUDDEN DELIGHT AT
THE SURPRISE IN FRONT OF YOU,
THE THING HAS CHANGED.
YOU SEEM TO BE IN A COMPLETELY
DIFFERENT WORLD
AND AS YOU PENETRATE DEEPER
INTO THE GARDEN,
YOU GENUINELY FEEL AS IF
YOU'RE ON
A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT PLANE OF
EXISTENCE.

Frank says AFTER DOING THE STREAM GARDEN
WE DECIDED THAT WE'D START
WORKING ON
THE SHADE BORDERS WHICH WERE
ALONG THE EDGE OF A WOODLAND.
AND IT TOOK A LONG WHILE TO GET
IT JUST RIGHT.
PATIENCE IS VERY IMPORTANT IN
GARDENING,
YOU CAN'T RUSH THINGS,
YOU'VE JUST GOT TO WAIT AND LET
THINGS DEVELOP ON THEIR OWN.
AND THAT'S
A VERY IMPORTANT POINT,
YOU GET MUCH MORE FUN AS YOU
WATCH THINGS CHANGE
AND THEY CHANGE FOR THE BETTER
AND ALL SORTS OF NEW THINGS
HAPPEN THAT YOU DIDN'T EXPECT.

Adrienne says IF YOU HAVE A PERENNIAL GARDEN
YOU HAVE TO PLAN IT SO THAT
THERE IS SOMETHING IN FLOWER,
OR IN ITS BEST POSITION
EVERY TWO WEEKS BECAUSE THEY
DON'T LAST ALL SUMMER.
BUT IN THIS GARDEN WHERE YOU SEE
AN ASTILBE GARDEN NEXT TO
A LILY GARDEN
NEXT TO ROSES, ETCETERA.
THAT'S BECAUSE
THEY COME IN WAVES
AND SOME OF THE WAVES INTERSECT
AND SOME OF THEM DON'T.
SO YOU HAVE ALL OF THESE
TIMINGS, IT IS VERY COORDINATED,
AND I THINK IT'S
ORCHESTRAL ALMOST.
IT'S LIKE MUSIC.

Frank says I LIKE TO THINK OF THE GARDEN AS
KIND OF A SERIES OF
MUSICAL THEMES LIKE A SONATA,
AND BUILDING TO A KIND OF
HORTICULTURAL CLIMAX,
IN OUR CASE AT THE END OF JULY
WHEN THE DELPHINIUMS
REACH FOR THE SKY,
AND WHEN EVERYTHING'S
BLOOMING ITS HEAD OFF.
SO I THINK OF IT AS SORT OF
A HORTICULTURAL SYMPHONY.

Colin says WHAT I LOVE MOST ABOUT
THE GARDEN THESE DAYS IS
THE REACTION OF PEOPLE WHEN
I TAKE THEM ON A TOUR.
IT IS ALWAYS DIFFERENT
AND I JUST LOVE THE VARIETY OF
BEING IN A WORK OF ART
THAT'S NOT STATIC.
IT'S ACTIVE,
IT IS ALWAYS CHANGING,
IT'S ALWAYS GOT SOMETHING
NEW TO SAY.

Adrienne says YOU'RE NEVER AT THE END OF
ANYTHING IN FRANK'S GARDEN.
YOU CAN'T COME TO SOMETHING AND
YOU THINK,
"OH THERE'S JUST
A CEDAR BUSH THERE.
I DON'T THINK I CAN GO."
NO, NO, THERE'S SUDDENLY
A PATH THERE.

Frank says I CONSIDER MYSELF A WORLD CLASS
PLAGIARIST.
AND AT ONE POINT IN OUR LIVES
WE HAD THE...
MY WIFE AND I,
HAD THE GREAT FUN OF TAKING
TREKS IN THE HIMALAYAS
WITH A WONDERFUL MAN CALLED
TONY SCHILLING,
WHO IS GREAT ENGLISH
HORTICULTURALIST.
AND THERE IS A WONDERFUL RAVINE,
WHICH HE PLANTED WITH ALL SORTS
OF HIMALAYAN PLANTS.
AND HE SAID,
"YOU KNOW, I'VE ALWAYS WANTED TO
HAVE A ROPE BRIDGE
CROSSING THIS RAVINE."
SO I SAID, "AH HA!
YOU'VE GIVEN ME AN IDEA!"
AND TWO WEEKS LATER WE HAD
A SWINGING BRIDGE.
AS AN EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE
THE RAVINE
ADDS AN UNORTHODOX ONE OF
FEAR TO THE MIX.

Frank walks across the swinging bridge.

Colin says HE ENDED UP WITH THOSE TWO
LITTLE ROPE BRIDGES,
TWO BIG ROPE BRIDGES, FOCUSING
AT A CENTRAL POINT AT
A LITTLE KIOSK IN THE GARDEN,
AND THAT KIOSK WAS JOKINGLY
REFERRED TO AS
THE COCKTAIL KIOSK BECAUSE YOU
THEN GO ACROSS THE BRIDGE
HAVE A DRINK AND THEN REALLY BE
WAVY ON THE BRIDGE COMING BACK,
THE OTHER BRIDGE.
AT THAT POINT THAT WAS THE END
OF THE GARDEN.
THERE WAS NO PIGEONNIER AT ALL.

Frank says AND THIS WAS
A VERY SEPARATE AREA
FROM THE REST OF THE GARDEN.
YOU DID NOT SEE IT FROM ANY
OTHER PLACE.
SO YOU COULD DO PRETTY MUCH WHAT
YOU WANTED.
AND I HAD BEEN STRUCK BY
THE IDEA
OF A WATER FEATURE
WITH A TALL BUILDING AT
THE END OF IT.
YOU SEE THAT QUITE OFTEN IN
EUROPE.
AND OF COURSE THERE'S
THE TAJ MAHAL.
WHY NOT!
WELL, I CAME A ACROSS THIS
SKETCH OF A PIGEONNIER
IN A PLACE CALLED GOURDON
IN THE DISTRICT OF
LOT IN FRANCE.
AND SO I THOUGHT, "WELL, LET'S
HAVE SOMETHING LIKE THAT."
AND IT COULD BE A VERY FORMAL
ELEMENT IN THE GARDEN.
IT WOULD BE...
IT WON'T IMPINGE ON ANY OF
THE OTHER ELEMENTS.
IT WILL BE A SURPRISE.
AND THAT IS FUN,
TO HAVE SURPRISES.
SO THAT'S WHAT HAPPENED.
IT TOOK US A LONG TIME.
IT TOOK ABOUT 15 YEARS TO DO IT.

