Transcript: Why Great Lakes Cruising is on the Rise | Aug 14, 2019

Fast clips show images of port city.

The narrator says LITTLE CURRENT, ONTARIO,
IT'S THE GATEWAY PORT TO
MANITOULIN ISLAND.

A satellite clip zooms in on Little Current, Manitoulin Island.

The narrator says THE COMMUNITY GETS ITS NAME
FROM THE CURRENT THAT RUNS
THROUGH THE NARROW CORRIDOR
THAT CONNECTS THE NORTHERN
CHANNEL IN GEORGIAN BAY
AND LAKE HURON.
TODAY, IT'S WATERFRONT
IS AS IMPORTANT AS EVER.
IT SERVES AS THE LIFEBLOOD
OF THE COMMUNITY.
DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS,
THE ISLAND OF ABOUT 13,000
IS A HOTBED FOR VISITORS.

A man at a restaurant's kitchen says THIS IS OUR KITCHEN.
STILL NEED THE LETTUCE, MILES.
WE CALL IT TEN WEEKS
OF CRAZINESS.

The narrator says CHRIS CALLAHAN IS THE OWNER
OF THE ANCHOR INN HOTEL
AND IT'S JUST ONE OF
THE MANY BUSINESSES
THAT DEPEND ON VISITORS
TO THE ISLAND.

A caption reads "Chris Callaghan. Anchor Inn Hotel."

Chris is in his mid-forties, with short wavy gray hair and a goatee. He wears a gray logo T-shirt.

Chris says IF YOU DIDN'T HAVE
THE BOATERS HERE,
IT WOULD BE A SLOW
TOURISM INDUSTRY.
WE DO RELY ON THE BOAT INDUSTRY.

The narrator says AND MORE RECENTLY,
BUSINESSES HAVE SEEN THE RETURN
OF AN OLD VISITOR
TO THESE WATERS - CRUISE SHIPS.

The caption changes to "Alan MacNevin. Mayor of Northeastern Manitoulin and the Islands."

Alan is in his sixties, balding and with a gray moustache. He wears a patterned lime green shirt and a black blazer.

He says THIS LITTLE PORT
OF LITTLE CURRENT,
BACK IN THE EARLY 1900S
WAS A BUSY PORT
FOR BOTH INDUSTRY
AND TOURISM -
THIS IS BACK TO
THE STEAMSHIP DAYS.

The narrator says CRUISE SHIPS STARTED RETURNING
TO THE ISLAND IN THE MID-2000S.
THIS YEAR, THREE SHIPS
WILL MAKE A TOTAL OF
29 VISITS TO MANITOULIN.

Alan says AROUND 2009-11, WE WERE ONLY
GETTING TEN OR 11 VISITS
AND OFTEN FROM MAYBE
ONE SHIP IN THOSE YEARS.
SO, WE HAVE SEEN AN INCREASE,
BUT IT'S BEEN GRADUAL.

The narrator says THE HISTORY OF CRUISING
ON THE GREAT LAKES IS LONG,
FILLED WITH BOTH
HIGHS AND LOWS.
THE INDUSTRY REACHED ITS HEIGHT
DURING THE FIRST HALF
OF THE 20TH CENTURY,
AND IT WAS EXACTLY
WHAT YOU WOULD EXPECT.

An old clips show an orchestra playing on a cruise.

An announcer says THE SHIP'S ORCHESTRA
STRIKES UP SOME LIVELY MUSIC,
PLAYING NUMBERS LIKE
"ANCHORS AWAY" AND "SAILING."
THEN, CONFETTI AND SERPENTINE,
SUPPLIED BY THE SHIP'S
SOCIAL DEPARTMENT,
ARE THROWN OVER THE RAILS,
CREATING A COLOURFUL
AND HAPPY SCENE.

