Transcript: Ep. 4 - Milan | Nov 25, 2018

Over images of Milan appears a map of Europe that shows the location of the city with the caption "Milan, Italy."

Mikael takes a walk on the streets of Milan.

Mikael is in his fifties, with short wavy gray hair and he wears black Bermuda shorts and a white shirt.

Mikael says WHENEVER I THINK ABOUT MILAN,
I'VE ALWAYS THOUGHT ABOUT
A DIVA. A CLASSY, RESPECTED,
AGING OPERA SINGER
WHO'S LED A LONG LIFE
AND HAS SO MANY
STORIES TO TELL.
THIS CITY IS STANDING
AT A CROSSROADS,
JUST LIKE EVERY OTHER
CITY IN THE WORLD,
IN THIS GROWING
AGE OF URBANISM.
BUT HERE, THE CONVERSATION
IS AMPLIFIED.
THERE IS A GROWING HUNGER
FOR REAL URBAN CHANGE.
I WANT TO FIND OUT
WHICH PATH MILAN
IS CHOOSING AND HOW IT
WILL FUTURE-PROOF ITSELF
USING THE POWER OF URBANISM
AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT.
MILAN, SHOW ME WHAT YOU'VE GOT.

In animation, Mikael's body gets covered in maps and city models. He extends his hand and a miniature model of a city appears on his hand.

The title of the show reads "The Life-Sized City with Mikael Colville-Andersen."

Clips show images of Paris. An animated map appears with the caption "Milan."

Mikael says LET'S BE CLEAR.
MILAN ISN'T ROME OR VENICE.
THERE ARE NO GONDOLAS HERE
AND NO NEVER-ENDING LINES
OF TOURISTS WAITING
TO VISIT THE COLOSSEUM.
A NEWLY FOUND DESIRE
TO STAND OUT, A QUEST FOR
A MODERN WAY
OF DEVELOPING A CITY.
ONCE CONSIDERED
THE BLAND FINANCIAL
CAPITAL OF THE COUNTRY,
MILAN IS NOW PROVING
ITS INDUSTRIAL PAST LEFT ALMOST
INDELIBLE SCARS
ON THE URBAN FABRIC,
BUT THE 2015 WORLD EXPO
SPARKED CHANGE.
SKYSCRAPERS, NEW PUBLIC
AND PRIVATE INITIATIVES,
INNUMERABLE URBAN RENEWAL
PROJECTS HAVE SINCE POPPED UP
ON ALMOST EVERY BLOCK.
SOME, OF COURSE, ARE MORE
SUCCESSFUL THAN OTHERS.
ONE THING IS FOR SURE:
DECADES OF OPEN-MINDEDNESS
AND OF OPEN DOORS
TO IMMIGRATION HAVE MADE MILAN
THE MOST MULTICULTURAL
HUB IN ALL OF ITALY.
TO ME, THAT IS A GOOD
PLACE TO START.
HEY! GIACOMO!

Giacomo says CIAO! CIAO!

Mikael says GOOD TO SEE YOU.

Giacomo is in his forties, balding and with a beard. He wears jeans and a white shirt.

Giacomo says THIS IS ACTUALLY THE BORDER
BETWEEN ITALY AS IT WAS
AND THE MODERNITY.

M AND YOU KEEP POINTING
RIGHT HERE.

Giacomo says RIGHT HERE!

M FUTURE, PAST.
FUTURE, PAST.

Giacomo says EXACTLY! THAT, TO ME, IS MILAN
AS IT WAS TEN YEARS AGO.
FROM SICILY, TO ROME, TO NAPLES,
ALL OUR HISTORY, OUR PIAZZAS,
THE CITY THE REST
OF THE WORLD THINKS IT IS.

He looks at two skyscrapers and says THIS, HERE,
IS THE MODERN MILAN.
THE LABORATORY OF MODERNITY
STARTED RIGHT HERE
TEN YEARS AGO, BUILDING
A NEW KIND OF CITY.

A caption reads "Giacomo Biraghi. Co-founder, Second Urban."

Mikael says GIACOMO IS AT THE HELM
OF SECOLO URBANO,
"THE URBAN CENTURY."
FORMED BY MORE
THAN ONE HUNDRED
CITY ENTHUSIASTS,
ABOUT URBAN ISSUES
ON A NATIONAL LEVEL.
AND THIS IS CITY LIFE,
MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, THESE
PLACES ARE MADE BY
AND FOR THE WEALTHY AND
HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT
ON THE SURROUNDING
URBAN FABRIC.
SO NATURALLY, I REGARDED
THE PLACE AS THE EPITAMY
OF THE FUNDAMENTAL PROBLEMS
BEHIND TOO MANY FLAWED
URBAN DEVELOPMENTS.
IN HIS VIEW, THIS PROJECT
REPRESENTS WHAT MILAN IS
AND WANTS TO BE:
BOLD AND AUDACIOUS,
KEEN ON TRYING NEW THINGS
EVEN IF THE RESULT
IS NOT ALWAYS PERFECT.

Giacomo says NOW WE ARE LEAVING THE BORDER
AND HEADING INTO THIS STREET,
WHICH TO ME IS VERY INTERESTING.
I THINK IT'S VERY IMPORTANT
TO SEE WHAT MILAN WAS.
FOR EXAMPLE, THIS STREET
IS FULL OF CARS.
IT HAS NO GREENERY,
IS FILLED WITH GRAFFITI,
BUT IT HAS A LOT OF BEAUTY
WITH THE MIXED VIEWS
AND THE OPENNESS.
AND THIS IS THE NEW MILAN.
THIS NEW EXPERIMENT.
WE HAVE A GATE AND A BUILDING
WITH NO MIXED VIEWS,
BUT IN EXCHANGE,
WE HAVE LARGER SIDEWALKS,
NO PARKING SPACES BECAUSE THERE
IS A GARAGE, AND A LARGE PARK.

Mikael says WE SEE NOTHING BUT FENCES.
I CAN'T GET INTO WHAT LOOKS
LIKE A VERY NICE BACKYARD.
IT'S INACCESSIBLE, ALMOST
LIKE A GATED COMMUNITY,
WHEREAS OVER HERE, I CAN
TALK TO SOMEBODY THROUGH
THEIR WINDOW AND ASK
FOR COFFEE OR SOMETHING.

Giacomo says WE STILL HAVE TO FIND A BALANCE
BETWEEN THIS MODEL AND SOMETHING
MORE OPEN, SOMETHING A
BIT MORE MIXED. TO ME,
THE MAIN POINT IS MILAN,
AMONGST ALL OTHER ITALIAN
CITIES, IS TRYING.
THAT'S THE SURPRISE.
A LITTLE HOLE IN THE GATE OFFERS
A WHOLE NEW PERSPECTIVE.
OF COURSE, IT'S VERY DIFFERENT
FROM WHAT WE HAD IN MILAN.

He points at a modern skyscraper between two more traditional buildings.

He says MOSTLY, YOU DON'T
HAVE PERSPECTIVE
TO SOMETHING DESIRABLE.
WE USED TO DO IT
CENTURIES AGO.
WE BUILT MONUMENTS,
CASTLES, CATHEDRALS.
THEN WE SHAPED THE CITY SO
PEOPLE COULD SEE SOMETHING
REPRESENTATIVE OF IT.
FOR THINGS TO CHANGE, WE HAVE
TO PROVE THIS NEW VISION,
IN MY OPINION.
A LOT OF THE NEWER
URBANISTS WANT
TO HAVE PEDESTRIAN PROMENADES,
THEY WANT TO HAVE
BIGGER PARKS.
I THINK IN A STRANGE WAY,
THIS CONTEMPORARY URBANISM
IS AFFECTING IN EXACTLY
YOUR DIRECTION
THE OLD FABRIC OF THE CITY.

Mikael says GIACOMO AND I HAVE CLEARLY
CONNECTED ON THE FACT
THAT A CITY HAS TO ADAPT
TO ITS CITIZENS' NEEDS
AND NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND.
LIKE ME, HE SEES THE CITY AS
CAN BE TRANSFORMED INTO MORSELS
OF COLLECTIVE WELL-BEING.
THE OLD MILAN, OLD
EUROPEAN CITIES,
EVEN OLD AMERICAN CITIES
WERE INDIVIDUAL.
IF WE NEEDED A BUILDING
HERE, SOME GUY PAID FOR IT
AND THEY BUILT A BUILDING.
NOW WE ARE IN A DIFFERENT AGE.
THE PROCESS HAS CHANGED.
NOW THERE ARE DEVELOPERS
WITH ENORMOUS AMOUNTS
OF POWER AND WORKING
WITH "STAR-CHITECTS."
IS THIS A THREAT TO THE FUTURE
DEVELOPMENT OF OUR CITIES?
THAT WE ARE LEAVING IT UP
TO VERY WEALTHY GROUPS
THAT WE CANNOT REALLY
INFLUENCE THE SAME WAY
THAT WE COULD INFLUENCE
THE ORGANIC NATURE
OF CITIES BACK IN THE DAY?

