Transcript: Ep. 1 - Cape Town | Nov 04, 2018

(music plays)

Against an aerial view of a city, an animated yellow world map with a country highlighted in orange appears. A caption reads "Cape Town, South Africa."

Mikael Colville-Andersen stands on a cliff overlooking Cape Town and the sea. He is in his early fifties, with a short goatee and graying hair. He wears sunglasses on his head, a gray shirt and light green shorts.

Mikael says IT'S BEEN MORE THAN 20 YEARS
SINCE THE END OF APARTHEID.
LIKE MANY ICONIC CITIES,
CAPE TOWN'S REPUTATION
PRECEDES IT.
I'VE HEARD THE SAME THING
FROM FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES
AROUND THE WORLD:
"MAN, THE BEACHES. THE FOOD,
THE WINE!" BUT OUTSIDE
THAT GLOSSY, GENTRIFIED,
RICH AND INCREDIBLY WHITE
URBAN BUBBLE, HAS THE POWER
OF DEMOCRACY AND THE QUEST
FOR EQUALITY IMPROVE LIVES
HERE ON THE CAPE?
IS URBANISM BEING USED
AS AN EFFECTIVE TOOL
FOR URBAN CHANGE?
WE'RE HEADING DEEP INTO
THE REAL AND RAW URBAN LANDSCAPE
OF A MODERN CAPE TOWN.

Mikael stands barefoot as an animated city in the shape of an electronic circuit crawls up his leg and arm. Amazed, he looks at his arm and then shows the palm of his hand to the screen. On his hand and in yellow letters, the title of the show reads "The Life Sized City." He turns his hand to show an animated skyline popping up. The title of the show reads "With Mikael Colville-Andersen."

Mikael says CAPE TOWN TOPS THE LIST
OF EVERY TRAVEL BLOG
THESE DAYS. PHOTOS SHOW
A MODERN, GLOSSY CITY.
A BEAUTIFUL PLACE FILLED
WITH PEOPLE HAVING
THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES.
BUT THIS IDYLLIC IMAGERY FAILS
TO REFLECT THE REALITY AND
THE COMPLEXITY
OF THIS MULTILAYERED CITY.
DON'T GET ME WRONG.
THE PLACE IS TRULY AMAZING,
BUT FOR REASONS THAT GO
WELL BEYOND WHAT
THE PICTURE POSTCARDS
WOULD HAVE YOU BELIEVE.
LET ME SUMMARIZE
THE BASICS: 1948,
APARTHEID IS IMPLEMENTED
IN SOUTH AFRICA.
BASED ON WHITE SUPREMACY,
SEGREGATION IS AT THE CORE
OF A SOCIAL SYSTEM THAT NOW
CONTROLS EVERYDAY LIFE.
IT DICTATES WHERE YOU CAN LIVE,
WHAT JOB YOU CAN HAVE,
WHO YOU CAN MARRY, WHICH
SEAT YOU CAN TAKE ON PUBLIC
TRANSPORTATION, ALL DEPENDING
ON WHETHER YOU'RE CONSIDERED
A SOUTH AFRICAN TERM,
ARBITRARILY DESIGNATING
PEOPLE WHO DIDN'T IDENTIFY
AS BLACK OR WHITE, OR PEOPLE
OF MIXED-RACE ANCESTRY.
NATIONWIDE, MORE THAN 3,5
MILLION PEOPLE ARE DISPLACED,
REMOVED FROM THEIR HOMES
AND RELOCATED IN RACIALLY
SEPARATED COMMUNITIES.
PEOPLE OF ALL ORIGINS RESIST,
PROTEST, DEMAND CHANGE,
AND THEY END UP IN JAIL,
AS DID NELSON MANDELA,
THE MOST "FAMOUS,"
IF WE CAN USE THAT WORD,
SUCH A REGIME COULD NEVER
BE SUSTAINABLE.

Old footage shows women carrying big packages on their heads, white police officers talking to a black man, men playing baseball, a beach sign that reads "White persons only," a bench that reads "For Europeans only," a fence that reads "Toilets non white men and women," a attack to a male politician and men protesting.

He continues AFTER SIGNS OF WEAKNESS,
IT FINALLY DISINTEGRATES
IN 1991. MANDELA AND
THE ANC, TRIUMPH IN 1994,
IN THE COUNTRY'S FIRST EVER
DEMOCRATIC ELECTIONS.
A FEW DECADES HAVE PASSED.
CAPE TOWN NOW MAKES
THE HEADLINES FOR ITS LAID-BACK
LIFESTYLE AND
ITS NATURAL BEAUTY.
BUT BENEATH THE SALES PITCH,
TRACES OF A DARK PAST
STILL LINGER. NEARLY 40 percent
OF THE CITY'S POPULATION
LIVES BELOW THE POVERTY LINE,
AND RADICAL DISPARITIES REMAIN
IN HEALTH AND ACCESS
TO EDUCATION,
AMONG OTHER THINGS.
AS I WALK THE STREETS
OF THIS BREATHTAKING
BUT DIVIDED CITY,
I HOPE THERE'S ENOUGH WILLPOWER
TO KEEP IT ALL GOING,
TO ALLOW EVERYONE HERE TO SEE
THE LIGHT AT THE END
OF A VERY LONG TUNNEL.

An animated red circle appears on the map of Cape Town. A caption reads "CBD. Central Business District."

Mikael and Andrew Boraine take a stroll around downtown. Andrew is in his late fifties, clean-shaven with receding white hair. He wears a gray shirt and black trousers.

Andrew says THE REAL CAPE TOWN
IS ONE OF A DIVIDED CITY.
THAT'S THE REALITY,
WHICH INCLUDES THE AREA
WE'RE IN RIGHT NOW, WHICH IS
A GREAT PLACE TO LIVE
AND A GREAT PLACE TO VISIT.

Street signs read "Mandela Rhodes Place. Church Antique and Art Market."

He continues YET, IT IS JOINED ON TO
THE REST OF THE CITY
IN THE GREATER
METROPOLITAN AREA,
WHICH HAS 101 SOCIAL AND
ECONOMIC PROBLEMS TO SOLVE.
THERE ARE HUGE AMOUNTS
OF POVERTY, INEQUALITY,
AND UNEMPLOYMENT.
THE DAY-TO-DAY LIFE OF MANY
CAPETONIANS IS FAR FROM GOOD.
IT'S PRETTY BAD. PART OF ME
FEELS I'M BACK IN 1997,
ALMOST UNDER THE STATE
OF EMERGENCY UNDER
THE OLD APARTHEID GOVERNMENT.

Mikael says WOW!

He continues NOT IN TERMS OF PERSONAL
SAFETY, NOT AT ALL,
BUT IN TERMS OF CLOSING
DOWN OF SPACE.
AND YET AT THE SAME TIME,
WE HAD OPTIMISM AT THAT STAGE
AND WE HAVE OPTIMISM NOW
THAT IT CAN BE TURNED AROUND
AGAIN BECAUSE SOUTH AFRICANS
ARE PRETTY RESILIENT.

In a slow motion clip, Andrew walks and stops to look at the camera. A caption follows him. It reads "Andrew Boraine. Writer, Activist and Urban Planner."

Mikael says AND LET ME TELL YOU,
ANDREW BORAINE KNOWS A THING
WHEN DEMOCRACY FINALLY
FOUND ITS WAY BACK IN.
IN FACT, HE WAS A SENIOR
OFFICIAL IN THE MANDELA
GOVERNMENT, AND BECAME
CAPE TOWN'S FIRST
POST-APARTHEID CITY MANAGER.

Old pictures show Andrew in his youth at his political role.

Mikael says ACTIVIST AND WRITER,
HE'S ONE OF THE CITY'S MOST
ADVOCATE FOR CHANGE.

Mikael says URBAN DESIGN WAS USED
TO SEPARATE, TO SEGREGATE.
DO YOU DECONSTRUCT THAT,
OR CAN YOU ADAPT IT
TO THE NEW REALITY?

Andrew says I MEAN, THERE'S THE PHYSICAL,
WHERE YOU PUT AFFORDABLE
HOUSING AND HOW DO YOU
KEEP IT AFFORDABLE.
BECAUSE ONCE IT'S IN A MARKET,
IF THE MARKET'S GOING UP,
IT RAPIDLY BECOMES
UNAFFORDABLE AGAIN.
IT'S ABOUT ACCESS AND MOBILITY.
THERE'S NO WAY THAT EVERYONE
LIVING IN THE TOWNSHIPS,
IN A DISPERSED URBAN SPRAWL,
GETS BACK INTO CONCENTRATED
DOWNTOWN URBAN AREAS.

A long queue of people at a bus stop appears.

He continues SO A BETTER PUBLIC TRANSPORT
IS ANOTHER WAY OF INTEGRATING
THE CITY. IF WE JUST RELY
ON THE GOVERNMENT TO SOLVE
ALL THE COMPLEX PROBLEMS, WE'RE
NOT GOING TO GET ANYWHERE.
CITIZENS HAVE TO BE INVOLVED,
PRIVATE SECTORS HAVE
TO BE INVOLVED, NGOS,
ACADEMICS AND RESEARCHERS
HAVE TO BE INVOLVED. AND I JUST
DON'T THINK WE HAVE ENOUGH
CAPACITY IN THE POLITICAL AND
STATE SYSTEM IN SOUTH AFRICA,
IN CAPE TOWN, TO SOLVE ALL
THESE COMPLEX QUESTIONS.

Mikael says NOW, OF COURSE, THERE ARE
A LOT OF PEOPLE DOING A LOT
OF GOOD THINGS IN CAPE TOWN.
BUT I MEAN, JUST THE VAST
SCALE OF THE ISSUES THAT
YOU'RE FACING, IS IT ENOUGH
TO BE HELPING THIS
NEIGHBOURHOOD HERE AND THERE,
AND EMPOWERING SOME PEOPLE?
I MEAN, HOW DO YOU SCALE IT UP?

Boys have fun around poor houses.

Andrew says WELL, IT'S NOT ENOUGH. I MEAN,
IF YOU HELP 10 FAMILIES WELL,
THAT'S GREAT. BUT THERE
ARE 100 000 FAMILIES
THAT NEED THAT SORT OF
HELP. CIVIC MOVEMENTS
OR SOCIAL MOVEMENTS ON
THEIR OWN ARE NOT GOING
TO BRING CHANGE. HOW DO YOU
LINK THE CHANGE AGENTS
WITHIN GOVERNMENT WITH
THE CHANGE AGENTS OUTSIDE
OF GOVERNMENT? WE'VE GOT
SOME REALLY GOOD ENGINEERS,
WE'VE GOT SOME REALLY
GOOD FINANCE PEOPLE,
BUT IF YOU DON'T PUT
THE RIGHT LEADERS IN PLACE,
AND IF THE LEADERS
AREN'T PREPARED TO WORK
WITH OTHERS LEADERS,
THEN WE'RE NOT GOING TO
SOLVE THE SITUATION.
SO DON'T GIVE ME RESOURCES. GIVE
ME COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP.

Mikael asks ARE YOU OPTIMISTIC
FOR THE FUTURE OF THE CITY?

Andrew pauses.

Mikael says IT'S A LONG PAUSE.