Colin says THE THING THAT MY FATHER WAS
MOST INTERESTED IN, I THINK,
IN HIS GARDEN WAS THE EFFECT
THAT IT HAD
ON INDIVIDUAL PEOPLE.
THAT'S WHY IT'S LAID OUT
SO THEATRICALLY.
HE WANTED VERY MUCH TO HAVE
PEOPLE HAVE
A SERIES OF EXPERIENCES,
THE WAY HE SAYS IT WAS,
"YOU KNOW, YOU WANT TO HAVE AS
MANY EMOTIONS AS YOU CAN."

Penelope says BECAUSE HE WAS
A VERY EMOTIONAL MAN I THINK
AND HE WANTED TO MAKE PEOPLE
FEEL SOMETHING.

Frank says AND THEY GET THIS SHOT OF
THE PIGEONNIER
WITH ITS BASIN IN FRONT OF IT
AND THEY GO, "OH WOW!"
"MY GOODNESS."
AND SO THAT'S EXCITING,
IT'S BECAUSE THEY HAVE
DISCOVERED SOMETHING.
AND IN A SENSE, REALLY,
ISN'T GOING AROUND
THE GARDEN THE...
CONSIST OF THE JOY OF
DISCOVERY.?
THE SURPRISES,
EXCITEMENT, THE HUMOUR.
BUT ESSENTIALLY DISCOVERING
FOR ONESELF
THESE NEW THINGS WITHOUT
PREPARATION.
AND THEY HAVE ANOTHER SURPRISE
AS THEY DO THAT BECAUSE
AS THEY WALK INTO THIS
PALISSADE,
THEY SUDDENLY SEE A GREY WOLF
LOOKING AT THEM
FROM ACROSS THE WAY
AND THEY GO LIKE THIS.
ANOTHER ELEMENT TO GET
THE JUICES GOING
AND GET THEM THINKING.

Penelope says WHERE HE COULDN'T USE WATER
HE USED MIRRORS TO REFLECT
SO YOU DOUBLED
THE SENSE OF SPACE
AND THAT'S WHAT REFLECTION DID
OF COURSE,
IT DOUBLED EVERYTHING THAT YOU
WERE LOOKING AT,
AND THESE WERE THE SORT OF
THINGS
THAT FRANK WAS INTERESTED IN.

Frank says AND YOU ENJOY IT,
OR YOU DISLIKE IT,
OR YOU ARE ENTERTAINED BY IT,
OR YOU ARE EMOTIONALLY
RUINED BY IT.
NOTHING MAKES ME HAPPIER THAN
SEEING SOMEONE BURST INTO TEARS
WHEN THEY ARE LOOKING AT A
CERTAIN FEATURE OF THE GARDEN.
WHY DOES THAT HAPPEN?
IT REMINDS THEM OF THEMSELVES,
OF THEIR OWN FAMILIES,
THEIR OWN LOVED ONES,
THOSE THAT ARE NO LONGER ALIVE.
IT JUST...
GARDENS SATISFY A NEED
IN HUMANS I THINK
THAT NOT EVERYBODY
RECOGNIZES OR HAS,
BUT WHEN THEY DO IT'S
A MARVELLOUS EXPERIENCE.
I LIKE TO THINK THIS GARDEN DOES
THAT FOR PEOPLE.

Colin says ONE OF THE THINGS THAT FIRST
HAPPENED TO ME WHEN I...
MEMORIES THAT I HAVE OF
THE GARDEN
IS OF A BIRTHDAY PARTY,
MINE I THINK,
AND MY GRANDMOTHER HAD PUT
A LITTLE NOTECARD ON
THE LILY PADS IN
THE WHITE GARDEN.
IT WAS MAGIC FROM THE FAIRIES,
THEY HAD COME TO THE GARDEN AND
APPARENTLY SHE HAD DONE THAT FOR
HIM AS WELL
IN THE GARDEN
WHEN HE WAS A CHILD.
THAT KIND OF EXPERIENCE,
WITHOUT REALLY KNOWING
HORTICULTURE,
SORT OF DEFINES A MAGIC,
A HEIGHTENED AWARENESS OF WHAT
A PLACE CAN BE,
AND IT STICKS WITH YOU.

Frank says I THINK GARDENS
SHOULD BE FUN TOO.
IT'S NICE TO HAVE A SENSE OF
WHIMSY.
PEOPLE SHOULD BE ENTERTAINED
AND THEIR EMOTIONS
SHOULD BE WRUNG.
SO I LIKE TO THINK THAT IF
PEOPLE GO AROUND THIS GARDEN,
BY THE TIME THERE THROUGH,
THEIR EMOTIONS WILL HAVE BEEN...
ALL THEIR EMOTIONS WILL HAVE
BEEN EXERCISED A BIT.

Penelope says THERE ARE SO MANY DIFFERENT WAYS
OF LOOKING AT A GARDEN,
IT CAN BE MYSTICAL,
IT CAN BE THEATRICAL,
AND FOR SOMEBODY LIKE FRANK,
THE THEATRE THING,
HE LOVED THAT THE DRAMA.
YES, IT'S GARDEN THEATRE AT
ITS BEST.

Frank says YOU ARRIVE IN THE CENTER OF
THE PIGEONNIER,
HOW ARE YOU GOING TO GET INTO
THIS DOOR, THIS CYLINDER?
AND I URGE THEM TO THINK OF
THEIR CHILDHOOD.
AND ALMOST EVERYBODY SAYS VERY
QUICKLY,
"OPEN SESAME,"
OR "OUVRE TOI SÉSAME,"
AND MAGICALLY THE DOOR OPENS.

Fast clips show images of the inside of the pigeonnier.

Adrienne says AND YOU GO UPSTAIRS INTO
THE TOWER
AND THERE IS CHINA THERE WHICH
HAS BEEN MADE TO COMPLEMENT
THE GARDENS HERE.
EVERYTHING IS OF A WHOLE.

Colin says SO AS YOU CLIMB THE STAIRS TO
THE PIGEONNIER
SUDDENLY YOU REALIZE YOU'RE
IN THIS FANTASTICALLY BEAUTIFUL
SWEDISH ROOM WHICH HAS
A SWEDISH STOVE IN IT
AND FANTASTIC BOTANICAL PRINTS
ON THE WALLS.
AND IT'S A VERY INTIMATE PLACE
BUT IT IS IN THE TREES
SO THAT WHEN YOU LOOK OUT
YOU FEEL LIKE YOU ARE
A BIRD IN THE TREES
AND YOU ARE LOOKING DOWN ON
THE REFLECTION POOL.
AND SO BEAUTIFUL BUT TOTALLY
SURPRISING TO FIND
IN THE MIDDLE OF A GARDEN.
IT IS WHAT A TRUE FOLLY
SHOULD BE.

