Transcript: Ep. 6 - Tokyo | Oct 15, 2017

A logo on a black background fades in and reads: "TVO Originals".

A map of Europe appears over an aerial view of the city of Tokyo.

A caption reads "Tokyo."

Mikael is in his fifties, with short wavy gray hair and he wears jeans and a pale blue shirt.

Fast clips show images of the streets of Tokyo.

Mikael says WHEN WE TRAVEL TO OTHER CITIES,
WE OFTEN EXPERIENCE
A SENSE OF FAMILIARITY.
FRAGMENTS OF THE URBAN
LANDSCAPE REMIND US
OF SOMEWHERE ELSE.
IT COULD BE STREET TYPOLOGY,
ARCHITECTURE, TOPOGRAPHY, EVEN
JUST A FEELING OF ANOTHER PLACE.
NOT ONCE, HOWEVER, HAS IT EVER
HAPPENED TO ME HERE.
THERE IS NO WHERE ELSE
LIKE IT ON THE PLANET,
AND IT'S QUITE
IMPOSSIBLE TO IMAGINE
THAT THERE EVER COULD BE.
IN ORDER TO DISCOVER
THE LIFE-SIZED CITY HERE,
I HAVE TO IGNORE THE VAST
SCALE OF THE URBAN LANDSCAPE
BECAUSE THIS... IS TOKYO.

(music plays)

In animation, Mikael’s body gets covered in maps and city models. He extends his hand and a miniature model of a city appears on his palm.

The title of the show reads "The Life-Sized City with Mikael Colville-Andersen."

Clips show images of Tokyo. An animated map appears with the caption "Tokyo."

Mikael says MODERN TOKYO IS
A FASCINATING URBAN MYSTERY.
FOR STARTERS, IT'S THE LARGEST
METROPOLITAN AREA IN THE WORLD,
HOME TO ABOUT
38 MILLION PEOPLE.
POPULATION OF CANADA
IN ONE CITY.
WITH ALL THESE PEOPLE
DOING ALL THE THINGS THEY DO,
SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS HERE
ARE OFTEN OPEN
24 HOURS A DAY.
AND THE CITY HAS DEVELOPED
ONE OF THE WORLD'S
TO HELP THEM MOVE AROUND.
ON THE SURFACE,
TOKYO LOOKS LIKE A WILD
OVERENGINEERED ENVIRONMENT,
WITH ENDLESS ROWS OF TOWERS
AND GLITTERING NEON.
BUT IF YOU DIG JUST A BIG
DEEPER, THIS MEGACITY
IS SO MUCH MORE THAN JUST
ITS IMPRESSIVE SIZE.
IN FACT, THERE ISN'T
JUST ONE TOKYO.

A map pops up with the caption "Tokyo Metropolitan Region. Tokyo City. The 23 Special Wards."

Mikael says THIS CITY IS MADE UP
OF COUNTLESS POCKETS
OF "LIFE-SIZEDNESS,"
ON EVERY BLOCK, HOWEVER
BUSY THAT BLOCK MAY BE.
EVERY DAY, CITIZENS
HERE ARE LEARNING
TO OUTSMART THEIR RELENTLESS
URBAN ENVIRONMENT.
ON SO MANY LEVELS, TOKYO
IS A LIVING PARADOX.
GRASPING THE COMPLEXITY OF
ITS MASS TRANSIT SYSTEM.

An animation shows the routing of Tokyo’s Metro Network.

Mikael says IT IS, WITHOUT A DOUBT,
THE GREATEST ILLUSTRATION
OF THE VASTNESS OF TOKYO AND
VITAL TO THE CITY'S
CLOCKWORK EFFICIENCY,
IT IS THE BUSIEST TRANSIT
SYSTEM IN THE WORLD,
CARRYING
GET READY FOR THIS -
ALMOST 9 MILLION
COMMUTERS A DAY.
THAT'S ABOUT 3,2 BILLION
PEOPLE YEAR IN AND YEAR OUT.
WE DON'T HAVE A PERMIT
TO FILM ON THE TRAINS
AND IN MANY COUNTRIES,
IT'S BECAUSE OF SECURITY.
HERE, IT'S SIMPLY BECAUSE
IT WILL MESS UP THEIR FLOW.
A CAMERA CREW TAKING UP TOO
MUCH SPACE RISKS DELAYING
TRAINS BY ONE OR TWO MINUTES,
SO WE'RE FREESTYLING TODAY.
AND THE TRAIN.
EVERY FOUR MINUTES: BOOM!

