Transcript: How Police Decide When to Use Force | Mar 12, 2019

In a clip, a police officer approaches a man standing next to a car at night.

Visibly agitated, the man says WHAT'S YOUR NAME? WHAT'S YOUR BADGE NUMBER?
GIVE IT TO ME.
YOU HAVE TO GIVE IT TO ME.

Fast clips show people practicing in a shooting range, then practicing combat tactics and firing taser guns at dummies.

Jeyan says THIS IS A LOOK AT HOW
THE NIAGARA REGIONAL POLICE
SERVICE TRAINS 700 SWORN
OFFICERS IN THE USE OF FORCE.

The man says YOU'RE A COP?
THINK YOU'RE ANY BETTER THAN ME?

The officer in training says CALM DOWN.

At the training session, a male voice says REACT.
HANDS UP.

Jeyan says USE OF FORCE IN THE
CONTEXT OF POLICING PERTAINS TO
THE AMOUNT OF POWER NEEDED TO
STOP A DISRUPTIVE PERSON.
IT IS OFTEN A SUBJECT OF DEBATE.
AND MOST TIMES POLICE ARE
CRITICIZED FOR THE AMOUNT OF
FORCE THEY USE.
AND SOMETIMES THEY'RE CELEBRATED
FOR USING VERY LITTLE.

As a clip shows officers detaining a person at night in the city, a headline appears that reads "Sammy Yatim: Changes coming to police use-of-force rules."

In a clip a man hold up what appears to be a gun, in broad daylight.

A police officer says GET DOWN!
GET DOWN!

The man says Kill me!

The officer says No! Get down!

Now in a room, officers help men and women wear police belts and gear.

A police officer says OKAY, YOU WANT TO PUT YOUR INNER BELT AS TIGHT AS YOU CAN
GET IT.

Jeyan says A GROUP OF
JOURNALISTS AND POLITICIANS WERE
INVITED BY NIAGARA POLICE TO
BETTER UNDERSTAND HOW POLICE
MAKE THE TOUGH DECISIONS.

An officer says WE'RE BRINGING IT DOWN ACROSS AND BRINGING OUR ENTIRE BODY INTO IT.

In an interview, the man talks.
A caption reads "Kris Hamilton. Instructor"

Kris, in his forties, clean-shaven and bald, says I WENT TO A CALL ONE TIME AND I WAS LIKE, OH, MY GOD, THIS IS
MESSED UP.
SOMEBODY SHOULD CALL THE POLICE.
AND REALIZING, OH, MY GOD, I
HAVE TO DEAL WITH THIS.

Jeyan says CHRIS HAMILTON IS AN
INSTRUCTOR WITH NIAGARA REGIONAL POLICE.
HE AND DAN DE ANGELIS HAVE OVER
45 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ON THE FORCE.

Dan, in his fifties with a stubble, says I BETTER BE PRETTY CONFIDENT IN MY SHOOTING.

A caption reads "Dan DeAngelis. Instructor."

Dan says SOME MISCONCEPTIONS OUT THERE
THAT EVERY SINGLE OFFICER ON THE
FORCE IS A MARTIAL ARTS EXPERT
AND SHOULD BE ABLE TO DISARM
SOMEBODY HOLDING A KNIFE WITH
THEIR BARE HANDS, OR IF SOMEBODY
POSSIBLY HAS A KNIFE OR A
PISTOL, WHICH REQUIRES US USING
OUR PISTOLS, WE SHOULD HAVE THE
ABILITY TO BE SNIPER-LIKE SHOTS
AND MAYBE SHOOT A KNIFE OR A GUN
OUT OF SOMEBODY'S HAND.

Jeyan says POLICE HAVE A NUMBER
OF RESOURCES AT THEIR DISPOSAL.
THEIR HANDS AND LEGS, PEPPER
SPRAY, BATONS AND OF COURSE A
GUN.
BUT WHEN TO USE EACH WEAPON IS
PREDICATED ON THE PARTICULAR
SITUATION.

At a training session, an instructor points at a circular graph. In the middle, it reads "Situation" and around it, it reads "Assess, plan, act." Around that inner circle, a second circle going from white to black, reads "Cooperative, passive resistant, active resistant, assaultive, serious bodily harm or death."

Jeyan continues THIS IS THE CURRENT USE OF FORCE
MODEL USED BY ALL OFFICERS IN THE PROVINCE.
THE MODEL WAS DEVELOPED AS A
GUIDE TO HELP POLICE OFFICERS
MAKE DECISIONS ABOUT USING FORCE
AND IS USED SIMPLY AS A WAY TO
REPRESENT THE DECISION MAKING
PROCESS.
IT STARTS AT THE CENTRE OF THE
WHEEL WITH A SITUATION.
BASED ON THAT, THE OFFICER WOULD
ASSESS THE SITUATION, PLAN AND
THEN ACT.
AN OFFICER WOULD HAVE TO
CONSIDER THE SUBJECT'S
BEHAVIOUR.
ARE THEY BEING COOPERATIVE?
ACTIVELY RESISTING?
OR IS THERE A CHANCE OF SERIOUS
BODILY HARM OR DEATH?
FROM THERE, THE OFFICER WILL
ASSESS WHETHER COMMUNICATION,
SOME FORM OF PHYSICAL CONTROL OR
WEAPONS WOULD BETTER DE-ESCALATE
THE SITUATION.

At the training session, the officer says SORT OF IN THIS KIND OF AREA
IN TERMS OF YOUR OPTIONS.
SOMETIMES OFFICER PRESENCE, JUST
BEING THERE, WILL STOP
SITUATIONS LIKE THIS.
YOU SHOW UP AND PEOPLE START TO
BECOME COOPERATIVE.