Giacomo says YES, THIS COULD BE
A REAL DANGER,
BUT AS FAR AS YOU'RE COMBINING
THE OLD AND THE NEW
AND AS FAR AS YOU ACCELERATE
THIS PROCESS OF CITY CREATION,
YOU CAN CHECK AND
BALANCE BETTER.
AT THE END, YOU SHOULD AND
YOU COULD AVOID THIS LOSS
OF CONTROL AND THIS LOSS
OF VISION BY REAL ESTATE
OWNERS AND MIX UP
THINGS TOGETHER.
SO MAYBE THE CITY THERE,
THE OLD CITY, IS THE ONLY
EFFECTIVE WATCHDOG
THAT CAN PREVENT
THE NEW PART FROM BEING
DETACHED FROM REALITY,
FROM THE COMMON GOOD
AND FROM THE PEOPLE.

(music plays)

Paola leads Mikael upstairs and says VERY EFFICIENT.
EVERYTHING IS ALL IN HERE.
NOW WE ARE ARRIVING
ON THE FIRST FLOOR. THIS HUGE
PLACE WE CALL "THE GALLERIA."

Paola is in her fifties, with short curly brown hair and wears glasses, jeans and a printed blue shirt.

Mikael says WOW! IT'S BEAUTIFUL!

Paola says YES.

They walk up to a terrace.

Paola says SO FROM HERE YOU CAN SEE
HOW CLOSE WE ARE
TO THE BUILDING.

Mikael says IN THE MIDDLE.

Paola says THIS IS A GOOD POINT OF VIEW.

The caption changes to "Paola Bonara. Board member, Cascina Cuccagna."

Mikael says PAOLA BONARA IS A VERY
BUSY WOMAN.
SHE'S A DOCTOR, A MOTHER,
SHE SINGS IN A CHOIR
WHO FOUGHT FOR YEARS TO
TRANSFORM CASCINA CUCCAGNA,
A 17TH CENTURY
ABANDONED FARMHOUSE
RIGHT IN DOWNTOWN MILAN
INTO AN OPEN SPACE.
THE IDEA WAS TO PRESERVE THIS
HERITAGE BUILDING IN A WAY
THAT WOULD TURN IT INTO
A FUNCTIONAL PLACE FOR LOCALS.
ALL IN ALL, IT TOOK
PAOLA AND FRIENDS
MORE THAN 15 YEARS TO GET
THIS SHOW ON THE ROAD,
BUT THE RESULT WAS
A GAME CHANGER
AND AN INSPIRATION FOR CITIZENS
ALL OVER THE CITY.
THERE ARE 18 OTHER FARMHOUSES
IN A STATE OF TOTAL ABANDONMENT
JUST WAITING FOR SIMILAR
PROJECTS TO BRING
THEM BACK TO LIFE.
THERE ARE SO MANY PEOPLE!
THIS IS REALLY ALIVE TODAY,
YOU KNOW?

Paola says FOR US, THE MOST IMPORTANT THING
IS THAT THIS PLACE IS OPEN.
IT'S OPEN TO EVERYBODY.
PEOPLE COME HERE FOR SOME
CARDS OR A PROJECT,
TO GO TO THE MOVIES,
TO LISTEN TO A CONCERT,
TO DO BOOKCROSSING,
TO DISCUSS SUSTAINABILITY
OR CIRCULAR ECONOMY,
THAT IS ONE
OF THE MOST IMPORTANT
POINTS OF OUR PROJECT.
THIS IS THE GRAPEVINE.

Mikael says OH!

Paola says IT'S VERY NICE TO SPEND TIME
UNDER THE GRAPEVINE.

Mikael says YEAH!
IN YOUR MIND,
IS THIS PUBLIC SPACE?

Paola says IN MY MIND, IT'S MY SPACE
THAT I GIVE TO THEM.
WE ARE THE GUARDIANS
OF THIS PLACE.
IF A CHILD COMES
AND BREAKS A TREE,
I CAN TELL HIM NOT TO DO IT.
BUT SOMETIMES,
THE PARENTS ARE STRANGE
AND SAY IT'S A PUBLIC PLACE.

Mikael says IS THAT NOT THE BEST SUCCESS?
THAT PEOPLE THINK
IT'S A PUBLIC PLACE?

Paola says YES, IT IS A GOOD
SUCCESS, BECAUSE
WE ARE TRYING TO BE INVISIBLE.
WE WANT THEM TO FEEL
THERE IS SOMETHING MORE
THAN THIS NICE PLACE
BECAUSE WE WANT THEM
TO PARTICIPATE WITH US.
WE ARE DOING SOMETHING FOR
THE TOWN AND WE WOULD LIKE
FOR OTHER PEOPLE TO PARTICIPATE
WITH US IN THIS PROJECT
AND CONTAMINATE THEIR
PROJECTS WITH OUR PROJECT.

Mikael says THE WORK OF THE GOOD PEOPLE
OF CASCINA CUCCAGNA
IS NOT ONLY IMPORTANT
FOR THIS NEIGHBORHOOD.
IT'S ALSO HAVING A POSITIVE
IMPACT ON THE ENTIRE CITY.
THEY HAD THE BRIGHT IDEA
OF OPENING THE DOORS
OF THEIR OLD FARMHOUSE
TO REFUGEES,
WOMEN WHO HAD JUST ARRIVED
WITH THEIR CHILDREN.
THEY FED THEM,
HOUSED THEM,
PROVIDED THEM
WITH HEALTHCARE.
THAT'S WHAT THIS INCLUSIVE
PROJECT IS ALL ABOUT.
IT'S A PLACE FOR
THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE,
TO BE USED AS
THE COMMUNITY SEES FIT.

Paola says WE TRY TO DO ALL
THESE THINGS WITH SIMPLICITY,
BUT IT'S DIFFICULT
TO BE SIMPLE.
IT'S VERY DIFFICULT
NOT TO IMPOSE RULES.

Mikael says MAYBE IT'S HARD
TO MAKE IT SIMPLE,
BUT IF YOU DO THAT,
THERE ARE NO LIMITS.

Paola says THE RESULTS ARE THE BEST.

Captions read "Flower workshop" and "Bike repair workshop."

Mikael says CASCINA CUCCAGNA IS HOST
TO MANY CITIZEN INITIATIVES.
ONE OF THEM IS DONATELLA'S
GIACIMENTI URBANI,
A KIND OF URBAN
ENVIRONMENTAL LAB.
TODAY, THEY'RE HOLDING
A RESTART PARTY,
BRINGING LIFE BACK
INTO BROKEN OBJECTS.
AND YES, I THINK I'LL NEED
PAOLA'S TRANSLATION
SKILLS FOR THIS.

The caption changes to "Donatella Pavan. Co-founder, Giacimenti Urbani."

Donatella is in her fifties, with shoulder length wavy white hair and wears a gray, purple and green blouse, a purple scarf and sunglasses over her head.

"The Restart party is a way to prolong the life of objects and to show people that many appliances, both electric and electronic, which we keep in our homes, may have a second life without being thrown away. Giacimenti Urbani strives to reduce waste and to promote circular economy. The Restart party is one of those means."

Mikael says IT'S SIMPLE. PEOPLE WRITE
THEIR NAMES ON THIS BOARD,
ALONG WITH THE OBJECT
THEY BROUGHT,
SO THAT THEY CAN KEEP
TRACK OF THE QUANTITY
OF POTENTIAL WASTE
THAT WAS AVOIDED.
THIS HAND MIXER IS FIXED.

Donatella says YES. WE AVOIDED ONE KILOGRAM
OF POTENTIAL WASTE.

Mikael says OKAY. SO WE SAVED IT.
WE SAVED ONE KILOGRAM OF WASTE.

Donatella says YES. A MICROWAVE OVEN.
A MICROWAVE.
A MICROWAVE.
A MICROWAVE OVEN.

Mikael says COULDN'T SAVE IT?

Donatella says WE COULDN'T SAVE IT.

Mikael says IT COULDN'T BE SAVED.
IS THAT FIXABLE?

A man at the workshop says YES, YES.

Mikael says SO YOU'LL GET A SMILEY FACE?

He says SURE.

A map pops up showing the route from Cascina Cuccagnia to Valvassori Peroni Markel.

Mikael says OF WASTE IN MILAN RESONATES
IN MANY DIFFERENT SPHERES.
THE CITY HAS NOW IMPLEMENTED
A POLICY AIMED AT REDUCING
FOOD WASTE AND
IS AT THE HELM OF THE MILAN
URBAN FOOD POLICY PACT.
IT'S BASICALLY AN AGREEMENT
ON SUSTAINABLE URBAN
FOOD SYSTEMS SIGNED BY
THE MAYORS OF 130 CITIES AROUND
THE WORLD. AND THAT'S GREAT,
BUT IF I'VE LEARNED ONE THING
IT'S THAT SMALLER, SIMPLER
CITIZEN-LED IDEAS
CAN OFTEN BE EVEN
MORE INSPIRING.

Rebecca says THEY ARE PACKING UP,
SO SALES ARE ALREADY CLOSED.
LET'S SEE...

Rebecca is in her thirties, with shoulder length, curly light brown hair and wears jeans and a white T-shirt with a print on the front.

Mikael says OKAY.

Rebecca says IF HE'S GOING
TO GIVE US SOMETHING.

