Transcript: City Wildlife Rescue - Ep. 11 | Mar 14, 2019

A clip shows an injured hawk on a vet's table.

The narrator says A GROUNDED RED-TAIL HAWK ARRIVES
AT THE CENTRE IN ROUGH SHAPE.

The vet says AH, HE'S GOT BOTFLIES
IN HIS SKULL.

The narrator says A FEISTY RARE WHITE SQUIRREL IS
UNABLE TO MOVE HIS LOWER BODY.

The vet says HE'S AGGRESSIVE AND
LIKES TO KILL PEOPLE,
WHICH IS A GOOD TRAIT
AT THIS POINT.

The narrator says AND A SECOND YOUNG RED-TAILED
HAWK NEEDS SOME HELP.

A rescuer says SHE SAID SHE CAN GET WITHIN
THREE FEET OF THE HAWK
BUT THAT IS TOTALLY NOT NORMAL.

The narrator says IT'S KNOWN AS THE
CITY WITHIN A PARK.
THE GREATER TORONTO AREA
IS HOME TO ONE OF THE
MOST DIVERSE URBAN WILDLIFE
POPULATIONS IN NORTH AMERICA.
HERE, MORE THAN SIX MILLION
BUSY HUMANS LIVE ALONGSIDE
350 DIFFERENT SPECIES
OF WILD ANIMALS.
WHEN WILDLIFE
CLASHES WITH URBAN LIFE
IT'S USUALLY THE
ANIMALS WHO LOSE.
THAT'S WHEN TORONTO WILDLIFE
CENTRE STEPS IN,
SAVING ANIMALS
ONE DAY AT A TIME.
(CHIRPING)

The name of the show reads "City wildlife rescue."

(HONKING)

The narrator says OVER THE COURSE OF A YEAR
MANY DIFFERENT ANIMAL SPECIES
COME THROUGH THE DOORS OF
TORONTO WILDLIFE CENTRE.
AND IT'S NOT UNCOMMON
TO SEE MANY RAPTORS HERE
AT THE BEGINNING OF
THE SUMMER SEASON.
THE RED-TAILED HAWK IS
THE MOST COMMON RAPTOR
IN THE GREATER TORONTO AREA.
ONE OF THESE AMAZING BIRDS
HAS JUST BEEN ADMITTED
INTO THE ASSESSMENT ROOM.

Lisa says YEAH, HE CAME IN
PANTING VERY LOUD
AND VERY KIND OF
AGGRESSIVE PANTING.
HIS EARS ARE VERY DIRTY.

Lisa is in her forties, with long wavy black hair and wears beige trousers and an animal print scrubs jacket.

Heather says NO, THEY'RE NOT RIGHT,
THEY'RE VERY MOIST
AND IN FACT ALL AROUND
THEM IS VERY MOIST.

Heather is in her thirties, with long layered light brown hair and wears blue scrubs.

The narrator says HEAD VETERINARIAN DR. HEATHER
REID AND REHABILITATION MANAGER
LISA FOSCO ARE EXAMINING A
VERY YOUNG RED-TAILED HAWK.
HE WAS FOUND ON THE
GROUNDS OF QUEENS PARK,
NEAR THE PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS
IN DOWNTOWN TORONTO.
A LOCAL RESIDENT NOTICED HIM
AND THOUGHT HE COULDN'T FLY.
SO, HE BROUGHT
HIM INTO THE CENTRE.
THE TEAM ISN'T SURE WHETHER
HE'S JUST TOO YOUNG TO FLY WELL
OR POSSIBLY SUFFERS FROM
MORE SERIOUS ISSUES.

Lisa says I'LL HOLD HIM AND YOU
CAN LOOK IN THE RIGHT EAR
BECAUSE IT'S VERY...

The narrator says AS SOON AS THE EXAMINATION
BEGINS LISA SPOTS A PROBLEM.

Lisa says IT'S A BOTFLY RIGHT
THERE ISN'T IT?

The narrator says A BOTFLY IS A RELATIVELY LARGE
AND HAIRY PARASITIC FLY
THAT LAYS ITS EGGS UNDER
THE HOST ANIMAL'S SKIN.

Lisa says AH, IT'S NEVER GOOD TO
HAVE PARASITES IN YOUR EARS.
I MEAN, IT'S NOT NORMAL.

Heather says HE'S GOT THAT SAME
STRUCTURE IN HIS EARS.

Lisa says I'M GOING TO PULL THAT OUT.
YOU WANT TO HOLD HIS BODY.
DO YOU THINK WE CAN GET AWAY
WITH FLUSHING THAT?

The narrator says HE'S 11 WEEKS OLD, WHICH MEANS
HE COULD HAVE TRIED TO FLY
OUT OF HIS NEST UNSUCCESSFULLY.
SO, AN INJURY IS NOT OUT
OF THE QUESTION.

Lisa says THERE SHOULD BE OTHER EVIDENCE
THAT HE FELL ON HIS HEAD.

The narrator says LISA'S BEEN REHABILITATING
ANIMALS FOR OVER 25 YEARS.
BY NOW SHE KNOWS
TO LISTEN TO HER GUT.

Lisa says OH, MY GOD!

Heather says FLY EGGS?