He steps on a train and says TOKYO IS SYNONYMOUS
WITH PUBLIC TRANSPORT.
THE OVERALL USAGE
OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT
IN THIS CITY IS DOUBLE THAT
OF THE ENTIRE UNITED STATES.
TEN TIMES MORE PASSENGERS
EVEN THAN PARIS,
ANOTHER GREAT PUBLIC
TRANSPORT CITY.
AND IT'S A JOY TO USE.
THE STATIONS ARE
INTUITIVELY DESIGNED,
THE WAYFINDING
IN THE GRAPHIC DESIGN
MAKES IT EASY FOR ME,
A VISITOR TO FIND
THE RIGHT TRACK, THE WAY OUT
OF THE STATION AND WHATNOT.
WHEN THEY PERFECTED IT AS
THEY HAVE HERE IN TOKYO,
IT MAKES YOU WONDER WHY
SO MANY OTHER CITIES
DON'T JUST "COPY PASTE."
IT JUST WORKS.
AREA ON THE PLANET
COMES WITH ITS FAIR
SHARE OF CHALLENGES.
THE MOST PROMINENT
OF THEM IS DEALING
WITH THE SEISMIC INSTABILITY
THAT GUIDES EVERYDAY LIFE.
YET, LIKE EVERYTHING HERE,
IT ALL SEEMS TO BE
WELL UNDER CONTROL.
WITH SURREAL SOLUTIONS THAT
FEEL LIKE THEY'RE PART
OF A SCIENCE-FICTION FILM
SCRIPT. BUT TRUST ME:
IT'S ALL VERY REAL,
AND A LOT OF IT IS COOL.
THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF
THERE WAS ONE YESTERDAY,
MAGNITUDE 3, APPARENTLY.
BUT I'VE BEEN TOLD THAT
THE CITY IS PREPARED.
BUILDINGS ARE SYSTEMATICALLY
EQUIPPED WITH
ANTI EARTHQUAKE TECHNOLOGY.
A MASSIVE UNDERGROUND
NETWORK CAN DIVERGE
WATER IN CASE OF A TSUNAMI.
EMERGENCY CENTRES CAN
POP UP ON EVERY BLOCK.

A map pops up with the caption "Nishigahara Park."

Mikael says THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD PARK
IS AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE
OF TOKYO'S UNIQUE
QUEST FOR SAFETY.
HELLO GO!

Go says HELLO MIKAEL!

Mikael says IT'S GOOD TO SEE YOU.
WHAT IS THE EXACT RISK
THAT WE'RE TALKING
ABOUT HERE?

Go is in his thirties, with short straight black hair in a side part and a goatee. He wears black trousers, a gray sports jacket and a black T-shirt.

Go says 70 percent TO 80 percent,
WITHIN 20 TO 30 YEARS.
SO WE THINK 20 TO 30 YEARS
MEANS IT COULD
BE 30 YEARS LATER
OR IT COULD BE TONIGHT.

A caption reads "Go Igarashi. Association for Aid and Relief."

Mikael says GO WORKS FOR
JAPAN'S ASSOCIATION
FOR AID AND RELIEF,
WHICH PROVIDES
INTERNATIONAL EMERGENCY
ASSISTANCE TO VICTIMS OF
NATURAL CATASTROPHES.
HE'S ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE
FROM AROUND THE WORLD
AND HAS NOW BROUGHT
HIS EXPERTISE HOME.