Andrew chuckles and says IN A SENSE, I FEEL THAT WE'RE
IN A SIMILAR TRANSITION PERIOD
LIKE WE WERE IN 1990. IT COULD
HAVE GONE REALLY BAD.
IT HAPPENED TO GO IN QUITE
A GOOD DIRECTION WITH
THE RELEASE OF MANDELA, THEY
SORT OF NEGOTIATED A TRANSITION.
BUT WE DIDN'T SOLVE
ALL OF OUR PROBLEMS THERE.
PERHAPS WE COVERED UP SOME
OF THEM THERE.
AND NOW WE HAVE TO FACE THEM.
IT'S IRRELEVANT WHETHER
I'M AN OPTIMIST OR A PESSIMIST.
IT DEPENDS ON HOW WELL PEOPLE
ARE GOING TO DEFEND
THE DEMOCRACY.
DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP
THROUGHOUT THE SYSTEM.
THAT'S WHAT WE NEED.

(music plays)

Mikael gets on a helicopter.

Mikael says WHEN YOU'RE LOOKING DOWN
AT CAPE TOWN FROM THE AIR,
YOU SEE THE SPATIAL PLANNING
IMPLEMENTED BY THE
APARTHEID REGIME.

Against an aerial view of the city, yellow lines appear. The caption changes to "Train track. Motorway."

He continues YOU SEE THE GRAN MOTORWAYS AND THE
TRAIN LINES SEPARATING
THE NEIGHBORHOODS:
THE POOR BLACK AFRICANS,
THE COLOUREDS, AND
OF COURSE THE WHITES IN
THE DOWNTOWN AREA.
IN SHORT, SEGREGATED
URBAN PLANNING HAS
LEFT VERY DEEP SCARS
ON GENERATIONS OF
CAPETONIANS. IT HAS ALSO
CREATED A TROUBLING NETWORK
OF PHYSICAL DIVISIONS,
STAGGERING TO LOOK
AT FROM UP HERE.
IT'S A CITYWIDE URBAN
FINGERPRINT OF A ONCE-DOMINANT
RACIST IDEOLOGY.

Back in the helicopter, Mikael says ONE OF THE
PRIMARY DIFFERENCES YOU SEE
FROM THE AIR IS BASIC GEOMETRY.
YOU HAVE THE INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS,
COMPLETELY ORGANIC AND RANDOM
IN THEIR STRUCTURE.
THE FORMAL SETTLEMENTS THAT
THE CITY HAS BUILT FOR THE PEOPLE,
YOU START TO SEE THE SQUARES, THAT WE KNOW
FROM MANY CITIES AROUND THE WORLD.
IT REALLY IS AMAZIN
TO SEE IT FROM THE AIR.
THE DIFFERENCES IN THE GEOMETRY,
THE DIFFERENCES IN THE COLOUR,
THE DIFFERENCES IN THE SPACE
THAT THEY'RE USING.
POSTAGE STAMP SIZED HOUSES
IN THE INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS,
AND THEN THE SPACE GROWS
WITH PROSPERITY,
UNTIL YOU GET TO
THE WEALTHY NEIGHBORHOODS
WHERE THEY HAVE,
YOU KNOW,
ALMOST AN ENTIRE
GOLF COURSE IN THEIR
BACKYARD.

Fast clips of different aerial views of the city flash by.

Mikael says MORE THAN 20 YEARS
AFTER THE END OF OFFICIAL
SEGREGATION, PEOPLE STILL LIVE
WITHIN THE SPATIAL SEPARATION
IMPLEMENTED DURING APARTHEID.
WHITES ARE IN THE DOWNTOWN
IN THE RICH SUBURBS,
BLACKS AND COLOUREDS STAY
IN THEIR DESIGNATED TOWNSHIPS.
IN AND AROUND THESE TOWNSHIPS,
PEOPLE HAVE ENDED UP
BUILDING INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS,
WITH NO PROPERTY DEEDS,
AND MORE OFTEN THAN NOT,
NO BASIC SERVICES.
BUT HEY, YOU HAVE TO LIVE
SOMEWHERE, RAISE YOUR KIDS,
BUILD A HOME. THERE ARE
ARE YOU READY FOR THIS? -
437 INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS
IN CAPE TOWN.
437.
I MEET SIZWE MXOBO IN PJS,
AN INFORMAL SETTLEMENT
IN THE TOWNSHIP OF KHAYELITSHA,
ONE OF SOUTH AFRICA'S LARGEST.

A caption reads "Khayelitsha." A yellow circle on the map of Cape Town reads "PJS."

He continues PJS IS SHORT FOR SECTION P,
JOE SLOVO.
BECAUSE LIKE MANY OTHER
INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS,
THE PLACE WAS NAMED AFTER
AND ANTI-APARTHEID ACTIVIST.
AND THIS ONE, JOE SLOVO,
WAS A FORMER HOUSING MINISTER
IN THE MANDELA GOVERNMENT.
CONSIDERED PERMANENT,
EVEN THOUGH
IT WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1989.

Sizwe Mxobo and Mikael crouch in the street as boys watch them. Sizwe is in his mid-thirties, with a black beard and balding. He wears a black and white shirt and denim shorts.

Sizwe draws the city design on the pavement. Animated lines appear as he draws.

Sizwe says SO YOU HAVE
THE CENTER OF THE CITY,
AND MOVING OUT, ALL THOSE
PLACES CLOSE TO THE CITY...

Mikael says WHITE.

Sizwe says THAT'S FOR WHITES ONLY.
AND THEN SECONDLY,
YOU'VE GOT YOUR CORNER AREA.
NOW LET'S ENTER THE EDGE
OF THE CITY.
THAT'S ALL THE BLACKS HERE.
SO EVEN TODAY,
IF YOU GO AND ENTER THE CITY,
YOU WILL SEE EVERY TIME
YOU CROSS A BRIDGE,
YOU GET A DIFFERENT SETTING.
AND THAT SETTING CAN START
SPELLING OUT WHO LIVES
THERE, THE TYPE OF PLANNING
THAT'S HAPPENING THERE,
WHAT'S ALLOWED TO HAPPEN THERE.

The caption changes to "Sizwe Mxobo. Urban Planner."

Mikael says SIZWE WAS BORN AND RAISED
IN A SIMILAR NEIGHBOURHOOD
IN THE TOWNSHIP OF NYANGA.
DESPITE POVERTY AND RACISM,
HE HAS NOW BECOME A SUCCESSFUL
URBAN PLANNER,
AND STILL LIVES IN AN INFORMAL
SETTLEMENT, JUST LIKE 25 percent
OF HIS FELLOW CAPETONIANS.

Sizwe says THERE ARE NO PAVED ROADS.
THERE ARE NO PLANNED PATHWAYS.
THIS IS A NEGOTIATED
PATHWAY THAT WE SEE HERE.
AND THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN
LEFT OVER TIME BY
PEOPLE SAYING:
"O.K. THIS WORKS
AS A MAIN ROAD."
THERE ARE NO FORMAL SERVICES.
THEN, OBVIOUSLY, THE BUILDING
MATERIALS ARE ZINC AND WOOD.
SO IT'S NOT FORMAL BRICK
AND MORTAR STRUCTURES.

Mikael says O.K.

Sizwe continues AND PEOPLE AREN'T ALLOWED
TO BUILD OR TO USE THAT TYPE
OF MATERIAL, BECAUSE THEN
IT WOULD SIGNIFY SOME SORT
OF PERMANENCY.
THE VIEW OVER THIS,
THIS IS TEMPORARY
LIVING OF SOME SORT.
SO THERE'S THE PLANNED
TOWNSHIP, WHERE YOU WILL HAVE
FORMAL HOUSES. BUT THEN,
THERE WILL BE OTHER STUFF
PLANNED WITHIN
THE PLANNED TOWNSHIP
THAT WOULD LEAVE THESE
OPEN SPACES THAT WE SEE.

Sizwe and Mikael walk around a modest settlement.

Mikael says RIGHT.

Sizwe continues SO IF YOU LOOK THERE, THESE
ARE THE FORMAL HOUSES THERE.

They stand on a street.

Sizwe says THIS WOULD HAVE BEEN A POCKET,
MAYBE FOR BUSINESS ONLY, RIGHT?
BUT NO BUSINESS EVER CAME IN.
SO THEN THERE'S THE INFORMAL
SETTLEMENT, WHICH GROWS
FROM PEOPLE'S NEED TO CLAIM
THEIR OWN SPACES.

Children follow them around. Mikael turns to look at them and smiles.

Sizwe says WHAT THEY'RE SAYING, SHOUTING
AND BEING REALLY HAPPY,
WHAT THEY'RE SAYING IS:
"WHITE PEOPLE! WHITE PEOPLE!"
AND IT'S BECAUSE OF
THAT APARTHEID PLANNING.
BECAUSE YOU NEVER SEE WHITE
PEOPLE ON THIS SIDE OF TOWN.

Mikael says BUT IT'S NOT NEGATIVE.
IT'S POSITIVE.

Sizwe says YEAH. IT'S SORT
OF CELEBRATING...

Mikael says "OH MY GOD! IT'S A WHITE GUY!"
RIGHT. O.K.

Sizwe says UH-HUH. SO THAT CELEBRATION
IS COMING FROM THE FACT
THAT THERE'S NO INTEGRATION
HAPPENING.

Mikael says BUT WE'RE WALKING AROUND
WITH ALL THE BEAUTIFUL KIDS,
IT SEEMS FRIENDLY, IT SEEMS
VERY LIFE-SIZED AS WELL.

Sizwe says OH YEAH.

Mikael says I MEAN, HOW DANGEROUS
IS THIS INFORMAL SETTLEMENT,
IF WE'RE TALKING GANGS
OR CRIME?

Sizwe chuckles and says SO THERE'S ROBBERIES
EVERY DAY, RIGHT?
FROM THE YOUTH,
THERE'S A LACK OF ACTIVITIES
OR A LACK OF JOBS.
BUT THEN AGAIN,
IT'S NOT THAT DANGEROUS.
DURING THE DAY, IT'S FINE.
THE PROBLEM IS DURING
THE NIGHT WHEN DARKNESS COMES.
BECAUSE THEN, THERE'S NO SENSE
OF SECURITY. SO PEOPLE LOCK
THEMSELVES BEHIND THE YARDS AND
CLAIM THEIR OWN PRIVATE SPACE.
SO SECURITY IS A CHALLENGE,
BECAUSE THERE'S A LOT OF GAPS
IN BETWEEN THE HOUSES.
FOR CRIMINALS, IT'S EASY
TO JUST DO SOMETHING
AND DISAPPEAR.

Mikael says WHAT ABOUT LIGHTING?
THAT HUGE LAMP POST.
THERE'S ALSO ANOTHER ONE
RIGHT THERE. WHO PUT THOSE IN?

Sizwe says THE GOVERNMENT.
LIKE THESE TOILETS HERE,
IT'S TO TRY AND SAY: "O.K.
WE'LL BRING IN FLUSH TOILETS."
BUT THOSE ARE COMMUNAL
TOILETS. THE PROBLEM IS
AND THEY'RE COUNTING THEM -
POLICIE IS ONE TOILET
FOR FIVE SHACKS. RIGHT?
THAT DOESN'T TAKE INTO ACCOUNT
HOW MANY PEOPLE LIVE
IN THOSE FIVE SHACKS
TO SHARE ONE.

Mikael says I THINK WE CAN AGREE
THAT TOILETS ARE... WELL,
A BASIC HUMAN NECESSITY.
HERE IN PJS, THEY ARE FEW
AND FAR BETWEEN.
ONLY 114 TOILETS
FOR 900 HOUSEHOLDS.
MOST OF THEM ARE EITHER
TEMPORARY, BROKEN OR ISOLATED.
AND THIS, OF COURSE, CAN LEAD
TO MAJOR ISSUES.
FOR OBVIOUS SANITARY REASONS,
YOU DON'T WANT A TOILET NEAR
WHERE YOUR KIDS PLAY.

