Transcript: Ep. 6 - Montreal | Dec 09, 2018

Over an image of the city of Detroit appears a map of America that shows the location of the city with the caption "Montreal, Canada."

Mikael takes a walk on the streets of Montreal.

Mikael is in his fifties, with short wavy gray hair and a stubble and he wears beige trousers and a pale blue shirt.

He says I SPEND A LOT OF TIME
IN MONTREAL. IT REALLY IS,
TOGETHER WITH COPENHAGEN
AND BARCELONA,
ONE OF MY FAVOURITE PLACES
ON THE PLANET, A HOME
AWAY FROM HOME.
BUT I STILL HAVE A PROBLEM
PUTTING MY FINGER ON
WHAT MAKES THIS CITY SO GREAT.
THROUGH THE CENTURIES, MONTREAL
HAS FOUND ITSELF AT A GLOBAL
CROSSROADS WHERE NATIONS,
CULTURES AND LANGUAGES HAVE MET,
OR WERE FIERCELY DEFENDED.
NOW, IT'S AS THOUGH MONTREAL
IS A CITY THAT SPENDS A LOT
OF TIME WONDERING ABOUT ITSELF.
I WOULDN'T CALL IT
AN IDENTITY CRISIS,
MORE OF AN IDENTITY
MÉLANGE.
THIS CITY FACES REAL URBAN
CHALLENGES.
THE PEOPLE HERE
WILL TELL YOU THAT THEY HAVE
THE WORST POTHOLES
ON THE PLANET.
IT MIGHT BE TRUE,
BUT THEY SAY IT
WITH A SENSE OF IRONIC PRIDE.
IS THAT THE METAPHOR
THAT DEFINES THIS PLACE?
CITIZENS CONSTANTLY HAVING
TO NAVIGATE SAFE PASSAGE
THROUGH A RUTHLESS
ASPHALT JUNGLE?
MAYBE IT IS.
LET'S FIND OUT.

In animation, Mikael's body gets covered in maps and city models. He extends his hand and a miniature model of a city appears on his hand.

The title of the show reads "The Life-Sized City with Mikael Colville-Andersen."

Clips show images of Detroit. An animated map appears with the caption "Montreal."

Mikael says "LITTLE PARIS."
IT'S NOT. IT'S BEEN
DESCRIBED AS NEW YORK
WITH A EUROPEAN TWIST.
NAH! WHILE IT'S TRUE
THAT MONTREAL IS THE LARGEST
FRENCH-SPEAKING CITY
IN NORTH AMERICA, TRUST ME
WHEN I SAY THAT THIS CITY
HAS AN IDENTITY ALL ITS OWN.
WHILE CHEAP RENTS HAVE
LONG MADE MONTREAL
A GREAT PLACE FOR ARTISTS
TO LIVE AND THRIVE,
GIVING THE CITY ITS CULTURAL
CLOUT, IT HAS ALSO SUFFERED
FROM YEARS OF CORRUPTION
AND NEGLECT.
MONTREAL CONTINUED
TO THRIVE, HOWEVER,
BY REINVENTING ITSELF
ON A SMALLER SCALE
THAN MOST URBAN HUBS.
THE CITY'S CURRENT IDENTITY
IS INEXTRICABLY TIED
TO THE VIBRANCY AND DIVERSITY
OF ITS NINETEEN BOROUGHS.
FROM ONE BLOCK TO THE NEXT,
THERE IS A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE.
I WOULD EVEN SAY
MULTIPLE WORLDS.
ALMOST SIX OUT OF TEN
MONTREALERS ARE IMMIGRANTS
OR OF IMMIGRANT DESCENT.
MONTREAL IS NOT THE BIGGEST,
NOT THE RICHEST,
NOT THE BOLDEST,
BUT THAT IS NOT THE POINT.
IT'S ONE OF THE BEST CITIES
TO LIVE IN, IN THE WHOLE
ENTIRE WORLD
AND THAT MAKES IT
A HAPPY UNDERDOG.

A caption reads "David Hanna. Professor of Urban Studies."

David is in his sixties, with short white hair and wears blue cargo trousers and a blue short-sleeved checker shirt.

David and Mikael take a stroll.

David says THERE ARE VERY FEW HIGH-RISES
IN MONTREAL.
EVERYWHERE, IT'S JUST
RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS
THAT ARE TWO, THREE, FOUR
STOREYS, WITH TIGHT-KNIT STREETS
AND EVERYTHING CLOSE TOGETHER.
THIS IS A TRIPLEX,
SO FLAT OVER FLAT OVER FLAT. AND
HERE YOU'VE GOT A SPONTANEOUS
MEETING BETWEEN
THE THIRD-STOREY RESIDENT
AND THE SECOND-STOREY RESIDENT.
VERY TYPICAL.

David says AS AN ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
IN URBAN STUDIES,
DAVID HANNA DIGS DEEP
TO UNDERSTAND WHAT MAKES UP
THIS PLACE, FOCUSING
ON HERITAGE AND TRANSPORT.
HE WAS RECENTLY APPOINTED
AS COMMISSIONER
FOR MONTREAL'S PUBLIC
CONSULTATION OFFICE.
OH, AND HE ABSOLUTELY
LOVES HIS CITY.

David says BOSTON HAS ITS DOUBLE-DECKERS
AND TRIPLE DECKERS.
CHICAGO IS FULL OF TWO-FLAT,
THREE-FLAT, FOUR-FLAT HOUSES.
IT'S THE SAME STUFF.
THE DIFFERENCE
IS THE OUTSIDE STAIRCASES,
THE BALCONIES.
THAT'S MONTREAL. IT BRINGS
PEOPLE OUTSIDE
IN THIS KIND
OF INTERMEDIARY SPACE.
YOU KNOW, YOU COME
OUT AND YOU RUN
INTO YOUR NEIGHBOURS.
NEIGHBOURLINESS IS JUST BUILT
INTO THE ARCHITECTURE.

Animated maps show the locations of Ontario Street, Wellington Street, Masson Street, Jarry Street, Monkland Avenue, and Fleury Street.

David says EVERYONE OF THESE
NEIGHBOURHOODS IN MONTREAL
HAS ONE OR TWO MAJOR
COMMERCIAL ARTERIES.
EVEN DURING THE ARRIVAL
OF THE AUTOMOBILE,
THE SHOPPING MALLS AND ALL THAT,
THESE WERE ALWAYS KEPT GOING
WITH A LOT OF MUNICIPAL CARE.

Mikael says SO IT BECOMES THE GLUE
OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD.
EVERY CITY HAS CHALLENGES.
EVERY CITY HAS A DARK SIDE.
WHAT IS THAT FOR MONTREAL?

David says HA! CORRUPTION.

Mikael says OH, OKAY. THAT WAS
A QUICK ANSWER.

David says WE HAVE A CORRUPTION
CYCLE HERE.
THE POPULATION'S APATHETIC,
DOESN'T WANT TO HEAR ABOUT IT.
THEN SUDDENLY, IT JUST GOES OVER
THE TOP AND THE PUBLIC WAKES UP.
"HOLY COW!
WHAT'S GOING ON HERE?"
AND THEN THEY WANT
COMMISSIONS OF INQUIRY
AND PROSECUTIONS.
AND BINGO!
WE GO THROUGH THREE YEARS
OF INTENSE INQUIRIES
AND EVERYBODY'S SHOCKED.
OH MY GOSH.
THEN WE GET THE REFORM
PERIOD. IT GOES ON FOR ABOUT
TWO OR THREE MORE YEARS.
A LOT OF REFORMS PUT IN,
NEW INSPECTORS,
NEW LAWS AND ALL THAT.
AND THEN WE GET THE SWEET SPOT.
WE GET ABOUT FIFTY YEARS
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT.

Mikael says AFTER YEARS OF CORRUPTION...
AND BY THAT,
I MEAN RIGGED BIDDING
ON MUNICIPAL CONTRACTS,
KICKBACKS TO CITY OFFICIALS
AND A MAYOR INDICTED
FOR FRAUD AND CONSPIRACY...
WELL, AFTER ALL THAT,
IMPORTANT REFORMS
WERE IMPLEMENTED AND
DAVID THINKS MONTREAL
IS IN FOR A PERIOD
OF INTELLIGENT AND
CITIZEN-ORIENTED GOVERNMENT.
WELL, ONLY TIME WILL TELL.
WHAT IS THE STATE OF THE NATION
IN MONTREAL REGARDING
GENTRIFICATION IN ESPECIALLY
A NEIGHBOURHOOD LIKE THIS ONE?

David says WELL, IT IS A HOT
SUBJECT HERE TOO.
THERE'S A LOT OF STRESS OVER
IT AND A CERTAIN AMOUNT
OF POLITICAL STRUGGLING OVER IT.
WE HAVE OUR TRADITIONAL
URBAN POOR
WHO ARE STILL HERE
AND SOME OF THEM BENEFIT
FROM RENTAL PROTECTION,
FROM CO-OP HOUSING
AND PROGRAMS THAT QUEBEC HAS
TO STABILIZE ITS PEOPLE AND KEEP
THEM IN THEIR HOUSES AT VERY
FAVOURABLE PRICES.

Mikael says RIGHT.

David says OTHERS ARE INDEED PUSHED OUT
BY RISING RENTS.

(music plays)

Mikael says I KNOW. THIS IS NOT NEW YORK
OR EVEN TORONTO,
BUT FOR THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD,
HOCHELAGA-MAISONNEUVE,
IT IS A RADICAL TRANSFORMATION.
AN OCEAN OF CONDOS
HAS POPPED UP IN THE
AREA, JUMPING FROM 500
TO 4,000 IN JUST TWENTY YEARS.
ACTIVISTS HAVE DENOUNCED
THE SITUATION OPENLY
AND VOCALLY,
AND SOMETIMES VIOLENTLY.
WE MAY NOT AGREE WITH
THE METHOD, BUT IT CERTAINLY
IS SYMBOLIC
OF A UBIQUITOUS DISCOMFORT.