Frank says AND THEN FROM THAT ROOM YOU CAN
GO UP FURTHER INTO THE TOWER
AND YOU COME UPON A NID D'AMOUR.
WHICH IS
A VERY IMPORTANT PART OF...
EVERY GARDEN SHOULD HAVE
A NID D'AMOUR IN MY THEORY.
AND THAT IS EXCITING BECAUSE IT
LOOKS LIKE A SWEDISH CASTLE.
NOT EVERYBODY GETS IN THERE BUT
THOSE WHO ARE INVITED ENJOY IT.

Adrienne says AND NOT ONLY IS IT ABOUT
PLANTING AND ABOUT COLOUR,
BUT IT IS ALSO ABOUT HUMOUR,
IT IS ABOUT PLAYFULNESS,
IT IS ABOUT JOY,
IT IS ABOUT ALL KINDS OF THINGS
WHICH YOU WOULD NEVER IMAGINE
IS JUST ABOUT GARDENING.
IT'S ABOUT THESE AREAS THAT HE
HAS CREATED WHERE HE HAS
FROG MUSICIANS PLAYING.
ONE IS DIXIELAND,
THE OTHER ONE IS CLASSICAL.

In a corner of the garden stand 4 statues of frogs playing jazz instruments.

Penelope says I MEAN, NEARLY ALL THE FEATURES,
THE THEMES THAT HE HAS USED IN
ALL OF THESE DIFFERENT AREAS,
EVOLVED FROM SOMETHING HE HAD
SEEN OR READ
BUT HE THEN ADDED TO IT
THE WONDERFUL FROG BANDS
AND THE MUSIC COMING ON AS YOU
WALKED THROUGH,
I MEAN,
ALL THESE WONDERFUL TOUCHES.
HE ALSO HAD THIS EXTRAORDINARY
SENSE OF HUMOUR
WHICH DEFINITELY CAME INTO
HIS GARDENING.
I HAVE REALLY SEEN
A LOT OF GARDENS
BUT FRANKS GARDEN HAS GOT,
YOU SEE,
THIS EXTRA TOUCH OF GENIUS
WHICH YOU COULD ARGUE WITH
HIM ABOUT.
I MEAN, I NEVER DID SIT DOWN AND
SAY,
"WHY DID YOU REALLY DO YOUR
JAPANESE GARDEN?"
HE'D SPENT SOME TIME IN JAPAN
SO HE REALLY WANTED TO DO IT.
YOU KNOW, SO I DIDN'T ALWAYS
AGREE WITH HIM ABOUT EVERYTHING
BUT IT IS STILL AMAZING WHAT
HE DID, YOU KNOW?

Tim says I WASN'T AWARE THAT IT WAS THERE
AND I HEARD THIS KNOCKING NOISE,
(SMACKING)
THIS HOLLOW...
WELL, IT IS A BAMBOO TUBE
BEING KNOCKED.
(SMACKING)
IT'S A DEER SCARER WHICH IS
A KEY ELEMENT
TO JAPANESE GARDEN DESIGN,
AND THEN JUST THE SHEER DELIGHT
OF SEEING IT.
I'LL NEVER FORGET
COMING ACROSS IT,
THIS PRISTINE JAPANESE TEAHOUSE.
I WAS STATIONED IN JAPAN JUST AT
THE END OF THE WAR.
WE LANDED ON THE BEACH NEAR
KOBE,
JUST AS THE ARMISTICE
WAS BEING SIGNED,
IN LANDING CRAFT
AND WALKED UP THE BEACH TO FIND
JAPANESE LADIES
BEAUTIFULLY DRESSED IN KIMONOS,
SELLING SUNTORY SCOTCH WHISKY
SPECIALLY BLENDED FOR THE U.S.
OCCUPATION FORCES.
I DID HAVE THE CHANCE TO VISIT
THE GREAT GARDENS OF NARA
AND KYOTO AND THEIR IMPACT IS
EXTRAORDINARY,
ESPECIALLY IN AUTUMN.
SO I HAD A FEELING FOR THAT.
SO WE THOUGHT WELL, "AH HA!"
HERE IN QUATRE VENTS WE HAVE
THIS RAVINE
WHICH IS ALWAYS BEEN THERE.
AND THERE WAS AN OLD WATER
RESERVOIR...
AN OLD RESERVOIR DOWN AT
THE BOTTOM OF IT.
WHY WOULDN'T THAT BE A LOGICAL
AND IDEAL PLACE
FOR SOME SORT OF
A JAPANESE STRUCTURE?
SO THAT IS HOW IT HAPPENED.
THEN WE HAD TO FIND
A JAPANESE CARPENTER
WHO KNEW WHAT HE WAS DOING.
BUT TO MY SURPRISE, TWO YEARS
LATER SUDDENLY THE PHONE RANG
AND SOMEONE IN CALIFORNIA
WAS SAYING,
"THE MAN YOU ARE LOOKING FOR
IS HERE
AND I AM GOING TO PUT HIS
AMERICAN WIFE ON THE PHONE
BECAUSE HE DOESN'T SPEAK
ENGLISH."

He rubs his hands and says SO I SAID WELL,
"WHEN DO WE BEGIN?"
AND THEY SAID, "WELL,
YOU HAVE TO BE PATIENT."
"WE HAVE TO FIND THE TREES,
WHICH WE WILL DO IN
NORTHERN-CALIFORNIA AND
SOUTHERN-OREGON, CUT THEM."
"I HAVE TO DRY THEM
IN MY BACKYARD,
THAT WILL TAKE TWO YEARS."
"IT WILL TAKE ANOTHER YEAR
TO DO THE JOINERY...
ANOTHER TWO YEARS TO DO
THE JOINERY."
BECAUSE EVERYTHING WAS...
NO NAILS USED IN
A JAPANESE STRUCTURE.
IT'S ALL DONE WITH
MORTISE AND TENONS.
AN EXTRAORDINARY EXERCISE.
AND HE SAID, "IN FOUR YEARS
FROM NOW WE'LL COME
AND WE'LL ERECT THESE
BUILDINGS,"
THE TWO OF THEM,
"AND THAT WILL TAKE
THREE SUMMERS."