Three boys dance near communal toilets.

He continues ON THE OTHER HAND,
IF THEY'RE TOO FAR
FROM THE SHACKS,
YOU RISK BEING MUGGED,
RAPED OR EVEN KILLED,
JUST GOING TO THE BATHROOM.

Sizwe says FOR ME, GROWING UP PRE-1994
AS AN 80'S KID, RIGHT,
I STARTED WONDERING
WHAT IT WOULD TAKE TO SHIFT
THIS INFORMALITY AND MAKE
IT FORMAL. WHY WE CAN'T BE
UPGRADED WHERE WE ARE,
IS WHAT DROVE ME FROM PRIMARY
SCHOOL TO HIGH SCHOOL TO COME
AND STUDY TOWN PLANNING,
WHICH I WON'T LIE,
I HAD NO CLUE THAT PROFESSIONS
AS TOWN PLANNING EXISTED.

Mikael says YEAH, WELL...
BUT YOU COME FROM A PLACE
WHERE REALLY EVERYBODY
IS A TOWN PLANNER.
YOU'RE ALL CONTRIBUTING
TO BUILDING THE NEIGHBOURHOOD...
AND KEEPING IT SAFE.

Sizwe says IN MY TIME,
WHEN I WAS IN CPUT,
THERE WAS NEVER MUCH WE TALKED
ABOUT LOOKING AT INFORMALITY
AS A WAY. SO THE TRADITIONAL
THINKING WAS THAT YOU DEAL
WITH INFORMAL
SETTLEMENTS BY MOVING
EVERYONE AND PLANNING
A NEW SETTLEMENT.

Mikael says SIZWE, THROUGH HIS WORK WITH
A LOCAL NGO CALLED DAG,
THE DEVELOPMENT ACTION GROUP,
PROPOSES WHAT HE CALLS
"REBLOCKING." THIS INVOLVES
REIMAGINING THIS SETTLEMENT
WITH MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY,
SO IT CAN BETTER FIT
THEIR NEEDS.

They walk into a chapel where a meeting takes place. A close-up shot shows bulleted lists on large pieces of paper on a wall.

He continues TOGETHER,
THEY DESIGN A NEW LAYOUT
BY MOVING A FEW SHACKS,
ADDING A ROAD, CREATING
A COURTYARD FOR KIDS TO PLAY,
PLANTING A FOOD GARDEN,
INSTALLING CLOTHESLINES.
THEY ALSO MAKE SURE
TO INSTALL BASIC SERVICES,
LIKE RUNNING WATER,
ELECTRICITY AND TOILETS.

Sizwe says points to a urban map of the city and says THERE'S A LOT
OF SPACE IN BETWEEN.
SO HOW DO WE CONSOLIDATE
THAT SPACE?
HOW DO WE REORGANIZE
THE SHAPE OF THE SHACK,
SO THAT IT MAKES IT MORE
FUNCTIONAL TO ACHIEVE MORE?
SO HOW DO WE OPTIMIZE
THIS SPACE THAT WE HAVE?

Sibongile Mvumvu and a group of people stand near them. Sibongile is in her early thirties, with a long black braid. She wears a pink sleeveless shirt and pearl earrings.

Pointing to the same map, Sibongile says IF WE CAN MOVE PEOPLE AROUND,
THEN WE CAN ACTUALLY HAVE
A WALKWAY AROUND THE...
AND THAT'S AWASOWA.
AS WE DON'T HAVE TOILETS
AROUND HERE, WE COULD
OPEN THE TOILETS AROUND HERE.

Mikael says I MEAN, IS THE COMMUNITY
WILLING TO DO THAT?
TO BE MOVED AROUND?

The caption changes to "Sibongile Mvumvu. PJS President."

Sibongile says THAT'S ACTUALLY ONE
OF THE THINGS THAT WE'RE GOING
TO PROPOSE TO THE COMMUNITY.

Mikael says O.K.

The caption changes to "Xolelwa Maha. PJS Resident." Xolelwa is in her late twenties with black hair in a tail. She wears a striped shirt.

Xolelwa stretches to point to the map and says ACTUALLY, YOU SEE HERE,
THIS IS AN OLD BUILDING.
THERE'S NO ONE STAYING
THERE. SO WE THINK THAT
THIS CAN BE USED AS A COMMUNITY
FACILITY FOR OUR YOUTHS.
OUR YOUTHS DON'T HAVE
THEIR OWN HALL WHERE THEY CAN
SHOW THEIR TALENT.
SO WE CAN USE THIS BUILDING
AS OUR COMMUNITY FACILITY.

Mikael says DO YOU FEEL THAT YOU CAN
CHANGE THINGS YOURSELF NOW?
NOW THAT YOU ARE FOCUSING
ON THIS?

A middle-aged man says I THINK SO. THAT'S MY HOPE.

Mikael says IT'S YOUR HOPE.

The middle-aged man says THAT'S MY HOPE.

Mikael says ARE YOU OPTIMISTIC WHEN
YOU START FOCUSING ON THIS?

Everyone says YES.

Sizwe says FOR ME, I THINK...
I'VE STARTED THINKING:
MAYBE THE BIGGEST
THING WE CAN DO IS
TO GET EVERYONE, ESPECIALLY
AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL,
TO BELIEVE IN THEMSELVES,
TO BRING CHANGE.
BECAUSE IF WE EXPECT IT TO COME
FROM OUTSIDE THE COMMUNITY,
THAT'S GOING TO TAKE ANOTHER
10 YEARS, 20 YEARS.
AND IF WE CAN GET PEOPLE
WHO HAVE PROTESTED TO START
CREATING THEIR OWN
PLANS AND SAY:
"LOOK, THIS IS WHAT WE WANT.
FOR THE TIME BEING,
WHILE WE'RE STILL WAITING
FOR THINGS TO GET BETTER,
WHILE WE'RE STILL WAITING
TO FIGURE THINGS OUT,
CAN WE WORK ON THIS? CAN WE SEE
WHAT ACTIONS WE CAN TAKE?"
THAT, FOR ME, IS THE START
OF CREATING THAT CHANGE.
BUT WE NEED TO GET THERE.
PEOPLE CREATING
THEIR OWN CHANGE.

Mikael says WHEN YOU LIVE IN AN INFORMAL
COMMUNITY LIKE HERE IN PJS,
IN CAPE TOWN, OR ANYWHERE
LIKE IT ANYWHERE ELSE
IN THE WORLD, AND
THE MUNICIPALITY REFUSES
TO ACKNOWLEDGE YOUR EXISTENCE,
OR PERHAPS JUST RELUCTANTLY
DOES SO, EMPOWERING
THE COMMUNITY TO GATHER
INFORMATION, TO MAP OUT
THE PLACE TO COLLECT DATA,
IS PROOF OF LIFE.
AND THAT PROVIDES
NOT ONLY HOPE, BUT DIGNITY.
AND THAT IS A POWERFUL PLACE
TO START WORKING
TOWARDS CHANGE.

A clip shows smiling male and female residents of the area visited.

The caption changes to "Cape Town Railway Station."

Khalied Jacobs is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven and bald. He wears a plaid shirt.

Khalied and Mikael stand in the mail hall of a modern train station.

Khalied says THIS CAMPUS WAS ONLY FOR WHITE
PEOPLE ORIGINALLY, AND THERE IS
A SECOND CAMPUS AT THE OTHER
END OF THE PLATFORMS WHICH WAS
DESIGNED FOR THE REST OF US,
INCLUDING MYSELF. AND ON SOME
OF THE LINES ALSO,
THE SERVICES WERE PREDOMINANTLY
FOR WHITE PEOPLE
IN THE MORE PRIVILEGED PARTS
OF THE CITY.
THE WAY THE SERVICES
WERE ORGANIZED,
THEY SORT OF SUPPLEMENTED
THE SPECIAL ORGANIZATIONS
OF THE BUILDING AS WELL.
THAT WAS THE CONTROL.
THEY'RE SUCH PETTY LAWS
THAT KIND OF CONTROL
HOW PEOPLE MOVED,
WHERE YOU COULD SIT,
WHERE YOU COULD MOVE THROUGH,
WHICH BATHROOM YOU COULD USE
AND WHICH YOU COULDN'T.
ALL OF THAT WAS DESIGNED AROUND
THE SEPARATION OF RACES.

Mikael says THIS IS CAPE TOWN'S CENTRAL
TRAIN TERMINAL.
AND HERE CHANGE
IS VERY APPARENT.
BUILT IN 1966,
IT WAS LONG CONSIDERED
THE MOST EXPLICIT EXPRESSION
OF APARTHEID IDEOLOGY.

The caption changes to "Khalied Jacobs. Architect and Urban Designer."

Mikael continues KHALIED JACOBS, AN ARCHITECT,
WAS PART OF THE TEAM WHO
COMPLETELY REDESIGNED
THE STATION IN 2010.
AND IT WASN'T ONLY
ABOUT AESTHETICS.
THEIR GOAL WAS
TO ERASE TRACES
OF SPATIAL SEGREGATION.

Khalied and Mikael walk around the station.

Khalied says THE THING IS THAT WE HAD
TO GET TO UNDERSTAND HOW
TO REUSE THE EXISTING
INFRASTRUCTURE.
WE DIDN'T THE RESOURCES
TO SIMPLY FLATTEN THE STATION
AND REBUILD AN EFFICIENT
STATION, TO REINTERPRET
THIS PLACE AS A GATEWAY
INTO THE CITY. THE SPACE
THAT WAS ORGANIZED TO SEPARATE
RACES WAS INVERTED.
SO THESE TRAINS
HAVE THEN BECOME
ACCESSIBLE TO EVERYBODY.
THERE AN AGGLOMERATION
OF MINOR CHANGES
THAT MADE A DRAMATIC IMPACT
IN TERMS OF HOW IT LOOKS
AND FEELS, AND HOW ONE USES IT.

Mikael says KHALIED AND HIS TEAM ADDED
WINDOWS. THEY CENTRALIZED
THE TICKETING SYSTEM.
THEY OPENED UP THE FACADE
TO MAKE A LARGE PUBLIC SPACE.
ALL OF THIS SO COMMUTERS
WOULD MIX, BUMP INTO
EACH OTHER, SEE EACH OTHER,
NO MATTER WHERE THEY CAME FROM,
BE IT THE RICH AND WHITE
CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT,
OR THE MOST DISTANT TOWNSHIP.
THE IDEA WAS TO CREATE
A SPACE THAT WAS FOR EVERYONE.
EVEN THE VENDORS, ONCE CLOGGED
IN THE MAIN FLOOR, WERE OFFERED
AN OPEN-AIR ROOFTOP
MARKET INSTEAD OF EVICTION.
WHAT WAS UP HERE BEFORE?

Now, they visit a street market.

Khalied says THERE WAS A MARKET
HERE BEFORE AS WELL.
BUT WHAT WE DID IN 2010 WAS
WE CONSOLIDATED THE MARKET INTO
A SINGLE MARKET,
AND WE REORGANIZED
IT WITH FORMAL STRUCTURES,
WE SUPPORTED ADDITIONAL
SERVICES LIKE BATHROOMS
AND THE LIKE, BUT WE ALSO
LINKED THE EXISTING TAXI RANK
TO THE TRAIN STATION.
AND THAT ROUTE,
THE PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION,
IS WHERE ALL THIS LIFE SORT
OF TRANSPIRED.