"Do you have any food to give?"

A farmer gives Mikael a box full of vegetables.

Mikael says OKAY, COOL.
GRAZIE MILLE.

The man says CIAO. GRAZIE.
GRAZIE.

The caption changes to "Rebecca Zaccarini. Founder, Recup."

Mikael says OKAY, COOL.
REBECCA IS NOT A CHEF.
SHE'S NOT A POLICY MAKER.
SHE IS, HOWEVER, A VERY
CONCERNED CITIZEN.
SEEING PEOPLE RUMMAGE
THROUGH TRASH CONSISTING
MOSTLY OF PERFECTLY
EDIBLE FOOD,
DISCARDED AT THE END OF EACH
DAY, WELL, THAT BUGGED HER.
HOW COULD SO MUCH
FOOD GO TO WASTE?
SO SHE ASKED THE MERCHANTS
IF SHE COULD COLLECT
THEIR UNSOLD PRODUCE
AND DISTRIBUTE IT
TO THE PEOPLE
OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD.
SIMPLE AS THAT.
AND NOW RECUP,
THAT'S THE NAME OF THE PROJECT,
HAS SPREAD TO 11 OF MILAN'S
NUMEROUS MARKETS.

The names of the markets pop up. They read "Esterle-Cambini, Via Emanuele Kant Bonola, Piazzale Martini, Via Vespri Siciliani, Via Val Maira Niguarda, Via E. Curiel, Via Termopili, Via Pietro Da Cortona, Piazzale Sant'Agostino Papiniano, Via Valvassori Peroni."

Rebecca says CIAO!

Mikael says THIS ONE?

A farmer says YES.

Rebecca says WHEN WE HAVE A CARGO BIKE,
IT'LL BE EASIER.

Mikael says DO YOUR VOLUNTEERS
HAVE A RELATIONSHIP
WITH THE MERCHANTS HERE?
DO THEY KNOW EACH OTHER?
OH, THAT'S RECUP.
THEY'RE COMING HERE NOW.

Rebecca says YES, THEY KNOW, BECAUSE AT
THE BEGINNING, WHEN WE DECIDED
TO START COVERING THE MARKET,
WE JUST CAME AND EXPLAINED
THE PROJECT TO ALL
THE MERCHANTS.
IF YOU WANT, THE NEXT WEEK WE'LL
START AND WE'LL COME TO YOU.

Mikael says THE MARKET SELLERS
THINK THEY CAN'T SELL THIS.

Rebecca says THEY CAN'T SELL IT,
BUT IT DOESN'T MEAN
THE FOOD IS NOT EDIBLE.
AS YOU CAN SEE, MAYBE
WE CAN CUT IT HERE,
BUT THE APPLE IS STILL GOOD.

Mikael says THE CAULIFLOWERS LOOK GOOD.

Rebecca says YES.
THE AVOCADO YOU'D HAVE
TO EAT TODAY AND NOT TOMORROW.

Mikael says YES.

Rebecca says BEFORE, AT THE END
OF THE MARKET,
PEOPLE WOULD GO THROUGH
THE RUBBISH TO RUMMAGE
AND TAKE ALL THESE THINGS,
ACTUALLY, OR THE LEFTOVERS
FROM THE MARKET THAT
THE MERCHANTS THROW AWAY.

Mikael says LOOK AT THAT. IT'S AN ABSOLUTELY
PERFECT CUCUMBER RIGHT THERE.

(music plays)

Mikael says TO COLLECT DATA ABOUT FOOD
WASTE, RECUP'S VOLUNTEERS WEIGH
THE RECOVERED FOOD.
MILAN IS HOPING
TO USE THIS INFORMATION
TO BETTER ANALYZE
THE SITUATION AND TO FIND
A LARGE-SCALE SOLUTION.
WE'VE ACTUALLY SCAVENGED
161 KILOGRAMS OF FOOD
JUST TODAY IN JUST ONE MARKET.

Rebecca steps on a scale and says EVERYBODY'S GOING TO KNOW
HOW MUCH YOU WEIGH.

A woman says CINQUE.

Mikael says CINQUE.
EIGHT. OTTO.

Rebecca says OTTO.

Mikael says DO YOU JUST WEIGH THE TOTAL OR
DO YOU WEIGH HOW MUCH BROCCOLI,
HOW MANY...

Rebecca says IT DEPENDS ON THE MARKET.
LIKE HERE,
THEY WEIGH THE TOTAL.

Mikael says HELLO. BIONGIORNO, SIGNORE.
WHAT DO WE HAVE TODAY?
WE HAVE SOME LETTUCE,
SOME ORANGES,
APPLES, AVOCADO...
HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN
COMING TO RECUP HERE?
[ITALIAN]

The man says "I've been coming here for about a year and a half. I come here every Saturday. I like it here. I like the way it's organized. I take things home."

Rebecca says "You also, you help a bit."

The man says "That's right, I help."

Rebecca says "We'll give you a T-shirt."

Mikael says GRAZIE MILLE, SIGNORE.
WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT
THE WHOLE RECUP PROJECT?

Another man says "Very, very good. Good vegetables with recycling and respecting the environment. Sometimes you meet new people this way and you get to know the neighbours."

Rebecca says YOU MEET NEW PEOPLE.

Mikael says YOU MEET NEW PEOPLE AND
YOU HELP THE CITY.
AWESOME, MAN.

(music plays)

Mikael says I'VE SEEN PROJECTS HOPING
TO SOLVE THE FOOD WASTE ISSUE
ALL OVER THE WORLD.
BUT THIS ONE IS A BIT
DIFFERENT AND REBECCA
INSISTS THIS IS NOT CHARITY.
IT'S NOT THE RICH GIVING
TO THE POOR.
IT'S SIMPLY EVERYONE
WORKING TOGETHER.
THOSE COMING TO TAKE FOOD
ALSO HELP COLLECT IT,
SORT IT AND DISTRIBUTE
IT AND THE VOLUNTEERS
TAKE FOOD HOME TOO.

Rebecca says SOMETIMES,
WHEN THERE ARE PEOPLE
NOT RESPECTFUL WITH THE OTHERS,
WHEN THEY RUMMAGE THROUGH
ALL THE RUBBISH,
I STOP THEM AND GIVE THEM
A BOX AND TELL THEM TO GIVE IT
TO THE OTHERS.
THIS WAY, LITTLE BY LITTLE,
THE PEOPLE THAT COME
HERE START SPEAKING
TO EACH OTHER.

Mikael says SO FROM BEING IN A WAY ANONYMOUS
AND JUST LOOKING AT THE PEOPLE
DIGGING THROUGH THE GARBAGE,
WHEN YOU STOP TO TALK TO THEM
YOU GIVE THEM DIGNITY AND THEN
YOU INCLUDE THEM IN A CIRCLE
OF MANY TYPES OF PEOPLE.

Rebecca says AND THEY FEEL PART
OF THE PROJECT.
THAT'S THE LAST
LINK OF THE CHAIN.
BUT IN THE FUTURE, WE HAVE
A LOT OF DREAMS AND IDEAS.
WE WANT TO GIVE JOBS TO PEOPLE.
WE'D LIKE TO CREATE
A SOCIAL ENTERPRISE
AND ALSO TRANSFORM THE FOOD.
WE ALREADY MAKE MARMALADE
FOR SOME SMALL EVENTS
AND WE MAKE SOME FOR OURSELVES.
BUT WE'D LIKE TO SELL
THE MARMALADE.
WHO COOKS THE MARMALADE?
WE CAN CALL ALL THE OLD LADIES,
ALL THE PEOPLE AND PAY THEM.

Mikael says OF ALL THE SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
THAT I'VE WITNESSED IN CITIES
AROUND THE WORLD, IT'S AS THOUGH
THE ONES THAT TACKLE FOOD
WASTE ARE ROCKING IT MORE
THAN ANYTHING ELSE.
IT'S SIMPLE, IT'S INTUITIVE, YOU
GET IT WHEN YOU SEE THE KIND
OF FOOD THAT'S BEING THROWN
OUT, YOU UNDERSTAND
THAT WE HAVE TO DO
SOMETHING TO REVERSE THAT.
BUT IT'S PROJECTS LIKE
RECUP THAT MIX FOOD WASTE
WITH SOCIAL INCLUSION
AND WITH STRENGTHENING
THE URBAN FABRIC
THAT I LOVE THE MOST.

(music plays)

Now Mikael stands on a bridge with Pier-Francesco.

Pier is in his forties, with short graying hair and a beard and wears glasses, a gray suit, a white shirt and a pale blue tie.

Mikael says I WAS HERE A BIT EARLIER
AND THERE WEREN'T SO MANY PEOPLE
AND NOW PEOPLE ARE
FINISHED WORK
AND ARE COMING DOWN
TO THE CANAL.

Pier says "This is the place, especially for nightlife. It's a favourite place for young people. Milan is a city for big opportunities. It's also a city of jobs and a city with a high quality of life."

A caption reads "Navigli. Milan's canals and waterways."