Go says WE SHOULD EXPECT
SOMETHING UNEXPECTED.
THAT'S THE PREPARATION WE NEED.
THIS PARK ACTUALLY
CAN BE TRANSFORMED
TO AN EVACUATION PLACE.
SOME EQUIPMENT HERE
CAN BE USED IN A TOTALLY
DIFFERENT FUNCTION
DEPENDING ON THE DISASTER.

They meet a man at the park.

The man says "This is a well."

The man pumps water out of the well.

Mikael has a sip and says THERE IS IT.

The man helps Mikael lift a wooden cover that reveals a hidden barbecue.

Mikael says LOOK AT THAT!
YOU GOT A BARBECUE.
THIS IS LIKE A VIDEO
GAME: YOU HAVE TO
FIND ALL THE DIFFERENT
DISASTER ELEMENTS.

The man lifts up a manhole lid and says "This toilet is for disasters."

Mikael says THIS IS FUN.

The man says "Normally these are play structures for children. But in earthquakes, we can pitch tents around this. We put a tent over the roof and surroundings."

Mikael says ON THE TECHNICAL
SIDE OF THINGS,
TOKYO IS WELL PREPARED
FOR AN EVENTUAL
LARGE-SCALE DISASTER.
ITS CITIZENS, HOWEVER,
DON'T ALL SEEM TO BE
ON THE SAME PAGE
WHEN IT COMES TO COLLABORATION.
ODDLY, IT FEELS LIKE
THEY'RE LIVING FRAGMENTED,
ISOLATED LIVES, MAKING HUMAN
RELATIONS A BIT COMPLICATED.
NOT KNOWING YOUR NEIGHBOURS,
ESPECIALLY WHEN THERE
ARE SO MANY OF THEM,
CAN REALLY BE A SHOWSTOPPER
SHOULD YOU NEED TO HELP
EACH OTHER OUT.

Go says THE BOND OF THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
IS NOT THAT STRONG.
PEOPLE DON'T KNOW
THEIR NEIGHBOUR.
IT'S QUITE HARD TO IMAGINE,
THAT AT THE TIME OF A DISASTER,
PEOPLE COULD HELP EACH OTHER,
OR IDENTIFY WHERE THAT
ELDER PERSON IS,
OR WHERE ARE THE KIDS AND
WHERE THEY SHOULD GO HELP.

Mikael says SERIOUSLY, THINK ABOUT IT.
ALMOST 40 MILLION PEOPLE
IN A SINGLE CITY.
THAT'S A LOT OF PEOPLE.
IT'S EASY TO FEEL A BIT
LOST IN THE CROWD.
BUT I'M TOLD THAT
THINGS ARE CHANGING,
THAT THE POPULATION
IS ACTUALLY DECREASING.
IS TOKYO HOPING TO BECOME
MORE AND MORE LIFE-SIZED,
OR HAS IT ALWAYS
SECRETLY EVOLVED AROUND
SMALL-SCALE ELEMENTS THAT ONLY
LOCALS CAN SEE AND EXPERIENCE?
IF SO, I MAY HAVE BEEN
LOOKING IN THE WRONG PLACES.

Mikael walk in a quiet neighbourhood with Sam.

Mikael says WAIT. IT'S LIKE... SO QUIET.
IT'S COMPLETELY SILENT
IN THOSE STREETS.

SaMikael says YEAH.

Mikael says WE'RE LIKE THE NOISIEST
THING HERE.

SaMikael says THIS IS REALLY, FOR ME,
THE KIND OF ICONIC SPACE
OF THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD,
BETWEEN THESE TWO BUILDINGS.
YOU CAN TOUCH THE WALLS TOO.
YEAH, EXACTLY.

A caption reads "Sam Holden. Researcher in Urban Studies."

Sam is in his thirties, with short brown hair and a stubble. He wears yellow trousers and a mottled blue sweater.

Mikael says TRACKING CHANGES IN
TOKYO'S URBAN FABRIC
IS SAM HOLDEN'S PASSION.
ON THE EVOLUTION OF
HIS ADOPTIVE CITY.
ACCORDING TO HIM,
JAPAN'S BIGGEST CITY
IS NOW AT A STANDSTILL...
OR, AS HE CALLS IT,
A "POST-GROWTH PERIOD."
SO... WHERE DOES IT HEAD NEXT?
WHY DO YOU USE
THE EXPRESSION "POST-GROWTH"?