Adrienne says ONE YEAR WE CAME AND
WE HAD A JAPANESE PERSON HERE
BUILDING THIS TEAHOUSE.
AND THE JAPANESE PERSON STAYED
FOR AS MANY MONTHS AS IT TOOK
TO BUILD THIS TEAHOUSE.
BUT ALL THE LOGS WHERE
WRAPPED STILL.
AND AT THE MOMENT WHEN THE HOUSE
WAS FINISHED,
THE PAPER WAS TAKEN OFF
THE LOGS.
THE REASON IS THAT
ALL THE LOGS HAD TO AGE AT
THE SAME TIME.
SO THE KIND OF DETAIL
THAT YOU GO INTO
IN SOMETHING LIKE THAT IS...
YOU KNOW, IT IS WONDERFUL.
YES, IT'S MAGIC.
BUT BEHIND ALL MAGIC THERE IS
A MAGICIAN.

An old picture of 3 military man appears with the caption "Frank Cabot during World War 2."

Fast clips show the interior of the Japanese tea house. The room is full of light wooded elements and low furniture.

Frank says THE TWO JAPANESE STRUCTURES THAT
WE ENDED UP WITH,
THE LARGER ONE IS KNOWN AS
AN AZUMAYA.
IT WAS THE KIND OF CONTEMPLATION
PAVILION
THAT A JAPANESE-- RETIRED
JAPANESE SAMURAI WOULD BUILD.
BY THE WAY, THE AZUMAYA HAS
WHAT'S CALLED AN IRIMOYA ROOF.
AND THERE IS TWO TONS OF TILES
WE GOT IN HIROSHI'S HOMETOWN,
SHINGU IN SOUTHERN JAPAN.
MOST OF THE WORK GOES INTO
THE ROOF IN A JAPANESE BUILDING.
IT TAKES YEARS TO...
IT TOOK TWO SUMMERS TO DO
THE ROOF.
IT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART.
THE SMALLER BUILDING WHICH IS
KNOWN AS AN HOOGYO
AND THAT WAS A VERY EARLY
JAPANESE FORM OF TEAHOUSE.
PROBABLY 16TH CENTURY,
17TH CENTURY.
AND IT LOOKS OUT OVER
THE BORROWED SCENERY,
THE SHAKKEI AS
THE JAPANESE CALL IT
AND THE FIELDS AND FORESTS
AND HILLS IN THE DISTANCE.
AND IT BECAME VERY MUCH A PART
OF THE GARDEN.
REALLY ALMOST MY FAVOURITE PART
OF THE GARDEN.

AND IN A SENSE,
GARDENS REALLY ARE NOT JUST
PHYSICAL AND NATURAL.
THEY'RE METAPHYSICAL.
THEY'RE AT TIMES TRANSCENDENT
AND INCORPOREAL.
THEY JUST HAVE AN EXTRA NUMINOUS
SPIRIT THERE.
IF THEY HAVE BEEN SUCCESSFUL AND
YOU SENSE THAT.
AND IT IS A WAY TO CONNECT
AT A DIFFERENT LEVEL
THAN ONE NORMALLY DOES.

Penelope says BUT I FEEL THAT WHEN I SEE
SOMETHING THAT IS REALLY GOOD
IT AFFECTS ME SO MUCH
THAT...THAT IT IMPROVES ME TOO,
IT MAKES ME BETTER.
NOT ONLY PHYSICALLY BETTER IF
I WAS ILL
BUT A BETTER PERSON.
AND I THINK, I MEAN,
IF YOU REALLY WANT TO BE
MORE MYSTICAL ABOUT IT
I ACTUALLY BELIEVE THAT
A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN LIKE
A BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPE
OR A BEAUTIFUL PICTURE,
I DON'T REALLY BELIEVE IN GOD OR
THE AFTERLIFE AT ALL
BUT WHEN I AM MOVED BY SOMETHING
LIKE THAT
I DO BEGIN TO THINK THAT THERE
REALLY MUST BE SOME OTHER THING
LIKE THE LORD WHO IS MAKING ME
FEEL LIKE THIS.
YOU KNOW, IT COULDN'T JUST HAVE
HAPPENED BY EVOLUTION.

A picture of Frank and Anne posing with the duke and duchess of York appears.

Frank says WHEN THE PRINCE OF...
ONE OF THE ENGLISH ROYAL FAMILY
CAME HERE ONCE FOR LUNCH,
THE LA MALBAIE
POLICE PRACTICED
CONVOYING FROM LA MALBAIE
TO HERE.
50 TIMES THEY DID IT WITH SIRENS
BLAZING ALL THE WAY.
THEY HAD TO PRACTICE THE ROAD
FROM THE MAIRIE TO HERE.

Penelope says THE NEXT MORNING HE SAID,
"WELL NOW WE'RE GOING TO GO
AROUND THE GARDEN PROPERLY
NOW ALL OF THIS IS OVER."
THE DUCHESS AND ALL THAT.
I DON'T REALLY REMEMBER AFTER
THAT VERY MUCH EXCEPT
ME WANDERING SLIGHTLY BEWILDERED
AROUND THE GARDEN WITH
HIS SHEET IN MY HAND TELLING ME
WHICH WAY TO GO.

Colin says THE EXPERIENCE HE WANTED PEOPLE
TO HAVE WAS THE ONE THAT
HE WANTED THEM TO HAVE.
NOT SOMETHING
THE OTHER WAY AROUND.
FOR INSTANCE, IF YOU COME FROM
THE JAPANESE PAVILION
UP THROUGH THE RAVINE
AND THEN FINALLY YOU GET TO THAT
HUGE COMPLICATED GARDEN,
THE SOUS-BOIS, YOU REALLY HAVE
A CUMULATIVE EFFECT
WHICH IS ENTIRELY DIFFERENT THAN
IF YOU DO IT
THE OTHER WAY AROUND.

Ann says MY FAVOURITE PART OF THE GARDEN
IS THE WOODLAND GARDEN,
WHICH HAS BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS
ALL SUMMER LONG
BUT EARLIEST SPRING THERE
MARVELLOUS.

Frank says PRIOR TO GETTING TO THE RAVINE,
WE'D TURNED THE WOODLAND INTO
A GARDEN.
THE WOODLAND WAS A MESS.
SO IT TOOK US I THINK ABOUT
SEVEN YEARS TO SLOWLY BUT SURELY
CLEAR THE WOODLAND.
OF COURSE,
THE THINGS THAT REALLY LIKED
THE WOODLAND
WHERE THE PRIMULAS.
THEY COME FROM THE MOST
FASCINATING PARTS OF THE WORLD.
THE HIGH ELEVATIONS IN
ASIA AND CHINA,
SIKKIM AND TIBET, NEPAL.