In a square, THIS LOOKS LIKE IT'S BEEN
RECENTLY REDONE. AM I RIGHT?

David says WELL, MORE THAN REDONE.
IT WAS DONE.

Mikael says IT WAS DONE?

David says THERE WAS NO SQUARE HERE.

Mikael says OH REALLY?

David says YEAH.
THIS IS A RAILWAY CROSSING.
COMING INTO THE INDUSTRIAL
NEIGHBOURHOODS AND
FLITTING OFF TOWARDS DOWNTOWN.
THEN IT FLOWED THROUGH HERE
AND DISAPPEARED OUT THROUGH
THE FACTORIES.
AND THEY ABANDONED IT
IN THE SIXTIES UNTIL FINALLY
IN THE NINETIES SOMEONE HAD
THE BRIGHT IDEA OF DOING
SOMETHING WITH SPECIAL SPACES.
THE GRADE LEVEL-CROSSING
BECAME A PUBLIC SQUARE.
THIS IS KIND
OF THE NEW HEART NOW
OF THE HOCHELAGA-MAISONNEUVE
NEIGHBOURHOOD.

Mikael says IS THIS A LIFE-SIZED CITY?

David says THE CITY'S MADE UP OF JUST
WHAT I WOULD CALL ORDINARY,
DISCREET PEOPLE SPACES
THAT ARE VERY HUMAN SCALE,
VERY LOCAL AND IT'S ALL
VERY PEOPLE-ORIENTED.
THAT'S WHAT MAKES
THIS PLACE JUST SO LIVEABLE.

(music plays)

Now Mikael waits on a park for a friend to arrive.

He arrives on a bike.

Mikael says WHEN THIS GUY,
LUC FERRANDEZ...
AND FULL DISCLOSURE HERE,
HE'S BECOME A VERY
GOOD FRIEND OF MINE...
WAS FIRST ELECTED
AS BOROUGH MAYOR
OF THE HIP PLATEAU MONT-ROYAL,
HE TRIGGERED A WAVE
OF VERY COOL MOVES,
ALL AIMED AT GIVING CITIZENS
THEIR NEIGHBOURHOOD BACK.

The caption changes to "Luc Ferrandez. Mayor, Plateau-Mont Royal."

Luc is in his mid-fifties, with short gray hair and a beard. He wears a blue suit and a white shirt.

Mikael says OVER THE COURSE
OF JUST A FEW YEARS...
ARE YOU READY FOR THIS?
LUC'S TEAM ADDED SEVEN
NEW PARKS, REVAMPED
SIX OTHERS, INSTALLED 226
PLANTERS ON STREET CORNERS,
MADE 93 INTERSECTIONS
SAFER FOR PEDESTRIANS,
LOWERED AVERAGE SPEED LIMITS,
CREATED 17,7 KILOMETRES
OF NEW BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE,
INSTALLED 5,000 BIKE
PARKING SPOTS AND
GREENED 43 ALLEYWAYS.
SOMEBODY PINCH ME.

Luc says PEOPLE DON'T SEE THE NEED
FOR PUBLIC SPACES.
YOU WANT TO GO THROUGH,
YOU WANT TO PARK,
YOU'RE BUSY. PEOPLE THINK:
"HEY, THIS GUY IS GOING
TO REMOVE PARKING,
TAKE OUT ROADS AND
INCREASE CONGESTION TO DO WHAT?
PUBLIC SPACES? WHO ASKED
FOR PUBLIC SPACES?"
BUT ONCE IT'S BUILT,
ONCE IT'S BUILT,
SOME OF THESE PEOPLE REALIZE:
"HEY, I NEEDED ALL MY LIFE
AND DIDN'T KNOW IT."
WE CAN DO TWENTY
DIFFERENT THINGS
JUST AROUND YOU.
TWENTY DIFFERENT THINGS
THAT MAYBE
YOU DIDN'T THINK ABOUT,
BUT THAT WILL
CHANGE EVERYTHING.
THE PARK, THE STREET,
THE SIDEWALK, THE BIKE PATH,
THE BACK ALLEY... WE HAVE
TO ENRICH PEOPLE'S SURROUNDINGS
SO THAT THEY SAY:
"YOU KNOW WHAT?
I WANT TO LIVE IN THE CITY."

(music plays)

Mikael says TO CALL THIS BIKE LANE
CONTROVERSIAL WOULD BE A
MASSIVE UNDERSTATEMENT. IT WAS
ONE OF LUC'S FIRST PROJECTS
IN THE PLATEAU. BACK IN 2011,
HE TRANSFORMED A STRETCH
OF LAURIER INTO A ONE-WAY
STREET AND IMPLEMENTED
BIKE LANES ON BOTH SIDES.
THE REST IS HISTORY.

They both go for a ride on the bike lane.

Mikael says AHA! I MEAN, THIS IS
A COMPLETE TRANSFORMATION.

Luc says WELL, I THINK THIS IS ONE
OF THE PLACES THAT PEOPLE
APPRECIATE THE MOST.
IT'S A SUBWAY STATION.
THE SIDEWALK WAS 1.5 METRES
ALONG THE STATION. THAT'S IT.
AND WE SAID, WE'LL DO ELEVEN
METER WIDE SIDEWALKS.
EVEN THE ENGINEERS SAID:
"WHY? WHY DO YOU NEED
ELEVEN METRES WIDE SIDEWALKS?"
I KNOW IN EUROPE, IT'S TOTALLY
DIFFERENT. PEOPLE ARE DOING
THIS ON A REGULAR BASIS.
BUT IN NORTH AMERICA,
IT BREAKS SOME RULES,
BUT NOW PEOPLE
ARE NOT SHY ANYMORE
TO GO FOR THAT.
THE GYMNASIUM'S HERE,
SO'S A SCHOOL, THE SUBWAY
STATION AND A CHURCH.
THIS IS THE CORE OF A VILLAGE
THAT DIDN'T EXIST ONLY BECAUSE
THERE WERE TOO MANY CARS
AND TOO MUCH NOISE.
ALL OF A SUDDEN, YOU WIDEN
THE SIDEWALK A LITTLE BIT,
YOU PLANT TREES AND IT APPEARS.
YOU COULD NOT HEAR THE KIDS
IN THE SCHOOL YARD AND
NOW YOU PASS BY AND
YOU CAN HEAR THEM.
BECAUSE YOU HEAR THEM, YOU TURN
YOUR HEAD AND YOU LOOK AT THEM.
IT CREATES A CONTACT.
IT CREATES LIFE. THIS IS BEAUTY.
THE BEAUTY OF THINGS IS NOT
THE TREE. IT'S HOW MANY PEOPLE
THE TREE WILL BRING IN.
WHEN IT WORKS, IT'S MAGIC.

(music plays)

Mikael says LUC HAS RECENTLY BEEN GIVEN
A NEW CITYWIDE MANDATE AND
IS NOW IN CHARGE OF THE CITY'S
MOST IMPORTANT PARKS,
GREEN SPACES AND
LARGE-SCALE PROJECTS.

In a park, Mikael says MONTREAL HAS A LOT
OF BEAR-SIZED PARKS.
HOW DOES THAT IMPACT
CITY LIFE HERE?

Luc says WE HAVE A LOT OF LOCAL PARKS
IN MONTREAL AND WE HAVE
TO HAVE A LOT OF PEOPLE
COMING TO THOSE LOCAL PARKS
TO MAKE THEM A PLACE TO MEET
AND TO CREATE SOCIETY.
AND NOW THIS
IS MY RESPONSIBILITY:
TO CREATE THESE HUGE
PARKS THAT ARE NO MORE
ABOUT PEOPLE
GATHERING TOGETHER,
BUT ABOUT PEOPLE DISCOVERING
THE WORLD.
PEOPLE HAVE TO DREAM
ABOUT THE PUBLIC SPACE,
BUT ARE THEY GOING FAR ENOUGH?
WHO DREAMT ABOUT
LES CHAMPS-ELYSÉES?
WHO DREAMT ABOUT
PICCADILLY CIRCUS?
YOU KNOW, WHEN YOU DREAM
ABOUT THESE THINGS,
YOU HAVE TO MAKE SURE
THAT WHEN YOU INVEST
150 MILLIONS OF DOLLARS INTO
THESE PLACES, YOU ARE REALLY
CATERING TO THE NEEDS
OF THE PEOPLE.
I HAVE THE CONVICTION
THAT WE NEED
GRANDEUR
IN OUR LIVES, THAT WE NEED
A PLACE THAT REPRESENTS
THE CITY AND THAT YOU MEET
THE CITY. WE WANT TO SELL
THIS TO MONTREALERS AND SAY:
"LOOK, WE NEED HUGE PUBLIC
SPACES, WE NEED
PUBLIC SPACES SO BIG
THAT WE NEED FOUR
FOUNTAINS ON THEM."
AND I HAVE A GREAT
ENTHUSIASM FOR THIS NEW DREAM.
IT IS GREAT FOR ME.
TEN YEARS AGO, PEOPLE WERE
SAYING THEY WOULD NEVER RAISE
THEIR KIDS IN THE CITY.
AND NOW I WANT TO TELL PEOPLE:
"YOU DON'T HAVE TO PAY
FOR IT. YOU HAVE TO PAY
THROUGH YOUR TAXES,
BUT IT'S YOURS. IT'S YOURS.
WE'RE TAKING CARE
OF IT AND IT'S GREAT."

Mikael says YOU'RE KIND OF JUST
THE GUARDIAN OF THE CITY
BECAUSE PEOPLE OWN IT.

Luc says OH! ABSOLUTELY!
THE PEOPLE DO OWN IT.
LET'S OWN THINGS IN COMMON,
LET'S INVEST IN THINGS IN COMMON
THAT WILL BE MUCH,
MUCH BETTER THAN IF YOU INVEST
IN YOUR BACKYARD.