SaMikael says THE BIG THING THAT'S REALLY
HAPPENING IN JAPAN
AT THE BEGINNING
OF THE 21ST CENTURY IS THAT
THE POPULATION IS STARTING
TO DECLINE.
SO IN THE NEXT 50 YEARS,
THE POPULATION OF JAPAN
IS GOING TO DECLINE
BY 45 MILLION PEOPLE AND
THEY HAVE THE LOWEST BIRTH RATE
IN THE WHOLE COUNTRY.

A caption reads "Japan’s population: from 127,000,000 to 82,000,000."

SaMikael says NOBODY'S HAVING KIDS.
TOKYO IS JUST
A GIANT DEMOGRAPHIC
BLACK HOLE RIGHT NOW.
IN THE 20TH CENTURY,
ECONOMIC GROWTH AS WELL WAS
LARGELY CORRELATED
TO DEMOGRAPHIC GROWTH.
WHEN YOU HAD A YOUNG
POPULATION THAT WAS ENTERING
THE WORKFORCE, THAT WAS
REALLY WHAT WAS DRIVING
THE ECONOMIC GROWTH. NOW THAT
THE POPULATION IS DECLINING
AND GETTING OLDER,
NOT ONLY IS THE AMOUNT
OF PEOPLE SHRINKING,
BUT THE ECONOMY
IS NOT GROWING EITHER.
IN TERMS OF THE CITY,
THAT MEANS THAT WE'RE STARTING
TO SEE MORE AND MORE BUILDINGS
THAT DON'T HAVE USERS.
YOU KNOW, YOU COULD
BE IN ANY NICE,
SEEMINGLY BEAUTIFUL
NEIGHBOURHOODS LIKE THIS.
IF YOU REALLY LOOK
AROUND, MAYBE 20 percent
OF THE STORES ARE
EMPTY OR YOU KNOW,
10 percent OF THE HOUSES HAVE
NOBODY LIVING IN THEM.
A LOT OF THE YOUNG PEOPLE
NOW WHO ARE USING
THESE VACANT SPACES IN
THE CITY, THEY'RE USING THEM
TO MAKE SHARED HOUSES
AND DIFFERENT SPACES,
BUT A LOT OF THOSE PLACES KIND
OF HAVE A PUBLIC FUNCTION
TO THEM AS WELL.
IT'S NOT JUST A PLACE
TO LIVE PRIVATELY
WITH YOUR FRIENDS.
IT'S A PLACE WHERE YOU CAN
CREATE SOME SORT OF CONNECTION
WITH THE CITY OR CREATE
SOME SORT OF SOCIAL PLACE.
THE CITY IS REALLY
FACING, I THINK,
TWO BIG URBAN CHALLENGES:
THE FIRST ONE
IS BY 2030, ONE OUT OF
EVERY FOUR PEOPLE IN TOKYO
IS GOING TO BE OVER 65.
HOW TO KEEP THOSE PEOPLE
ENGAGED IN THE COMMUNITY,
HOW TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY'RE
NOT ISOLATED, ESPECIALLY BECAUSE
TRADITIONAL SPACES OF COMMUNITY
ARE STARTING TO DISAPPEAR.
AND THE OTHER PROBLEM
IS THAT YOUNG FAMILIES
DON'T REALLY HAVE PLACES WHERE
THEY CAN RAISE THEIR KIDS HERE.

(music plays)

Mikael says BUT CHALLENGES, IN GENERAL,
CAN BE MET WITH SOLUTIONS.
IF COMMUNITIES HERE ARE
WILLING TO GET ORGANIZED
TO WORK TOGETHER,
THEY CAN TRANSFORM
THE VACANT SPACE
INTO PUBLIC SPACE.

SaMikael says SO THIS IS SHINA AND IPPE.
A FRIEND OF MINE
RUNS THIS SPACE.