Mikael says SO THIS IS ALSO AN A TO B
CORRIDOR AS WELL.
IT'S WHERE YOU PUT THE SHOPS,
IN AN A TO B CORRIDOR.
I MEAN, THAT'S BASIC MARKET
ECONOMY, RIGHT?

Khalied says ABSOLUTELY.

Mikael says O.K. THAT'S WHAT CREATES
THE DYNAMIC HERE.

Khalied says WE START TO UNDERSTAND
THAT THE SCALE OF THIS BUILDING
EQUATES TO 25 CITY BLOCKS.

Mikael says 25 CITY BLOCKS, YEAH.

Khalied continues AND, SO THE SCALE IS ENORMOUS.
SO THE CHALLENGE OF COURSE,
IS WE'RE SITTING WITH A PIECE
OF INFRASTRUCTURE
THAT IS NECESSARY
TO UNDERPIN THE CITY.

Mikael says I LIKE THE SIGN THAT SAYS:
"NO ILLEGAL TRADERS."
AND IT PROVIDES SOME SHADE
TO THE ILLEGAL TRADERS.
I FIND THAT A NICE IRONY.

They chuckle.

Mikael says THE INFORMAL IS FROM
THE NECESSITY OF COURSE, RIGHT?
AND THE NEED FOR FORMALIZATION
IS... I'VE ALWAYS WONDERED
WHERE THE BALANCE IS. HOW
MUCH OF THAT DO YOU KEEP?

Citizens shop at the market.

Khalied says THIS IS WHERE
THE CONTRADICTION IS:
BETWEEN THE LAWS
AND WHAT HAPPENS.
SO THE LAWS TALK
ABOUT CLEANING, WHEREAS
DISRUPTION TALKS ABOUT HOW ONE
CREATES ONE'S OWN IDENTITY
IN THE MAKING OF YOUR SPACE.
THAT IS UNLIKELY TO HAPPEN
WITH AN INSTANT CITY,
OR WITH A SET OF RULES.
SO THE RICHNESS OF THE CULTURE
AND THE DAY TO DAY LIVING
IS ABLE TO EXPRESS THE MAKING
OF A CITY BY PEOPLE
CONTRIBUTING TO THAT MAKING.

Against traffic, the animated map appears. It shows a red line connecting the railway station on one side of the city to Khayelitsha, on the opposite side.

Mikael says REDEFINING THE CENTRAL
STATION'S ROLE WAS A GREAT STEP
FOR CAPE TOWN. BUT CREATING
AN INCLUSIVE CITY IS ALSO ABOUT
BRINGING VITALITY
TO NEGLECTED PLACES.
SO WHEN KHALIED AND
HIS TEAM WERE COMMISSIONED
TO CREATE A BIKE LANE
ON SPINE ROAD, IN THE TOWNSHIP
OF KHAYELITSHA, THEY USED
THE INFRASTRUCTURE BUDGET
TO KICKSTART SOMETHING
MUCH BIGGER:
TRANSFORMING SPINE ROAD
INTO A VIBRANT STREET
REVOLVING AROUND
THE NEEDS OF ITS CITIZENS.

Now, Khalied and Mikael walk down a crowded street.

Khalied says SO THAT IMPLIES GETTING ALL
THESE PROPERTIES THAT HAVE
THEIR BACK FACING THE
STREET BECOME THE FRONT,
WHERE THE PEOPLE LIVING
IN THIS COMMUNITY CAN FIND SPACE
TO SPEND TIME. SO ONE OF
THE FIRST INTERVENTIONS WE DID,
IN ADDITION TO PUTTING
THE INFRASTRUCTURE,
WAS TO ORGANIZE SOME
OF THE INFORMAL TRADERS
TO ARRANGE AND ORGANIZE
THEMSELVES AROUND IT.

Mikael says RIGHT.

Khalied continues SO YOU CAN SEE THE ENERGY
THAT HAS SPONTANEOUSLY
BEEN DEVELOPED. IT'S FRIDAY
NIGHT, THEY COME TO PARTY.
THEY ARE DRESSED
TO THE NINES,
AND THEY COME TO
SOCIALIZE AS WELL.

Young women dance on the street.

Mikael says YOU CREATED A FRAMEWORK AND
THE PEOPLE WENT: "I GET THAT."

Khalied says AND OCCUPY IT.

Mikael says AND THEY OCCUPY IT.

Khalied says SO IT WAS DESIGNED WITHOUT
USING A PEN AND PAPER.
WHAT WE SEE ON THIS SIDE
HERE ARE PEOPLE STARTING
TO ORGANIZE THEMSELVES
AROUND THAT SPACE.

Mikael points to a side and says AND THIS IS MORE PERMANENT.
THIS IS A CONTAINER CONVERTED
FOR CHIPS, CHICKEN
WINGS, BARBERSHOP.

Khalied says BUT THE IDEA IS THAT
IT EVENTUALLY BECOMES
BOTH ENVIRONMENTS,
YOU KNOW? WHERE YOU BRING
LIVING CONDITIONS,
PLUS TRADING, PLUS SOCIAL
ENVIRONMENT, ALL IN THE SAME
SPACE. IT'S ABOUT REAL TRADE
AND REAL-LIFE EXPERIENCES
FOR THE MEN IN THE STREETS.
SO THIS IS THE VERY FIRST
PROPERTY THAT CHANGED
ITS BACK TO ITS FRONT.
HE REMOVED THE FENCE AND OPENED
UP HIS B and B TO THE STREET.
AND HE INFLUENCED
HIS NEIGHBOURS WHO VERY QUICKLY
TURNED THEIR BACKS INTO FRONTS.
AND OVER TIME,
A FEW RESTAURANTS OPENED.
THE CORNERS BECAME VERY ACTIVE,
SO IT BECAME A SOCIAL EVENT.
A LOT OF PEOPLE COME
ON A FRIDAY NIGHT.

They talk to a young couple.

A young man says EVERY WEEKEND.

Khalied says EVERY WEEKEND.

Mikael says EVERY WEEKEND.

Khalied says THIS IS THE PLACE TO BE, RIGHT?

A woman holding a drink says THIS IS SPINE ROAD.
THE ROAD, I TELL YOU!
ONLY HERE!
BRING IT ON!

Mikael and the woman share hand gestures.

Mikael and a man wearing a hat make a special greeting with their hands.

The man wearing a hat says ONE, TWO, THREE!

Khalied says TOWN PLANNING IN PARTICULAR
WAS TOO IMPLICATED
IN THE APARTHEID'S NARRATIVE.
NOW, IT'S A RESPONSIBILITY
FOR URBAN DESIGN AND PEOPLE
IN THE PLANNING PROFESSIONS
TO BEGIN USING THE SAME TOOLS,
TO REGENERATE THE NEW NARRATIVE
FOR HOW WE MAKE THINGS HERE.

A boy collects water from a faucet outside poorhouse and a woman peels a chicken.

Mikael says AS IS THE CASE IN EVERY CITY
I'VE VISITED, THE PLACE WHERE
PEOPLE LIVE IMPACTS HOW THEY
PERCEIVE THEIR OWN WORLD.
BUT IT'S EVEN MORE IMPORTANT
HERE, IN CAPE TOWN.
CENTRAL NEIGHBOURHOODS
ARE STILL PREDOMINANTLY
WHITE AND RICH. BUT NOW,
IT ISN'T BECAUSE THE LAW
IMPOSES IT, BUT RATHER
BECAUSE AFFORDABLE HOUSING
IS A SCARCE COMMODITY.
WE'RE JUST OUTSIDE DOWNTOWN
CAPE TOWN, IN A NEIGHBOURHOOD
CALLED WOODSTOCK.
THE TRADITIONAL WORKING CLASS
NEIGHBOURHOOD NOW RAPIDLY
BEING GENTRIFIED.
WITH THE SCALE OF THE HOUSING
CRISIS THAT THIS CITY
IS FACING,
FOR SOME ACTIVISTS,
TAKING MATTERS INTO
THEIR OWN HANDS
MEANS EMPLOYING
A TRIED AND TESTED
TECHNIQUE: SQUATTING.
OCCUPYING AN OLD BUILDING
IN ORDER TO INSIST
ON A BETTER FUTURE
FOR HOUSING IN THIS CITY.

Mikael stands by a gate and says KNOCK! KNOCK!
HELLO! HI SARITA!

Sarita Pillay is in her early thirties with short black hair. She wears a black dress.

Sarita says NICE TO MEET YOU.

Mikael says HI! YEAH, THANKS
FOR HAVING US.
WHAT IS THE HISTORY OF THIS
BUILDING ORIGINALLY?

Sarita says SO THIS BUILDING USED TO BE
A GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL.
AT THE MOMENT, ONLY PART OF IT
IS STILL FUNCTIONING AS
A GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL,
BUT IT HAS BEEN EMPTY
FOR EIGHT YEARS.

The caption changes to "Sarita Pillay. Activist, Reclaim the City."

Mikael says SARITA PILLAY WORKS
WITH RECLAIM THE CITY,
AN ACTIVIST MOVEMENT
THAT FIGHTS FOR
AFFORDABLE HOUSING
IN CENTRAL NEIGHBOURHOODS,
HOPING TO REVERSE
THE CONSEQUENCES
OF SEGREGATION AND ISOLATION.

Sarita and Mikael walk down a bright corridor.

Sarita says NOW, THERE ARE PEOPLE
LIVING IN HERE,
FAMILIES LIVING IN HERE.

Mikael says FAMILIES!

Sarita says CHILDREN LIVING IN HERE.
I'M SURE YOU'LL GET
A CHANCE TO SPEAK
WITH SOME OF THE ACTIVISTS.

Mikael points to a wall and says THAT'S GREAT: "KEEP CALM AND
LET'S FIND YOU A NEW HOME."
RIGHT THERE.

Sarita says YEAH. SO EXACTLY, PEOPLE HAVE
MADE THIS THEIR HOME NOW.
THIS IS THE COMMUNAL KITCHEN.

Mikael turns and shakes hands with Janika. She is in her mid-thirties, with long straight brown hair. She wears a sleveless purple shirt.

Mikael says HI!

Janika says JANIKA. NICE TO MEET YOU.

Mikael says AND YOU'RE A RESIDENT?

Mikael says YES.

Janika says AND HOW LONG HAVE YOU
BEEN LIVING HERE?

Janika says I'VE BEEN LIVING HERE
FOR SEVEN MONTHS NOW.

Mikael says SEVEN MONTHS.

Janika says YEAH. ME AND MY FAMILY, MY TWO
DAUGHTERS AND MY HUSBAND. YEAH.

Mikael says WHERE DID YOU LIVE BEFORE?

Janika says I LIVED BEFORE IN PELICAN PARK
WHERE I WAS EVICTED.

Mikael says FOR NOW, DO YOU LIKE LIVING
HERE? YOU'RE OCCUPYING,
THERE'S A MOVEMENT
OF COURSE, BUT IT'S...

Janika says YES. AND I'VE LEARNED SO MUCH
SINCE I'VE BEEN HERE. IT'S ONLY
FOR ME LIVING HERE,
BECAUSE I NEED A ROOF
OVER MY HEAD. I'VE BEEN
LEARNING SO MUCH BECAUSE
WE'VE GOT WORKSHOPS GOING.
I JUST WANT TO GO ON.

Mikael says IF YOU FIND A PERMANENT PLACE
TO LIVE, YOU FEEL LIKE
YOU'RE GOING TO BE PART
OF THE MOVEMENT, YEAH?