Lisa says FLY EGGS.
FLIES LAY THEIR EGGS, WHICH
DEVELOP INTO MAGGOTS.
OH YEAH, THOSE ARE FLY EGGS.
THESE LITTLE TINY
YELLOW THINGS HERE.
AND SO, THERE'S JUST LIKE A
MASS OF THEM IN THE FEATHERS.
AH, HE'S GOT BOTFLIES
IN HIS SKULL.

Heather says OH, THERE YOU GO, THAT
WOULD EXPLAIN THE FLY EGGS.
SO, THERE'S ACTUALLY LIKE A
LARVA RIGHT UNDERNEATH HIS SKIN,
WHICH WE JUST...
LISA JUST TOOK OUT.
AND IT'S CAUSED A
WOUND ON HIS HEAD,
WHICH IS WHY THE FLIES
WERE LAYING EGGS.
THEY LIKE TO LAY EGGS
AROUND AN OPEN WOUND.

The narrator says FINDING THE BOTFLIES
HAVE OFFERED THE TEAM
SOME CRITICAL INFORMATION.
NOW THEY CAN MOVE FORWARD WITH
THE TREATMENT FOR THE PARASITES
AND GET THIS YOUNG HAWK
ON THE ROAD TO RECOVERY.
BUT THEN LISA NOTICES SOMETHING.

Lisa says HE'S STILL HOLDING THAT WING
AT THAT WEIRD ANGLE.

Heather says SEE, I WONDER IF THERE'S
SOMETHING GOING ON
WITH THE WING.
DO YOU WANT TO QUICKLY
RADIOGRAPH HIM BEFORE WE GET...

Lisa says LET'S WATCH HIM FLAP.
IT'S ON AN ANGLE.
DO YOU SEE IT?
IN THE RIGHT WING?
HIS CLAVICLE IS STABLE.
I DON'T FEEL ANYTHING
IN THE SCAPULA
BUT I CAN FEEL
HIS ENTIRE CORACOID.

Heather says OKAY.

Lisa says WING'S GOOD, ACTUALLY, WAIT.
SORRY BUDDY, HANG ON.
YEAH, THERE'S SOMETHING
WRONG WITH THE RIGHT CORACOID.

Heather says UH, THAT'S NOT GOOD.

Lisa says I'M INCLINED TO GIVE
HIM A COUPLE OF DA...
I MEAN, I DON'T THINK WE
NEED TO RADIOGRAPH HIM.

Heather says NO, BUT I THINK IT'S SOMETHING
WE SHOULD SCHEDULE,
MAYBE FOR A
COUPLE DAYS FROM NOW.

Lisa says YEAH.

The narrator says IT SEEMS TO BE THE DAY FOR HAWKS
AS OVER ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE
GTA THE RESCUE TEAM IS
RESPONDING TO A CALL FROM A
LOCAL RESIDENT CONCERNED WITH
A RED-TAILED HAWK THAT LANDED
ON HER PROPERTY
EARLIER THIS MORNING.

A woman says I WAS GOING DOWN THE PATHWAY
AND ON THE WAY BACK
I NOTICED THE HAWK
ON A LOW TREE STUMP.
HE WAS JUST SITTING
THERE JUST BEAUTIFUL.
SO, MY HUSBAND AND I
DECIDED TO SIT ON THE PORCH
AND JUST WATCH HIM
UNTIL HE FLEW AWAY.

The narrator says BUT THE HAWK DIDN'T FLY AWAY
AND THAT'S WHEN SHE SUSPECTED
SOMETHING COULD BE WRONG.

The woman says WE SEE HAWKS,
THEY'RE GENERALLY CIRCLING
OR THEY'RE HIGH IN THE TREE.
THIS ONE BEING SO LOW TO
THE GROUND WAS REALLY UNUSUAL
AND YOU COULD TELL HE WAS
A YOUNG HEALTHY ANIMAL.
WHEN HE STARTED TO FLY HE ONLY
WENT SIX FEET AND THEN HE WAS
DROPPED TO THE GROUND, SO
WE KNEW HE WAS IN TROUBLE.

The narrator says BASED ON THAT
INITIAL INFORMATION,
STACEY FREEMAN FROM THE
RESCUE TEAM IS ALSO WORRIED.

Stacey is in her thirties, with straight brown hair with bangs in a ponytail and wears army green trousers and a brown hooded sweatshirt.

Stacey SHE SAID SHE CAN GET WITHIN
THREE FEET OF THE HAWK,
SO THAT IS TOTALLY NOT NORMAL.
THERE'S SOMETHING
GOING ON WITH THIS HAWK,
SO WE'RE HERE TO
GRAB HIM RIGHT NOW.

The narrator says SARAH AND STACEY
ASSESS THE SITUATION.

Sarah is in her thirties, with long wavy brown hair in a half ponytail and wears light gray trousers and a blue sweatshirt.

Stacey says GO IN NICE AND CALM
AND SEE HOW HE REACTS.

The narrator says THEY NEED TO GET CLOSE
WITHOUT SPOOKING THE ANIMAL
AND POSSIBLY MAKING
HIS INJURIES WORSE.

Sarah says HERE, I CAN TAKE THAT, STACE.
THAT WAY YOU CAN GO IN AND
IF YOU GET THE OPPORTUNITY...

Stacey says DO YOU WANT TO CUT HIM OFF
AND I'LL STAY BACK?