Mikael says THE CONCENTRIC LAYOUT
OF THE CITY CENTRE REFLECTS
THE NAVIGLI, THE SYSTEM
OF INTERCONNECTED
URBAN CANALS THAT WAS CREATED
BETWEEN THE ROMAN ERA
AND THE EARLY 19TH CENTURY.
I MEET PIER-FRANCESCO MARAN,
DEPUTY MAYOR FOR URBAN PLANNING
AND GREEN AREAS AT THE NAVIGLIO
STILL OPEN. ALL THE OTHERS,
SOME OF WHICH WERE DESIGNED
BY A CERTAIN LEONARDO DA VINCI

says YOU MIGHT HAVE HEARD OF HIM –
WERE COVERTED UP AND
TRANSFORMED INTO,
YOU GUESSED IT, ROADS.
BUT HEY, THE GOOD NEWS:
THE CITY PLANS
TO REOPEN EIGHT KILOMETERS
OF THESE FORGOTTEN TREASURES.
TELL ME ABOUT
THE ACTUAL PROCESS.
IT SEEMS LIKE AN ENORMOUS
PROJECT TO UNCOVER
ALL OF THESE CANALS.

Pier says "It's not out only project, bit it's one of the most difficult. We had an idea and now we're realizing it. Our idea is to recreate the canal below and to reopen it on five specific points that are easier to reopen after the digging. Soon, we'll talk to the citizens about this problem. We think it's much more interesting than just to say we are reopening it without explanation."

Mikael says I GUESS THE CITIZENS ALSO
DESERVE THAT YOU EXPLAIN
THE CONSEQUENCES, RIGHT?

Pier says "It's part of the public debate on the city."

Mikael says DO YOU FIND THAT A LOT
OF THE MILANESE ARE SURPRISED
TO LEARN THAT THERE ARE CANALS
UNDER SOME OF THE ROADS?
THE YOUNGER GENERATION MAYBE
DOESN'T EVEN KNOW ABOUT THIS.
THEY KNOW?

Pier says "People know the story of the Navigli in Milan. We held a referendum and people want to reopen it. but, it's also a dream, I would say. To reopen the Navigli is complicated. It's expensive and that can create problems. But our idea is to start this dream by reopening part of the Navigli."

Mikael looks at a man on the bridge and says HE'S JUST RIDING HIS BIKE
AND COACHING THE ROWERS.
THAT'S AWESOME, MAN!
THAT'S SO COOL.

(music plays)

Mikael says says THE IDEA, OF COURSE,
IS TO RECREATE PLACES
AS VIBRANT AS THE NAVIGLIO
GRANDE ALL AROUND THE CITY
AND EVEN IN THE PERIPHERY.
BUT THE PROJECT ALSO
SERVES ENVIRONMENTAL
AND SUSTAINABLE PURPOSES.

Pier says "The problem is to move the water from the north of the city to the south of the city. Because in the north, the problem is we have too much water. The rivers there flood often. In the south, we don't have enough water for agriculture. A canal is useful for that."

Mikael says HISTORICALLY, DID YOU HAVE
THE SAME PROBLEM OF FLOODING
IN THE NORTH AND AGRICULTURE
IN THE SOUTH WITHOUT MUCH WATER?
WERE THE CANALS...

Pier says "The problem started when we covered the river."

Mikael says OKAY. BUT THAT'S THE POINT.

Pier says "So to solve the problem of traffic, we created a new problem of flooding. Now we are trying to rethink the city in a much more environmental way. Our canal is not just for aesthetics of tourism. It can also serve to implement our environmental strategy."

Mikael says OKAY.
COULD THIS BE A NEW
IDENTITY FOR THIS CITY,
BRINGING BACK THE CANALS?

Pier says "Yes, absolutely. This is part of the identity of the old Milan."

Mikael says YOU HAVE ALREADY
TESTED IT IN A WAY.
WHAT WAS DARSENA LIKE
BEFORE YOU REDESIGNED IT?

Pier says "Darsena was the ancient part of Milan. During the 90s, it was quite abandoned, because the former mayor wanted to build parking spaces. He didn't build them because citizens protested, so it was an abandoned place. We refurbished it and now citizens use it. if somebody came to visit Milan, you would take them to Darsena because it's new. It's important. It was the first time the citizens of Milan understood the value of new water canals in Milan. Milan will become a much bigger city. There will be less pollution and the water will help. The blue and green will be part of the future of our city."

(music plays)

They now walk along a rail yard.

Piero says "This area already looks like it will in the future. It's already green, but we should clean it up a bit."

Piero is in his thirties, with short receding brown hair and a beard and he wears glasses, red trousers, a white T-shirt, an unbuttoned blue shirt and a periwinkle blue hoodie.

A map pops up with the caption "Porta Romana Rail Yard."

Mikael says THIS IS PORTA ROMANA.
IT'S BASICALLY
200,000 SQUARE METRES.
OF NEARLY ABANDONED RAIL YARD.
FROM THE LOOK OF IT,
YOU MIGHT THINK I'M LOST
IN SOME DODGY SUBURB
FAR FROM THE CITY CENTRE.
BUT NOPE, NOT AT ALL.
THE LARGEST OF MILAN'S
7 ABANDONED RAIL YARDS,
IT NOW SITS BETWEEN TWO
BUSTLING NEIGHBORHOODS.

A map shows the locations of the abandoned rail yards.

Mikael says THESE RAILYARDS ONCE
SEPARATED THE CITY FROM
ITS INDUSTRIAL ZONE.
BUT OVER THE PAST DECADES,
MILAN HAS SPRAWLED
SO DRASTICALLY THAT
IT'S GROWN FAR BEYOND
THIS FORMER FRONTIER.
PIERO IS THE CITY'S CHIEF
RESILIENCE OFFICER AND
HE SEES THESE DERELICT PLACES
AS BLANK SLATES AS UNIQUE
OPPORTUNITIES TO CREATE
SOMETHING NEW AND BETTER.

The caption changes to "Piero Pellizzaro. Chief Resilience Officer."

Piero says "Thirty thousand people come into the city every year. The problem is the rent is so high. So we are now pushing to have more social housing with affordable rent. This could make a significant change in balancing the cost of rent from a long-term perspective."

Mikael says THEN YOU HAVE THE PRADA
FOUNDATION
WITH ITS BIG FANCY BUILDING.
IT FEELS LIKE...
I SEE SOMETHING LIKE THAT AND
I WONDER IF THEY'RE COMING.
IS THIS GOING TO BE
A FANCY DEVELOPMENT
WITH HUGE COMPANIES MOVING IN?

Piero says "I mean, this helps to make the area attractive."

Mikael says OKAY.

Piero says "Honestly, if you want to lead as a city, you also have to develop something that is maybe not for you, but for the entire world. So Even if someone says there will be speculation. No, there will not. Because the project is already defined. Do you want to take part in this process? These are the rules. And the rules are set by the city, together with the community, together with the national railway."

Mikael says THE CITY HAS CONVINCED
THE NATIONAL RAILWAY COMPANY
TO PUT THIS LAND TO BETTER USE,
TO GIVE IT A NEW LEASE ON LIFE.
SO THEY'VE ESTABLISHED
A MASTER PLAN.
A THIRD OF THE LAND WILL
BE DEVOTED TO HOUSING,
INCLUDING SOCIAL HOUSING,
AND 65 PERCENT WILL BE TRANSFORMED
INTO GREEN SPACE.
PUBLIC SPACE AND INSTITUTIONS
WILL OCCUPY WHAT'S LEFT
AND IT ALL BEGINS VERY SOON.
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT,
PUBLIC PARTICIPATION.
IS THERE A TRADITION
FOR THAT IN MILAN
OR IS A NEW THING IN THIS
AGE WHEN YOU'RE TRYING
TO FIGURE OUT WHERE
TO GO AND WHAT TO DO?

Piero says "There is an ancient tradition, then we got lost and we became more individualistic in the 80s and 90s. And then ten years ago, we got back on this new way of participating in every kind of new development. It's not required, but we go for public engagement and for the community stakeholder. We had a participatory process last year to identify the priorities and objectives for the future planning of this area. And at every meeting, there was more than a thousand people coming and joining this discussion. People need to be a part of the changes. It is one of the key elements of the City of Milan in the last 15 years. It is not a matter of the city councillors, it is not a matter of the private sector, it is not a matter of the single citizens, it is a matter of the community. They want to rethink things themselves and to bring back Milan to its place as one of the leading cities, globally."

Mikael says ARE YOU OPTIMISTIC ABOUT ALL
OF THESE DIFFERENT THINGS
THAT ARE HAPPENING IN MILAN?
THAT IT WILL LEAD TO SOME KIND
OF COHESIVE PLAN FOR THE FUTURE?

Piero says "I'm optimistic, but we can't get too comfortable. We need to always have some doubts about what we are doing and we need to take care of...there is some issues... We have new citizens coming to the city. There are different cultures, there are different religions and there is a different approach to life, and we need to ensure that they all have the same opportunities as Italians have. This is an essential element, to have a cohesive and inclusive development on this, so respect everybody, every culture and we can make a difference in the city."