Mikael says OH YEAH, MAN!

SaMikael says YEAH! SO THIS IS THE SPACE
THAT'S USED BY A LOT
OF THE LOCAL MOTHERS
AND CHILDREN.
IT'S KIND OF
A LOCAL LIVING ROOM.

Mikael says TO UNDERSTAND FAMILY LIFE
IN TOKYO,
WHAT IS IT LIKE
TO HAVE TWO CHILDREN?
THE DAILY LIFE FOR
A FAMILY HERE?

A woman says "Well, I would say it’s hard."

Mikael says ONE REASON FOR THIS
IS A BLATANT LACK
OF DAYCARE CENTRES.
FOR THE NUMBER OF FAMILIES
IN NEED OF THIS SERVICE,
EVEN IF PEOPLE ARE HAVING
FEWER CHILDREN THAN EVER.
THE AUTHORITIES ARE
CLEARLY NOT UP TO SPEED,
SO PROJECTS LIKE THIS
ONE PARTLY FILL THE GAP
FOR SOME PARENTS, BY
CREATING A COMMUNITY SPACE
WITH ACTIVITIES FOR
CHILDREN OF ALL AGES.

There are lots of adults who are friends here. They keep an eye on the kids, they know what’s going on.

Mikael says SO EVERYBODY HELPS TAKE CARE
OF EACH OTHER'S CHILDREN.

The woman says "Yes, it’s very nice! It’s comfortable. It makes me feel like I’m not alone."

Mikael says NICE TO MEET YOU.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH,

The woman says NICE TO MEET YOU.
THANK YOU SO MUCH!

Mikael says COOL.

The woman says THANK YOU.

Mikael says PLEASURE!

He high-fives the woman’s baby and says BOOM. YEAH!
[SAM HOLDEN]
O.K!
SEE YOU LATER!

He pokes the woman’s toddle’s stomach and says GOT YOU AGAIN!

(music plays)

Mikael walks in a busy area of the city and says TOKYO WORKS. IT FUNCTIONS
SMOOTHLY ON SO MANY LEVELS.
REGARDING URBAN PLANNING,
THE STATUS QUO
HAS BEEN FOR MANY,
MANY DECADES,
A STRICT TOP DOWN APPROACH,
ESPECIALLY IN AREAS LIKE THIS.
THINGS ARE CHANGING.
URBAN ACTIVISM, COMMUNITY
ENGAGEMENT ARE TAKING
HOLD HERE IN THIS CITY.

A caption reads "Miki Yasui. University Professor and Advisor to the city."

Miki is in her forties, with shoulder length black hair with a side swept bang. She wears blue trousers, a white blouse and a chunky necklace.

Mikael says MIKI YASUI IS A PROFESSOR
IN URBAN STUDIES
FOR THE CITY OF TOKYO.
SHE BRINGS COMMUNITY
ORGANIZATIONS AND
THE PRIVATE SECTOR TOGETHER
TO ADVOCATE FOR THE CREATION
OF MORE AND BETTER
PUBLIC SPACE.
CAN YOU TELL ME A BIT ABOUT
THE TRADITIONAL JAPANESE
IN URBAN PLANNING
IN TOKYO AS WELL?
TO ME, IT ALWAYS FELT LIKE
A VERY STRICT TOP DOWN APPROACH.

Miki says RIGHT.
IT USED TO BE A VERY
TOP DOWN PROCESS.
BUT MOST OF THE PROPERTIES
ARE OWNED BY PRIVATE
COMPANIES OR PRIVATE OWNERS.
SO IF WE HAVE A TOP
DOWN APPROACH,
NOTHING CAN BE DONE
BY THE GOVERNMENT,
BECAUSE THEY
DON'T OWN THE LAND.
THEY HAVE TO NEGOTIATE
WITH THE PRIVATE OWNERS
OR THEY HAVE TO BUY THE LAND.
THAT WAS SO DIFFICULT.
SO THEY CHANGED THEIR MIND
AND THE GOVERNMENT
TRIED TO GIVE MORE
INCENTIVES SO
THE PRIVATE COMPANIES
DO SOME GOOD FOR THE PUBLIC.
HERE IS A GOOD EXAMPLE.
20 OR 30 YEARS AGO,
THIS PLACE HAD ONLY
A BUSINESS FUNCTION.
SO ON SATURDAY OR SUNDAY,
YOU COULDN'T SEE ANYONE.
THIS WAS A LOT FOR CARS
UNTIL LAST YEAR, ACTUALLY.