Sarah says IF YOU GO IN SLOW ENOUGH
AND QUIET ENOUGH
HE PROBABLY WON'T
EVEN HEAR YOU COMING.

They approach the hawk with nets.

The narrator says HE MAY APPEAR OBLIVIOUS
BUT LIKE MOST WILD ANIMALS
HE'S DEEPLY TUNED IN
TO HIS ENVIRONMENT.
AT A MOMENT'S NOTICE HE ESCAPES.

Stacey says OKAY.

The narrator says SO, THEY TRY AGAIN
FROM A DIFFERENT ANGLE.

Sarah says YOU OKAY?

Stacey says YEAH.

Stacey catches the hawk.

Sarah says GOOD JOB.

Stacey says OKAY, YOU HAVE HIS FEET,
SORT OF?
GOT HIS FEET.

Sarah says OKAY.
I CAN WORK HIS TALON,

Stacey says THERE YOU GO.

The narrator says FINALLY WITH THE HAWK IN HAND,
SARAH IS EAGER TO GET HIM
INTO THE CENTRE TO MAKE A
DEFINITIVE ASSESSMENT.

Sarah says THERE COULD BE A NUMBER
OF THINGS WRONG WITH HIM.
HE'S DEFINITELY
NOT FLYING PROPERLY,
WHICH IS OUR MAIN CONCERN HERE.
HE COULD BE FULL,
IN ALL HONESTY,
AND JUST NOT READY TO MOVE.
HE COULD HAVE HIT A WINDOW
BY THE CONSTRUCTION SITE.

The narrator says HE'S QUITE DOCILE AND
EASY TO APPROACH.
THAT'S UNUSUAL BEHAVIOUR
IN A YOUNG HAWK
AND THE TEAM IS CONCERNED
THAT THERE MIGHT BE SOMETHING
SERIOUSLY WRONG WITH THIS GUY.
IT'S DEFINITELY NOT A GOOD SIGN
THAT HE ISN'T FLYING.
STACEY FREEMAN HAS JUST RETURNED
FROM RESCUING A RED-TAILED HAWK
THAT WAS FOUND ON
PRIVATE PROPERTY.

Stacey says SHALL WE JUST WRAP
HIM IN A TOWEL?

The narrator says NOW SHE'S CONSULTING WITH
REHABILITATION MANAGER
LISA FOSCO ON THE
CONDITION OF THIS HAWK.

Stacey says THE LADY THAT FOUND THIS HAWK
HAS REPORTED IT AS
NOT BEING ABLE TO FLY.

Lisa says OKAY.

Stacey says IT CAN ONLY GET ABOUT SIX FEET.

Lisa says OKAY, WHY DON'T YOU GO
AHEAD AND PULL HIM OUT
AND WE'LL GET A WEIGHT ON HIM.

Stacey says ON HIS BACK?

Lisa says UH HUH.
OKAY, I GOT HIM.

They examine its wings.

Lisa says THIS BIRD'S FLIGHTED.

The narrator says AS SOON AS LISA
TAKES A CLOSER LOOK
SHE MAKES A NASTY DISCOVERY.

Lisa says COME AND HOLD, PLEASE.
WHOA, FLAT-FLIES!
OH, NO, NO.

The flies jump on Stacey.

Lisa says IT'S A PARASITE.

Stacey says OH, THERE'S ANOTHER ONE.

Lisa says OKAY, WELL, LET'S JUST
KEEP THEM COVERED.
OKAY, YOU'RE GOING TO HOLD
HIS TALONS WITH ONE HAND,
WITH THIS HAND.
HOLD HIS TALONS.
OKAY, HOLD HIS WING OUT
WITH THAT HAND.
THANK YOU.
HE'S COVERED IN THESE.
OKAY, I WANT TO DE-PARASITIZE
THIS GUY BUT I WANT TO GET HIM
OUT OF THE ROOM BECAUSE WE
HAVE ANOTHER RED-TAIL IN HERE
AND HE'S LOADED.

Stacey says YEP.

The narrator says ANOTHER RED-TAILED HAWK
COVERED IN PARASITES.

Lisa says ALL RIGHT, UNCOVERED BIRD.

The narrator says BEING INFESTED WITH NASTY
PARASITES MIGHT BE
AN UNCOMFORTABLE PROGNOSIS
BUT IT'S NOT A DEADLY ONE.

Lisa says JUST REMEMBER I'M
ALWAYS TELLING EVERYONE
NOT TO DISRUPT FEATHERS,
EXCEPT FOR NOW.

The narrator says THE FLAT-FLIES HAVE GOTTEN SO
BAD THAT THEY MAY HAVE WEAKENED
HIS DEFENCES, LEAVING HIM
WITHOUT THE ENERGY TO HUNT
OR FLY FOR LONG
PERIODS OF TIME.

Lisa says ALL RIGHT, LET'S GO AHEAD AND
SET HIM BACK IN HIS HOUSE.

The narrator says BUT WITH PROPER NUTRITION AND
TREATMENT FOR THE PARASITES
HE SHOULD BEGIN TO
FEEL BETTER SHORTLY.
THIS HAWK IS AT AN AGE WHERE
HE CAN TAKE CARE OF HIMSELF
IN THE WILD AND THAT'S
WHAT THE TEAM HERE WANTS.