(music plays)

Mikael says FOR SOME NEIGHBOURHOODS,
THE PRESERVATION OF LIFE-SIZED
BUILDING AND PEOPLE
SPACES SUCCEEDED.
BUT MAN, IT WAS
A VERY CLOSE CALL.

He stands before a giant building and says WHAT A MONSTER! IT JUST LOOKS
COMPLETELY OUT OF SCALE, RIGHT?
IT JUST DOESN'T MATCH.

The caption changes to "Alanna Dow. President, Milon Parc Community."

Alanna is in her sixties, with short straight gray hair and wears black trousers and printed sweater in blues and greens.

She says THE IDEA OF THESE DEVELOPERS
WAS TO RAZE SIX BLOCKS OF OLD,
GREY STONE HOUSES AND BEAUTIFUL
1800S AND...

Mikael says LIKE THIS SORT
OF BUILDING HERE.

Alanna says 1900S, THIS SORT OF BUILDING
HERE, YES.
ALL OF THOSE WERE TO GO
AND THEY WERE BUILDING
ALL THOSE HIGH-RISES.
225 BUILDINGS...

Mikael says BUILDINGS.

Alanna says WERE LOST.
WHAT WE DID SAVE
WERE 640 UNITS.

Mikael says YEAH.

(music plays)

Mikael says IT COULD HAVE BEEN WAY WORSE IF
ALANNA AND HER FRIENDS HADN'T
PUT UP AN EPIC FIGHT TO SAVE
THE MILTON-PARC NEIGHBOURHOOD.
THROUGH THE 70S AND 80S,
THERE WERE DEMONSTRATIONS,
SIT-INS AND PROTESTS.
AND THE ACTIVISTS,
THEY FINALLY WON IN 1987.
NO MORE HIGH-RISES WOULD BE
ALLOWED TO SCAR THE SKYLINE
HERE FROM THAT MOMENT ONWARD.
BUT IT WASN'T JUST
AN ARCHITECTURAL THING.
THE FIGHT WAS FIRST AND
FOREMOST ABOUT MAINTAINING
THE SOCIOECONOMIC MIX THAT MADE
THE NEIGHBOURHOOD SO SINGULAR.
TO KEEP AFFORDABLE RENTS
IN PLACE, THEY ENDED UP
CREATING NORTH AMERICA'S
LARGEST CO-OP NETWORK.
PICTURE THIS:
THE MILTON-PARC COMMUNITY IS
MADE OF 21 SMALLER CO-OPS;
1,500 PEOPLE AND VARIOUS
FORMS OF HOUSING FROM LARGE
SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES TO ROOMING
HOUSES. OH, AND THE BEST PART?
TO PREVENT SPECULATION,
THEY CAME UP WITH
THIS CREATIVE SYSTEM:
FRONT YARDS, BACKYARDS
AND ALLEYWAYS ARE ALL
OWNED BY THE COMMUNITY.

Alanna says IN OUR PROJECT, WE BUILT
IN ACQUIRED RIGHTS,
SO THAT THE PEOPLE LIVING
HERE COULD INDEED STAY HERE,
BUT WE SIGNED A DOCUMENT
WHICH TIES US ALL
TO PROVIDE IN EMPTY APARTMENTS
LOW-RENT HOUSING FOR FAMILIES.
THERE ARE ALSO SPACE
REQUIREMENTS.
THE MILTON-PARC
COMMUNITY HAS PEOPLE
FROM 50 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES
LIVING HERE FROM ALL DIFFERENT
BACKGROUNDS AND
SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS.
AND IF PEOPLE MOVE INTO
THE CO-OP AND ARE
IN A RELATIVELY POOR
ECONOMIC SITUATION,
IF THEY IMPROVE THEIR
SITUATION IN THE TIME
THEY'RE HERE, THEY DON'T GET
KICKED OUT LIKE WHAT HAPPENS
IN CERTAIN GOVERNMENT-RUN
COOPERATIVES AND SO ON.
SO IT'S UNIQUE...

Mikael says RIGHT.

Alanna says IN THE WAY IT'S SET UP.

(music plays)

Mikael says THIS IS PRECISELY WHAT MAKES
THIS PLACE STAND OUT.
THAT AND THE FACT
THAT THE MILTON-PARC PEOPLE
NEVER STOP PUSHING
FOR COLLECTIVE WELL-BEING.
THEIR LATEST ENDEAVOUR:
TRANSFORMING A NOW
DECOMMISSIONED HOSPITAL HOUSED
IN A NEARBY HISTORICAL
BUILDING INTO YET
ANOTHER CO-OP.
THEY'RE JOINING FORCES
WITH LOCAL GROUPS TO MAKE SURE
THAT THESE FUTURE SPACES
INCLUDE THE MIXED COMMUNITY
THAT LIVES IN THE AREA:
STUDENTS, FAMILIES AND
A GROWING NUMBER OF SENIORS.
ALANNA INSISTS: MILTON-PARC
CO-OP IS MUCH MORE
THAN HERITAGE HOUSES AND LOW
RENTS. IT'S ABOUT BUILDING
A COMMUNITY WITH A VISION.

A caption reads "Hotel-Dieu Hospital."

Alanna says WE BROUGHT UP OUR DAUGHTER HERE
AND IT WAS AMAZING BECAUSE
EVERYBODY KNOWS EVERYONE.
WE NEVER WORRIED ABOUT HER BEING
OUT ON THE STREET BECAUSE,
LIKE JANE JACOBS SAID:
"EYES ON THE STREET
ARE SO IMPORTANT."
AND WHEN YOU LIVE IN A CO-OP,
ESPECIALLY A HUGE CO-OP COMPLEX
LIKE THIS, THERE ARE MANY,
MANY EYES ON THE STREET.
HI, GUYS. THIS IS MIKAEL.

They meet a young family on the street.

Mikael says HI.
DOUBLE THE FUN!

A young woman says HI HOW ARE YOU?

Alanna says READY TO GO TO THE PARTY AGAIN?

Mikael says ALANNA'S DAUGHTER AND
GRAND-KIDS ARE HERE FOR WHAT
I IMAGINED AS A SMALL
NEIGHBOURHOOD GET-TOGETHER.
I WAS THINKING A BACKYARD,
A FEW TABLES, A BARBECUE.
BOY! WAS I WAY OFF!
LOOK AT THAT! LOOK HOW LONG THAT
TABLE IS! WE'RE IN A BACK ALLEY
IN MONTREAL WITH THE PEOPLE
OF THE CO-OP. THAT'S AMAZING!

Alanna says SALUT, CHARLOTTE. CA VA?
[HI, CHARLOTTE. HOW ARE YOU?]

Mikael says BONSOIR.
[GOOD EVENING.]

Alanna says HI, CHARLES.
FINE, THANKS.

Mikael says THE COMMUNITY ALANNA WAS
TALKING ABOUT -
THIS IS IT.

People bring all kids of food and beverages to the table.

Alanna says LET'S GO GET SOME WINE.
HAVE A SEAT.

Mikael says THANK YOU.

Alanna says WOULD YOU LIKE RED OR WHITE?

Mikael says YES.

Alanna says YES? OKAY.

Mikael says WHAT A SETUP!
IT'S ABSOLUTELY AMAZING.

Alanna says GREAT.
THERE YOU GO.

Mikael says THANK YOU.

Alanna says HI, CHELSEY.

Mikael says IT'S REALLY HARD TO INTERVIEW
YOU HERE TODAY BECAUSE
YOU'RE TALKING TO ME
AND THEN YOU GO:
"HEY! HOW ARE YOU?"
THAT'S AWESOME.

Alanna says SORRY ABOUT THAT.

Mikael says NO, DON'T BE SORRY. IT'S...

Somebody else greets Alanna.

Mikael says EXAMPLE!
DID YOU ENVISION BACK THEN,
WHEN YOU WERE
FIGHTING THE FIGHT,
THAT YOU'D BE SITTING
IN THIS BACK ALLEY
ON A BEAUTIFUL SUMMER'S DAY
WITH ALL OF THESE PEOPLE?

Alanna says THIS IS ONE OF
THE MAJOR CHANGES
THAT I AM
SO THRILLED WITH,
THAT SO MUCH
SOCIAL COHESION
CAME OUT OF EVERYTHING
THAT WE'VE BEEN DOING.
EVERYBODY GETS TOGETHER,
HAS A GOOD TIME,
EXCHANGE IDEAS, ASKS
ABOUT EACH OTHER'S KIDS.

Mikael says IS THIS SOMETHING THAT COULD
EXTEND EVEN FURTHER IN MONTREAL?

Alanna says SURE. I THINK SO. AND I THINK
ONE OF THE THINGS THAT PEOPLE
HAVE TO LOOK AT IS NOT JUST
PERHAPS BUILDING NEW CO-OPS,
BUT TAKING AREAS LIKE
THIS WITH HERITAGE HOMES
AND REALLY WORKING
ON PERHAPS TALKING
TO THEIR NEIGHBOURS
AND CONVINCING
THEM THAT THEY COULD DO CO-OPS
AND BUYING THEIR PLACES AND
DOING A SIMILAR THING.
YES, I THINK IT'S DOABLE.