Jeyan says THE MODEL IS IN THE
SHAPE OF A CIRCLE BECAUSE LIKE
MOST SITUATIONS POLICE ARE
CALLED TO THEY ARE ALWAYS
CHANGING AND REQUIRE POLICE
OFFICERS TO RE-EXAMINE.

Dan says BASED ON THAT SITUATION,
THEY'RE GOING TO ASSESS IT.
THEY'RE GOING TO PLAN AND
THEY'RE GOING TO ACT.
THE SITUATION'S GOING TO HAVE A
SUBJECT MAYBE MULTIPLE SUBJECTS.
THEY'RE GOING TO PRESENT LEVELS
OF BEHAVIOUR, AND BASED ON THE
LEVELS OF BEHAVIOUR PROVIDED BY
THE SUBJECTS, THE OFFICERS HAVE
A VARIETY OF USE OF FORCE
OPTIONS AVAILABLE TO THEM.

Jeyan says BUT WHEN DOES A GUN,
THE MOST POWERFUL WEAPON IN A
POLICE OFFICER'S ARSENAL, BECOME
APPROPRIATE?

Dan says A GUN WILL GET PULLED OUT
EVERY SINGLE TIME AN OFFICER
PERCEIVES THAT THEIR LIFE IS IN
DANGER OR THEY'RE IN DANGER OF
SERIOUS BODILY HARM OR DEATH, OR
SOMEBODY FROM THE PUBLIC IS IN
DANGER OF SERIOUS BODILY HARM OR DEATH.

Jeyan says IN 2017, POLICE
ARRIVED TO 41 DIFFERENT CALLS
WHERE SOMEONE WAS ARMED WITH A
WEAPON.
IN YEARS PREVIOUS, THOSE WEAPONS
INCLUDED BASEBALL BATS,
SCREWDRIVERS AND SYRINGES, JUST
TO NAME A FEW.

Dan says WOULD BE AN OFFICER'S WORST
NIGHTMARE TO HAVE TO SHOOT
SOMEBODY.
WE DON'T SHOOT TO KILL.
WE SHOOT TO STOP THE THREAT, ALL
RIGHT?
WE WILL SHOOT THAT PISTOL UNTIL
THAT THREAT IS STOPPED, AND THEN
WE REASSESS THE SITUATION.

Jeyan says WHEN POLICE DO FIRE
THEIR GUN, THEY ARE AIMING FOR
THE CHEST AND STOMACH AREA.
WHY NOT SHOOT AT AN ARM OR A LEG?

Dan says NOW WE SHOOT FOR THE UPPER
THORACIC.
IT'S A LARGE TARGET AREA.
IT'S AN AREA THAT UNDER STRESS,
OKAY, WE COULD PROBABLY HIT.
IT'S VERY, VERY DIFFICULT TO HIT
A MOVING TARGET UNDER STRESS.
TO HIT A SMALL TARGET, THAT'S
WHY WE'LL NEVER, EVER TARGET A
LEG OR AN ARM.
IT'S A VERY, VERY DIFFICULT
SHOT.

A voice says TASER TASER TASER.

An officer shoots a taser gun.

Jeyan says CONDUCTED ENERGY
WEAPONS, BETTER KNOWN AS TASERS,
WERE INTRODUCED TO CANADIAN LAW
ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES IN 2001.
THEY SEND A JOLT OF ELECTRICITY
INTENDED TO STUN AN INDIVIDUAL'S
MOTOR NERVOUS SYSTEM.
THE CHARGE IS DELIVERED THROUGH
A PAIR OF WIRED PROBES, WHICH
MEANS IT NEEDS TO ATTACH TO A
PERSON'S CLOTHING OR SKIN TO
HAVE ANY EFFECT.

At the training, an instructor says AND IT HURTS.
IT HURTS LIKE HECK.

Jeyan says OFFICERS ARE TAUGHT A
NUMBER OF HAND-TO-HAND COMBAT
MOVES THAT INCLUDE KNEES AND
ELBOWS.
IN CASES WHERE OFFICERS ARE
BEING ACTIVELY RESISTED,
SOMETHING LIKE PEPPER SPRAY.

A trainee shoots pepper spray at paper cups hanging from threads.

The instructor says THERE YOU GO.
GOOD.

Jeyan says EVERY OFFICER IN THE
PROVINCE HAS TO COMPLETE USE OF
FORCE TRAINING EVERY 12 MONTHS.
THE TRAINING ALSO INCLUDES
REAL-LIFE SCENARIOS WHICH HELPS
OFFICERS IN PLACES LIKE THE
NIAGARA REGION WHERE THERE'S A
COMBINATION OF RURAL AND URBAN
GEOGRAPHY, BUT THEY CAN NEVER
TRULY PREDICT WHAT THEY MIGHT
ENCOUNTER OUT IN THE REAL WORLD.

Kris says I CAN TELL YOU FROM MY OWN
PERSONAL EXPERIENCE THAT EVEN
HOW PREPARED YOU THINK YOU ARE
FOR A CALL, YOU'RE STILL A HUMAN BEING.
THEY ARE STILL GOING TO AFFECT YOU.

At the training facility, officers yell PUT IT DOWN.
DROP IT!
PUT IT ON THE FLOOR NOW!

A caption appears on screen. It reads "Ontario Hubs Field Producer, Jeyan Jeganathan, @JeyanTVO. Editor, David Erwin."

An animated slate reads "Ontario Hubs. Ontario Hubs are made possible by The Barry and Laurie Green Family Charitable Trust and Goldie Feldman."

Watch: How Police Decide When to Use Force