Lisa says WHAT WE'LL BE DOING IS GIVING
HIM A LITTLE BIT OF A BREAK,
LETTING SOME OF
THOSE PARASITES DIE OFF.
UM, WE'VE GOT THIS
ROOM QUARANTINED
FROM OTHER HAWKS RIGHT NOW.
JUST AGAIN TO GIVE US
A CHANCE TO GET THOSE
EXTERNAL PARASITES
UNDER CONTROL.

The narrator says LIKE WITH THE FIRST RED-TAILED
HAWK THAT CAME INTO THE CENTRE
EARLIER TODAY, THIS YOUNG HAWK
WILL BE GIVEN MEDICATION FOR THE
PARASITES AND LOTS OF NUTRITIOUS
FOOD TO HELP HIM RECOVER.
IN A FEW DAYS THEY'LL TEST
HIS FLYING, MAKE SURE HE'S
GAINING WEIGHT AND IS
COMPLETELY FREE OF FLAT-FLIES.
LISA IS CONFIDANT THEY CAN
GET HIM BACK OUT TO HIS HOME
IN THE WILD IN NO TIME.
IN THE WEST END OF TORONTO
LIES ONE OF THE CITY'S MOST
DIVERSE AND BUSY PARKS,
TRINITY BELLWOODS.
IT'S A POPULAR PARK FOR HUMANS
AND THEIR CANINE COMPANIONS.
BUT IT'S ALSO HOME TO A VAST
NUMBER OF WILD ANIMALS.
THE MOST MYSTERIOUS OF THOSE
ANIMALS IS THE WHITE SQUIRREL.
NO ONE KNOWS EXACTLY HOW
MANY THERE ARE BUT DATING BACK
DECADES RESIDENTS HAVE BEEN USED
TO SPOTTING THIS FAMILY OF
PALE BUSHY TAILED CREATURES
IN AND AROUND THE AREA.
THEY'VE BECOME KIND OF A PARK
MASCOT, WHICH EXPLAINS THE ALARM
THAT ONE RESIDENT FELT WHEN
HE SPOTTED ONE OF THE
RARE WHITE SQUIRRELS
WHILE OUT WITH HIS DOG.
THE SQUIRREL WAS UNABLE TO WALK;
IT WAS OBVIOUS HE NEEDED HELP.

Lisa says HERE'S THE SITUATION
THAT HE'S IN.
I THINK WE'RE AT ONE WEEK...
WE'RE CLOSE TO A WEEK NOW, UM,
HE'S BEEN DRAGGING
THE WHOLE TIME.

The narrator says BROUGHT IN A WEEK AGO, THIS
UNIQUE SQUIRREL HAS SUSTAINED
A SPINAL INJURY AND LOST
MOBILITY IN HIS LOWER BODY.
IT MEANS LISA HAS
HAD TO HELP HIM
WITH EVEN THE MOST BASIC TASKS.

Lisa says OKAY, WHEN HE FIRST CAME IN HE
COULDN'T URINATE ON HIS OWN,
SO I WAS EXPRESSING HIS BLADDER
FOR ABOUT THE FIRST TWO DAYS.

Heather says OKAY, THAT'S PRETTY COMMON
WITH SPINAL...

Lisa says YEAH, PRETTY TYPICAL.
THEY CAN'T ALWAYS URINATE
ON THEIR OWN.
I THINK HE WAS
RIGHT ON SCHEDULE.
AND HE'S VERY, VERY BITEY.
HE ALSO LIKES TO EAT HIS BOX.

Heather says YES, HE DOES.
OKAY, SO THE PLAN IS KIND OF...

Lisa says UM, I'M GOING TO
PUT HIM ON THERE.
LET ME GRAB HIM WITH THIS.
I TRY NOT TO GRAB HIM WITH
GLOVES BECAUSE HE HATES THEM.

The narrator says VETERINARY TECHNICIAN AARON
ARCHER HAS COME IN TO HELP
WITH THE ASSESSMENT.

Aaron is in his early forties, with short receding graying hair and a stubble and wears gray trousers and a blue scrubs jacket.

Lisa says ALL I'VE TOLD HIM IS THAT
HE'S AGGRESSIVE AND LIKES TO
KILL PEOPLE, WHICH IS A
GOOD TRAIT AT THIS POINT.
OKAY.
SEE, HE'S PEEING ON HIS OWN.
SO, THE OTHER THING THAT'S
CHANGED ABOUT HIM IS THAT, UM,
HE'S GOT SOME
FLEXION IN HIS LEGS.
UM, ALSO, THAT'S WHAT I WAS
TALKING ABOUT THE OTHER DAY
THAT HE'S BEEN DOING.
SO, IF I PULL ONE I GET
A REACTION IN THE OTHER.
HOWEVER, HE'S PROBABLY GOING
TO RUN INTO THE CORNER.

She puts the squirrel on the floor and says SO, SEE THAT LEFT ONE
IS STARTING TO WORK.
HE WILL BITE IF YOU GRAB HIM.
SO, THAT'S BETTER.

The narrator says LISA HAS BEEN DOING
PHYSIOTHERAPY WITH HIM EVERYDAY
AND SHE CAN SEE THERE'S
OBVIOUS IMPROVEMENT.