Mikael says MILAN HAS A REPUTATION FOR BEING
ONE THE MOST WELCOMING CITIES
IN EUROPE FOR REFUGEES.
THEY TALK ABOUT THE MILAN MODEL,
BUT NOW THE TENDENCY
IS WANING BECAUSE OF POLITICS
AND MANY OTHER ASPECTS THAT
WE ARE SEEING NOT ONLY IN MILAN,
BUT CITIES AROUND THE WORLD.
I'M GOING TO MEET SOME
PEOPLE HERE IN ZONE 8
WHO ARE TRYING THEIR BEST
TO REVERSE THAT TENDENCY
AND INSIST ON MAKING
REFUGEES FEEL WELCOME.

Alessandro says THE EXCHANGE BETWEEN
PEOPLE IS A RICHNESS
AND WE ARE TRYING
TO MAKE A BRIDGE
AND TO ESCAPE OR AVOID
THE FEAR AMONGST PEOPLE.

Alessandro is in his late thirties, with very short receding brown hair and a shadow of a beard. He wears glasses, gray jeans, a white T-shirt and a gray hooded jacket.

The caption changes to "Alessandro Azzoni. Co-founder, Zona 8Solidale."

Mikael says THERE ARE THREE LARGE SCALE
REFUGEE CAMPS
IN THIS NEIGHBORHOOD ALONE
AND THEY'RE HOME TO
ALMOST 500 PEOPLE.
FOR ALESSANDRO AND HIS FRIENDS,
THAT'S HOW IT ALL STARTED.
THEY JUST WANTED TO GET
TO KNOW THEIR NEW NEIGHBORS AND
TO MAKE THEM FEEL WELCOME.
WHAT BETTER WAY
THAN SHARING A MEAL?
SO THEY ORGANIZED A DINNER,
AND THEN ANOTHER ONE
AND ANOTHER ONE, INVITING
REFUGEES AND PEOPLE
THAT HAD BEEN LIVING
IN ZONE 8 THEIR ENTIRE LIVES.

Alessandro says WE HAVE THREE KINDS OF AFRICAN
FOODS TONIGHT, FROM SOMALIA,
FROM SIERRA LEONE
AND FROM GAMBIA.

Mikael says YOU ARE FROM SOMALIA?
AND WHEN DID YOU COME TO ITALY?

A woman speaks Somalian.

A man says ALMOST ONE MONTH...
ONE YEAR. SORRY.

Mikael says ONE YEAR. AND YOU?

The man says ME, ABOUT ONE YEAR.

Mikael says ONE YEAR AS WELL?

Mikael serves food and says LIKE THAT? ALRIGHT.
IS THAT GOOD?

A woman says THAT'S GOOD.

Mikael says NEXT. NEXT.
THERE YOU GO.

A woman says THAT ONE WILL NEED
A DIFFERENT SAUCE.

Mikael says ALRIGHT.

The woman says GAMBIA ON ONE SIDE,
SOMALIA ON OTHER SIDE.

Mikael says AND DOES EVERYBODY VOTE
ON WHICH ONE IS THE BEST?
YOU'RE HOPING FOR SIERRA LEONE.

The woman says YEAH, ALRIGHT.

Mikael says GAMBIA.
MY KITCHEN IS SO BORING COMPARED
TO THIS ONE, BELIEVE ME!
THIS IS SIERRA LEONE.

He serves plates and says SIERRA LEONE?
AND GAMBIA.

(music plays)

Mikael says AFTER THE FOOD IS SERVED,
I CHAT WITH ALESSANDRO
AND HIS FRIENDS: SELAM,
COFOUNDER OF ZONA 8 SOLIDALE,
KAMARA AND RAHIM
FROM SIERRA LEONE
AND MOHAMMED FROM GAMBIA.
THAT WAS INTENSE!
THAT WAS WILD!
THAT WAS JUST... THE KITCHEN,
EVERYBODY, THE VOLUNTEERS...
WHO ARE A LOT
OF THE ITALIAN VOLUNTEERS?

Alessandro says THOSE PEOPLE ARE
MOSTLY FROM ZONE 8,
WHO ARE ORGANIZING
AND WORKING THE DINNER.

Mikael says KAMARA, HOW LONG
HAVE YOU BEEN IN EUROPE?

Kamara says IT'S BEEN 1 YEAR AND 2 MONTHS.

Kamara is in his thirties, with short curly brown hair and a goatee and wears a white T-shirt.

Rahim says WE CAME AT THE SAME TIME.

Rahim is in his thirties, with short curly brown hair and a goatee. He wears a black T-shirt and a black cap hat.

Mikael says AT THE SAME TIME. TOGETHER?

Rahim says WE CAME TOGETHER.

Muhammed says "I've been here for two years and four months now."

Muhammed is in his thirties, with brown hair in dreadlocks, a goatee and wears a red polo T-shirt.

Mikael says ARE YOU ALL STAYING
IN THE CAMP NEAR HERE?

Rahim says YES.

Mikael says YES. WE TALK ABOUT HOW MILAN
HAS REALLY DONE MAYBE
MORE THAN OTHER CITIES.
DO YOU THINK THAT'S TRUE?

Selam is in her thirties, with mid-length brown hair in an afro and wears a black top, a gray cardigan sweater and a printed orange scarf.

She says THE CITY IS MORE REACTIVE,
MAYBE BECAUSE
IT'S A CITY OF MIGRATION.
MY PARENTS CAME
FROM OTHER COUNTRIES.
PEOPLE THAT GO
TO SCHOOL WITH ME...
NOBODY REALLY COMES FROM MILAN.

Alesandro says MILAN IS BETTER THAN THE REST
OF ITALY BECAUSE THE REST
OF ITALY IS AWFUL.
MILAN IS MORE OPEN-MINDED,
BUT IT'S DEFINITELY NOT ENOUGH.

Selam says PEOPLE ARE AFRAID BECAUSE
IN A SMALL TOWN,
THEY OPEN MAYBE A BIG CENTER.
OR OUTSIDE SMALL CENTERS,
THEY OPEN BIG CENTERS
THAT ARE REALLY ABANDONED.
NO ONE KNOWS ANYTHING
ABOUT THOSE PEOPLE. IN A CITY,
YOU CAN HAVE 300 PEOPLE STAYING
IN A CAMP NOT FAR
AWAY FROM THE CITY,
BUT IT'S DIFFICULT
TO KNOW EACH OTHER.

(music plays)

Mikael says FOR ALESSANDRO, SELAM AND
EVERYONE AT ZONE 8 SOLIDALE,
THE SOLUTION TO THE MIGRANT
CRISIS IS NOT TO CLOSE
THE BORDERS OR TO BUILD
LARGE-SCALE CAMPS
TO HOUSE REFUGEES
AND ASYLUM SEEKERS.
CITIES NEED TO FIND A WAY
TO INTEGRATE NEWCOMERS
IN THE EXISTING COMMUNITIES,
INTO THE SOCIAL FABRIC,
NOT APART FROM IT.
IS THIS NEIGHBORHOOD, ZONE 8,
IS IT BETTER NOW WITH THE WAY
THAT THE COMMUNITY HAS
WELCOMED THE IMMIGRANTS?

Selam says I WOULD SAY THAT BECAUSE
THERE IS LESS STRESS.
WELCOMING REFUGEES WAS
ACTUALLY DEPICTED
AS A VERY TERRIFYING
THING AND ACTUALLY
WHAT WE CAN SHOW
IS THAT IT'S NOT.
WE THINK THAT WELCOME
IS A THING THAT CANNOT
BE SAID BY A PLACE,
BY A BUILDING,
BY AN INSTITUTION.
IT CAN ONLY BE SAID
BY A COMMUNITY.
SO THE WELCOME THAT WE GAVE WAS
THE WELCOME OF A COMMUNITY.
WE THEN STARTED
TO WORK TOGETHER
AND NOW WE WORK TOGETHER.

Mikael says WHAT IS YOUR SITUATION?

Muhammed says "At the moment, I have a permit."

Mikael says OKAY. CAN YOU WORK?

The caption changes to "Muhammed Mannek. Refugee."

Muhammed says "I can work, with this permit. I remember my first time in Italy, before meeting these people, it was crazy for me. but fortunately, I met Alessandro. Ii call him my brother. I met with so many, many Italian people and they respect me and we respect them, too. They are the people who took me to school. They have a running team called 'No one is illegal.' It's created by Alessandro and now we meet every Sunday. Now I'm a good Italian and I want to stay here."

Alessandro says I'M RICHER NOW.
I NOW HAVE FRIENDS
FROM SOMALIA,
SIERRA LEONE AND GAMBIA.
BEFORE, I WOULDN'T
HAVE BEEN ABLE
TO SHOW YOU THESE
COUNTRIES ON A MAP.
NOW I KNOW THEIR CULTURE,
THEIR FOOD
AND I HAVE SO MANY FRIENDS
WHO SHARE MY INTERESTS.
LISTENING TO MOHAMMED,
IT'S VERY TOUCHING FOR ME.
SO I GUESS WE DID
SOMETHING GOOD.