The narrator says LIVE MUSIC, DANCING,
AND PLENTY OF TIME TO
RELAX AND ENJOY THE VIEWS.
PASSENGER STEAMSHIPS WOULD
FREQUENT MAJOR CITY CENTRES,
LIKE TORONTO, DETROIT,
AND CHICAGO,
BUT WOULD ALSO MAKE
STOPS IN SMALLER CITIES
ALONG THE SHORES
OF THE GREAT LAKES,
AND IT WAS A BIG DEAL
FOR THOSE COMMUNITIES.

The announcer says THERE IS ALWAYS A CROWD
WATCHING THE SHIP COME IN,
AS ITS ARRIVAL IS ONE OF THE
MAJOR EVENTS OF THE WEEKS.
(ORCHESTRAL MUSIC PLAYING)

The caption changes to "Stephen Burnett. Great Lakes Cruising coallition."

Stephen is in his sixties, with short wavy white hair and a beard. He wears a white polo T-shirt and a black cap.

Stephen says WHEN WE STARTED 20 YEARS AGO,
WE REALLY WERE REFLECTING
ON WHAT HAPPENED
AT THE TURN OF THE CENTURY,
WHEN THERE WERE SHIPS
ON THE GREAT LAKES,
THE AIRLINES
WEREN'T AS PROLIFIC,
ROADS WEREN'T AS GOOD,
CARS WEREN'T AS QUICK,
AND IT WAS EASIER TO TAKE A SHIP
FROM ONE SIDE OF
THE LAKE TO THE OTHER.
SOME OF THE CRUISE SHIPS
WILL ANCHOR IN THE HARBOUR,
JUST TO THE RIGHT OF THAT
RED SPA BUOY THERE.

The narrator says STEPHEN BURNETT IS THE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
OF THE GREAT LAKES
CRUISING COALITION.
THE ORGANIZATION IS COMPRISED
OF BOTH AMERICAN
AND CANADIAN
PORT CITIES AND TOWNS.
ITS GOAL IS TO INCREASE
PASSENGER CRUISING
ON THE GREAT LAKES.

Stephen says GENERALLY, THE GREAT LAKES
IS THE LAST UN-CRUISED
REGION OF THE WORLD.

The narrator says BURNETT'S JOB IS TO SELL
SHIP-OWNERS
AND OPERATORS ON THE IDEA OF
CRUISING THE FIVE GREAT LAKES.

Stephen says THE CONVINCING JOB
WAS REALLY EDUCATION,
AND WE HAVE TO CONVINCE THE
CRUISE SHIP OWNERS
AS WELL AS THE PORTS.
SO, WEREN'T REALIZED WE WENT
INTO A SALES SITUATION.
WE WERE INTO TEACHING GEOGRAPHY,
TEACHING POTENTIAL,
TEACHING A LITTLE BIT OF
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT.

The narrator says A TYPICAL CRUISE LASTS
ABOUT TEN DAYS
AND VISITS SEVERAL PORTS
ON BOTH THE AMERICAN
AND CANADIAN SIDE.
AND THEY'RE NOT CHEAP -
STARTING AROUND 4000 DOLLARS US
AND GETTING UP TO 10,000 DOLLARS.
ONE OF THE MORE POPULAR ROUTES
WOULD SEE PASSENGERS
START IN CHICAGO.
THE SHIP WOULD TRAVEL UP
LAKE MICHIGAN,
OVER TO LAKE SUPERIOR,
THROUGH THE NORTH CHANNEL
TO LITTLE CURRENT
IN MANITOULIN ISLAND,
AND THEN SOUTH
THROUGH LAKE HURON
AND UP LAKE ERIE WITH
A STOP IN NIAGARA FALLS,
AND THEN FINISHING
IN LAKE ONTARIO
IN THE PORTS OF TORONTO.

An animated map draws the route.