Tim says SO IN THE 19TH CENTURY THE WHOLE
THE AREA OF PLANT HUNTING,
PLANT COLLECTING FOR MEDICINAL
AND TRADE REASONS
BECAME MORE AND MORE IMPORTANT.
THERE WAS A GREAT MANIA FOR
COLLECTING PLANTS.
I MEAN, THIS IS SOMETHING
YOU SEE ALSO IN QUATRE VENTS
BECAUSE FRANK CABOT HIMSELF OF
COURSE WENT
AND COLLECTED PLANTS IN
THE HIMALAYAS.

Frank says AND WHEN ONE IS IN
THE MOUNTAINS OF CHINA,
AND WALKING UP RIVERS IN CHINA,
IT LOOKS AS IF A LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECT AS COME ALONG
AND PLANTED THIS PLANT AS FAR AS
THE EYE CAN SEE,
ON EITHER SIDE OF THE RIVER.
IT'S AN EXTRAORDINARY THING.
I FIND THAT SEEING A PLANT
IN NATURE
HELPS ONE PLACE IT IN
THE GARDEN.
YOU'VE ALL HEARD OF
THE PRIMROSE PATH.
WELL, THEY ARE
A PROMISCUOUS LOT.
THEY TEND TO CROSS BREED,
INTERBREED.
SO YOU GET ALL THESE
FASCINATING HYBRIDS.
AND IN FACT,
TO OUR GREAT SURPRISE,
WE DISCOVERED A NEW HYBRID IN
THIS GARDEN.
AND RAYNALD, THE HEAD HONCHO IN
THE GARDEN,
WHOSE WORKED WITH ME SINCE
HE WAS 17 YEARS OLD,
FOR THE LAST 27 YEARS,
CAME UP ONE DAY AND HE SAID,
"THIS ONE LOOKS DIFFERENT."
AND SURE ENOUGH HE WAS RIGHT.
(LAUGHING)

The caption changes to "Raynald Bergeon. Head gardener, Les Quatre Vents."

Raynald is in his forties, with short straight graying hair and wears a gray T-shirt.

He says "Its unique characteristic is its colour magenta, which didn't exist before. The second thing is that it is sterile, it doesn't produce seeds. As far as I know, they don't exist anywhere else, not in Québec or the world. It has been recognized and registered. It's name is Primula by Randay Raynald. It was Mister Cabot who decided to give it that name. It was very nice of him because I don't deserve any special credit, I only found it. There are rare plants in the garden, the Cypripedium acaulis is one of these. We had one specimen, which grew into one large mass. About the years ago we decided to divide it, except that, the following year, we lost almost half of it. That's part of nature too. We had to live with that. We can't choose what will survive and what will die. We aren't the ones who decide. We're just performers, trying to do the best we can."

Frank says YOU EMERGE FROM THE WOODS
AND YOU COME OUT ABOVE
THE SWIMMING POOL
AND SEE CHARLEVOIX
ONCE AGAIN,
YOU'VE LEFT ASIA BEHIND YOU
AND YOU ARE LOOKING AT
FRENCH-CANADA ONCE MORE.
AND THEN THERE IS
A PERIMETER ROAD THAT...
A CARRIAGE TRAIL THAT RUNS BELOW
THE SWIMMING POOL DOWN TOWARDS
THE VEGETABLE GARDEN.
THIS IS MY WIFE'S DOMAIN.
SHE'S IN CHARGE OF
THE VEGETABLES,
DESIGNING THE VEGETABLE PLOTS.
MAKING SURE THAT THEY'RE
WHAT THEY SHOULD BE.
AND I'VE BEEN ALLOWED TO PLANT
SOME PERENNIALS.
AND SHE'S NOW LIMITED ME FROM
PLANTING ANY MORE PERENNIALS
BECAUSE THEY THINK THEY
THREATEN HER VEGETABLES.
BUT AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED
THERE'S NO SUCH THING
AS TOO MUCH DELPHINIUMS.

Anne says EVERYBODY HAS TO HAVE A GARDEN
AND IT'S PART OF LIFE,
YOU HAVE TO HAVE VEGETABLES.
(LAUGHING)

Anne says WHEN I FIRST MET FRANK
WE WENT CAMPING
AND THAT WAS ONE OF THE MOST
WONDERFUL PARTS OF THE WORLD
IS IN NATURE, AND WE OUGHT TO
TRY TO SAVE IT,
AND YOU KNOW, KEEP THINGS FROM
BEGINNING DEVELOPED.
THAT IS WHY WE KEPT THIS
PROPERTY.
SO IT'S ALWAYS BEEN OUR DESIRE
TO KEEP THINGS FROM BEING SPOILT
AND TO SAVE THEM AS THEY ARE AND
THE FARMS
OR THE LAND AND THE WOODS.

Jean says "On the other side of the Malbaie River, the seigniory that extended from Les éboulements near Cap-aux-Oies was the property of John Nairn. The seigniory was named Murray Bay. On the site of the Murray Bay seigniory, there was naturally a manor house. Regrettably, it was demolished in 1960. I was later informed that it was in such a state, having been constructed almost entirely of wood, that it couldn't be saved. Obviously, I didn't believe this because a structure can always be restored. Now this area is the shopping mall of La Malbaie. I believe that the loss of the Nairn manor is one of the biggest cultural losses of La Malbaie."

Colin says WHEN THINGS BECAME AVAILABLE
BECAUSE OF NEGLECT,
OR THE FAMILY WAS SELLING OUT,
HE OCCASIONALLY WOULD BUY THEM
AND CREATED AN ORGANIZATION
CALLED HERITAGE CHARLEVOIX
TO PRESERVE THEM.
AND THE MOULIN DE LA RÉMY IN
BAIE-ST-PAUL
AND THE BAKERY THAT GOES WITH
IT, IS THE BIGGEST ONE.
SO THOSE BUILDING AND
THAT PATRIMOINE FEELING
THAT HE VALUED SO, HE ACTUALLY
WAS VERY ACTIVELY INVOLVED
IN PRESERVING.
(GEARS RUMBLING)
(WATER RUSHING)
(THUDDING)

Fast clips show images of the working mill.