Heather says SO, WE'RE SEEING
IMPROVEMENTS DAILY THEN
IN HIS NEUROLOGICAL FUNCTION.
HE'S ABLE TO USE
HIS LEGS BETTER.

Lisa says BUT HE'S GOT REALLY GOOD...
THIS IS HIS WEAKER LEG.
HE'S GOT GOOD PURPOSEFUL
MOVEMENT IN BOTH OF HIS LEGS.
FEEL HIM AT ALL?

Heather says AND THEN HIS INJURY ON HIS BACK.
SO, ARE YOU GIVING HIM
ORAL FLUIDS THEN,
LIKE FLUIDS WITH A
SYRINGE EACH DAY?

Lisa says I'M GIVING HIM ORAL FLUIDS
EVERY TIME THAT I FEED HIM,
WHICH IS ONCE A NIGHT.
OKAY, SO CAN YOU CHECK
HIS HYDRATION IF I HOLD HIM?

Heather says YEAH, I DID.
HE DOES SEEM A LITTLE BIT,
I MEAN, HE'S GOT...
IT'S A LOT BETTER.
IT'S A LOT BETTER.
HE LOOKS PRETTY GOOD BUT
I THINK IF HE'S NOT ABLE TO
DRINK ON HIS OWN THAT IT'S
A GOOD IDEA TO KEEP...

Lisa says I MEAN, HE CAN PROBABLY DRINK ON
HIS OWN IF HE STOPS, YOU KNOW,
FLIPPING HIS HOUSE UPSIDE DOWN,
WHICH IS I THINK THE ISSUE.

Heather says HE'S VERY BUSY IN THERE.

Lisa says SO, DO YOU FEEL DIFFERENT?
HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT HIM?

Heather says WELL, I FEEL LIKE THERE'S
BEEN ENOUGH IMPROVEMENT
THAT WE SHOULD CONTINUE
WITH OUR CURRENT TREATMENT.

Lisa says OKAY.

Heather says UM, I DON'T KNOW IF HE'LL
EVER REGAIN FULL FUNCTION.
I MEAN, WE CAN'T REALLY KNOW
THAT RIGHT NOW BUT I THINK THAT
IF WE'RE CAREFUL WITH HIS
INJURIES AND WE CONTINUE WITH
HIS MEDICATION AND GIVE HIM THE
SUPPORTIVE CARE THAT HE NEEDS,
I THINK THAT HE'S DIFFERENT THAN
THE PICTURE WE SAW ON MONDAY.

The narrator says WHILE HIS IMPROVEMENT IS
SIGNIFICANT IT DOESN'T MEAN
HE'S WELL ENOUGH YET
TO RETURN TO THE WILD.
LISA IS PRAGMATIC
ABOUT THOSE CHANCES.

Lisa says WE'VE HAD HIM A WEEK,
HE'S COME A REALLY LONG WAY.
AT THE SAME TIME HE'S GOT
A REALLY LONG WAY TO GO.
WE DON'T KNOW WHAT HIS
FINAL PROGNOSIS IS GOING TO BE.
HE MIGHT CONTINUE TO
HEAL AND THEN PLATEAU
AND NOT BE RELEASABLE
AND NOT BE FUNCTIONAL.
OR HE MIGHT JUST CONTINUE
TO HEAL UNTIL HE CAN
RUN UP THE TREE LIKE
ANY OTHER SQUIRREL.

The narrator says HIS FAST RATE OF
RECOVERY HAS MADE LISA
A LITTLE MORE OPTIMISTIC.

Lisa says GENERALLY WHAT WE'LL DO IS
WE'LL JUST KEEP GOING, UM,
AND HAVE VETS LOOK AT HIM
EVERY COUPLE OF DAYS
AND IF THERE'S A POINT WHERE
WE DON'T SEE IMPROVEMENT
THEN WE WOULD POTENTIALLY LOOK
AT STOPPING BUT AT THIS POINT
HE'S GAINING A LOT OF
GROUND EVERY DAY.
HE IS VERY
APPROPRIATELY AGGRESSIVE.

Heather says YEAH, BEHAVIOURALLY
HE SEEMS GOOD.
HE SEEMS GREAT.

Lisa says I HAVE HOPE.

The narrator says WHILE THE SQUIRREL RETURNS
TO HIS TEMPORARY HOME
AT THE CENTRE, LISA AND HEATHER
CONTINUE THEIR ROUNDS.
THEY'VE COME TO REASSESS
ONE OF THE TWO RED-TAILED HAWKS
THAT WAS BROUGHT IN
A FEW DAYS BACK.
THIS ONE IS YOUNGER AND
WAS FOUND AT QUEEN'S PARK
IN DOWNTOWN TORONTO.
HE WAS COVERED IN PARASITES,
WHICH ARE BEING
TREATED SUCCESSFULLY,
BUT NOW THEY'RE CONCERNED
ABOUT WHETHER HE CAN FLY.

Lisa and Heather examine the hawk.

Lisa says IT'S LIKE UP A
LITTLE BIT MORE DORSAL-Y.

Heather says YEAH.
HE DOESN'T LIKE THAT EITHER.

The narrator says HE'LL BE ASSESSED
FOR HIS ABILITY TO FLY
IN A COUPLE OF DAYS.
RIGHT NOW LISA
WANTS TO MAKE SURE
THE PARASITES HAVE ALL GONE.