Janika says I WILL STILL BE PART
OF THE MOVEMENT.

Sarita says YOU CAN SEE PEOPLE ARE LIVING
HERE, AND HERE COMES BEVIL.

Mikael walks into a bedroom.

Mikael says HEY! NICE TO MEET YOU!

Bevil stands up and says HELLO!

Bevil is in his fifties, clean-shaven with short white hair. He wears glasses and a patterned white and blue shirt.

They shake hands.

Mikael says AND YOU'RE IN YOUR ROOM?

Bevil says YEAH. THIS IS MY SPACE
THAT I OCCUPY HERE.
I'M A PROPERTY OWNER,
BUT I'VE BEEN A POLITICAL
SOCIAL ACTIVIST FOR MOST
OF MY LIFE, AND SO
THIS FOR ME IS AN IMPORTANT
PART TO SHOW THAT IT'S NOT
ALL PROPERTY OWNERS WHO SUPPORT
THE OPPOSITION TO WORKING CLASS
PEOPLE LIVING IN THE AREA.

The caption changes to "Bevil Lucas. Political Activist."

Bevil, Mikael and Sarita keep visiting the facility.

Bevil says MANY OF THESE ROOMS ARE CLOSED.
THERE ARE FAMILIES
LIVING IN THERE.
THEY'VE CLEANED IT UP,
THEY'VE MADE IT
THEIR HOMES NOW.

Sarita says THERE'S EVEN A LITTLE
TUCK SHOP NOW.

Bevil says A TUCK SHOP, YEAH.

Sarita says JANIKA'S STARTED A LITTLE
BUSINESS HERE WHERE
SHE'S SELLING STUFF
TO OCCUPIERS.

Bevil says THIS SPACE IS AN INTENDANT
PLAY AREA THAT WE WANT
TO SPRUCE UP FOR THE CHILDREN
THAT ARE HERE.

Bevil opens a door.

Sarita says OH, WOW.

Mikael says OH YEAH. O.K.

He chuckles.

They walk into a messy room and start to clean and remove objects.

Mikael says RENTAL OPPORTUNITIES IN OR
CLOSE TO THE CENTRE OF THE CITY
ARE EXTREMELY LIMITED AND
COSTLY. THE AVERAGE RENT
OF A ONE-BEDROOM APARTMENT
IS ABOUT 13 000 RANDS.
BUT WITH A MONTHLY MINIMUM
WAGE OF 3000 RANDS,
THESE MARKET-PRICE APARTMENTS,
HENCE THE URGENT NEED
FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING
DEVELOPMENT.

The caption changes to "Average rent: 1,425 CAD."

Mikael continues SARITA AND
THE LOCAL CITIZENS WANT
TO PROVE TO THE AUTHORITIES
THAT CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
TO A PROBLEM OF THIS MAGNITUDE
CAN BE FOUND IN THE MOST
SURPRISING PLACES, LIKE HERE,
IN AN ABANDONED HOSPITAL.

Now, Mikael and Sarita stand on the street.

Mikael says OH YEAH. YOU CAN REALLY SEE
THE WHOLE BUILDING HERE.

Sarita says YEAH. WHEN RECLAIM
THE CITY STARTED,
IT STARTED BECAUSE OF A PIECE
OF LAND IN SEA POINT CALLED
THE TAFELBERG SITE,
AND THIS PIECE OF A PUBLICLY
EARNED LAND WAS IN THE MIDDLE
OF A WEALTHY SUBURB.
AND THE HOUSING DEPARTMENT
IN THE PROVINCE SAID THIS PIECE
OF LAND IS PERFECT
FOR HOUSING.

The animated map appears. A white dot reads "Tafelberg."

She continues NEXT THING YOU KNOW,
IT WAS SOLD TO A PRIVATE
DEVELOPER, A PRIVATE SCHOOL
FOR OVER A HUNDRED MILLION
RANDS. AND THIS PIECE
OF LAND THAT COULD HAVE
SET THE TONE FOR DESEGREGATING
CAPE TOWN, SHOWING THAT IT WAS
POSSIBLE TO BUILD AFFORDABLE
HOUSING WITHIN THE CITY,
BECAUSE THAT'S NEVER HAPPENED
BEFORE BY THE WAY, AND
THAT MADE PEOPLE COMPLETELY
OUTRAGED. SO A BUNCH
OF ACTIVISTS GOT TOGETHER
FROM ACROSS CAPE TOWN
AND THEY SAID:
"ENOUGH IS ENOUGH. WE'RE GOING
TO OCCUPY PUBLIC BUILDINGS
IN THE INNER CITY TO DEMAND
THAT AFFORDABLE HOUSING
BE PROVIDED." IN THE END,
IT'S WHAT EVERYONE'S
FIGHTING FOR. IT'S DIGNITY.
TO BE RECOGNIZED AS HUMAN
ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO LIVE
WITH YOUR FAMILY SECURELY.
NOT PRECARIOUSLY, NOT WONDERING
EVERY DAY WHETHER YOU'LL BE
KICKED OUT, BUT KNOWING
THAT YOU'RE PROTECTED,
THAT YOU'RE SAFE, THAT THE STATE
IS ON YOUR SIDE. I THINK THAT
IS REALLY WHAT PEOPLE
ARE CALLING FOR AT THE MOMENT.
THEY DON'T FEEL THAT WAY.
THEY FEEL LIKE THEY'RE BEING
ABANDONED, THAT THEY'RE BEING
CHUCKED TO THE OUTSKIRTS
OF THE CITY.
AND ESPECIALLY
IN A CITY LIKE OURS,
WITH A HISTORY LIKE OURS.
TO JUST LET THE MARKET
RUN ITS COURSE IS COMPLETELY
NAIVE AND COMPLETELY UNJUST,
BECAUSE IT'S VERY CLEAR
THAT WHAT'S HAPPENING IS NOT...
IT'S NOT FAIR,
AND IT'S ACTUALLY ENTRENCHING
WHAT APARTHEID DID,
RATHER THAN ADDRESSING IT.
SO I THINK THAT FOR PEOPLE,
IT'S A VERY SIMPLE FACT.
RECOGNIZE THAT WE'RE HUMAN.
RECOGNIZE THAT WE HAVE DIGNITY,
AND IT'S A BASIC PRINCIPLE,
BEING ABLE TO LIVE SECURELY
AND SAFELY, RIGHT?

Mikael says BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS.

Sarita says EXACTLY.

People enjoy a sunny day in a swimming pool.

The caption changes to "Affordable housing sites."

Mikael says IT LOOKS LIKE THE CITY
OF CAPE TOWN IS FINALLY
LISTENING TO
ITS CITIZENS' NEEDS.
CITY HALL HAS RECENTLY
ANNOUNCED THAT FIVE AFFORDABLE
HOUSING PROJECTS WILL SEE
THE LIGHT OF DAY IN THE NEAR
FUTURE IN THE CITY CENTRE.
BUT, LIKE ANYWHERE ELSE
IN THE WORLD, YOU HAVE
TO WONDER HOW MUCH IS TALK,
HOW MUCH IS WALK.
TO GET A SENSE OF HOW
THINGS ARE MOVING ALONG HERE,
I MEET UP WITH BRETT HERRON,
THE MAN IN CHARGE OF THE CITY'S
TWO MOST PRESSING ISSUES:
NOTHING LESS.

The caption changes to "Brett Herron. Urban Planner. City of Cape Town." He is in his early fifties, with a goatee and blond hair. He wears a white shirt and gray trousers.

Mikael and Brett stand on a bridge.

Mikael says WHAT IS IT LIKE TO BE YOU,
WORKING FOR THE CITY
OF CAPE TOWN, FACING
ALL OF THESE OVERWHELMING
CHALLENGES?

Brett says THERE ARE ENORMOUS CHALLENGES
THAT WE HAVE TO DEAL WITH
IN AN ENVIRONMENT
WITH CONSTRAINED FINANCIAL
RESOURCES, A LONG HISTORY
OF OPPRESSION
AND OUR APARTHEID
HISTORY STILL VERY MUCH DEFINES
THE SPECIAL REALITY IN OUR CITY
AND THE INEQUALITIES
IN OUR CITY.

Mikael says HOW DO YOU START THE APPROACH?
FOR ME, I SEE HOUSING AS ONE
OF THE PRIMARY TASKS AT HAND.
WHEN YOU'RE OUT IN
THESE INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS,
IT REALLY IS A MOVING
EXPERIENCE. WHAT IS THE STATE
OF THE NATION IN CAPE TOWN
FOR TACKLING THAT?

Brett says SO, HOUSING, I THINK,
IS OUR BIGGEST CRISIS,
AND WE ARE PROJECTING
THAT WE NEED TO PROVIDE
650 000 HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES
TO FAMILIES WHO QUALIFY
FOR THE STATE'S ASSISTANCE
OVER THE NEXT 15 YEARS.
650 000. IT'S A MAMMOTH TASK.
WE ARE CURRENTLY PROVIDING
ABOUT 10 000 IN A GOOD YEAR,
A YEAR. SO HOUSING
IS OUR BIGGEST CRISIS.
WE HAVE PURSUED,
CONSECUTIVE DEMOCRATIC
GOVERNMENTS, HAVE PURSUED HIGH
NUMBERS OF HOUSING DELIVERY
AT THE EXPENSE OF LOCATION.
SO WE CREATE THESE SUBURBS
OF POVERTY, AND THAT IS NOT
ADDRESSING THE HISTORY
OF OUR CITY, AND IT'S NOT
ADDRESSING THE EXCLUSION,
THE SOCIAL AND
ECONOMIC EXCLUSION.

Fast clips show the suburbs and modern buildings of the city.

Brett continues SO WHERE PEOPLE
LIVE ACTUALLY MATTERS.
AND THAT IS THE TASK
THAT WE ARE GRAPPLING
WITH RIGHT NOW,
TO FIND HIGHER DENSITY HOUSING
IN BETTER LOCATIONS.
THE DENSITIES ARE THERE,
THE JOBS ARE HERE, AND
THE PUBLIC TRANSPORT IS POORER.

Mikael says HOW DO YOU IMPROVE
THE TRANSPORT SYSTEM,
AND WHAT DOES CAPE TOWN
HAVE PLANNED IN THAT DEPARTMENT?

Brett says THE FIRST CHALLENGE
IN OUR TRANSPORT SYSTEM
IS THE FRAGMENTATION.
SO WE HAVE THREE MODES
OF TRANSPORT: BRTS, SCHEDULED
BUS AND COMMUTER RAIL, OPERATED
BY THREE DIFFERENT AUTHORITIES.
SO NO WONDER
THERE'S FRAGMENTATION.
A JOURNEY IS NOT
A SENSIBLE JOURNEY FOR ANYBODY
IF YOU GO ACROSS THOSE MODES.
AND THEN WE HAVE THE INFORMAL
PUBLIC TRANSPORT SECTOR,
LIKE THE MINIBUS TAXIS,
WHICH IS LICENSED
BY THE PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
TO OPERATE. SO THE STARTING
POINT IS FOR THE CITY
TO BE THE AUTHORITY
OF ALL OF THOSE
MODES OF TRANSPORT.
WE HAVE TO INTEGRATE THOSE
MODES. GET ONE TICKET,
ONE TIMETABLE, ONE AUTHORITY,
ONE PLAN, AND WE'VE BEEN REALLY
FIGHTING HARD TO GET THAT DONE.

An old yellow and gray train enters the city.