Mikael says I'M THE PROUD SON OF IMMIGRANTS,
GOOD PEOPLE LOOKING
FOR A BETTER LIFE.
IMMIGRANTS WHO HAD
AN EASIER JOURNEY
THAN THE BRAVE SOULS
I'VE MET HERE.
I GREW UP IN A CITY AND
THROUGHOUT MY CHILDHOOD,
MY FAMILY HOME WAS FILLED
WITH WAVE AFTER WAVE
OF REFUGEE FAMILIES.
MY PARENTS INSISTED ON BEING
THE FIRST POINT OF CONTACT
FOR NEW PEOPLE COMING
TO THE COUNTRY.
CZECHOSLOVAKIANS, UGANDANS,
VIETNAMESE...
THAT WAS MY CHILDHOOD.
MEETING AN ENTIRE COMMUNITY
DOING WHAT I WAS TAUGHT
WAS RIGHT IS INSPIRING
ON SO MANY LEVELS.

(music plays)

Mikael says BUILDING STRONG COMMUNITIES
SEEMS TO BE OF VITAL IMPORTANCE
FOR CITIZENS
ALL OVER THIS CITY.
I MEET DANIELE IN HIS
NEIGHBORHOOD OF NOLO,
SHORT FOR NORTH OF LORETO.
WHEN HE MOVED HERE
THREE YEARS AGO,
HE DIDN'T KNOW A SOUL
AND WELL, HE JUST WANTED
TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS.
SO HE LAUNCHED
A FACEBOOK PAGE CALLED
NOLO SOCIAL DISTRICT,
SIMPLY HOPING TO BRING
PEOPLE TOGETHER
IN HIS NEW NEIGHBORHOOD.

The caption changes to "Daniele Dodaro. Co-founder, NoLo Social District."

Daniele is in his late thirties, with short brown hair and a beard and wears glasses, jeans and a denim shirt.

Daniele says THE FIRST TIME, WE WERE FOUR,
AND THEN THE WORD STARTED
SPREADING AND THEN NOLO
BECAME A BIT FAMOUS.
NOW WE ARE SOMETHING
LIKE 5,600.

Mikael says 5,000!

Daniele says YES. PEOPLE WHO LIVE
AND WORK HERE.

Mikael says THE NOLO SOCIAL
DISTRICT IS INSPIRED
THE IDEA IS SIMPLE:
INSPIRING NEIGHBORS
TO MEET, TO CHAT,
TO HELP EACH OTHER
OUT AT NO COST.
THERE ARE NOW MORE
THAN 450 SOCIAL STREETS
ALL OVER THE WORLD,
FROM ITALY TO CANADA,
FROM NORWAY TO NEW ZEALAND.

Daniele says EVERY SATURDAY MORNING,
WITH THE NEIGHBORS,
WE ORGANIZE A BREAKFAST
ON THE STREET
OR ON THE SQUARE.

Mikael says SO A PUBLIC SPACE?

Daniele says YES, A PUBLIC SPACE. WE USE
THE PUBLIC SPACE BECAUSE IT'S...
I KNOW IT'S SOMETHING...

Mikael says BECAUSE IT'S PUBLIC!

Daniele says BECAUSE IT'S PUBLIC!

Mikael says FOR YOU, IT'S SUPER IMPORTANT
THAT YOU'RE OUT ON THE STREET
WITH THESE PEOPLE,
MEETING THEM FACE TO FACE.

Daniele says YES, BECAUSE THE SOCIAL STREET
IS NOT JUST A FACEBOOK GROUP.
WE USE FACEBOOK AS
A MEDIUM, AS A TOOL,
IN ORDER TO MEET
PEOPLE IN THE FLESH.
THE AIM IS TO GO OFFLINE,
NOT TO REMAIN ONLINE.
I THINK THAT
IT'S SOMETHING SIMPLE,
BUT IMPORTANT.
THERE ARE PEOPLE
THAT ARE MAYBE BAKING
A CAKE FOR THE NEIGHBOURS
AND THEY SHARE THEIR FOOD,
THEY SHARE THEIR TRADITIONS
AND THEIR CULTURE.
THE IMPORTANT WORD
IS "SHARE." WITH PEOPLE.

Mikael says CO-CREATION.

Daniele says YES, SOMETHING LIKE THAT.

Mikael says CO-CREATION OF A SOCIAL STREET.

Mikael says BEFORE WE GET TO
THE NEIGHBORHOOD BREAKFAST,
WE STOP AT SARA'S, COFOUNDER
OF THE NOLO SOCIAL DISTRICT,
TO PICK UP A TABLE.
AND THIS IS WHERE IT GETS
A BIT AWKWARD.
I DIDN'T BAKE A CAKE,
SO WE NEEDED TO PICK
UP SOME PASTRIES.
SO YOU CREATED THE FRAMEWORK,
YOU GAVE THE PEOPLE SOMETHING
THEY OBVIOUSLY WANTED
AND WERE WAITING FOR.
HOW HAS IT EXPANDED?

Daniel says THERE IS, FOR EXAMPLE,
A KNITTING GROUP.
THERE ARE PEOPLE
WHO GO RUNNING.
THERE IS AN ENGLISH
CONVERSATION GROUP,
A FRENCH CONVERSATION
GROUP AND THEN
THERE IS A COMMUNITY RADIO.
IT'S A LOCAL RADIO MADE
BY NEIGHBORS WHO BECAME FRIENDS
THANKS TO THE SOCIAL STREET.
IT'S JOURNAL RADIO.
IT'S ONLY ABOUT THE DISTRICT,
SO THEY DO INTERVIEWS
AND CUT AND PASTE
AND SOMETHING LIKE THAT.
FORTUNES OF THE PEOPLE HERE,
BUT ALSO MAYBE INFORMATION
ABOUT EVENTS AND OTHER THINGS?
EVENTS AND WHAT HAPPENS.

Mikael says ALRIGHT. COOL.

The DJ says "We can listen to it and dance."

A woman says "Yes, let's listen to it and dance."

The DJ says "Same thing for the interviews."

Daniele and Mikael walk past the radio station.

Then they greet people on the street.

Daniele says CIAO.

Mikael says NICE TO MEET YOU.

A man helping set up a folding table says COOL.

Mikael says RIGHT.

They set up a spread of food and drinks for the people gathering around the table.

Daniele says AS YOU CAN SEE,
IT'S SOMETHING REALLY SIMPLE,
BUT IT'S SOMETHING THAT
WE ARE NOT ALLOWED TO DO
BECAUSE WE ARE BREAKING
THE LAW IN A CERTAIN WAY.
YOU HAVE TO ANNOUNCE TO THE CITY
THAT YOU ARE DOING THIS AND
YOU HAVE TO PAY BECAUSE
YOU USE THE PUBLIC SPACE.

Mikael says THESE ARE IN A WAY JUST
BREAKFAST ACTIVISTS.

Daniele says YES.

Mikael says BREAK-TIVISTS.

Daniele says BREAK-TIVISTS.

Mikael says DID I JUST MAKE THAT UP?
I DON'T KNOW. OKAY.

Daniele says I NEVER USED THIS,
BUT I LIKE IT. SARA!

Sara is in her thirties, with short slightly wavy brown hair with bangs and wears gray jeans, a black sleeveless shirt and a sweater around her waist.

Mikael says HOW HAS THIS CHANGED
YOUR PERCEPTION
OF YOUR OWN NEIGHBORHOOD
WHERE YOU LIVE?

The caption changes to "Sara Atelier. CO-founder, NoLo Social District."

Sara says COMPLETELY, I WOULD SAY.
WHEN I STARTED THIS,
I WAS NEW IN MILAN AND
NEW IN THE DISTRICT
AND I DIDN'T KNOW ANYONE.
BASICALLY, I DECIDED
THAT I NEEDED A WAY TO MEET
MY NEIGHBORS
AND MAKE NEW FRIENDS.
SINCE THEN,
I MET SO MANY PEOPLE
AND I REALLY LOVE
LIVING ON THIS STREET.
I DON'T WANT TO MOVE ANYMORE.
IT'S HOME, FINALLY.

Mikael says FINALLY HOME?
COOL. WHERE DOES IT END?
WHAT'S THE GOAL
FOR SOCIAL STREETS IN NOLO?

Daniele says I DON'T KNOW.
MAYBE THE GOAL IS NOT TO NEED
THE SOCIAL STREET ANYMORE.
MAYBE WHEN THE SOCIAL STREET
DOES ITS JOB PERFECTLY,
WE WON'T NEED
A FACEBOOK GROUP
IN ORDER TO DO ALL THESE
TYPES OF PROJECTS AND STUFF.
IS A PARADOXE.
THE BEST-CASE SCENARIO IS THAT
WE DON'T NEED IT ANYMORE.