Mikael says O.K. THIS IS A NEW...

They walk to a pedestrian area with café tables.

Miki says YEAH, THIS IS VERY NEW.
THIS IS THE RESULT OF A TOUGH
NEGOTIATION BETWEEN
THE ORGANIZATIONS' MANAGEMENT
AND THE GOVERNMENT.
WHAT WE WANTED WAS
TO DO THE EXPERIMENT, JUST
ONE OR TWO DAYS, A WEEK,
TWO WEEKS, AND GO
LONGER AND LONGER.
AND FINALLY, WE GOT THIS.
AND YOU SEE MORE WOMEN HERE.

Mikael says YEAH.

Miki says AND THIS AREA
USED TO BE ORGANIZED
FOR BUSINESSMEN,
NOT WOMEN.
UNTIL 20 YEARS AGO, ONLY
MEN WERE WALKING OUTSIDE,
AND THE WOMEN STAYED AT HOME
TO RAISE THE CHILDREN.
BUT NOW, MORE THAN TWO THIRDS
ARE DOUBLE-INCOME FAMILIES.
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY
ARE VERY GOOD TIMES
FOR FAMILIES AND FRIENDS
GETTING TOGETHER.

(music plays)

Mikael says THE INTEGRATION OF
WOMEN INTO THE JOB MARKET
HAS CHANGED THE CULTURE OF
URBAN JAPAN FOR THE BETTER...
OBVIOUSLY. BECAUSE WOMEN, AS AN
INTEGRAL PART OF THE WORKFORCE
ALSO MEANS WOMEN WHO ARE
MORE ACTIVELY PARTICIPATING
IN THE FUTURE OF THEIR CITY.

Miki says I THINK PEOPLE ARE USING
THEIR ENVIRONMENT NOT
ONLY FOR MOVING,
BUT ALSO FOR STAYING
AND ENJOYING.
I MEAN, IN THE PAST 30 YEARS,
PEOPLE WERE WALKING TOO RAPIDLY.

Mikael says IS TOKYO SLOWING DOWN?
THAT'S POSITIVE?

Miki says IT'S REALLY POSITIVE,
I THINK. YES.

Mikael says IF YOU'RE WALKING AROUND TOKYO,
YOU MIGHT WONDER WHAT
THESE THINGS ARE.

He points at guides on the sidewalk slightly raised above ground level.

Mikael says IT'S KIND OF DIFFICULT TO
WALK ON, TO BE HONEST,
WHEN YOU'RE EXPLORING THE CITY.
BUT THEY'RE HERE FOR
THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED.
CLEAR GUIDES TO HELP
THEM GET AROUND THE CITY.
NOT JUST ON THE MAIN STREETS,
LIKE IN OTHER CITIES
IN THE WORLD.
ABSOLUTELY EVERYWHERE.
EVEN ALL THE TRAIN STATIONS
IN JAPAN AND IN TOKYO
HAVE FACILITIES, ELEVATORS,
TO HELP PEOPLE WITH
DISABILITIES GET AROUND,
AND TO USE THE PUBLIC
TRANSPORT SYSTEM.
TEMPORARY RAMPS WILL COME OUT AT
TRAIN STATIONS WHEN A TRAIN
STOPS TO HELP PEOPLE GET
ON AND OFF THE TRAIN,
REALLY TAKING CARE OF PEOPLE
WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT,
WITH DISABILITIES
AND ESPECIALLY THE BIG ISSUE
HERE: AN AGING POPULATION.