B BASICALLY WHAT WE'RE DOING IS
WE'RE FLUSHING OUT THE EAR
BECAUSE IT'S GOT A LOT
OF DRIED BLOOD IN THERE.
WE CAN'T REALLY SEE
IN THERE VERY WELL,
SO WE JUST WANT TO MAKE
SURE WE CAN SEE IN THERE
AND RULE OUT THAT THERE'S
ANY PARASITES IN THERE.

Heather says OH, YEAH, THAT'S A LOT BETTER.
THAT'S PRETTY GOOD,
I DON'T SEE ANY.
WELL, I THINK, LISA,
YOU'LL BE HAPPY WITH IT,
IT LOOKS A LOT BETTER.

Lisa says GOOD.

Heather says CLEANED, THAT'LL FEEL A LOT
BETTER FOR HIM, THAT'S FOR SURE.
IT'S ONE OF THOSE THINGS
YOU CAN'T CLEAN YOURSELF
WHEN YOU'RE A BIRD.

The narrator says NOW FOR A BIT OF HYDRATION.

Lisa says UM, THIS IS BASICALLY A
STERILE ELECTROLYTE SOLUTION,
SO IT'S SIMILAR TO WHEN
PEOPLE DRINK GATORADE
TO TRY TO REHYDRATE
THEMSELVES.

The narrator says AND FINALLY SOME MEDICATION.

Lisa says THIS PILL KILLS ANY LIVE LARVA
THAT'S ON HIS BODY AND BECAUSE
WE FOUND A COUPLE OF FLY EGGS
AND WE FOUND LIVE LARVA ON HIS
HEAD, JUST IN CASE THERE'S SOME
DEEP IN THOSE EARS WE CAN'T SEE.

The narrator says THIS GUY'S A LITTLE YOUNGER THAN
THE OTHER HAWK THAT CAME IN
ON THE SAME DAY, AND HE
STILL NEEDS HIS PARENTS.
IT'S IMPORTANT THAT THEY
GET HIM BACK TO HIS HOME
AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

Lisa says GENERALLY WHEN WE GET THESE
BIRDS IN WE TRY TO RE-NEST THEM,
WE TRY TO GET 'EM BACK
TO THEIR ORIGINAL NEST.

The narrator says IN A FEW DAYS HE'LL BE
COMPLETELY FREE OF PARASITES
AND THEY'LL X-RAY HIS SHOULDER
TO MAKE SURE THERE'S NO INJURY.
THEY'RE HOPING BOTH HAWKS WILL
BE HEALTHY ENOUGH TO BE RELEASED
BEFORE THE WEEK IS OUT.
THE LAST THING THAT LISA AND
HEATHER WANT IS FOR ANY ANIMAL
TO STAY AT THE CENTRE TOO LONG.

(music plays)

The narrator says IT'S BEEN ABOUT A WEEK SINCE
TWO SEPARATE RED-TAILED HAWKS
ARRIVED AT TORONTO WILDLIFE
CENTRE ON THE SAME DAY.
THEY CAME FROM OPPOSITE ENDS
OF THE GTA BUT THEY WERE BOTH
BADLY INFESTED WITH
PARASITES AND BOTH WERE
TREATED SUCCESSFULLY
BY THE REHAB TEAM.
THEY ARE FINALLY PARASITE FREE.

Heather sees a hawk fly and says WOW!

Lisa says THIS BIRD'S FLIGHTED.

The narrator says ONE LUCKY HAWK HAS RECEIVED THE
ALL CLEAR AND IS GETTING READY
TO BE RELEASED TOMORROW MORNING.

Lisa says I'M HAPPY TOO.

Heather says GOOD, I'M IMPRESSED.

Lisa says ME TOO.

The narrator says BUT THIS YOUNGER HAWK WAS
SHOWING FURTHER COMPLICATIONS
WITH HIS SHOULDER,
AND THE TEAM IS WORRIED
ABOUT HIS ABILITY TO FLY.

Heather says WE HAVE A CONCERN THAT
PERHAPS THERE'S A FRACTURE
IN ONE OF THE BONES
OF HIS SHOULDER.
JUST THE WAY HE WAS HOLDING
HIS WING AND WHEN WE WERE
FEELING HIM WHEN
WE FIRST CAME IN.
SO, THE ONLY WAY TO REALLY
DETERMINE WHAT'S GOING ON
WITH HIS WING AND THE BONES IN
HIS WING IS TO TAKE AN X-RAY.
WE'LL JUST QUICKLY
TAPE HIS WINGS DOWN.

The narrator says THEY PROMPTLY X-RAY THE BIRD AND
BEGIN TO ASSESS THE RESULTS.

Heather says I DON'T THINK THERE'S ANYTHING
REALLY HORRIFIC GOING ON.

The narrator says SO FAR THEY CAN'T FIND
A CONCLUSIVE DIAGNOSIS.

Heather says AND THEN THE REST OF THE
WING LOOKS OKAY TOO.
HE STILL HAS A LOT OF CARTILAGE,
BEING SO LITTLE, SO IT COULD
JUST BE LIKE THIS AREA IN THE
SHOULDER IS STILL DEVELOPING.
THERE'S NOTHING
OBVIOUSLY FRACTURED,
THERE'S NOTHING
REALLY TERRIBLE GOING ON.