Mikael says BEYOND THE ABSENCE
OF CENTRALIZED TRANSPORT
LOGISTICS, CAPE TOWN
HAS TO FIX ITS RAIL NETWORK.
OVERUSED AND UNDERFUNDED,
TRAINS ARE LITERALLY
FALLING APART HERE.
DELAYS AND CANCELED TRAINS
ARE THE DAILY NORM,
EVEN THOUGH A MASSIVE NUMBER
OF CAPETONIANS COUNT ON THEM.
AT PEAK HOURS, PASSENGERS SIT
ON WINDOW LEDGES
OR EVEN CLIMB ONTO THE ROOF,
JUST TO GET TO WORK.

Brett says OUR COMMUTER RAIL SERVICES
NOW ARE SO UNRELIABLE,
IRREGULAR, TRAINS ARE BEING
CANCELED AND THE CONDITIONS
OF THE TRAIN ARE SO
APPALLING, PEOPLE ARE DYING.
SOMEONE DIED ON THE TRAIN
BECAUSE THEY WERE TRAVELING
ON THE ROOF. SO WE HAVE
TO GET THE RAIL SYSTEM RIGHT.

Mikael says 95 percent OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT USERS
LIVE ON A LOW INCOME AND DEPEND
ON THE INFORMAL MINIBUS TAXIS
TO GET AROUND.
THE CITY RECENTLY TRIED
TO REPLACE THE INFORMAL
NETWORK WITH AN OFFICIAL
BUS RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM.
BUT IT QUICKLY BECAME
APPARENT THAT PEOPLE RELIED
ON THE FLEXIBILITY, FREQUENCY
AND AFFORDABILITY
OF THE MINIBUS SYSTEM.
AS A RESULT, ONLY 2 percent OF
THE POPULATION USES THE BRT.
LET'S FACE IT: THE INFORMAL
TAXIS ARE HERE TO STAY.

Brett says WE HAVE ABOUT 500 000 PEOPLE WHO
WALK TO WORK EVERY DAY
BECAUSE THEY CAN'T AFFORD
PUBLIC TRANSPORT.
SO IT'S NOT JUST
INFRASTRUCTURE, IT'S NOT
JUST PLANNING. IT'S NOT
DESIRE LINES, IT'S ALSO ACCESS.

Mikael says HOW DO YOU, AS A CITY HALL,
TRY TO MAKE PEOPLE FEEL
INCLUDED IN THE GRANDER
PROJECT THAT IS CAPE TOWN?

Brett says WE HAVE TO REMEMBER
THAT RACIAL SEGREGATION,
RACIAL OPPRESSION,
RACIAL EXCLUSION, HAPPENED OVER
MANY, MANY, MANY DECADES.
WE'RE NOT GOING TO ACHIEVE
THAT IN 23 YEARS OF DEMOCRACY.
IT'S GOING TO TAKE DECADES.
WHATEVER PROJECT WE DO,
WE HAVE TO PUT IT THROUGH
THAT LENS OF "IS IT GOING
TO BUILD A CITY THAT'S MORE
INCLUSIVE, MORE CARING,
WELL-RUN, FULL OF OPPORTUNITY,
AND SAFE?"

Words painted on the stair steps of a building read "A city built by service excellence, accountability, trust, accessibility, integrity."

He continues THOSE ARE THE PILLARS
THAT WE'RE STRIVING TOWARDS.
WE CAN'T HAVE THE EXPECTATION
THAT WHAT HAPPENED
IN APRIL 1994 CHANGED SOUTH
AFRICA. WE'VE ALL GOT WORK
TO DO EVERY SINGLE DAY
TO CHANGE SOUTH AFRICA.
AND IT'S GOING TO TAKE...
THAT WORK WILL CONTINUE LONG
BEYOND MY LIFETIME.

Mikael says SOUTH AFRICA'S ALARMING
UNEMPLOYMENT RATE IS STILL
AT THE CORE OF THE SOCIAL
DIVIDE THAT PLAGUES DAILY LIFE.
LET'S FACE IT:
COMMUNITIES HERE STILL LIVE
IN SEPARATE BUBBLES THAT RARELY
INTERSECT. JOSH FOUNDED FIX
FORWARD TO BRIDGE THAT GAP.

The caption changes to "Joshua Cox." He is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven with short blond hair. He wears a black T-shirt with a printed green and white circle and blue jeans.

Mikael continues HE CONNECTS HOMEOWNERS,
MOSTLY WHITE, WITH TRADESMEN,
MOSTLY BLACK OR COLOURED.
AND THEY'RE NOT ONLY
FIXING HOUSES.
CITIZENS EMERGING FROM VERY
DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS.

They approach a humble house.

Joshua says GLADMAN!

Gladman Mapuma comes out. He is in his late thirties, clean-shaven with a shaved head. He wears a black cap, glasses and a beige T-shirt.

Gladman says HI JOSH!

Mikael says WAS IT DIFFICULT TO FIND JOBS
BEFORE YOU CONNECTED
WITH FIX FORWARD?

The caption changes to "Gladman Mapuma. Tradesman. Fix Forward."

Gladman says YES, IT WAS DIFFICULT, MAN.
IT WAS VERY DIFFICULT
BECAUSE IT WAS NOT EASY
FOR US, BLACK PEOPLE,
TO CONNECT WITH
THE WHITE PEOPLE,
BECAUSE THEY DON'T TRUST US.

The animated map appears. A red line connects Khayelitsha and Epping.

Next, the three of them approach a small white van. Gladman unloads boxes and tools of the back of the van.

Joshua says WE'RE READY TO DO SOME WORK.

Mikael says SO YOU HELP CONNECT
THE LABORERS WITH PEOPLE
IN WEALTHY NEIGHBOURHOODS,
APARTMENTS AND WHATNOT.

Joshua says YES, YES. SO WE CONNECT
THEM TO PEOPLE WHO LIVE
IN THE MORE AFLUENT AREAS,
AS WELL AS TO LARGE BUSINESSES
WHO ARE WANTING RENOVATIONS
OR MAINTENANCE SERVICE DONE
ON THEIR PROPERTY.

Mikael says LIKE THE FACTORY SHOP THERE.

Joshua says SUCH AS THIS.

Mikael says RIGHT.

They all carry the tools to the terrace of a building. Then, Gladman and other men do construction work.

Joshua says THERE'S A LOT OF NEGATIVE
PRECONCEPTION THAT PARTICULARLY
MANY OF THE WEALTHY WHITE
HOMEOWNERS HAVE ABOUT PEOPLE
FROM LOW-INCOME AREAS AND ABOUT
BLACK PEOPLE IN PARTICULAR.

Mikael says ARE THEY LITERALLY SCARED?

Joshua says I THINK FOR MANY,
THEY LITERALLY ARE SCARED.
PARTICULARLY FOR SINGLE
OR OLDER WOMEN WHO HAVE
REALLY LIVED THROUGH THE YEARS
OF APARTHEID. THERE WAS A LOT
OF COLLECTIVE WHITE
FEAR AROUND, EVEN WHAT
THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY
WOULD BRING, WITH BLACK PEOPLE
TAKING OVER CONTROL
OF THE COUNTRY, THERE WAS REAL
FEAR THAT PEOPLE HAD
FOR THEIR PERSONAL SAFETY.
SO THERE'S A LOT OF THAT,
THAT WE ARE TRYING
TO CHALLENGE AND OVERCOME,
BUT THERE'S DEFINITELY
ALSO THIS CONCEPT
OR PRECONCEPTION THAT
PEOPLE HAVE THAT EVEN IF I TRUST
THIS INDIVIDUAL FROM A PERSONAL
PERSPECTIVE, THE WORK,
THE QUALITY OF THEIR WORK,
IS GOING TO BE SUBSTANDARD.

Mikael says IT'S ALL QUITE SIMPLE.
FIX FORWARD ACTS AS
A SAFETY NET BETWEEN
THE CLIENT AND THE TRADESMEN
CARRYING OUT THE WORK.
IF THE CLIENT IS NOT HAPPY
WITH THE WORK,
FIX FORWARD...
WELL, THEY'LL FIX IT,
WHICH ALMOST NEVER HAPPENS.
THERE ARE NOW MORE THAN
100 TRADESMEN WORKING
AND BUILDING TRUST
IN THIS CAPE TOWN PROJECT.
AND JOSHUA HOPES TO EXPAND,
CREATIVE SIMILAR POSSIBILITIES
IN JOHANNESBURG AND BEYOND.

Joshua says WE'VE GOT BIG AMBITIONS
TO EXPORT THE MODEL OUTSIDE
OF SOUTH AFRICA.
A COUPLE YEARS BACK,
WE WERE IN COLUMBIA.
WE SPENT 10 DAYS THERE.
THERE'S A LOT OF INTEREST
IN THE FIX FORWARD MODEL THERE,
BECAUSE OF THE CLASS DIVIDES,
THE SORT OF DISTRUST BETWEEN
RICH AND POOR, AND THE NEED
FOR SOMEONE TO COME IN
AND BRIDGE THOSE COMMUNITIES.
IN AUSTRIA, EVEN,
WHICH WAS A SURPRISE TO ME,
THERE'S A LOT OF INTEREST
IN WHAT WE'RE DOING,
BECAUSE OBVIOUSLY,
YOU HAVE THE WHOLE SITUATION
WITH THE IMMIGRANTS. AND AGAIN,
THERE'S THIS ISSUE OF DISTRUST.
SO THERE'S A LOT OF INTEREST
AS WELL TO SEE HOW
WE CAN APPLY THE MODEL
THERE. SO IT'S NOT ONLY
FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES, BUT
IT'S ALSO FOR THE SORT OF MORE
DEVELOPED AND
INDUSTRIALIZED COUNTRIES.
WHEN APARTHEID ENDED,
THINGS DIDN'T SUDDENLY ALL FALL
INTO PLACE, AND BLACK PEOPLE
WERE SUDDENLY OFFERED
THESE AMAZING OPPORTUNITIES
AND PEOPLE'S LIVES IMPROVED.
PEOPLE ARE STILL STRUGGLING
UNDER THE LEGACY OF THE SYSTEMS
THAT APARTHEID CREATED,
AND I THINK BY AND LARGE,
WHITE PEOPLE HAVE VERY
LITTLE UNDERSTANDING
OF WHAT THAT EXPERIENCE IS.
WHEN I WAS LIVING UP
IN JOHANNESBURG, I USED
TO SPEND A LOT OF TIME
ON THE WEEKENDS GOING
TO THIS PARTICULAR TOWNSHIP
DIEPSLOOT, I'D GO AND WATCH
FOOTBALL GAMES WITH
MY FRIEND SIMON.
WE WOULD GO AND HAVE
A BEER AT THE SHEBEEN,
SORT OF THE LOCAL PUB.
I HAD GUYS COMING UP TO ME AND
I COULD CLEARLY SEE
THEY WERE WORKING
ON LABORERS WAGES.
THESE ARE PEOPLE WHO
WERE LIVING PRETTY WELL BELOW
THE POVERTY LINE,
OFFERING TO BUY ME A BEER.

Mikael says IS THIS A ONE-WAY STREET?

Gladman says FOR US, YOU SEE, ON
THE BUILDING SIDE OF THINGS,
I CAN TELL YOU SOMETHING...
WE GO AND WE BUILD
YOUR HOUSE THERE, AND THEN AFTER
WE'VE BUILT THAT HOUSE,
WE CAN'T ENTER THAT HOUSE
WHEN IT'S COMPLETELY FINISHED.