Stephen says IT'S YOUR RETIRED TRAVELLER.
IT'S PEOPLE THAT GENERALLY
HAVE THE TIME AND THE INTEREST
IN TRAVELLING OFTEN
IN THEIR OWN BACKYARDS.
THAT MEANS THAT
WE HAVE A LOT OF AMERICANS
TRAVELLING ON THESE CRUISES.
NOT AS MANY CANADIANS YET.
THAT WILL START TO GROW.
BUT WE'RE NOW GETTING A
CONSIDERABLE NUMBER OF PEOPLE
FROM GERMAN SPEAKING COUNTRIES -
GERMANY, AUSTRIA, SWITZERLAND -
A LOT OF PEOPLE
COMING FROM FRANCE.
AND NOW, WE'RE MOVING OUT TO
COUNTRIES LIKE ISRAEL,
AUSTRALIA, AND IRELAND,
AND, OF COURSE, THE UK.

The caption changes to "Jane Chandra. Cruise Passenger."

Jane is in her sixties, with short slightly wavy white hair and wears a yellow top and sunglasses over her head.

She says WE HAVE NOT EXPLORED
MUCH OF THIS PART
OF THE COUNTRY RECENTLY.
I GREW UP IN SOUTHERN OHIO.
SURESH GREW UP IN INDIA.
AND WE HAVE BEEN TO
DETROIT YEARS AGO,
CLEVELAND YEARS AGO,
CHICAGO A NUMBER OF TIMES.
BUT WE HAVE NOT
EXPLORED THE LAKE AREA
AND THIS IS A WONDERFUL
WAY TO DO IT.

The caption changes to "Merle Goldstein. Cruise Passenger."

Merle Goldstein is in her sixties, with short curly gray hair and wears a mint green T-shirt and sunglasses.

Marle says I WAS LOOKING FOR A
COMBINATION VACATION
THAT WAS...
HAD A RELAXATION COMPONENT,
AS WELL AS AN
INTEREST COMPONENT.
AND LIKE A LOT OF PEOPLE
ON THE EAST COAST,
I'VE BEEN TO MANY
OTHER COUNTRIES.
I HAVEN'T EXPLORED
AS MUCH OF THE UNITED STATES
AS I'D HAVE LIKED TO.

The narrator says THE GREAT LAKES CRUISING SEASON
LASTS ABOUT 150 DAYS,
FROM MAY TO OCTOBER.

A clip shows indigenous people drumming, chanting, and dancing.

(SINGING INDIGENOUS MUSIC,
DRUMS POUNDING)

The narrator says THE STOP ON
MANITOULIN IS UNIQUE
COMPARED TO THE REST
OF THE PORT CITIES.
PASSENGERS ARE IMMERSED
IN INDIGENOUS CULTURE.
MANITOULIN IS HOME TO
SIX FIRST NATIONS,
ACCOUNTING FOR 40 PERCENT
OF THE ENTIRE
POPULATION ON THE ISLAND.
(SINGING INDIGENOUS MUSIC,
DRUMS POUNDING)

The caption changes to "Naomi Mishibinijima. Wikwemikong Tourism."

Naomi is in her thirties, with short wavy brown hair and wears a blue logo T-shirt.

She says MANITOULIN ISLAND
IS THE ANCESTRAL HOME
OF THE ODAWA PEOPLE.
WE ARE THREE NATIONS
COMBINED LIVE HERE -
OJIBWE, ODAWA, POTAWATOMI.
COLLECTIVELY, WE IDENTIFY
OURSELVES AS THE ANISHINABEK.

A man says SO, THE DANCERS ARE AWARE
OF THE BREAK AT...

The narrator says WIKWEMIKONG TOURISM SPECIALIZES
IN AUTHENTIC INDIGENOUS
CULTURE TOURISM
FOR ALL VISITORS TO THE ISLAND.

Naomi says HERE IN CANADA, THERE'S
FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIES
AROUND EVERY URBAN CENTRE,
AROUND MANY TOWNS,
AND I IMAGINE IT'S THE SAME IN
THE STATES AND MAYBE EVEN MORE.
SO, IT'S ALWAYS INTERESTING TO
HEAR THAT THEY'RE NOT FAMILIAR
WITH THE INDIGENOUS
COMMUNITIES IN THEIR AREAS.