A woman says UH HUH.

The narrator says IT'S GOOD NEWS, THE X-RAY LOOKS
FINE BUT THE TEAM STILL WANTS TO
KEEP HIM IN THE AVIARY
FOR A LITTLE WHILE LONGER
TO OBSERVE HIS FLIGHT AND MAKE
SURE HE'S READY FOR RELEASE.
MEANWHILE REHABILITATION
MANAGER LISA BOSCO
AND STAFF VETERINARIAN DR. DIANA
SINCLAIR ARE ABOUT TO EXAMINE
A WHITE SQUIRREL
THAT WAS RECENTLY
BROUGHT INTO THE CENTRE
WITH A SPINAL INJURY.
IT'S BEEN A FEW DAYS
SINCE HIS LAST EXAM
AND LISA IS EAGER
TO SEE HIS PROGRESS.

Diana is in her early thirties, with long straight blond hair and wears gray cargo trousers and a white T-shirt.

Lisa says DO YOU WANT ME TO HOLD HIM
FIRST OR RUN HIM FIRST?

Diana says PROBABLY RUN HIM FIRST.

Lisa says OKAY, READY?
GO.

The narrator says AS LISA PULLS ON HIS LEGS
HIS REFLEX IMMEDIATELY
TRIGGERS BACK.
IT'S A GOOD SIGN.

Diana says SEE, HE'S BETTER
ON THE LEFT THEN?

Lisa says YEAH, HE'S ALWAYS BEEN STRONGER
ON THE LEFT THAN THE RIGHT.
WHEN IT FIRST
STARTED COMING BACK
IT WAS COMING BACK ON THE LEFT.

Diana says YEAH, CAN WE JUST COVER HIS HEAD
UP OR HE'S GOING TO GET ME.
SO HE'S GOT A REALLY GOOD
STRONG WITHDRAWAL THERE.
AND I BELIEVE THE LAST
TIME I COULD NOT ELICIT
A PATELLA REFLEX ON HIM, HE'S
JUST TOO SMALL, BUT WE'LL SEE.

The narrator says NOW, JUST LIKE AT THE HUMAN
DOCTOR'S OFFICE, DIANA TAPS
THE SQUIRREL'S KNEES TO EXAMINE
HIS NEUROLOGICAL REFLEXES.

Diana says INTERESTING.
I CAN DEFINITELY ELICIT ONE ON
THE RIGHT AND NOT ON THE LEFT.
IT COULD BE ME THOUGH.
HE'S JUST SO-- HIS PATELLA
TENDON IS SO LITTLE.

The narrator says THE PATELLA TENDON, ALSO
CALLED THE PATELLA LIGAMENT,
IS THE STRONG FLAT LIGAMENT
THAT STRETCHES ACROSS
MANY MAMMALS' KNEES.
DIANA IS WORRIED
THAT WITH THE SQUIRREL
IT'S TOO SMALL TO
TRIGGER A RESPONSE.

Diana says I THINK HE'S JUST TOO LITTLE.

Lisa says SEE HIS GRIP?
SEE HIS GRIP?
HE'S GRIPPING.

Diana says DO YOU THINK WE COULD
SEE HIM RUN ONCE MORE?
LIKE, I JUST HAVEN'T...

Lisa says LET'S BLOCK HIM IN THE SPOT.
CAN YOU BE A BLOCK?
OKAY.

Diana says OKAY SO HE'S MUCH
BETTER ON THE LEFT
AND HE'S DEFINITELY KIND
OF FALLING OVER ON THE RIGHT.
BUT HE'S GOT GOOD PURPOSEFUL
MOVEMENT IN BOTH LEGS FOR SURE.

Lisa says WE CAN CONTINUE HIS
ANTI-INFLAMMATORIES
AND I CAN DO SOME
MORE PHYSIO ON HIM.
I STOPPED BECAUSE HE
WAS IMPROVING QUICK.

The narrator says HIS PROGRESS IS EXCITING.

Diana says LOOK AT HIS TAIL, LIKE,
HE DIDN'T SEEM TO HAVE ANY
MOVEMENT IN HIS TAIL BEFORE.

Lisa says HE HAD NOTHING.

Diana says YEAH.

Lisa says LOOK AT HIM, HE'S FLAGGING
IT JUST TO BE MAD.

Diana says YEAH.
THAT'S AWESOME.

Lisa says OKAY.

The narrator says IT'S TIME TO WRAP
UP THIS EXAMINATION.
WITH SUCH DRASTIC IMPROVEMENT
DAILY, LISA IS OPTIMISTIC.
IF HIS PROGRESS
CONTINUES AT THIS RATE
HE'LL BE BACK HOME
AT HIS PARK IN NO TIME.

Diana says OKAY.

Lisa says I'LL START REALLY GENTLE
PHYSIO STARTING TOMORROW.

Diana says OKAY, I LIKE IT.
THANK YOU.
YEP.

Lisa says I LOVE IT.

Diana says THANKS.

The narrator says AND SHE HAS REASON TO LOVE IT.
THANKS TO HARD WORK
AND DEDICATION,
THIS RARE SQUIRREL CONTINUED
TO RECOVER REMARKABLY QUICKLY.

Lisa says I'M REALLY PROUD OF HIM.