(music plays)

Mikael walks on a trail in a park and says THIS IS CHAMPS DES POSSIBLES,
THE FIELD OF POSSIBILITIES,
A DISUSED, POST-INDUSTRIAL
URBAN SPACE IN THE HEART
OF THE MILE-END
HERE IN MONTREAL.
ONE OF MY FAVOURITE DESIRE
LINES IN MONTREAL,
POSSIBLY THE WORLD, LEADS
THIS WAY, RIGHT TOWARDS
THIS HOLE IN THE FENCE
AND THE RAILWAY.
THIS IS NO LONGER
AN INDUSTRIAL AREA.
NOW THERE ARE DENSELY
POPULATED NEIGHBOURHOODS
ON EITHER SIDE AND
THIS IS AN INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT
DESIRE LINE FOR HUNDREDS
IF NOT THOUSANDS
OF PEOPLE
EVERY SINGLE DAY.
THE RAILWAY IS OWNED BY
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY.
THE CITY HAS
A DIFFICULT TIME
ENGAGING THEM IN A CONVERSATION
ABOUT HOW TO CREATE
LEVEL CROSSINGS.
IN THE MEANTIME,
WHAT HAPPENS IS THE CITIZENS
TAKE BACK THE SPACE.
THEY CUT HOLES IN THE FENCES.
THERE ARE FACEBOOK GROUPS
TELLING PEOPLE WHERE THE NEW
HOLES ARE. HERE YOU CAN SEE
A FORMER HOLE, WHICH HAS BEEN
PATCHED UP WITH A CHAIN-LINK
FENCE AND REINFORCED WITH STEEL.
AND THE CITIZENS HERE,
YOU CAN SEE,
HAVE JUST CREATED ANOTHER HOLE.
SO, LET'S JUST DO IT.

(music plays)

A map shows the location of Le village au pied-du-courant.

Mikael says NOW I'VE BEEN AROUND AND I'VE
SEEN CITIES ALL OVER THE GLOBE,
AND TO ME MONTREAL SEEMS
TO BE THE LAND OF OPPORTUNITY
WHEN IT COMES TO UNDERUSED
SPACES JUST WAITING
TO BECOME SOMETHING
USEFUL AND MEANINGFUL
TO THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY.

Now Mikael stands with a woman in an urban recreational space.

The caption changes to "Violaine St-Cyr. Project Manager, Village au Pied-du-Courant."

Violaine is in her thirties, with long, slightly wavy brown hair and wears a beige T-shirt dress.

She says WE'RE NEXT
TO THE JACQUES-CARTIER BRIDGE,
WE'RE BY
THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER,
WE'RE BETWEEN THE PORT
AND THE HIGHWAY.
IT'S KIND OF A BIT OF
A RIDICULOUS SPOT, BUT IT WORKS.
JUST LAST YEAR, WE HAD 120,000
PEOPLE COME IN FOUR MONTHS.
PEOPLE NEED SPACES LIKE THIS.
YOU SEE SO MANY PEOPLE MOVE
TO THE SUBURBS THESE DAYS
AND TRY TO FIND A SAFE
HAVEN OR SOME PEACE.
WE'VE KIND OF WEDGED IT IN AND
TRIED TO MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN
WHERE PEOPLE MAYBE WOULDN'T
HAVE THOUGHT IT WAS POSSIBLE.

Mikael says THIS ODD AND INTERESTING
PLACE IS CALLED
LE VILLAGE AU PIED-DU-COURANT,
WHICH ROUGHLY TRANSLATES
AS THE VILLAGE BY THE RIVER.
THE NON-PROFIT BEHIND IT AND
BEHIND MANY PUBLIC SPACE
INITIATIVES THROUGHOUT THE CITY
IS LA PÉPINIÈRE, "THE NURSERY."
IT'S AN URBAN LAB FOCUSED
ON INNOVATION, CREATIVITY AND
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
TO REDRAW AND RETHINK
UNUSED URBAN SPACES.
VIOLAINE IS THE PROJECT MANAGER
FOR THIS VERY
SUCCESSFUL PROJECT.

Violaine says WE'RE ON A SNOW DUMP
HERE, SO...

Mikael says WAIT! WHAT?
SORRY. YOU'RE ON A SNOW DUMP?

Violaine says YES.

Mikael says WHAT'S A SNOW DUMP?

Violaine says MONTREAL GETS A LITTLE BIT
OF SNOW IN THE WINTER.
SO THIS IS WHERE THE CITY
ACTUALLY BRINGS ALL THE SNOW
OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD. SO THEY
COME AND BRING IT HERE.
THERE ARE HUGE PILES AND
IT ACTUALLY MELTS HERE.

Mikael says ALRIGHT.

Violaine says SO IN THE WINTER, IT'S USED BY
THE CITY, BUT IN THE SUMMER,
THERE'S ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.
IT LOOKS LIKE A HUGE,
EMPTY PARKING LOT.

Mikael says RIGHT.

Violaine says SO EVERY YEAR,
WE BRING THE SAND,
WE BUILD THE BOARDWALK,
WE MAKE A CALL FOR PROPOSALS
TO INVITE TEAMS OF DESIGNERS,
ARCHITECTS, VISUAL ARTISTS
AND JUST THRIFTY PEOPLE,
TO PARTICIPATE IN
THE INSTALLATIONS OF THE SITE.
WE'RE REALLY BRINGING BACK
ATTENTION TO HOW INCREDIBLE
THIS AREA OF THE CITY IS.
IT'S NOT JUST FOR CARS.
IT'S FOR THE PEOPLE TOO.
THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO LIVE
ON THE OTHER SIDE
OF THE HIGHWAY AND
IT'S THEIR NEIGHBOURHOOD.
OFTENTIMES, PEOPLE
WHO LIVE KIND OF DOWNTOWN OR ON
THE PLATEAU MONT-ROYAL ARE NOT
USED TO COMING TO THIS AREA.
WE'RE SLOWLY SHIFTING THE
PERSPECTIVE OF PEOPLE AND
ENCOURAGING PEOPLE TO COME BACK
AND ENJOY THEIR WATERFRONT.
ONE DAY, OUR DREAM
IS TO BE ABLE TO TOUCH
THE WATER WITH OUR FEET.

(music plays)

Mikael says EVEN IF ACCESSING THE NEARBY
WATER ISN'T HAPPENING JUST YET,
THERE'S STILL A LOT GOING ON
HERE. PLAYGROUNDS, ART
EXHIBITIONS, CONCERTS, MOVIE
NIGHTS, YOGA CLASSES...
OR, SHOULD YOU WANT
TO JUST HANG OUT,
YOU CAN HAVE A DRINK,
EAT A BITE AND RELAX
WITH YOUR FEET IN THE SAND.
NOT BAD FOR A PLACE
THAT DOUBLES AS A SNOW
DUMP IN THE WINTER.
WHAT IS THIS SPACE?
IS IT PRIVATE SPACE?
PUBLIC SPACE?
HOW DO YOU DEFINE IT?

Violaine says IT'S PROVINCIALLY OWNED
PRIVATE LAND, BUT WE'RE CREATING
A PUBLIC SPACE OUT OF IT.
SO THAT IN AND OF ITSELF IS ONE
OF THE GREY ZONES
THAT WE EXIST IN.
WE'RE NOT REALLY IN ANY KIND
OF AREA WHERE
THERE IS NECESSARILY
LAWS DEFINING EXACTLY
WHAT WE CAN AND CANNOT DO,
SO IT'S BOTH THE CURSE
AND THE BEAUTY OF THE PROJECT.
PEOPLE AREN'T USED YET
TO JUST BEING PART OF SOMETHING
IN A PUBLIC SPACE.
IT'S LIKE YOU HAVE
TO BE INVITED OR TOLD
WHAT YOU'RE ALLOWED TO DO,
SO WE'RE SLOWLY BUT SURELY
TRYING TO SEE HOW PEOPLE
RELATE TO ALL OF IT
AND TO EVERYTHING
THAT WE'RE DOING HERE.

(music plays)

Mikael says LISTEN. WHAT ALSO MAKES
THIS PLACE STAND OUT,
LIKE ALL THE PROJECTS RUN
BY THE PEOPLE BEHIND IT,
IS AN AUDACIOUS PHILOSOPHY.
THERE'S NO PUBLICITY,
NO CORPORATE SPONSORS
AND NO BRANDING
OF ANY KIND ON THE SITE.
VIOLAINE ADMITS IT CANDIDLY.
TO SUSTAIN THIS MODEL,
TO INVEST MORE MONEY INTO THESE
ATTRACTIVE AND CITY-DEFINING
PROJECTS, PLAIN AND SIMPLE.

Violaine says WE'RE NOT FORCING PEOPLE
TO CONSUME.
THE WHOLE PROGRAMMING IS FREE.
TO PLAY PÉTANQUE, YOU HAVE
TO PUT IN A LITTLE DEPOSIT.
WE'RE REALLY TRYING TO CREATE
A MORE PARTICIPATORY CITY.
A CITY WHERE PEOPLE WORK
TOGETHER, TALK TO NEIGHBOURS,
WHERE PEOPLE ARE LESS
SOCIALLY ISOLATED.
THIS SPACE AND THE OTHER
SPACES THE ORGANIZATION
DEVELOPS HAVE THAT IN MIND.
SO, YES YOU CAN BUY SOMETHING,
YOU CAN HAVE A DRINK, YOU CAN
BUY FOOD, BUT YOU'RE REALLY HERE
JUST TO HAVE AN EXPERIENCE AND
TO PARTICIPATE IN YOUR OWN CITY.

They get some drinks at a stall.

Violaine says MERCI.

Mikael says MERCI.

Mikael plays a game of Petanque and says ALRIGHT.
OH! A ROLLER!
DO YOU THINK THIS
IS SOMETHING THAT
CAN BE SCALED MAYBE UP,
BUT ALSO OUTWARDS?

Violaine says IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT NOT
TO JUST REPLICATE THINGS BECAUSE
PEOPLE ENJOY IT.
WE WANT MORE OF THEM.
I THINK THE ROOTING
IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
AND THE INSPIRATION
OF THE ACTUAL ENVIRONMENT
THAT YOU'RE HAVING THE PROJECT
IN IS REALLY IMPORTANT
TO CONSIDER AND TO MAINTAIN.
I THINK THAT MASS PRODUCTION
IS SOMETHING THAT WE HAVE
A TENDENCY TO REVERT TOWARDS
OR WANT TO GO TOWARDS,
BUT I THINK THE CONCEPT,
THE CALLS FOR PROPOSALS,
THE FACT THAT IT'S AN
UNDERUTILIZED SPACE
THAT CAN DEFINITELY EXIST
ELSEWHERE IN THE CITY.
BUT IT'S REALLY IMPORTANT
TO NOT JUST REPLICATE
FOR THE SAKE OF IT.