A tour bus guide says ON YOUR RIGHT, OKAY, YOU WILL
SEE, AS WE PASS THIS TREELINE,
THE MAGNIFICENT NORTH CHANNEL.

Naomi says SO, THE FIRST STOP THEY MAKE
IS AT THE CHURCH OF
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION.

(SPEAKING INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE)

Naomi says AND THERE,
THEY HEAR ABOUT THE HISTORY
OF THAT PARTICULAR CHURCH,
CATHOLICISM ON MANITOULIN,
AND HOW THAT CHURCH IS BUILT.
IT'S A UNIQUE CHURCH IN THAT
IT'S CIRCULAR, IT'S ROUND.

The narrator says VISITORS ARE THEN TAKEN TO THE
OJIBWE CULTURAL FOUNDATION
IN M'CHIGEENG FIRST NATION.
THEY LEARN THE CULTURAL
SIGNIFICANCE OF ITEMS LIKE
SAGE,
CEDAR, SWEET GRASS
AND TOBACCO,
DURING A TRADITIONAL
SMUDGING CEREMONY.

Naomi says WHAT I REALLY LIKE
ABOUT THIS PROGRAM
IS THAT THE DANCE PRESENTATION
LET'S THEM KNOW
THAT THESE CULTURAL
AND SOCIAL GATHERINGS
ARE OPEN TO EVERYBODY.
EVERYONE CAN PARTICIPATE.

The narrator says THE TOURS ARE A WAY
OF RECONCILIATION
THROUGH EDUCATION.
WIIKWEMKOONG
FIRST NATION WAS HOME
TO ONE OF THE FIRST RESIDENTIAL
SCHOOLS ON THE GREAT LAKES.

Naomi says THEY'RE VERY ABBREVIATED
LEARNING AND TEACHING FASHIONS.
SO, THEY GET A
LITTLE TASTE OR AN IDEA
TO GIVE THEM
A BETTER APPRECIATION
OF INDIGENOUS CULTURE AND
INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE,
AND HOPEFULLY THAT WILL
KIND OF SPARK AN INTEREST
AND ALSO SPARK CONVERSATIONS
WHEN THEY RETURN HOME
OF WHAT THEY LEARNED.
(DRUM POUNDING)
(AUDIENCE APPLAUDING)

Jane says THE DANCING,
THE-- THE SMUDGING,
THE THINGS LIKE THE BRAID,
I THINK ABOUT OUR GRANDDAUGHTERS
ALL HAVE LONG HAIR
AND THEY BRAID THEIR HAIR,
AND THIS IS SOMETHING I HOPE I
CAN REMEMBER TO GO HOME
AND SHARE WITH THEM.
AND THE CIRCLE, THE YOUNG WOMAN
BECK WHO DID THE HOOP DANCE,
WITH HER EXPLANATION
WITH THE CIRCLE -
THESE ARE JUST WONDERFUL
CULTURAL THINGS
THAT WE DON'T LEARN
ABOUT NORMALLY,
UNLESS WE ACTUALLY ARE HERE.

The caption changes to "Suresh Chandra. Cruise Passenger."

Suresh is in his fifties, with short gray hair and wears a patterned black and white shirt and a khaki cap.

He says I WISH MORE AMERICANS WOULD KNOW
ABOUT THIS PARTICULAR TRIP
AND COME TO THE GREAT LAKES
BECAUSE ALL THESE LITTLE TOWNS
AND ISLANDS HAVE
SO MUCH TO OFFER.

(music plays)

The end credits roll.

Ontario Hubs Field Producer, Jeyan Jeganathan. @JeyanTVO.

Editor, David Erwin.

A slate appears with the caption "Ontario Hubs are made possible by: The Barry and Laurie Green Family Charitable Trust and Goldie Feldman."

Watch: Why Great Lakes Cruising is on the Rise