Mikael says WOW.

Gladman continues BUT WE ARE THE PEOPLE
WHO BUILT THE HOUSE.
SO THAT'S ANOTHER STORY.
IT'S SOMETHING THAT HAPPENS
MOST OF THE TIME.

Mikael says THAT'S IRONIC, YEAH.

Gladman chuckles.

Joshua says WE'RE NOT GOING
TO STOP UNTIL WE CHANGE,
UNTIL WE CHANGE THINGS.

Mikael applies plaster to a wall and some of it falls.

Gladman says OH, SORRY.

Mikael says YOU SAID "SORRY."
I SHOULD SAY "SORRY."

Mikael chuckles.

Gladman says IT'S LIKE THAT, MAN.

Gavin McJannet drives a car. Mikael sits in the back.

On his cell phone, Gavin says WE'RE IN A WHITE HYUNDAI, H.-Y.
WE'LL MEET OUR GUYS THERE.

Mikael says WE'RE HEADING INTO ONE
OF THE TOWNSHIPS CALLED
HANOVER PARK,
AND IT'S NOT EASY ACCESS.
IT'S A GANG-CONTROLLED AREA.
IT ALL HAS TO BE PREARRANGED.
WE CAN'T JUST DRIVE
INTO THIS AREA.

The caption changes to "Gavin McJannet. Local Producer." He is in his late forties, with a short beard and curly blond hair. He wears a gray cap, glasses and a beige shirt.

Gavin says YOU'LL SEE GUYS THAT WILL COME
OUT WITH MOBILE PHONES.
IT GOES VIRAL PRETTY QUICKLY
WHEN THERE'S A FOREIGN VAN
OR A CAR.

Mikael says THEY KNOW THE CARS, EVEN.

Gavin says YEAH.

Mikael says YEAH, O.K. DAMN.
THERE'S A LOT OF EYES ON US.

Mikael says gets out of the car and says ALL RIGHT. O.K. HERE WE GO.

A young man shakes Mikael's hand and says HELLO MIKAEL!

Mikael walks into a building.

Mikael says NICE TO MEET YOU, MAN.
HANOVER PARK.
A MERE 20 MINUTES OUTSIDE
THE CITY CENTRE, BUT IT FEELS
LIKE A WHOLE DIFFERENT PLANET.
IN 2012, THERE WERE
42 MURDERS HERE.
42, OUT OF A POPULATION
OF ABOUT 50 000 PEOPLE.
YOU CAN'T JUST WALK
ON THE STREET HERE.

Newspaper clips showing episodes of violence appear on a wall.

He continues GANGS ARE EVERYWHERE,
ON EVERY CORNER. THE RESIDENTS
ENDURE THEIR DAILY DOSE
OF SHOOTINGS, AND THE RAMPANT
FEAR IT GENERATES.

Craven Engel is in his mid-forties, clean-shaven and bald. He wears a light blue shirt with a dark collar and pocket.

Craven says HANOVER PARK GETS VERY VIOLENT
AT TIMES. WE CAN GET UP
TO 100 INCIDENTS HAPPENING
IN A MONTH, BETWEEN
10 AND 20 PEOPLE SHOT
IN A MONTH. AND THAT'S
HOW COMPLICATED...

Mikael says IN THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD, HERE.

Craven says IN THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD HERE.
THEY DON'T ASK QUESTIONS.
THEY FIRST SHOOT,
AND THEN THEY ASK THE QUESTION.

The caption changes to "Craven Engel. Founder of Ceasefire Cape Town."

Mikael says THE ONLY REASON I'M HERE WITH
MY CAMERA CREW IS THIS MAN.
CRAVEN ENGEL DOESN'T SELL DRUGS
AND HE DOESN'T SHOOT PEOPLE.
IN FACT, HE'S PROBABLY
NEVER DONE ANYTHING ILLEGAL
IN HIS ENTIRE LIFE.
BUT HE KNOWS ALL THE HANOVER
PARK GANGLORDS
BY THEIR NICKNAMES.
AND THAT'S BECAUSE
THIS SEASONED PASTOR HIRES
EX-GANG LEADERS TO BECOME
INTERRUPTORS FOR CEASE-FIRE,
THE CHICAGO-INSPIRED INITIATIVE
HE FOUNDED AFTER BURYING YET
ANOTHER 12-YEAR OLD.

Craven says THEY'RE CALLED INTERRUPTORS.
THEY'RE CREDIBLE MESSENGERS.
THEY USED TO BELONG TO GANGS.
THEY'RE USED TO BEING PRESENT.
SO NOW THE GANGS ARE OPENED
TO TALK TO THEM ABOUT ANYTHING.
BUT THE MAIN JOB OF
THE INTERRUPTOR IS TO INTERRUPT
THE SHOOTER FROM SHOOTING.
JUST TO KEEP PEOPLE SAFE
AND REDUCE SHOOTINGS.

Mikael says THEY'VE INSTALLED SOUND
SENSORS THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE
THE EXACT LOCATION THROUGH
AN APP ON THEIR MOBILE PHONE,
AND THEY RUN STRAIGHT TOWARDS
THE DANGER.

Craven holds a cell phone to show the app.

He says IF THERE IS A SHOT FIRED ON
THAT PARTICULAR AREA,
YOU WILL GET THE SIGNAL
COMING TO YOUR PHONE.

They sit at a desk in front of a computer screen. They listen to shots.

Craven continues AND THEN TWO SECONDS LATER,
FROM THAT INCIDENT, IT WILL BE
ON THIS SYSTEM. WE CAN LISTEN
TO THE SHOTS RIGHT HERE.

Mikael points to the screen and says HOW COME THERE ARE SO MANY
AIMS HERE? IS IT LIKE JUST
WHERE THEY HANG OUT?

Craven says NO, NO. THESE WERE
ALL SHOTS FIRED BETWEEN
THOSE TWO GROUPS HERE.

Mikael says AH! O.K.

Craven says IN THE LAST 2 MONTHS,
THERE WAS AN ALTERCATION
BETWEEN THOSE TWO GROUPS.
THERE'S A GANG THAT SIDE,
THERE'S A GANG THAT SIDE,
OPEN FIELD IN THE MIDDLE.

Now, Craven and Mikael walk in the street followed by teenagers and kids.

Mikael says THIS IS A COOL
NEIGHBOURHOOD RIGHT NOW,
WITH ALL THE KIDS OUT HERE.

Craven says YEAH, THE PEOPLE ARE COOL,
BUT YOU KNOW, IT'S ALMOST
LIKE PEOPLE ARE REALLY
DESENSITIZED TO SHOOTINGS.

Mikael says YEAH, SURE.

Craven says SO WHAT WE WANT
TO DO IS RESENSITIZE THEM.

Mikael says I MEAN, YOU HAVE THE ISSUES,
BUT IT IS A COMMUNITY, RIGHT?

Craven says THEIR PARENTS ARE HERE,
THEIR SISTERS ARE HERE,
THEIR BROTHERS ARE HERE,
THEIR CHILDREN ARE HERE.
THEY'RE NOT SEPARATE FROM
THE COMMUNITY.
IT DOESN'T CHANGE THE FACT
THAT THE CORE PURPOSE
IS TO MAKE SOME MONEY,
IS TO BUILD TERRITORY.

Mikael says HOW DO THE GANGS FEEL WHEN
ONE OF THEIR MEMBERS LEAVES?

Craven says THEY FEEL PROUD ABOUT IT.

Mikael says O.K.

Craven says AND IT'S ONE OF OURS.
IF YOU CHANGE YOUR LIFE
AND YOU GO FOR BETTER, AND YOU
ADD VALUE TO YOUR FAMILY,
YOU ADD VALUE TO SOCIETY,
THE GANGS WILL RESPECT THAT.

Craven greets a male teenager on a bike and speaks Afrikaans.

Craven says NOW THESE ARE THE SHOOTERS
WE'RE DEALING WITH NOW.
THAT'S ONE OF OUR GUYS
TALKING TO A SHOOTER.
THE GUY THAT GREETED ME NOW
IS A SHOOTER.
HE'S PROBABLY GOT ABOUT
15 OR 16 MURDERS ON HIS RECORD.

Mikael says THE GUY ON THE BIKE?

Craven says WHO SPOKE TO ME NOW.
SO OUR RELATIONS ARE
WITH THE SHOOTERS.
GOING IN.

Mikael says GOING IN.

Craven says YEAH, WE'RE GOING IN.

Mikael says WE WEREN'T IN BEFORE?

Craven says THAT'S NOT IN, BROTHER.
THAT'S A TERMINUS.

Mikael says O.K.

Craven says THIS IS IN. THIS FAMILY HERE
ALSO LOST AN INDIVIDUAL HERE.
IF YOU WANT TO SEE
AN INTERRUPTOR
YOU'LL FIND HIM ON THE...

Mikael says THEY'RE HANGING
OUT HERE...

Craven says WITH HIGH RISK, YEAH.
THEY'RE MEASURING
THE ATMOSPHERE.
THEY'RE RATING THE INDIVIDUALS.
THEY'RE GATHERING DATA
ALL THE TIME. SO WHEN
THEY COLLECT IT,
THEY WILL KNOW HOW
TO INTERVENE WHEN
THERE'S AN INCIDENT.

The caption changes to "Tasleem Johnson. Interrupter Ceasefire." He is in his twenties, with a short goatee and short black hair. He wears a black cap, blue jeans and a grey and yellow sport jacket.

Tasleem says BOTH OF MY
COUSINS WERE EXECUTED
IN THE SAME YEAR.
AND WITH THE
THREE CHILDREN THAT I HAVE
SOMETHING JUST POPPED INTO
MY HEAD, AND I HAD TO MAKE
A CHANGE IN LIFE.
SO I REACHED OUT TO CEASEFIRE,
THEY REACHED OUT TO ME,
AND THEN CAME THE CHANGE.

Mikael says SO IF CEASE FIRE WASN'T
HERE IN HANOVER PARK...

Tasleem says I WOULD HAVE NEVER BEEN
A CHANGED MAN.

Mikael says YOU'D BE DOING THE SAME THING,
OR YOU'D BE DEAD.

Tasleem says THE SAME THING, ALL OVER
AND OVER.

Craven says HE SAID: "OR YOU'D BE DEAD."

Tasleem says OR I'D PROBABLY BE DEAD, YES.

They chuckles.

Mikael says IT MAY SEEM LIKE A JOKE,
BUT I ASSURE, YOU, IT'S NOT.
MURDER IN THIS SQUARE
IS NOTHING UNUSUAL.
TASHLEEM, LIKE THE TEN OTHER
INTERRUPTORS FROM CEASE FIRE,
DECIDED HE'D HAVE
ENOUGH. AND IT WORKS.
FROM 2012 TO 2016,
FATAL SHOOTINGS DECREASED
BY 26 percent HERE.

Against a type of swing, the caption changes to "Number of shots fired: 37 percent."

Mikael says SO YEAH, THEY'RE ACTUALLY
SAVING LIVES.

Tasleem says MOST OF THE DAY
I DO INTERRUPT,
ON A DAILY BAISIS,
BECAUSE VIOLENCE
CAN OCCUR AT ANY TIME.
VIOLENCE HAS
NO SCHEDULE, IT HAPPENS
LIKE...

He snaps his fingers and contineus I USED TO
BE AFFILIATED WITH THEM.

Mikael says OH, THIS WAS YOUR GANG?
ALL RIGHT.

Tasleem says I HAD TO BE CAREFUL.