Violaine takes her turn at the game.

Mikael says OH NO!
I'M USING
MY MICROPHONE CABLE HERE.

He measures the distance between their balls and says TROIS À UN?

Violaine says TROIS À UN. OUI.

Mikael says ALRIGHT.

A caption reads "Score. Mikael: 3; Violaine: 1."

Then Violaine's score goes up to 13.

(music plays)

Mikael says TO BE HONEST, THE AMOUNT
OF LOST SPACE
IN THIS CITY COMPLETELY
BLOWS MY MIND.
SOMETHING LIKE 21.8
SQUARE KILOMETRES
OF VACANT, ABANDONED SPACE.
THAT'S 4.4 PERCENT
OF THE ENTIRE MUNICIPALITY
JUST SITTING THERE,
UNUSED AND SOMETIMES
EVEN UNACCOUNTED FOR.
I SEE THIS AS A WORLD OF NEW
POSSIBILITIES TO MAKE THIS CITY
EVEN MORE SPECTACULAR.

The caption changes to "Mikael St-Pierre. Urban planner and co-owner of Lande."

Mikael is in his twenties, with short brown hair and a beard and he wears jeans and a white short-sleeved shirt.

He says TO ME, DOING SOME PROJECTS
ON VACANT LANDS IS REALLY
IMPORTANT SINCE IT HELPS
COMMUNITIES HAVE A VISION
FOR THEIR NEIGHBOURHOODS AND
IT TRIES TO CERTAIN NEEDS
THAT THE NEIGHBOURHOOD HAS.
LET'S SAY IN THIS ONE
NEIGHBOURHOOD THERE'S NO GROCERY
STORE, NO COMMUNITY GARDEN,
BUT THERE'S VACANT LAND.
PEOPLE COULD DECIDE TO DO
A GARDEN THERE AND
SUDDENLY, THE VACANT LAND
BECOMES SOMETHING THAT ANSWERS
THE NEEDS OF THE COMMUNITY.

Mikael says RIGHT.

Mikael Saint Pierre says SO THAT'S WHY TO ME IT'S REALLY
IMPORTANT AND IT'S SOMETHING
I REALLY LIKE. THIS WAY,
WE SEE SOME PEOPLE
COME OUT AND GIVE IDEAS.
THAT'S OUR DEMOCRACY IN ACTION.

(music plays)

Mikael says MIKAEL ST-PIERRE IS A YOUNG
AND INSPIRING URBAN PLANNER.
WITH HIS FRIENDS
LAWYERS,
URBANISTS AND DESIGNERS -
HE FOUNDED LANDE,
A NON-PROFIT HELPING CITIZENS
RECLAIM VACANT LAND.
THEY SEE THEMSELVES
AS FACILITATORS.
THEY DIG UP THE INFO
ABOUT THE CURRENT OWNER
OF THE VACANT LAND,
WHETHER IT'S THE CITY
OR A PRIVATE OWNER, SECURE
ACCESS TO IT AND EVEN HELP
WITH DESIGN AND COMMUNITY
ENGAGEMENT SO THAT CITIZENS
DEVELOP THEIR OWN PROJECTS.
THE PEOPLE OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
THEN TAKE THE HELM, GIVING
NEW LIFE TO THE DEAD SPACE
AROUND THEIR HOMES.

Mikael Saint Pierre says WE HAVE A TOOL THAT WE MADE.
IT'S A WEBSITE AND
I CAN SHOW IT TO YOU.
IT'S A MAP WHERE YOU CAN
SEE ALL THOSE SPOTS
IN THE CITY OF MONTREAL.
AS OF RIGHT NOW, WE HAVE
OVER ONE HUNDRED VACANT LANDS
THAT ARE ON THE MAP AND
THOSE ARE ALL VACANT LANDS
THAT PEOPLE SENT US.
LET'S SAY WE CLICK
ON WHERE WE ARE RIGHT NOW.
HERE'S ALL
THE INFORMATION ABOUT IT.
SO THAT'S THE BASIC
INFORMATION. WE ALSO HAVE
THIS FACEBOOK PLUG IN WHERE
PEOPLE CAN START COMMENTS,
SAYING : ."I LIVE CLOSE BY
AND WANT TO DO SOMETHING."

Mikael says THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT
IS HAPPENING HERE.
THIS 181 SQUARE METRE
LOT WAS PRIVATELY OWNED,
BUT LEFT TO ROT FOR MANY YEARS.
TRASH WAS SCATTERED EVERYWHERE.
RATS HAD BASICALLY TAKEN OVER.
SO PEOPLE BEGAN USING IT
AS A DUMP, WHICH,
NO SURPRISE,
DIDN'T PLEASE THE NEIGHBOURS.
WITH THE HELP OF LANDE,
THEY TURNED THINGS AROUND.
THE MUNICIPALITY
PURCHASED THE LAND
AND CONTRIBUTED TO A SMALL,
PARTICIPATORY BUDGET.
CITIZENS BANDED TOGETHER
AND AGREED ON A WISH
LIST FOR THE PLACE.
IN NO TIME, THEY CREATED THIS.

A picture shows an image of people gathering in a small park next to a building with a wall intervened with street art.

Mikael says OFF WE GO, IN SEARCH
OF OTHER SUCCESS STORIES.
THIS ONE HERE
IS THE ALLEY BESIDE
THE JARDINS BASILE-PATENAUDE,
JUST A FEW BLOCKS AWAY.

The caption changes to "David-Alexandre Boutin. Coordinator, Jardin Basile-Patenaude."

David is in his forties, with short straight gray hair and wears glasses, off-white Bermuda shorts, a blue T-shirt and a cap hat.

He says IT LOOKED LIKE THIS.
GARBAGE, BINS,
GRAFFITI, CARS, CONCRETE.
WE DECIDED TO GET TOGETHER,
THIRTY VOLUNTEERS AND PEOPLE
FROM THE AREA, AND
WE PLANTED 150 FRUIT TREES.
WE PLANTED SO MANY
FLOWERS FOR POLLINATORS.
IN ONE WEEKEND,
WE FLIPPED THE PLACE.

Mikael says DAVID-ALEXANDRE HAS LIVED
IN ROSEMONT FOR MANY YEARS.
EVERY DAY, THIS SOCIAL WORKER,
DOUBLING AS A FORESTRY WORKER,
RODE HIS BIKE THROUGH
THIS CONCRETE ALLEYWAY
ALONG A DERELICT COMMUNITY
GARDEN IN ONE OF THE POOREST
AND MOST CHALLENGED PARTS
OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD.
HE DECIDED IT WAS
TIME FOR CHANGE.
AND WHEN THIS GUY,
AKA THE POWERHOUSE,
PUTS HIS MIND TO IT,
THINGS GET CHANGED.

David-Alexandre says WHO CAN WE CONTACT AT THE CITY
AND THE BOROUGH TO HELP US
TO USE THIS LAND IN A PLACE
WHERE THERE ARE SO MANY NEEDS?
THAT'S WHEN MIKAEL
AND LANDE CAME IN.

Mikael Saint Pierre says WHERE WE'RE STANDING RIGHT
NOW, IT'S A BACK ALLEY.
IT'S OWNED BY
THE CITY OF MONTREAL.

Mikael says BUT WHEN THERE'S A WILL,
OF COURSE, THERE'S A WAY.
LET ME WRAP MY BRAIN
AROUND THIS. THE LAND
IS OWNED BY A SUPERMARKET.
WELL, EXCEPT FOR A TINY
PIECE OWNED BY THE CITY,
PREVENTING ANY POSSIBILITY
OF EXPANDING THE STORE.
THE CITY'S BEEN RENTING
THE WHOLE PLOT FOR YEARS
TO HOST THE COMMUNITY GARDEN,
BUT THE CITY OFFICIALS
DIDN'T EVEN REALIZE
THEY WERE ALSO RENTING
ALL THE ABANDONED SPACE AROUND
THE GARDEN, UP UNTIL LANDE,
AFTER IN-DEPTH RESEARCH,
DISCOVERED IT FOR THEM.
THIS WAS A GAME CHANGER.

Mikael Saint Pierre says BASICALLY, WE GAVE
THEM ACCESS TO THE LAND
AND THE GROUP WENT
FORWARD WITH THE REST.

David-Alexandre says WE DECIDED TO PLANT FRUIT TREES
EVERYWHERE. SO WE HAVE PEARS,
APPLES, PLUMS, RASPBERRIES,
BLUEBERRIES, HASKAP BERRIES,
GOJI BERRIES.
IT'S FREE FOR EVERYBODY.
YOU SEE THE RASPBERRIES HERE.

Mikael says THERE THEY ARE.

David-Alexandre says WHEN THEY'LL BE RIPE,
EVERYONE CAN PICK THEM.
PEOPLE IN NEED, WITH
SOCIOECONOMIC DIFFICULTIES,
THEY DESERVE TO HAVE A NICE
PLACE TO LIVE AROUND.

Mikael says SO THAT'S THE VALUE.

David-Alexandre says THAT IS THE VALUE.

Mikael says IT WASN'T THE VALUE OF BEING
ABLE TO PICK PLUMS.
IT'S A NICE VALUE, BUT
I MEAN, IT'S MORE THAN THAT.

David-Alexandre says YES, IT IS, BUT IT IS MORE
SOCIAL. CONNECTING PEOPLE,
CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY,
GETTING THEM INVOLVED.
LIKE THE CHICKEN COOP. IT'S RUN
ENTIRELY BY THE COMMUNITY.
FOR EXAMPLE, JEAN-SÉBASTIEN
AND HIS SON TAKE
THE CHICKENS OUT ON MONDAY
MORNINGS AND FEED THEM.
AT NIGHT, IT'S MICHELINE
AND HER GRANDSON
THAT COME. SO YES,
WE WANTED TO BONIFY THE PLACE
WITH FRUIT TREES,
BUT THE MAIN THING
WAS TO CREATE LINKS
BETWEEN THE PEOPLE
OF PLACE BASILE-PATENAUDE.