(music plays)

Mikael says ON THE SUBJECT
OF TRANSPORTATION,
I REALLY GET THE FEELING
THAT MILAN IS TRYING.
FOR MANY YEARS,
THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN
WAS THEIR CONGESTION
CHARGE FROM 2012.
IF YOU WANT TO DRIVE YOUR CAR
INTO THE CITY CENTRE AREA C,
WHICH STARTS BEHIND ME,
YOU HAVE TO PAY A FEE.
THERE HAVE BEEN AMAZING RESULTS:
A REDUCTION IN POLLUTION
IN THE CITY CENTER BETWEEN
6 AND 17 PERCENT.
THIS IS ALSO ONE OF THE FEW
LARGE CITIES IN EUROPE
THAT NEVER GOT RID
OF ITS TRAM SYSTEM.
YOU SEE AN ECLECTIC
MIX OF VINTAGE TRAMS
AND NEWER MODELS DOING THE HARD
WORK ON THE RAILS
AT STREET LEVEL.
THE NEXT STEP IS EXPANDING
THE METRO.
LET'S THROW INTO THE MIX
A SUCCESSFUL BIKE-SHARE SYSTEM,
CAR-SHARE PROGRAMS,
EVEN AN ELECTRIC
SCOOTER SHARE SYSTEM.
IT'S AS THOUGH MILAN
IS THROWING EVERYTHING
THEY HAVE AT THE ISSUE.
I REALLY GET THE FEELING
THAT THIS IS ONE
OF THE WORLD'S GREAT
TRANSPORTATION LABORATORIES.
BUT EVEN IF MILAN IS THROWING
ALL TYPES OF TRANSPORTATION
ALTERNATIVES INTO THE MIX,
THE CITY HAS TO ADDRESS
ITS CAR SITUATION.
IT IS AFTER ALL ITALY'S SECOND
MOST CONGESTED CITY AFTER ROME.
THERE ARE LOTS OF CARS
HERE AND, OF COURSE,
THAT MEANS LOTS OF PARKING.
ON THE STREETS OBVIOUSLY,
BUT ALSO EVERYWHERE ELSE.
MOTORISTS HERE PARK WHEREVER
THEY CAN AND CLEARLY,
WHEREVER THEY WANT,
INCLUDING SQUARES
AND OTHER PUBLIC SPACES.
IN FACT, MANY OF THESE
PIAZZAS, ONCE AT THE CENTER
OF MILANESE SOCIAL LIFE,
ARE NOW NOTHING
MORE THAN PARKING LOTS.

Michela says SO WE ARE TRYING TO RECREATE
A PUBLIC SPACE ALTERNATIVE
TO JUST A CAR PARKING SPACE.

The caption changes to "Michela Fancello, Davide Molteni and Carlotta Bonvicini. Co-founders, 12 M."

Michela is in her thirties, with mid-length curly brown hair and wears glasses, jeans and a printed shirt.

Davide is in his forties, balding and wears jeans, a green T-shirt and an unbuttoned gray shirt.

Carlotta is in her thirties, with short straight blond hair and wears black trousers and a black and white printed sleeveless shirt.

Mikael says MICHELA, DAVIDE AND CARLOTTA
CALL THEIR VERY COOL PROJECT
12 M2.
IT'S ALL IN THE NAME.
12 M2
IS THE EXACT AMOUNT OF SPACE
OCCUPIED BY A PARKED CAR.
TODAY, WE'RE TRANSFORMING
THIS PARKING LOT
INTO SOMETHING
MUCH MORE USEFUL,
AT LEAST TEMPORARILY.
WE'RE SHOWING THE CITIZENS
THAT THIS SPACE AND MANY OTHERS
LIKE IT WERE ONCE USED
DIFFERENTLY AND COULD BE AGAIN.

They set up an installation on the parking lot.

Michela says AS YOU CAN SEE,
A CAR IS PARKED ON AVERAGE
90 PERCENT OF ITS ENTIRE LIFE.
IT'S A LOT OF SPACE TAKEN UP
BY A CAR THAT IS JUST PARKED.
A FEW YEARS AGO, A SHARING
SYSTEM STARTED HERE IN MILAN
AND A CAR MOVING
TAKES UP LESS SPACE
THAN A CAR PARKED.
SO SOMETHING IS CHANGING
IN THIS DIRECTION,
BUT WE STILL HAVE A LOT
OF PARKING SPOTS
IN THE CITY CENTER.
SOMETIMES, WE DON'T EVEN
HAVE SIDEWALKS.

Mikael says THAT'S RIGHT! THAT'S
A VERY SMALL SIDEWALK.

Michela says EXACTLY. IT'S NOTHING.

Mikael says HOW DO YOU DESIGN THIS SPACE?
YOU HAVE ALL OF THESE DIFFERENT
THINGS. YOU HAVE THE BARRIERS.
YES, I CAN GET THE BARRIERS.
YOU HAVE A BIKE STATION
FOR BIKE REPAIRS,
WHICH IS COOL.
BUT HOW DO YOU ACTUALLY
MAKE THE LIST AND
DECIDE WHAT
YOU WANT IN THE SPACE?

Michela says WELL, WE TRY TO INTEGRATE
SOME DIFFERENT REALITIES,
BOTH FROM THE NEIGHBORHOODS AND
FROM FORMER INSTALLATIONS.
WE TRY TO CREATE A SPACE
WHERE IT'S POSSIBLE
TO COOPERATE TOGETHER.
PEOPLE FROM THE NEIGHBORHOOD
BUT ALSO PEOPLE FROM THE CITY
AND THE SMALL NEIGHBORHOOD.
WE WANT TO DO THINGS
TOGETHER AND SEE HOW
THE PEOPLE REACT TO THIS AND
IF THEY ARE WILLING TO CHANGE.

Mikael says IT'S NOT JUST PUTTING UP PLANTS.
IT'S ACTUALLY A DISCUSSION ON
"OH! WE NEED ROSEMARY THERE!"
IT'S REALLY KIND OF COOL!
THERE'S A SYSTEM TO THIS
AND ITS ESTHETIC.

Davide stands next to a metal plant shelf and says THEY PREFER THE AROMATIC
PLANTS IN THE LOWER PARTS,
SO WHEN YOU SIT DOWN,
YOU CAN SMELL IT.

Mikael says SO THERE IS A SYSTEM.

Davide says AND THE FLOWERS ARE UP.

Mikael says FOR THE VISUAL.
JUST UP HERE?

Davide YES. PUT IT HERE,
FOR EXAMPLE.
AND THEN WE CAN PUT THIS HERE.
VERY GOOD.

Mikael says IT LOOKS LIKE THE CITY JUST
MIGHT BE LISTENING.
AND IT'S NOW CONSIDERING
THE IMPLEMENTATION
OF SIMILAR POP-UP INSTALLATIONS
ELSEWHERE AS A PILOT PROJECT.

Carlotta says THIS IS LIKE A PERFORMANCE
SURPRISE TO MAKE PEOPLE
UNDERSTAND THERE IS A DIFFERENT
POSSIBILITY. GOING AGAINST CARS
DOESN'T REALLY HAVE
THE RIGHT EFFECT ON PEOPLE.
BUT I THINK THAT WHAT REALLY
MAKES A MODERN CITY MODERN
AND CONTEMPORARY IS THE
POSSIBILITY TO HAVE A CHOICE,
TO LET THE PEOPLE
CHOOSE THE MODE
OF TRANSPORTATION
THAT THEY WANT TO USE.

Mikael says HOW DO YOU THINK TRANSFORMING
THIS SPACE WOULD AFFECT
THE NEIGHBORHOOD?

Carlotta says THE FIRST THING IS,
WE TRY REALLY NOT
TO DO SOMETHING THAT COULD
FEEL LIKE IT'S AGAINST THEM.
ONE MORNING, WE WERE HERE
AND WE MET THE RESIDENTS.
THEY THOUGHT THIS COULD
BE COOL AND THAT
THEY SHOULD FIND A DIFFERENT
PLACE TO PARK THEIR CARS.
BUT AT LEAST, THIS IS BECOMING
A SORT OF SQUARE.
WE SAID YES, THAT IT COULD
BECOME SOMETHING LIKE THIS.

Mikael says TACTICAL URBANISM CAN BE SUBTLE,
BUT IT CAN ALSO BE BOLD.
IT SHOWS THE RESIDENTS
OF A NEIGHBORHOOD ANYWHERE
IN THE WORLD WHAT IS POSSIBLE.
BUT IT ALSO PEELS BACK
THE FAÇADE TO REVEAL
WHAT EVERY CITY WAS
FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS:
A LIFE-SIZED SPACE FOR PEOPLE.

Mara says THIS IS THE MEETING POINT.
THAT'S WHERE WE WAIT
FOR KIDS AND PARENTS
AND AT 8 O'CLOCK, WE LEAVE.

Mara is in her forties, with long curly red hair and wears black leggings, denim shorts, a black top and a black cardigan.

Mikael says WE HAVE TO GET THERE ON
TIME BECAUSE THE SCHOOL
IS REALLY STRICT ABOUT
KIDS ARRIVING ON TIME.

Mara says WE HAVE TO, YES. TEACHERS
DON'T WANT THEM TO BE LATE,
OF COURSE, SO WE HAVE
TO LEAVE AT 8 O'CLOCK.

Mikael says MASSA MARMOCCHI.
LET'S TRANSLATE THAT
TO "A WHOLE BUNCH
OF KIDS ON BIKES,"
STARTED WHEN A MOTHER
MADE A SIMPLE REQUEST
ON FACEBOOK. SHE WANTED TO BIKE
TO SCHOOL WITH HER 5-YEAR OLD,
BUT WITH MILAN'S
VERY INTENSE TRAFFIC,
IT'S NO SURPRISE
THAT SHE SIMPLY DIDN'T DARE.
SO MARA AND A FEW FRIENDS,
MEMBERS OF THE CRITICAL MASS
MOVEMENTS, ANSWERED
THE CALL ENTHUSIASTICALLY.