Colin says HE CARED TREMENDOUSLY ABOUT
THE VIEW SHED ALWAYS.
HE WORRIES ABOUT WHAT
POINTE-AU-PIC LOOKS LIKE
FROM THE CAP-A-L'AIGLE SIDE
AND HE ALSO KNOWS THAT
WHEN HE BUILDS
A SILO AND A BARN ON
THE CAP-A-L'AIGLE SIDE
THAT EVERYBODY IN POINTE-AU-PIC
IS GOING TO BE CRITICIZING IT.
AND HE REALLY SPOKE FOR
THE PATRIMOINE
AND CARED DEEPLY ABOUT IT.
SO DEEPLY THAT AT ONE POINT WE
HAD A COUNTRY SIDE EXCHANGE
IN WHICH EXPERTS CAME FROM ALL
OVER EUROPE, MOSTLY,
TO DISCUSS WHAT WAS
GOING TO HAPPEN
AND WHAT CHARLEVOIX WAS GOING TO
LOOK LIKE IN 50 YEARS.
AND ONE OF THE THINGS THAT
I KNOW THAT HE REMEMBERED WAS
DRIVING IN HIS MOTHER'S CAR,
FATHER'S CAR,
UP THE VALLEY OF
THE MURRAY RIVER,
THE MALBAIE RIVER AND SEEING THE
KEROSENE LAMPS IN THE HOUSES
IN THE EVENING OF THE FARMERS
WHO HAD ONE HORSE,
AND ONE PLOUGH AND WERE LIVING
A VERY OLD-FASHIONED AND
BEAUTIFUL WAY.

Old images of La Malbaie in 1930 appear.

(CART RATTLING)
(CHILDREN SHOUTING)

Colin says NOW THERE IS AN APPRECIATION OF
THE OLD WAYS THAT'S RETURNING
AND PEOPLE ARE ACTIVELY VALUING
THOSE CULTURAL ARTEFACTS
THAT MAKE THIS LANDSCAPE
SO FANTASTIC.

Frank says WELL YOU KNOW, YOU GO TO ALL
THESE EFFORTS
TO CREATE SOMETHING AND PEOPLE,
FRIENDS WOULD COME AND VISIT AND
ENJOY IT
AND THEY SORT OF INTIMATED,
"WELL, WE'D LIKE TO BE ABLE TO
COME REGULARLY
AND COME AND TAKE A LOOK."
AT THE SAME TIME,
THERE IS A WONDERFUL LOCAL
NATURE CENTRE UP HERE THAT...
LE CENTRE ECOLOGIQUE DU
PORT-AU-SAUMONS,
WHICH IS ONE OF THE LEADING
NATURE CENTRES IN FRENCH CANADA.
AND THE MAN WHO WAS RUNNING IT
ONE DAY CAME TO ME AND HE SAID,
"COULD WE HAVE THE BENEFIT AT
YOUR PLACE?"
AND WE SAID, "OH SURE!"

The caption changes to "Father Louis Genest. Founder of The Cepas, Naturre conservation centre and summer camp."

Louis is in his eighties, bald and clean-shaven and wears glasses and a blue T-shirt,

He says "We came to Mister Cabot's home and I had brought the plans and estimates that had been drawn up. I showed them to him and he said: 'What!? This exists only a few kilometres from my home and I don't know about it.' He said: 'Can I help you out in some way?' I was decided that we would organize a Festival of Natural Sciences in Charlevoix. Mister Cabot decided to offer a public visit of his gardens for the first time."

Frank says I THOUGHT THERE WOULD BE
A 123 OLD ENGLISH LADIES
WHO WOULD COME, ANGLOPHONES,
YOU KNOW,
BUT WHEN THE TIME CAME,
THERE WERE 2,000 CARS
PARKED ALONG THE MAIN ROAD
IN EITHER DIRECTION.
EVERYBODY WANTED TO COME.

Pictures appear with the caption "First public visit of the gardens, July 1987."

Louis says "They had announced it in the media, on the radio, on the television. It was the only event of the festival that was a success. Because it was a hot summer, people would have rather been in their bathing suits with a cold beer in their backyard than listening to scientists making lectures. But the opening of the gardens was a success. But it ended abruptly, that's the funniest part!"

A newspaper article appears with the title "Success of the visit of the gardens at Les Quatre Vents."

Frank says THE JOY THAT THOSE PEOPLE HAD,
IT WAS A MAD HOUSE.
THEY WERE THRILLED WITH WHAT
THEY SAW.
THEY WERE RUNNING AROUND
THE ROPE BRIDGES,
THEY WERE UP AND DOWN
THE RAVINE.
THEY WERE ALL OVER THE PLACE,
IT WAS CHAOS.
BUT OBVIOUSLY IT WAS EXCITING.

Louis says "There were so many people I tell you, it was like Expo 67. At 6 p.m., the supervisor looked at his watch and said that it was time to close. There were still around 800 or 900 people waiting. They started yelling: 'We've been here for 6 hours! We've been here for 4 hours! I came all the way from Lac Saint-Jean!'."

Frank says SO WE THEN DECIDED,
"WELL, NEXT YEAR LET'S HAVE
A SERIES OF MAYBE
FOUR SATURDAYS IN SUMMER.
AND WE'LL CONTROL THIS AND
PEOPLE WOULD BUY TICKETS
AND THEY CAN COME.
AND THOSE WOULD BE GUIDED TOURS,
15 PEOPLE.
AND THEY DID IT BEAUTIFULLY.
AND THEY WORKED IT OUT IN A WAY
SO THAT YOU WOULDN'T SEE
ANY OTHER GROUP WHEN YOU WERE
IN THE GARDEN.
SO IT BECAME A MARVELLOUS
EXPERIENCE.

Colin says ONE OF MY VERY GOOD FRIENDS WAS
DISCUSSING THE ISSUE OF
THE PUBLIC VERSUS PRIVATE GARDEN
WITH ME, AND SHE SAID,
"NO! DON'T EVER MAKE IT
A PUBLIC GARDEN.
ALWAYS KEEP IT
A PRIVATE GARDEN."
AND I SAID, "WHY ARE YOU SO
INTENSE ABOUT THIS?"
AND SHE SAID,
"THERE IS A FRISSON OF VOYEURISM
THAT PEOPLE REALLY LIKE."
"THEY KNOW WHEN THEY LOOK AT
THE HOUSE FROM THE OUTSIDE
AND THEY SEE THE LITTLE 'PRIVÉ'
SIGN ON THE STEPS,
THAT THERE IS A LIFE GOING ON IN
THERE, AND THAT IS IMPORTANT."

Frank says AND ALL TO THIS GENERATED MONEY
FOR THE CENTRE ECOLOGIQUE.
AND NOW I THINK IT ADDS UP TO
75- 80,000 DOLLARS A YEAR
TOWARDS THEIR BUDGET.
SO THAT'S THE RATIONAL FOR
VISITING.
AND I THINK ALSO IT'S RIGHT
BECAUSE IF WE CREATE ALL OF THIS
AND NOBODY SEES IT EXCEPT US
THAT'S A LITTLE SELFISH.
AND I THINK GARDENS LIKE TO BE
SEEN. I THINK THEY ENJOY IT.
THEY DO BETTER BECAUSE THEY KNOW
PEOPLE ARE COMING TO SEE THEM.