The narrator says AND AFTER ONLY A FEW MORE WEEKS
OF CARE HE WAS RELEASED BACK
TO TRINITY BELLWOODS PARK TO
JOIN HIS FAMILY AND FRIENDS.
A FEW DAYS AGO THIS
HEALTHY, PARASITE-FREE
YOUNG RED-TAILED HAWK
WAS TRANSFERRED
TO THE OUTDOOR AVIARY AT
TORONTO WILDLIFE CENTRE.
AFTER CAREFUL OBSERVATION,
LISA IS CONFIDENT THIS BIRD
IS SUITABLY FLIGHTED AND
IS READY TO GO HOME.
BEAUTIFUL.
IT'S TIME TO BE RELEASED
BACK TO THE PARK
WHERE HE WAS FIRST FOUND.

Andrew saysdrew is in his thirties, with short straight brown hair and wears gray cargo trousers and a blue Wildlife Centre's T-shirt.

Andrew says I SEE A PARENT AND I THINK
THROUGH THE BINOCULARS
WE'LL BE ABLE TO TELL THAT
THAT'S THE OTHER YOUNG ONE.

Sarah says YEAH, I'LL GRAB 'EM.

The narrator says ANDREW AND SARA HAVE
ARRIVED AT QUEEN'S PARK.

Andrew says I GOT CONFIRMATION FROM SECURITY
THAT THERE ARE ONLY TWO BABIES.
SO, WE'VE GOT ONE AND
THAT'S THE OTHER ONE.
I REALLY WANTED TO GET UP ON
THE ROOF, THEY SAID WE CAN'T.
SECURITY, SAFETY REASONS.
SO, I THINK OUR
NEXT BEST OPTION
IS ONE OF THESE
HUGE MATURE TREES.
AND IS THAT THE LITTLE GUY?

Sarah says YEAH, HIS MOM'S
GIVING HIM SOME FOOD.

Andrew says OH, YEAH.
PERFECT.
ALL RIGHT, WELL, IT'S AN
ACTIVE FAMILY.

The narrator says ANDREW PLANS TO
CLIMB UP ONE OF THE TREES
AND PLACE THE BIRD ON A BRANCH.

Andrew says I KIND OF LIKE THE PINE TREE
BECAUSE THEY'RE DRAWN TO PINE,
USUALLY THEY NEST IN
PINE OR BUILDINGS, SO,
YOU KNOW THEY'RE
COMFORTABLE IN THIS TREE.
IT'S PROBABLY EASIER FOR THE
PARENTS TO SEE HIM IN THIS TREE
I THINK AND WE CAN GET
RIGHT TO THE CANOPY.

The narrator says WITHIN MINUTES THE TEAM
IS GETTING READY TO CLIMB UP
THIS HUGE OLD PINE TREE.
ANDREW GETS HIS SAFETY GEAR ON.
SARA TRANSFERS THE
HAWK INTO A BUCKET
SO THAT ANDREW
CAN HOIST HIM UP.

Andrew says KNOCKING INTO A BRANCH
OR FALLING OUT OF A TREE,
I'M WORRIED ABOUT THE
PARENTS COMING DOWN
AND SWOOPING DOWN ON ME.

The narrator says HE CLIMBS TO THE HIGHEST
BRANCH HE CAN REACH.

Andrew says I'M GOING TO PUT THE BIRD THERE
AND THEN SLOWLY
JUST LET HIM GO UP.
HOPEFULLY HE WON'T PANIC
AND HE'LL JUST STAY PERCHED.
BUT YOU NEVER KNOW.

The narrator says WITH 12 YEARS OF ANIMAL
HANDLING BEHIND HIM,
ANDREW EXPERTLY PULLS THE HAWK
OUT OF THE BUCKET WITH ONE HAND
WHILE HE HOLDS ONTO HIS POSITION
IN THE TREE WITH THE OTHER.
WITH ONE SWIFT MOVEMENT, HE
PLACES THE BIRD ON THE BRANCH.

Andrew says WHERE'D HE GO?

Sarah says HE'S STILL IN THE TREE STILL.

Andrew says OKAY.

The narrator says THE HAWK IS COMFORTABLE
IN HIS NATURAL SURROUNDINGS.

Andrew says HE CAN SEE THE PARENTS
RIGHT OVER THERE.

The narrator says AND HIS FAMILY IS ONLY A FEW
TREES AND BUILDINGS AWAY.

Andrew says IT'S A PERFECT SPOT.

The narrator says ANDREW'S WORK HERE IS DONE.

Andrew says I'M REALLY HAPPY
WITH HOW THAT WENT.
HE WAS A LITTLE BIT MORE FRISKY
THAN I WAS EXPECTING, SO I HAD A
BEAUTIFUL BRANCH ALL SET UP AND
HE JUST POPPED RIGHT OFF OF IT
BUT THAT'S NO PROBLEM, HE'S
ACTUALLY CLOSER TO HIS PARENTS.
AND I HEAR HIM NOW SCREAMING
DIRECTLY AT THE PARENTS.
SO, THEY DEFINITELY
KNOW HE'S THERE.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Series producer, Sharone Ostrowsky.

Narrator, Phil Curran.

Logo: Canada Media Fund.

Whistle Stop Productions Inc.

Distributed by Blue Ant International.

Watch: City Wildlife Rescue - Ep. 11