A man says MIKAEL, WHENEVER YOU'RE READY.
GO CAPTURE THESE GUYS
AND PUT THEM IN.

Mikael says ALRIGHT. YOU'RE THE BOSS
TONIGHT, RIGHT?
SO, YEAH, ALRIGHT.
YOU GOT MY BACK?

The man says YEAH, I'VE GOT YOUR BACK.

Mikael tries to catch a chicken in the coop and says ALRIGHT.
IT'S THE OLD DANISH THING. YEAH!
YOU AND ME, BABY.
YOU AND ME.
YEAH, YOU KNOW WHERE
TO GO. YOU KNOW.
THAT'S RIGHT, GIRL. YOU KNOW.

(music plays)

Mikael says MONTREAL IS A
VERY GREEN CITY.
WITH ABOUT 21 PERCENT OF ITS AREA
COVERED BY GREEN CANOPY.
UNFORTUNATELY, THIS COULD ALL
CHANGE VERY DRASTICALLY OVER
THE NEXT DECADE, NO THANKS
TO THE RAVAGING ASH
TREE BEETLE EPIDEMIC.
ACTION HAS BEEN TAKEN AND
ALMOST 60,000 OF MONTREAL'S
ASH TREES WERE SAVED.
BUT STILL, 20,000
OF THEM NEEDED TO BE
CUT DOWN, LEAVING JUST
AS MANY EMPTY SPOTS ON
THE STREETS OF MONTREAL.

Mikael walks in a workshop.

The caption changes to "Ronald Jean-Gilles. Founder, Bois Public."

Ronald is in his forties, balding and with a graying beard. He wears glasses, jeans and a black and white gingham shirt.

He says OUR MAIN GOAL IS TO GIVE PUBLIC
TREES BACK TO THE COMMUNITY,
SO WE RECYCLED THESE TREES,
TURNED THEM INTO FURNITURE
AND THROUGH DIFFERENT PROJECTS,
WE MAKE SURE THAT THEY END UP
IN PUBLIC SPACES.

Mikael says IT ALL STARTED AS A PILOT
PROJECT, WHEN THE BOROUGH
OF ROSEMONT-PETITE PATRIE
CALLED ON RONALD JEAN-GILLES,
A SOCIAL ENTREPRENEUR.
THE HOPE WAS TO FIND A WAY
TO TURN TREES INTO SOMETHING
MORE THAN JUST WOOD CHIPS.
AND AS IT TURNS OUT, THE BEETLE
ONLY ATTACKS THE BARK
OF THE TREES, LEAVING THE REST
OF THE WOOD INTACT. AND WOOD,
BETWEEN YOU AND ME
AND RONALD HERE,
MEANS FURNITURE.
IN THIS CASE, STREET FURNITURE.
TO MAKE IT ALL HAPPEN,
HE PARTNERED UP WITH SEVERAL
LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS.
ONE OF THEM, LES ATELIERS
D'ANTOINE, IS A WORKSHOP
FOCUSED ON SOCIAL INCLUSION.
AND THIS IS WHERE
BOIS PUBLIC, WHICH TRANSLATES
TO "THE WOOD OF THE PEOPLE,"
IF YOU WANT TO BE FANCY,
MAKES MOST OF THEIR FURNITURE.
WHO ARE THE PEOPLE WORKING HERE?

The caption changes to "Jean-Francois Belanger. Project Manager, Les ateliers d'Antoine."

Jean-Francois is in his thirties, with short brown hair and a beard and he wears a black T-shirt with gray stripes.

He says WE'VE GOT YOUNG PEOPLE THAT CAME
HERE BECAUSE THEY WERE TRYING
TO REINTEGRATE
THE WORKFORCE.
WE HAVE LOCAL PEOPLE,
IMMIGRANTS.
EVERYBODY IS WELCOME.
WE TEACH THEM HOW
TO MAKE FURNITURE.
THEY WORK HERE FOR FIVE
MONTHS AND AFTER THAT,
THEY GET A CERTIFICATE
SO THEY CAN LOOK
FOR A REAL JOB ON THE MARKET.

Ronald says SO YES, WE HAVE A GOOD IMPACT
ON THE ENVIRONMENT BY RECYCLING
THE TREES, BUT THERE'S ALSO
A SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC
IMPACT BY HELPING
THESE YOUNG ADULTS
TO HAVE A SECOND
CHANCE IN LIFE.

Mikael says IT ALL STARTED IN THIS
NEIGHBOURHOOD, BUT THE IDEA
HAS NOW SPREAD AROUND THE CITY.
RONALD AND BOIS PUBLIC
ARE DEVELOPING IDEAS
WITH OTHER BOROUGHS AND
EVEN OTHER CITIES AFFECTED
BY THE ASH TREE
BEETLE EPIDEMIC.
THEIR NEXT STEP?
THEY WANT TO RECYCLE
OTHER TYPES OF TREES
WHICH HAVE BEEN CUT DOWN
FOR OTHER REASONS.
SINCE ITS FOUNDATION,
BOIS PUBLIC HAS BUILT ALMOST
ONE HUNDRED BENCHES,
PROVIDING PUBLIC SEATING
IN FIVE NEIGHBOURHOODS.
AND TO DO THAT,
THEY'VE RECYCLED MORE
THAN 1,400 TREES.
NOT BAD, MY FRIEND.
NOT BAD.
THESE LITTLE BENCHES
AREN'T MEANT
FOR THIS SPECIFIC PARK.
THEY'LL SOON BE MOVED
TO A GREEN ALLEY WAY SOMEWHERE
IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD,
FOR THE KIDS.

Mikael laughs and says MAKES YOU WANT TO SIT.

Ronald says FOR ME, THE BEST STORY
IS WHEN WE INSTALL THE FURNITURE
WITH THE PARTICIPANTS
WHO ARE PART
OF THE REINTEGRATION PROGRAM.
THEY INSTALL THE FURNITURE
AND THEY GET THE REACTION
DIRECTLY FROM THE CITIZENS
WHO PASS BY.
THEY TELL THEM:
"OH, THIS IS BEAUTIFUL,"
AND THEY CAN PROUDLY SAY
THAT THEY WORKED
ON THIS PROJECT.
"I DID THIS. I BUILT THIS."
THIS IS THE BEST RECOGNITION
FOR ME.

(music plays)

Mikael says IF WE'RE GOING TO TALK
ABOUT URBAN CYCLING,
MONTREAL HAS BEEN,
IN THE NORTH AMERICAN CONTEXT,
WAY AHEAD OF THE CURVE.
THE FIRST PROTECTED BIKE LANE
WAS PUT IN IN THE MID-1980S
ON THIS STREET, RACHEL.
THE DESIGN THE CITY
WENT WITH WAS KIND
OF LAZY URBAN PLANNING,
THESE BIDIRECTIONAL LANES
ON ONE SIDE OF THE STREET.
THIS IS NOT BEST PRACTICE
AT ALL. THIS CITY DESPERATELY
NEEDS AN INFRASTRUCTURE
NETWORK OF PROTECTED
BIKE LANES. SO THE QUESTION
IS: WHERE DOES MONTREAL
GO FROM HERE? THE PEOPLE HAVE
SHOWN THAT THEY'RE READY
FOR MORE AND THAT
THEY DESERVE MORE.
CITYWIDE, JUST UNDER 3 PERCENT CHOOSE
THE BICYCLE AS TRANSPORT,
BUT IN CERTAIN AREAS, LIKE HERE
IN THE BOROUGH OF THE PLATEAU,
DOUBLE DIGITS ARE IMMINENT.
THEY'RE READY TO HIT 10 PERCENT.
YOU DON'T SEE
THAT IN NORTH AMERICA AT ALL.

A caption reads "Percentage of commuters who bike to work: 2.5 percent in Montreal, 10.8 percent in Plateau-Mont Royal."

The caption changes to "Chicago, 1.69 percent; New York City, 1.27 percent; Los Angeles, 0.91 percent; Houston, 0.27 percent; Phoenix, 0.77 percent."

Mikael says THE CITY IS STARTING
TO IMPLEMENT
UNIDIRECTIONAL CYCLE
TRACKS ON EITHER SIDE
OF THE STREET AND THAT
IS A GREAT SIGN.
THIS CITY HAS EVERYTHING
IT NEEDS TO BECOME
A WORLD-CLASS BICYCLE CITY.

(music plays)

Mikael says WE'RE IN PARC JARRY, ON
THE BORDER OF PARC-EXTENSION,
OR PARC-EX AS IT'S KNOWN
LOCALLY. A VERY DIVERSE
AND LOW-INCOME NEIGHBOURHOOD,
BUT ONE THAT'S ALSO STUCK
BETWEEN A HIGHWAY, A BIG
BOULEVARD AND A RAILWAY.
THE CYCLING NETWORK HERE
IS ALMOST NON-EXISTENT
AND BIKE CULTURE
IS NOT REALLY A THING
FOR MANY NEWCOMERS,
ESPECIALLY WOMEN.

Mikael meets a couple in a workshop.

The caption changes to "Cassandre Ville. Cycling teacher. Nils Henner. Coordinator, Culture Velo."

Cassandre is in her late twenties, with long wavy brown hair and wears baggy printed trousers and a black T-shirt.

Nils is in his late twenties, bald and with a beard with a long braid on the chin. He wears glasses, black jeans and a blue T-shirt.

Cassandre says WELCOME.

Mikael says THANK YOU.