Ann says IT'S WORTH HAVING THIS GARDEN
FOR THAT REASON
BECAUSE IT WOULD BE WRONG TO
HAVE IT ALL JUST TO OURSELVES.

Colin says MY FATHER THOUGHT OF IT AS
A WORK OF ART
AND ART IS SUPPOSED TO MAKE
A DIFFERENCE IN PEOPLE'S LIVES.
AND WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THE PUBLIC
DAYS OF THE CENTRE ECOLOGIQUE
IS THE FACT THAT PEOPLE WHO COME
TO VISIT IN THOSE LARGE GROUPS,
BY THE TIME THEY'VE FINISHED
THREE HOURS LATER
THEIR LIVES HAVE BEEN CHANGED.
THEY HAVE MOVED FROM ONE PLACE
TO ANOTHER
AND OFTEN IT IS A VERY MOVING
AND IMPORTANT PLACE.
AND TO ME THAT IS
THE POWER OF ART.
IF GREAT ART CAN MOVE PEOPLE,
THE MORE IT CAN BE SUSTAINED,
THE MORE IMPORTANT IT IS
FOR LIFE
'CAUSE WE ALL NEED ART TO LIVE.

Raynald says "If it gives people the desire to create a garden, even on a small scale, that is what's important. If it gives even one more person this desire, then all the better."

Louis says "Visiting the gardens at Les Quatre Vents definitely encourages people to protect the environment. They are filled with such wonder that they cannot help but fall in love with nature and what we love, we defend."

Tim says WITH THE ENVIRONMENTAL
CATASTROPHE WHICH WE ARE TOLD
IS ENGULFING US,
MORE AND MORE ARTISTS IN
DIFFERENT DISCIPLINES
ARE LOOKING AT ECOLOGY
AND ENVIRONMENT AND
OUTDOOR SETTINGS
AND NATURAL MATERIALS AS A WAY
OF EXPRESSING THEMSELVES
BECAUSE THIS SEEMS TO BE
THE MOST URGENT ASPECT OF
HUMAN EXPERIENCE AT
THE MOMENT,
OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH
THE PLANET.
AND OF COURSE MAKING A GARDEN
IS PERHAPS A HUMAN BEINGS
MOST INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP WITH
THE PLANET
BECAUSE IT IS A ONE TO ONE
RELATIONSHIP.
IT'S A PHYSICAL RELATIONSHIP,
YOUR HANDS IN THE SOIL ARE IN
AN EMBRACE OF SORTS.

Frank says THE FASCINATING THING IS THAT
AS YOU WORK WITH PLANTS
AS A GARDENER,
YOU RELATE TO THE PLANTS.
YOU BECOME ATTACHED TO THEM.
YOU ARE PLEASED WHEN THEY SHOW
THEIR PLEASURE
BY BLOOMING THEIR HEADS OFF OR
DOING THE RIGHT THING
OR GETTING BIGGER.
YOU'RE DISAPPOINTED WHEN THEY
DISAPPOINT YOU.
SO THERE IS ALWAYS THIS
PERSONAL,
EMOTIONAL RELATIONSHIP WITH ALL
THE DIFFERENT SPECIES.
YOU WANT TO MAKE SURE THAT SUCH
AND SUCH IS DOING ALL RIGHT.
SO THERE IS THIS FRAGILITY IN
THE SETTING
AND YOU HAVE TO CONSCIOUSLY
THINK ABOUT,
I'M AFRAID THE WHOLE TIME,
WHETHER IT IS RIGHT OR NOT.
OR WHETHER IT NEEDS ADJUSTMENT
OR ATTENTION.

Penelope says I WILL DIE WHEN
I CANNOT GARDEN ANYMORE.
WELL, WE KNOW IT NOW DON'T WE,
FROM HOSPICES AND THINGS
THAT PATIENTS REALLY GET
TO FEEL BETTER
IF YOU HAVE A GARDEN.

A picture of a garden appears with the caption "Ruth Bancroft, California."

Anne says WE WENT TO VISIT A GARDEN IN
CALIFORNIA
BECAUSE WE HAD BEEN TOLD IT WAS
A WONDERFUL GARDEN.
IN FACT IT WAS ALL CACTUSES AND
DRY PLANTS
AND THINGS AND FRANK DIDN'T LIKE
THEM AT ALL.
BUT WHEN WE WENT TO SEE IT
HE WAS SO IMPRESSED,
HE THOUGHT IT WAS THE MOST
BEAUTIFUL GARDEN HE'D EVER SEEN.
AND THE LOVELY LADY THAT OWNED
IT-- HE SAID,
"WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN
TO THIS GARDEN
WHEN YOU CAN NO LONGER DO IT?"
AND SHE SAID,
"WELL I DON'T KNOW BECAUSE MY
CHILDREN AREN'T INTERESTED."
AND SO I JOKINGLY SAID TO FRANK
AS WE LEFT,
"WHY DON'T YOU START A GARDEN
CONSERVANCY?"
BECAUSE I HAD JUST BECOME ON THE
BOARD OF THE NATURE CONSERVANCY
AND IT SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA
TO SAVE THINGS.

Pictures of different gardens appear.

A caption reads "Greenwood Garden, New Jersey. Preserved by the Garden Conservancy."

The caption changes to "Longue Vue, New Orleans. Preserved by the Garden Conservancy."

The caption changes to "Gardens of Alcatraz, California. Preserved by the Garden Conservancy."

Anne says AND IT GAVE HIM THIS IDEA
AND HE WENT AND WORKED WITH THAT
WITH LOTS OF OTHER PEOPLE.
IT WAS A BIG JOB AND IT HAS BEEN
VERY SUCCESSFUL.

A picture of the Garden Conservancy Planning Group of 1989 appears. The member in the picture are Anne Cabot, Angela Labsbury, Marco Polo Stufano, Betty Corning, and Frank Cabot.

Penelope says AND THEN IT SPREAD ALL OVER
THE COUNTRY
AND IN EVERY CITY OR STATE
THERE WOULD BE
A LITTLE COMMITTEE.
ALL OF WHOM WERE MOSTLY LADIES
OF COURSE,
EATING OUT OF FRANK'S HAND,
ABSOLUTELY ADORING HIM.
HE JUST HAD A VERY BROAD VIEW
AND HE WAS AN ENORMOUS INFLUENCE
DO YOU KNOW, REALLY.