The caption changes to "Mara Scollo. Co-founder, Massa Marmocchi."

Mikael says THEY RALLIED OTHER PARENTS
AND THEY ALL BIKED
TO SCHOOL TOGETHER, CREATING
A MOVEMENT IN ITS OWN RIGHT.
MASSA MARMOCCHI NOW
OPERATES IN 25 SCHOOLS
THROUGHOUT MILAN, UNDERLINING

Mara says THE GOAL, FIRST OF ALL,
IS TO EDUCATE KIDS
TO USE BIKES,
NOT ONLY TO GO TO PARKS,
BUT TO USE IT AS A TRANSPORT.
WE WOULD LIKE THEM TO GROW
UP WITH THIS CONSCIOUSNESS
THAT THEY HAVE THE RIGHT
TO SHARE THE ROADS
AND THEY HAVE
THE RIGHT TO USE A BIKE
EVERY DAY TO GO TO SCHOOL
AND TO DO WHATEVER
THEY WISH TO DO WITH A BIKE.

Mikael says WHAT HAS THE RESPONSE BEEN LIKE
WHEN WE'RE IN THE TRAFFIC?

Mara says PEOPLE WHO DRIVE THE CARS
CAN BE VERY MAD AT US.
THEY GET VERY NERVOUS BECAUSE
THEY WANT TO GO TO WORK
AND THEY DON'T WANT TO WAIT.
AND IT'S WEIRD BECAUSE
WHEN THEY ARE IN TRAFFIC
BEHIND THE CARS, THEY WAIT
FOR 30 MINUTES ALSO,
FOR EXAMPLE.
BUT FOR US, WITH KIDS,
THEY SHOULD BE MORE PATIENT.
IT'S SOMETHING NICE, YOU KNOW.

Mikael says MARA AND HER MASSA MARMOCCHI
FRIENDS INSIST ON THE RIGHT
TO USE THE STREETS.
THEY'RE ALSO FIGHTING
FOR BETTER CYCLING
INFRASTRUCTURE.
EFFORTS HAVE IN FACT
BEEN MADE BY THE CITY
IN THE PAST FEW YEARS,
BUT MANY OF THE BIKE LANES
HAVE YET TO BE CONNECTED
IN A COHESIVE,
COHERENT NETWORK.

Mara says A CHANGE SHOULD BE MADE
IN THE MINDS OF PEOPLE,
IN THE WAY THEY WANT
THE CITIES TO BE.
WE WANT THE CITIES
TO BE MORE LIVABLE.
SO IF YOU WANT THIS,
YOU HAVE TO MAKE A CHANGE.
YOU HAVE TO HAVE FEWER CARS.
YOU HAVE TO GIVE ROOM
TO PEDESTRIANS AND TO BIKES.
THAT'S A FACT.
WE NEED IT.

Mara says "So, kids, no racing today. We all go slow, OK?"

Mikael says ARE WE READY TO GO?

Mara says YES, WE ARE READY TO GO.

Mikael says THE KIDS ARE READY TO GO!

A map pops up showing the route from the meeting point to the school. A caption reads "7:35 a.m."

Mara says "Kids, we're stopping here as usual!"

Mikael says RIGHT OR STOP?

Mara says YES, WE STOP BECAUSE
IT'S QUITE DANGEROUS.
WHEN WE ARE SAFE, WE GO.

Mikael says WE'RE ACTUALLY RESPECTING
THE TRAFFIC LAWS IN CERTAIN
INTERSECTIONS AND GATHERING ALL
THE KIDS, THEN WE CONTINUE ON.
IT'S IN YOUR FACE, BUT THERE'S
ALSO A CERTAIN STRUCTURE TO IT.

Mara says "OK kids, let's go!"

Mikael says IS THIS NORMAL TO HAVE
THIS MANY KIDS
ON A FRIDAY GOING TO SCHOOL?

Mara says I THINK TODAY THERE ARE
A LITTLE BIT MORE KIDS,
BUT ANYWAY WE ARE
A VERY NICE GROUP
WHEN THE WEATHER IS VERY NICE.

Mikael says YES. COOL!
AND LOTS OF PARENTS
ARE HERE WITH THEIR KIDS,
COMING FROM THE SIDES.

Mara says YES, BECAUSE THERE IS
A SORT OF BIKE BUS.
SOME KIDS WAIT FOR US.

Mara says "Slow down kids!"

Mara says OKAY, NOW IT'S CRAZY.

Mikael says NOW IT'S CHAOS.

Mara says NOW WE ARE CLOSE
TO THE SCHOOL.
THAT'S FINE.

Mikael says THAT'S FINE.

Mara says WE ARE ALMOST THERE.

Mikael says WE MADE IT.

The caption changes to "7:57 a.m."

Mara says WE MADE IT.

Mikael says ON TIME!
THREE MINUTES EARLY!

Mara says ACTUALLY, YES.

Mikael says IT'S NOT VERY ITALIAN
TO BE EARLY, IS IT?
THEY'RE HAPPY.
THE KIDS ARE HAPPY.

Mara says YES, THEY ARE!

Mikael says THEY WERE HAPPY WHEN
THEY ARRIVED AT THE PLAZA,
THEY WERE HAPPY ON THE RIDE
AND THEY'RE HAPPY NOW.

Mara says YES, THEY ARE.

Mikael says THAT'S NOT A BAD START
TO THEIR DAY.

Mara says THAT'S WHY WE DO IT, YES.

Mikael says BUT THERE'S A LOT OF SCIENCE
FROM DENMARK
THAT SHOWS THAT KIDS
THAT RIDE A BIKE TO SCHOOL,
EVEN JUST TWO KILOMETERS,
THEY ARE GOING
TO BE BETTER STUDENTS.
THEY ARE GOING TO BE AWAKE,
ALERT AND THEY'RE ACTUALLY
GOING TO LEARN MORE
JUST BECAUSE THEY DID
A SIMPLE BIKE RIDE.
SO IT'S JUST NOT TAKING
BACK THE STREETS,
IT'S ALSO IMPROVING
THEIR QUALITY OF LIFE.

Mara says I'M SURE IT IS.
WE DEFINITELY FEEL BETTER.
YOU SEE KIDS SMILING,
YOU SEE KIDS HAPPY,
YOU BIKE TOGETHER
AND IT'S A VERY NICE
WAY TO START THE DAY.
SO, YES.

Mikael says HOW CAN YOU NOT HAVE A GOOD
DAY WHEN LOOKING
AT ALL THOSE KIDS HAVING
THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES?

Mara says EXACTLY!
YOU SAW IT! DEFINITELY!

Mikael says THE WHOLE CREW, EVERY TIME
WE LOOKED AT EACH OTHER,
WE WERE SMILING THE ENTIRE TIME.
OH MY GOD! IT IS AMAZING!

(music plays)

Mikael says MILAN IS AT A CROSSROADS.
BUT YOU KNOW WHAT?
IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN
A CROSSROADS.
THIS IS THE GATEWAY
TO EVERYWHERE,
POSSIBLY EUROPE'S
GREATEST INTERSECTION.
MILAN HAS NEVER BEEN
A POMPOUS CAPITAL
WITH THE BURDEN OF HISTORY
ON ITS SHOULDERS.
THIS CITY IS COMPLETELY
FREE TO SHRUG.
WHERE DO YOU WANT TO GO?
I DON'T KNOW, BUT LET'S FIGURE
OUT HOW TO GET THERE.
YOU KNOW WHAT MILAN IS?
IT IS ONE OF THE WORLD'S
GREATEST URBAN START-UPS.
TWO THOUSAND AND FOUR YEARS
YOUNG AND READY TO GO.
AND THERE'S NO SHORTAGE
OF INVESTORS IN THE FORM
OF CITIZENS EAGER
AT THE OPPORTUNITY,
READY TO INVEST THEIR IDEAS,
PASSIONS,
AND THE MOST VALUABLE ASSET
OF ALL: CIVIC PRIDE.
MILAN IS IN THAT SWEET
SPOT. THEY CAN BE BOLD,
DISRUPTIVE, FREE TO EXPERIMENT
IN THIS FANTASTIC URBAN
LABORATORY.
WILL IT WORK? I HOPE SO,
BUT I HAVE NO IDEA.
IN A WORLD OF HESITANT
MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT,
WHERE BABY STEPS ARE THE STATUS
QUO, MILAN IS FREE-STYLING.
AND THAT IS EXACTLY
THE KIND OF INSPIRATION
AND LEADERSHIP CITIZENS
HERE AND IN CITIES AROUND
THE WORLD NEED AND DESERVE.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Hosted by Mikael Colville-Andersen.

Directed by Myriam Berthelet and Michel D.T. Lam.

Series director, Michel. D. T. Lam.

Producer, Nicolas Boucher.

Produced in association with TVO.

Executive producers, Jane Jankovic.

Logo: DBC2.

Copyright 2018.

Watch: Ep. 4 - Milan