Mikael says IS IT RISKY FOR YOU?

Craven says LOOK, IT'S A HIGH-RISK AREA.
YOU HAVE TO ALWAYS KEEP
YOUR ALERTS ON.
ALL THE TIME.

Mikael says YEAH. AT WHAT AGE DO
THE CHILDREN GET RECRUITED
BY THE GANGS?

Tasleem says 13 YEARD OLD,
12 YEARS OLD.

Mikael says 12?

Tasleem says YEAH, YEAH.
A PAIR OF NIKE'S,
A NIKE TRACK SUIT.

Mikael says THEY BRIBE THEM IN A WAY.

Tasleem says THEY BRIBE THEM.

Mikael says THEY PROMISE THEM MONEY.

Tasleem says WHAT YOUR MOTHER
OR FATHER CAN'T BUY FOR YOU
THEY WILL BUY IT FOR YOU.

Mikael says YOU ALSO THINK ABOUT
THE KIDS, BECAUSE
THEY'RE GROWING UP IN THAT.

Kids look at the camera and play with it.

Craven says WITH WHAT WE CALL
AN OUTREACH COMPONENT,
YOU ARE AT THE CENTRE NOW.
SO THE CENTRE FACILITATES
AN EARLY INTERVENTION
FOR YOUTHS AT RISK. SO IT'S
MORE PREVENTION, YOU KNOW.
THERE'S NOT A LOT
HAPPENING FOR KIDS.
WE STOP THEM,
BUT IT'S A STRUGGLE.

Mikael says MANY OF THE CHILDREN GROWING
UP HERE HAVE NEVER SET FOOT
OUTSIDE THEIR NEIGHBOURHOOD.
SO CRAVEN AND HIS TEAM
ALSO ORGANIZE FIELD TRIPS
TO TABLE MOUNTAIN, THE DOWNTOWN
AREA AND THE BEACH,
JUST TO SHOW THEM THAT THEIR
CITY IS SO MUCH MORE THAN
JUST SHOOTINGS AND VIOLENCE.
THE GOOD PEOPLE OF
WAVES
FOR CHANGE,
A SMALL SURFING
CLUB HAVE, IN A WAY,
THE SAME GOAL.
LIKE SO MANY THINGS
IN CAPETONIAN SOCIETY,
EVEN THE OCEAN STAYED
SEGREGATED AFTER THE END
OF APARTHEID. THAT WAS BEFORE
WAVES FOR CHANGE.
THEY WANT TO GIVE THE OCEAN
BACK TO THE WHOLE COMMUNITY,
NO MATTER WHO YOU ARE
OR WHERE YOU'RE FROM.
TODAY, MORE THAN 500 KIDS
FROM THE NEARBY TOWNSHIPS TAKE
SURF LESSONS WITH APISH AND
MICHELLE, TWO LOCALS
WHO VOLUNTEER TO LEAD
AND EXPAND THE CLUB.

The caption changes to "Apish Tshetsha and Sibongiseni Michelle Jonas. Surf Coaches. Waves for Change."

Next, Mikael stands next to Michelle, Bulelani and other teenager boy.

The caption changes to "Bulelani Zelanga. Participant."

Mikael says HOW DO YOU FEEL WHEN
YOU'RE IN THE SURF, MAN?

In his teens, Bulelani says I FEEL LIKE
I'M LIKE A CHAMPION,
BECAUSE I'M HERE, SURFING.
MOST OF THE THINGS THAT ARE
OUT THERE ARE TERRIBLE.
WHEN I'M HERE, I FEEL HAPPY.
AND I'M SAFE HERE.

Apish is in his mid-twenties, with a small goatee and a shaved head. He wears a gray cap and a beige long-sleeved shirt.

Apish says IT'S VERY TOUGH
IN THE TOWNSHIPS
THERE'S VIOLENCE, DRUGS,
ABUSE, ALCOHOL ABUSE, NEGLECT.
THEY'VE BEEN THROUGH A LOT.
NOW, WE BRING THEM HERE
TO CREATE A SUPPORT GROUP,
GET THEM TOGETHER
TO SHARE THEIR PROBLEMS,
AND ALSO COME UP WITH SOLUTIONS
ON HOW TO FACE THOSE PROBLEMS.
AND I'M USING THE OCEAN
AS A METAPHOR. LIFE GOES ON.
YOU HAVE TO FALL,
AND THEN CRAWL BACK
AND TRY AGAIN.

Mikael says SO IT'S KIND OF, IN A WAY,
OPENING A DOOR OUT
OF THE TOWNSHIPS, SHOWING
THEM THAT THE WORLD IS MUCH
BIGGER THAN THEIR STREET.
AND IN A WAY, PHYSICAL
ACTIVITY IS ALSO GOOD WITH KIDS.

Apish says PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES TO KEEP
THEM SAFE AND ALSO TO KEEP
THEM FIT AND HAPPY,
AND THE MORE YOU FEEL GOOD
ABOUT YOURSELF, LOOKING GOOD,
YOU ALSO DO GOOD,
TAKING RIGHT DECISIONS.
THE OCEAN IS VERY THERAPEUTIC.
EVEN IF THEY'RE NOT FEELING
WELL BECAUSE OF WHATEVER
HAPPENED IN THE TOWNSHIP
BACK HOME, ONCE THEY GET
IN THE OCEAN, THEY SAY
THAT THEY WISH THEY COULD
STAY THERE FOREVER,
THEY FEEL GOOD ABOUT
THEMSELVES, AND THEY JUST FORGET
ABOUT THE THINGS OR STUFF
THAT'S HAPPENING
IN THE BACKGROUND.

Mikael says SO PHYSICAL FREEDOM FROM
THE TOWNSHIP, BUT ALSO MENTAL
FREEDOM FROM THE STRUGGLES
OF DAILY LIFE.

Apish says YEAH.

Mikael says THAT'S WHAT THE OCEAN
CAN DO FOR THEM.

Apish and a group of boys sit in a circle on the beach.

Apish says ALL TOGETHER.

[team warmup]
Standing up, they all rhythmically tap their legs and perform a ritual. Next, holding hands, they all walk towards the sea.

Mikael says WERE YOU ONE
OF THESE KIDS BEFORE?

Michelle is in her mid-twenties, with long braided black hair. She wears a beige long-sleeve shirt.

Michelle says YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.
THEN I BECAME A COACH.

Mikael says SO YOU WENT TO THE OCEAN AND
YOU HAD TO STAY AT THE OCEAN.

Michelle says YEAH, I HAD NO IDEA ACTUALLY.
I'D NEVER BEEN AT THE BEACH,
AND THAT'S WHEN
I CAME THROUGH SURFING.

Mikael says HOW HAS THIS CHANGED
YOUR LIFE?

Michelle says IT HAS CHANGED MY LIFE,
I'M BECOMING MORE AWARE
OF THINGS AND THINKING
POSITIVELY ABOUT MY LIFE,
EXPECTING CHALLENGES IN LIFE
AND HOW TO SOLVE THEM.
ACTUALLY, I'M THE FIRST WOMAN
WHO STARTED SURFING
IN MY COMMUNITY,
SO THAT HAD A VERY BIG EFFECT
ON ME, I REALISED THAT I COULD
ACHIEVE SOMETHING
AND NOT DO IT FOR PEOPLE,
BUT FOR MYSELF.
I CONSIDER MYSELF A ROLE MODEL
FOR THEM, BECAUSE I'M HERE
FOR THEM AND THEY TALK
ABOUT MANY THINGS WITH ME.
WE SHARE A LOT OF THINGS
TOGETHER, SO... YEAH.

Mikael says SO YOU'RE LIKE:
"HEY, I DID IT. WHY NOT YOU?
COME ON! LET'S GO, GIRLS."

Michelle says YEAH, YEAH, YEAH.

Mikael says WHAT ABOUT YOU? HOW DID
YOU GET INTO THE PROGRAM?
WERE YOU A SURFER BEFORE?

Apish says NO, I'D NEVER SURFED BEFORE.
I'D NEVER SWIM BEFORE.
I DIDN'T KNOW HOW TO SWIM.
I'M NOW A LIFEGUARD,
WITH CHILD CARE SKILLS AS WELL.

Mikael says WHY IS IT IMPORTANT
FOR YOU TO HELP THESE KIDS?

Kids train and surf.

Apish says IT'S ALSO ABOUT SHARING
WHAT I HAVE.
NOT JUST HELPING THEM BECAUSE
THEY NEED HELP, BUT ALSO
INVESTING IN THEM SO THAT
THEY CAN ALSO BRING THE CHANGE,
AND THEY CAN ALSO BE
ROLE MODELS FOR OTHER
YOUNG GENERATIONS
THAT COME AFTER THEM.

Mikael walks into a tattoo store.

A Male Tattooist says SO I'M GOING TO PUT IT
LIKE THAT.

Mikael says YEAH.

The Male Tattooist says AND THEN WE JUST FIT
THE NUMBER IN,
JUST TAKE A FEW HOURS, IS ALL.

Mikael gets a tattoo done.

Mikael says AFTER MEETING AMAZING,
INSPIRING PEOPLE, I DECIDED TO
GET PJS, "SECTION P, JOE SLOVO."
ADDED TO MY URBAN MAP.
I JUST THINK THAT THE COMMUNITY
AND THE STRUGGLES THAT
THEY EXPERIENCE EVERY DAY
IS SYMBOLIC FOR ME OF THE CITY
AS A WHOLE.

Then, he checks the tattoo on the back of his shoulder in a mirror.

Mikael says WOW, THAT'S COOL.
IT FITS PERFECTLY
WITH MEDELLIN
COMUNA 8 AND PARIS.
PJS NOW HAS A RIVERFRONT.

(soft music plays)

Now, Mikael walks around the city and says MANY CITIES HAVE
A DOUBLE IDENTITY, USUALLY
DUE TO ECONOMIC INEQUALITY.
A LINE BETWEEN THE HAVES
AND THE HAVE NOTS.
IN CAPE TOWN, HOWEVER,
THERE ARE SO MANY LEVELS:
HARD BORDERS BETWEEN THE RICH
AND THE POOR, BETWEEN CLASSES
AND RACES, DEMONSTRATIVE
PHYSICAL SEGREGATION
OF CITIZENS. I HAVE THE UTMOST
RESPECT FOR THE BRAVE PEOPLE
WHO INHABIT THIS PLACE,
AND FOR THE PEOPLE LIKE THOSE
I'VE MET WHO ARE TRYING TO MAKE
THINGS BETTER, TRYING TO DRAG
CAPE TOWN OUT OF THE MUD
OF COLONIALISM, OF APARTHEID
AND OF INEQUALITY.
WHAT I'VE SEEN
IS SMALL PROJECTS,
BUT THEY'RE TACTICAL,
STRATEGIC AND THEY'RE SCALABLE.
SIMPLE TOOLS LIKE DATA,
DESIGN AND EMPOWERMENT.
IN A NUTSHELL:
KNOWLEDGE. HOPE IS ETERNAL,
BUT ONLY COMBINED WITH
THAT KNOWLEDGE WILL CAPE TOWN
RISE TO FACE THE CHALLENGES
OF THE FUTURE.

Against a black screen showing electric pieces of city maps, the end credits roll.

Hosted by, Mikael Colville-Andersen.

Directed by Myriam Berthelet and Michel D. T. Lam.

Producer, Nicolas Boucher.

Executive Producer, Myriam Berthelet.

Logo: DBC2.

Copyright, 2018.

Watch: Ep. 1 - Cape Town