Nils points at a map on the wall and says THIS IS A MAP
OF THE BIKE PATHS IN MONTREAL.
WE ARE HERE IN THIS AREA.
DO YOU SEE THIS BLANK SPOT?
THERE'S A SMALL ISLAND
OF CYCLE PATHS.
THAT'S PARC-EXTENSION
AND IT'S NOT ACTUALLY
CONNECTED TO THE REST.
SO WE'RE HERE TO EMPOWER PEOPLE
AND ENCOURAGE THEM TO GO ACROSS
THE BORDER OF THEIR DISTRICT.

Mikael says CASSANDRE AND NILS,
TWO FRENCH IMMIGRANTS,
ARE PART OF CULTURE VÉLO,
AN ORGANIZATION DEMOCRATIZING
THE BICYCLE AS A MEANS
OF TRANSPORTATION.
THEY OPENED A BIKE
SHOP, BUT THEY WANTED
TO DO MORE. SO THEY STARTED
PROVIDING CYCLING CLASSES
TO THE IMMIGRANT
WOMEN OF PARC-EX.

At the park, Cassandre waves at a woman and says THAT'S CHADANA. HI.

Mikael says HI.

Cassandre says SHE'S ONE OF THE STUDENTS.
THAT'S MIKAEL.

Mikael says HELLO. MIKAEL.

Cassandre says ARE YOU READY TO BEGIN?

Chadana, a brown haired woman in her forties, says YEAH.

She climbs up a bike and says YEAH. PERFECT.

Cassandre says OKAY. SO LIKE THE LAST TIME,
YOU'RE GOING TO TRY TO...
DO YOU REMEMBER, WHERE YOU
PUSH AND YOU WIDEN YOUR FEET?
TRY TO PUSH A LITTLE BIT MORE,
TO HAVE SOME MORE SPEED.
YEAH, THAT'S GOOD.
AND LOOK IN FRONT OF YOU.
GOOD! YOU'RE DOING WELL.
SO DON'T BE AFRAID
TO GO A LITTLE BIT FASTER.

Mikael says HOW DO YOU SEE THE IMPORTANCE
OF THESE WOMEN LEARNING
HOW TO RIDE A BIKE?

Cassandre says I THINK IT'S IMPORTANT
AS A WAY TO EMPOWER WOMEN.
IT CREATES A SENSE
OF SISTERHOOD.
IT CREATES RELATIONSHIPS
BETWEEN WOMEN
THAT WOULDN'T HAVE
MET OTHERWISE.
THEY IDENTIFY WITH EACH OTHER.
I HAD ONE STUDENT LAST YEAR
WHO WAS CYCLING IN THE PARK.
SOME WOMEN THAT LIVE
IN THE SAME NEIGHBOURHOOD SAW
HER AND THEY RECOGNIZED HER.
THEY CALLED HER IN THE EVENING
AND TOLD HER IT WAS AMAZING
THAT SHE KNEW HOW TO RIDE A BIKE
AND THEY WANTED TO LEARN TOO.

Nils says IT'S A GOOD WAY TO GO FROM
A SPORT TO TRANSPORT.
SHE TOLD ME
THAT IT'S SUPER FAST.
ONE OF HER STUDENTS WENT
TO THE LIBRARY AND
IT WAS SUPER FAST WITH THE BIKE.
SHE WAS REALLY HAPPY ABOUT THAT.
I THINK IT HAS TO START WHERE
YOU START FEELING CONFIDENT AND
THEN YOU CAN START TO EXPLORE,
TO MOVE FROM ONE PLACE
TO ANOTHER AND
THEN BREAK THE BORDERS.

(music plays)

Mikael says ADAMA IS FROM SENEGAL.
SHE ARRIVED IN MONTREAL
A FEW YEARS AGO
WITH HER HUSBAND
AND THEIR THREE KIDS AND LANDED
HERE IN PARC-EXTENSION.
COULD YOU RIDE A BIKE BEFORE?

The caption changes to "Adama Diallo."

Adama is in her thirties, wears jeans, a black sweatshirt with a yellow print on the front, a black and white printed headscarf and a bike helmet.

She says NO. I NEVER...

Mikael says NEVER?

Adama says NO.

Mikael says WHAT IS THE GOAL FOR YOU
TO LEARN HOW TO RIDE A BIKE?

Adama says MY GOAL IS TO RIDE
THE BICYCLE WITH MY KIDS ONE DAY
AND TO GO TO WORK
WITH MY BICYCLE.

Mikael says OKAY.

Adama says YES. IT'S FUN AND
IT'S FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.

Mikael says FOR THE ENVIRONMENT TOO.
YOU'RE THIS CLOSE, I THINK.
TOTALLY. I WILL
LET YOU PRACTISE.

Adama says THANK YOU.

Mikael says THANK YOU.
THREE LESSONS AND
SHE'S BEEN RIDING UP AND DOWN.
SHE'S A BIT WOBBLY GETTING
THE MOMENTUM GOING,
BUT I'M IMPRESSED BY
ANYBODY WHO CAN DO THAT
AS AN ADULT IN THREE HOURS.

Cassandre says I THINK IT MAKES YOU DISCOVER
THE CITY DIFFERENTLY.
YOU CAN REALLY FEEL
THAT YOU'RE AT HOME.
YOU CAN GO EVERYWHERE. IT HAD
THE SAME EFFECT ON ME, ACTUALLY.
I REALLY FELT AT HOME
WHEN I BEGAN TO RIDE A BIKE.
JUST USING THE PUBLIC TRANSPORT
AND EXPLORING THE CITY
AND FEELING AT EASE EVERYWHERE.
SO I THINK IT CAN BRING
THAT TO THEM TOO.

Nils says IT'S REALLY BUILDING BRIDGES
BETWEEN THE PEOPLE INSIDE
THE COMMUNITY, SO THAT
THE COMMUNITY OF BIKE
LEARNERS GROWS AND EVENTUALLY,
THEY'LL BE THE TEACHERS.
AND THEY TAKE BACK THE COURSES.

Cassandre says THE MOST IMPORTANT PART IS
TO GIVE THE IDEA THAT FIRST,
YOU CAN STILL LEARN AND
IT'S NOT TOO LATE.
IN A FEW YEARS, WE'LL SEE
A LOT OF WOMEN RIDING
IN PARC-EXTENSION.

Mikael says YEAH. COOL.

Nils says WE HOPE SO.

(music plays)

Mikael says MY NEXT STEP
IS MONTREAL-NORTH,
A NEIGHBOURHOOD TROUBLED
BY A PERSISTENT HIGH
CRIME RATE AND POVERTY.
MANY OF ITS RESIDENTS FEEL
MORE OFTEN THAN NOT FORGOTTEN
BY THE MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES
AND LEFT ALONE TO DEAL
WITH SOCIAL EXCLUSION.
THE INFAMOUS ILOT PELLETIER
WAS KNOWN FOR YEARS
THINGS DRUG AND PROSTITUTION.
IT WAS A VIRTUAL
NO-GO ZONE SMACK DAB
IN THE MIDDLE
OF A RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBOURHOOD.
CHILDREN WOULD
WALK PAST THE SAD
AND DERELICT PLACE
EVERY DAY ON THEIR WAY
TO THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL.
AFTER A POLICE CRACKDOWN,
CITIZENS DECIDED THEY'D HAD
ENOUGH AND THEY COMPLETELY
TURNED THINGS AROUND.
LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS BOUGHT
THE BUILDINGS
AND CREATED SOCIAL HOUSING.
THE CITIZENS ALSO LAUNCHED
A SERIES OF CREATIVE PROJECTS.
THEY OPENED A DAYCARE,
A COMMUNITY GARDEN
AND A FOOD CO-OP.

Mikael helps unload fruit boxes from a truck and says VOILÀ.
SO, NORIA, WHAT ARE WE DOING?

The caption changes to "Noria Belamri. Member, Panier Fute Co-op."

Noria is in her forties, with shoulder length wavy brown hair and wears a denim shirt and a red apron.

She says PEOPLE MAKE THEIR ORDERS
FOR TWO WEEKS.

Mikael says DO THEY PICK IT UP OR
DO YOU DELIVER?

Noria says PEOPLE COME TO PICK IT UP, THOSE
WHO HAVE THE ABILITY TO DO IT.
BUT THERE IS ALSO DELIVERY FOR
PEOPLE WHO HAVE LESS MOBILITY.

Mikael says WHEN NORIA LANDED HERE FROM
ALGERIA IN 2009 SHE WAS SHOCKED
TO LEARN THAT FOOD ACCESS WAS
AN ISSUE IN MONTREAL-NORTH,
RIGHT HERE IN CANADA.
ONE PERSON OUT OF THREE
IN THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD LIVES
IN A FOOD DESERT, AN URBAN AREA
IN WHICH IT'S DIFFICULT TO BUY
AFFORDABLE OR GOOD-QUALITY
FRESH FOOD.
AND ALMOST HALF
OF THE CHILDREN HERE LIVE UNDER
THE POVERTY LINE. NORIA
REALIZED THAT POVERTY, WELL,
IT HITS ALL OVER THE GLOBE,
NO MATTER WHAT CONTINENT
YOU LIVE ON. BUT SHE GOT
INVOLVED RIGHT AWAY AND
BECAME ONE OF THE FIRST MEMBERS
OF THE PANIER FUTÉ FOOD CO-OP.
EVERY MEMBER HERE VOLUNTEERS
AT LEAST THREE HOURS A MONTH,
SO THAT EVERYONE HAS ACCESS
TO FRESH AND AFFORDABLE FOOD.

Noria says THIS IS THE PLACE WHERE
THE CO-OP OPERATES.
MAYBE YOU CAN HELP
WITH THE PARSLEY.

Mikael says YEAH, SURE.
ALRIGHT. GOT IT.
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE
BETWEEN NOW AND THEN,
WHEN YOU FIRST ARRIVED?