Colin says GARDENS ARE
VERY DIFFICULT TO SAVE,
THEY'RE NOT LIKE BUILDINGS,
THEY'RE NEVER THE SAME ONE
SEASON TO THE NEXT.
SUDDENLY GLOBAL WARMING CAN
HAPPEN
AND WE SHOULD BE GROWING PALM
TREES IN LA MALBAIE
AS OPPOSED TO THUYA HEDGES.
AND IF THE GENIUS OF GARDENS ARE
TO BE APPRECIATED,
WE NEED TO SAVE THE BEST ONES
SO THAT PEOPLE CAN
LEARN FROM THEM.

Anne says WELL, THE FUTURE OF THIS PLACE
I HOPE WILL BE ABLE TO
KEEP GOING AS LONG AS POSSIBLE
AND PEOPLE WILL LOOK AFTER IT.

Colin says MY PARENTS OFTEN WONDERED,
I THINK,
WHETHER ONE OF THEIR CHILDREN
WOULD BE AROUND TO TAKE CARE OF
THESE THINGS
AFTER THEY WERE GONE.
AND MY MISSION IN LIFE RIGHT NOW
IS TO MAKE SURE THAT THIS THING
GETS PRESERVED AND GOES ON.

Raynald says "My wish for the garden is that it continues to flourish for a very long time. And also that people recognize the contribution that Mister Cabot has made to horticulture in Québec. That is very important."

Penelope says I THINK HE WASN'T INTERESTED IN
JUST BEING A RICH MAN
AND SOME OF THESE
OTHER PEOPLE WERE,
IT WAS A COMPETITIVE THING.
AND THAT DIDN'T INTEREST
FRANK REALLY,
HE WAS MUCH, MUCH MORE AN
EDUCATIONALIST THAN THAT.
HE WANTED TO TEACH PEOPLE AND
ENCOURAGE THEM.
BUT HE ALSO JUST ABSOLUTELY
LOVED IT, DO YOU KNOW.
HE HAD A PASSION,
HE HAD A PASSION.

Frank says I THINK EVERYONE HAS A GARDEN
WITHIN THEM
AND IT'S A WAY OF EXPRESSING
ONES CREATIVITY.
AND IT IS JUST THE MOST
SATISFYING EXERCISE.
IT REALLY IS THE PUREST OF
HUMAN PLEASURE.
AND IN THE WINTERTIME
ONE CAN THINK ABOUT IT AND
PLAN CHANGES.

Fast clips show images of the garden in winter.

Frank says AND I FOUND THAT IN THE END
A GOOD GARDEN HAS A SOUL.
ESPECIALLY IF IT IS MADE BY
AN INDIVIDUAL.
AND I THINK THAT'S
VERY IMPORTANT
BECAUSE IF YOU HAVE SOMEBODY
ELSE DO IT FOR YOU
IT REALLY ISN'T YOUR GARDEN.
IT DOES NOT HAVE THAT QUALITY
THAT A PERSONAL GARDEN HAS.
THERE'S A WONDERFUL WORD CALLED
"NUMINOUS."
WHICH MEANS YOU SENSE A NUMINOUS
SPIRIT IN THE GARDEN.
YOU SENSE THE FACT THAT SOMEBODY
HAS DONE THIS.
SOMEBODY'S PARTICULAR
PSYCHOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES
ARE EXPRESSED IN THIS PLACE.
AND IF YOU ARE SENSITIVE AND
OPEN AS YOU GO THROUGH IT
AND EXPOSE YOURSELF TO WHAT
THE GARDEN HAS TO TELL YOU,
YOU GET A LOT MORE OUT OF IT.
SO I'M HAPPIEST WHEN I SEE
SOMEONE SITTING QUIETLY
ON A BENCH AND JUST DRINKING
IN THE SIGHTS
AND SOUNDS AROUND THEM.
GARDENERS I SUPPOSE,
ARE ALL TRYING TO RECREATE
THE GARDEN OF EDEN.
THERE'S A WONDERFUL SAYING THAT,
"THE SENSES ARE
THE GATEWAY TO THE SOUL."
AND I REALLY BELIEVE THAT.
AND I THINK I'M NEVER HAPPIER
IF I THINK THAT
SOMEONE'S SOUL HAS BEEN TOUCHED
BY THEIR EXPERIENCE HERE
AT QUATRE VENTS.

A caption reads "Francis Higginson Cabot. 1925-2011."

As the end credits roll, a long list of Frank Cabot's horticultural achievements and awards appear.

1958: He creates the Stonecrop Gardens in upstate New York.

1973-1976: Nominated distinguished advisor for the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

1976: He begins the expansion of the gardens at Les Quatre Vents.

1987: First public tour of Les Quatre Vents with proceeds to benefit the Port-au-Saumon ecological centre.

1989: Founder of the Charlevoix Heritage Society to aid the protection and preservation of the region's architecture and landscapes.

1989: founder of the Garden Conservancy to preserve outstanding private gardens across the United States of America, to date more than 90 gardens have received aid.

1992: The Stonecrop Gardens and Horticultural School are opened to the public.

1992: Better Earth Award, Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

1992: Gold Medal, Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

1993: Debevoise gold medal, Garden club of America.

1994: He creates the Quatre Vents Foundation to support the preservation of the gardens.

1994: Restoration of the gardens at Aberglasney in England. The completed Gardens were opened to the public in 1999.

1994: Distinguished achievement award, Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.

1996: Delia White Vail Award, Cleveland Botanic Garden.

1997: Scott Award. The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College.

1997: Swan Award, Cheekwood, Nashville.

1997: John D. Rockefeller Award (with Anne P. Cabot), Historic Hudson Valley.

2000: Liberty Hyde Bailey Award, American Horticultural Society.

2000: Hutchinson Award, Chicago Botanic Garden.

2001: Frank Cabot is made knight of the National Order of Québec.

2001: He publishes his book on the garden at Les Quatre Vents entitled The Greater Perfection, the inspiration for this film.

2002: Greensfelder Medal, Missouri Botanical Garden.

2003: Literature award, Council on botanical and horticultural libraries.

2003: The Henry Francis Du Pont Award.

2005: Honorary member of the Order of Canada.

2006: Achievement award, Garden Club of America.

2006: Honorary Fellow (with Anne P. Cabot), Trinity College, Carmarthen, Wales, Great Britain.

Different species of flowers in the garden appear on screen.

Copyright 2016, Films Reflextor.

Watch: The Gardener