Noria says FIRST, I THINK IT GIVES HOPE
FOR MANY PEOPLE.
THE CO-OP GIVES THEM
SOCIAL INTERACTIONS.
PEOPLE GET TOGETHER.
THEY LEARN TO LIVE TOGETHER
AND LIVING TOGETHER MEANS
HAVING MORE TOLERANCE
TOWARDS THE OTHERS AND WORKING
TOWARDS YOUR OWN SELF.
YOU KNOW, WHEN
YOU LIVE IN POVERTY,
IT ENCOURAGES LONELINESS.
WHEN YOU'RE ALONE,
THINKING YOU'RE THE ONLY
ONE IN YOUR SITUATION
AND BEING EXCLUDED,
IT'S DIFFICULT TO GET INVOLVED
IN SOCIETY. IT'S THE HUMAN
CONNECTION, ACTUALLY,
THAT'S LACKING IN
THIS INDIVIDUALISTIC SOCIETY
AND THAT'S WHAT
WE ARE TRYING TO CHANGE.

Mikael says SO IT'S NOT JUST FOOD AND FOOD
ACCESS, IT'S COMMUNITY.

Noria says IT'S COMMUNITY, YEAH.

Mikael says THAT'S IMPORTANT TO YOU.
I CAN HEAR IT.

Noria says OF COURSE, OF COURSE.
I COME FROM ALGERIA.

Mikael says YEAH. HOW DO YOU SEE THE FUTURE
OF YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD?

Noria says MY VISION IS THAT
THIS IS JUST A TOOL
TO GENERATE OTHER CHANGES.
IT STARTS SMALL,
BUT IT GETS BIGGER.
WE JUST HAVE
TO PUT SOME ENERGY
AND SOME EFFORT IN IT.

Mikael says RIGHT.

Noria says AND BELIEVE.
THAT'S IMPORTANT.

(music plays)

An aerial view shows the locations of Montreal-North and Hochelaga-Maisonneuve.

The caption changes to "Janie Beauchamp and Catherine Robert. Co-founders, Le P'tit Village Sicard."

Janie is in her thirties, with short straight brown hair and wears sunglasses, black leggings, a black tank top and pendant earrings.

Catherine is in her thirties, with long light brown hair in a low ponytail and wears denim shorts, a pale gray T-shirt and sunglasses over her head.

Catherine says YOU'RE IN MY BACKYARD,
ACTUALLY.

Mikael says I'M IN YOUR BACKYARD.
AWESOME!

Catherine says YOU'RE IN MY BACKYARD,
BECAUSE IT'S APARTMENTS
WITH USUALLY SMALL, SMALL YARDS.
I'M ON THE SECOND FLOOR,
SO I DON'T HAVE
ACCESS TO THE YARD.
OKAY.
SO THE ALLEY IS MY BACKYARD.

Mikael says JANIE AND CATHERINE WERE
NEIGHBOURS FOR YEARS, BUT THEY
ONLY BECAME FRIENDS WHILE
TRANSFORMING THEIR BACK ALLEY
INTO A GREEN SPACE. IT'S CALLED
LE P'TIT VILLAGE SICARD,
"THE LITTLE SICARD VILLAGE,"
NAMED AFTER A NEARBY STREET.
YOU HAVE TO UNDERSTAND
THAT ALLEYS ARE A TRUE PART
OF THIS CITY'S DNA.
GET THIS!
THERE ARE MORE THAN 500
KILOMETRES OF ALLEYWAYS
ON THE ISLAND OF MONTREAL.
THAT'S A LOT!
THEIR MODERN RENAISSANCE
HAPPENED IN THE 80S
AND THROUGH THE 90S WITH
A FEW MUNICIPAL PROGRAMS
GIVING THE CITIZENS THE MEANS
TO GREEN THEM TOGETHER,
TRANSFORMING CAR SHORT CUTS
INTO VIBRANT AND UNIQUE SPACES.
THERE ARE NOW AROUND
400, AND COUNTING,
OF THESE GREEN ALLEYS
THROUGHOUT TWELVE
OF MONTREAL'S
NINETEEN BOROUGHS.

Catherine says WHEN I STARTED TO COME IN THE
ALLEY, I WAS THE ONLY ONE.
BUT AS SOON AS YOU START
LIVING IN THE SPACE,
PEOPLE START COMING OUT. SEE?

A boy approaches a hugs Janie.

Mikael says YEAH. THERE'S ONE.
IF THERE'S PEOPLE, THEN THERE'LL
BE MORE. IF THERE'S NOBODY,
THEN NOBODY WANTS TO COME.

Janie says "At first, our goal was to reduce traffic and add greenery to reduce urban heat islands. So we removed some pavement and we added some soil, some trees, some flowers. Then we blocked the access to the alley. This way, we reduce traffic. Time went on and we now have fruit trees for the kids and vegetables."

Mikael says OH! RIGHT HERE! YOU CAN FEEL IT
RIGHT HERE, RIGHT?
SERIOUSLY MAN,
THE TEMPERATURE JUST DROPPED
15 DEGREES HERE
JUST IN THE STREET.

Janie says "We have a big show today. We want to meet the new families that have just moved in. So we organized a party for the kids to celebrate the end of the school year. A circus troupe will be showing up soon."

Mikael says JANIE AND CATHERINE INSIST:
THIS IS JUST A BUNCH
OF NEIGHBOURS DOING
A BUNCH OF STUFF.
NO RULES, NO OBLIGATIONS,
NO STRICT ORGANIZATION.
AND FOR THE GOOD PEOPLE
OF THIS LITTLE VILLAGE,
IT NEEDS TO STAY THAT WAY.

Janie says "When we're inspired to develop a project that really matters to us, we move forward with it and people are free to join in or not. Sometimes four people show up and sometimes there are 150."

Catherine says WE'RE ORGANIZED ENOUGH IN LIFE.
WE DON'T NEED TO BE ORGANIZED
ON THE WEEKEND.

Janie says "When it's mandatory or too formal, we must deal with rules and dynamics between neighbours. It's not always easy and we don't want it to get complicated. We improvise and trust our instincts."

The neighbours decorate the alley for a show for children.

A woman says "Please take a seat and smile. The show's about to start!"

Mikael says WHEN YOU STARTED,
YOU DIDN'T HAVE
THE GRAND VISION OF THIS TODAY.

Catherine says NO. THE COMMUNITY
THAT WAS BUILT AROUND
THE GREEN ALLEY IS A BIG BONUS.
SO BIG THAT WE WERE
SUPPOSED TO MOVE AND
WE DECIDED TO STAY. AND A LOT
OF PEOPLE ARE COMING BACK.
MY HUSBAND LOST HIS FATHER
AND WHEN WE CAME BACK
FROM THE FUNERAL, THERE WERE 20
OR 30 CARDS AROUND OUR DOOR.

Mikael says OH WOW!

Janie says "With messages."

Catherine says WITH CONDOLENCES.
"WE'RE THERE FOR YOU."
WE CAME BACK AND
WE SAW THIS. OH MY GOD!

Janie says "People express their solidarity."

Catherine says YEAH. SOLIDARITY. CAREFREE.
WE FELL IN LOVE WITH EVERYBODY.

Mikael says COOL.

Catherine says ALMOST EVERYBODY.

Janie says "We've created a small village within a big village."

Mikael says I'VE MET WITH GREAT PEOPLE
WORKING ON GREAT PROJECTS HERE
IN MONTREAL, URGING THE CITY
TO DO MORE, TO BE BETTER.
BUT THIS LITTLE BACK ALLEY
FILLED WITH KIDS AND PEOPLE
SIMPLY HANGING OUT AND
BECOMING FRIENDS,
THIS IS WHAT MONTREAL
TRULY IS FOR ME.
THE CITIZENS HERE DON'T ALWAYS
NEED THE CITY IN ORDER TO MAKE
THINGS HAPPEN. THEY JUST DO IT,
IN EVERY NEIGHBOURHOOD,
ON EVERY SCALE.
THEY ARE TRULY AN INSPIRATION
TO URBAN CITIZENS
AROUND THE WORLD.

(music plays)

He walks in a tattoo parlor and says HI.

The tattoo artist says HOW ARE YOU?

Mikael says GOOD.

He gets a tattoo on his right upper arm and says I KIND OF WANTED ANOTHER TATTOO
OF MONTREAL, BUT THEN I THOUGHT,
I ALREADY HAVE IT. I HAVE
THE AUTHENTIC STORY.
MY FAVOURITE STREET,
ST-VIATEUR.
THIS IS WHERE I FIRST
LANDED, AS IT WERE.
THIS IS WHERE I MEET
MY FRIENDS.
THIS IS WHERE I STAY.
IT MEANS A LOT TO ME, SO I'M
JUST GOING TO BLING IT UP A BIT,
GIVE IT THE SNOW THAT IT HAS
FIVE MONTHS A YEAR, GIVE IT BIKE
LANES WHICH IT DESERVES,
AS DOES THE REST OF THIS CITY.
ARE YOU DONE?
OH! THAT IS SO COOL!

(music plays)

Mikael says THIS IS A CITY THAT STANDS
FIRMLY ON THE SHOULDERS
OF ITS CITIZENS, WHO
HAIL FROM EVERY CORNER
OF THE WORLD.
THEY DEFINE IT,
NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND.
MONTREAL IS RAW,
EDGY, IRREVERENT,
CREATIVE, DYNAMIC, RESILIENT.
AND ON TOP OF THAT,
THIS IS ONE OF THE COOLEST,
MOST CHILL PLACES
I COULD EVER IMAGINE.
MONTREAL.
MONTRÉAL.
CALL IT WHATEVER YOU WANT.
I REALLY DON'T THINK IT CARES.
THIS UNDERDOG CITY IS JUST HAPPY
THAT YOU WANT TO BE HERE
AND THAT'S WHY I KEEP
COMING BACK.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Hosted by Mikael Colville-Andersen.

Directed by Myriam Berthelet and Michel D.T. Lam.

Series director, Michel. D. T. Lam.

Producer, Nicolas Boucher.

Produced in association with TVO.

Logo: DBC2.

Copyright 2018.

Watch: Ep. 6 - Montreal