(music plays)

Mikael says WITH 20 percent OF ITS POPULATION
NOW OVER THE AGE OF 65,
DEMOGRAPHIC SHIFT IS
THE BIGGEST SOCIAL CHALLENGE
TOKYO IS FACING TODAY.
THE CITY HAS INFRASTRUCTURE
FOR THE ELDERLY,
HELPING THEM TO MOVE
AROUND SAFELY.
THE PROBLEM IS THAT THEY
DON'T HAVE THAT MANY REASONS
TO MOVE AROUND.
MORE OFTEN THAN NOT, THEY
JUST END UP ALONE AT HOME.
HIROMICHI AOKI IS TRYING
TO CHANGE THAT.

A caption reads "Christine Lavoie-Gagnon. Translator."

Christine is in her thirties, with long blond hair in a bun. She wears jeans and a white T-shirt.

Mikael says HELLO AOKI-SAN.

A caption reads "Hiromichi Aoki. Founder of Town Concierges."

Hiromichi is in his seventies, clean-shaven and with short graying hair. He wears glasses, jeans, a white jacket, a gingham shirt and a gray and black cap.

Mikael says TO SPEND HIS RETIREMENT
MOPING AROUND AT HOME,
REALIZING THAT MOST
PEOPLE HIS AGE
WEREN'T AS HEALTHY AND FIT AS
HE WAS, HE SOLVED THE PROBLEM
BY CREATING A PROJECT
CALLED TOWN CONCIERGE.
THE VOLUNTEER GROUP CREATES
POSSIBILITIES FOR OTHER
ABLE-BODIED PENSIONERS,
ENABLING THEM, EMPOWERING THEM.
IN TURN, THEY HELP OTHERS IN
MANY WAYS, FROM DELIVERING
GROCERIES TO RENOVATING HOUSES.

Hiromichi says "It’s a virtue and a vice. Japanese people work like loyal soldiers. But they don’t function well
when they aren’t at work. So they watch TV, eat a lot, drink wine. They’re inactive and get sick. We’ve created a system where the healthy elderly volunteer their time to those who need it."

Mikael says CAN I ASK YOU
HOW OLD YOU ARE?

Hiromichi says "I’m 75."

(music plays)

Mikael says THE VOLUNTEERS VARY
IN AGE, BUT THIS IS TOKYO,
SO MOST OF THEM ARE OVER 65.
SOMETHING THAT I FIND
ABSOLUTELY AMAZING.
PEOPLE WITH SPECIFIC SKILLS
ARE MATCHED TO OTHERS
WITH SPECIFIC NEEDS.
WE'RE TALKING ABOUT SMALL
THINGS, BUT THINGS THAT MATTER.
SOMETIMES AS SIMPLE
AS CHANGING A LIGHTBULB.

They visit a senior citizen in need.

Hiromichi says "Here’s the problem."

Mikael says IT'S BURNED UP, YEAH.
WHEN YOU ARE AN ELDERLY WOMAN,
IT'S ONE OF THE MOST
DIFFICULT THINGS YOU CAN DO.
YOU CAN'T EVEN GET UP
ON THE LADDER TO DO THIS.
SO IT'S ONE SIMPLE LITTLE INPUT
THAT WE COME HERE AND
WE PUT IN A LIGHTBULB.
IT MAKES HER DAY, LIGHTS
UP HER FRONT PORCH,
MAKES HER FEEL MORE
SECURE ON THIS STREET.
IT'S SIMPLE, BUT EFFECTIVE.

A volunteer says "There you go."

Mikael says BOOM!
IS THIS THE FIRST TIME THAT
SHE HAS USED THE ORGANIZATION?

The translator asks the woman the question.

The woman says "No, this is my second time."

Mikael says CAN YOU ASK THE GENTLEMAN
WITH THE BIKE,
DOES HE DO THIS A LOT?

The man says "I’ve worked with Mr. Aoki for a long time."

Mikael says HOW OLD YOU ARE, SIR?

The man says "I’m almost 70."

Mikael says THE OWNERS OF THIS
HOUSE ARE AWAY,
SO MR. AOKI OFFERED TO
TRIM THEIR BUSHES.
AND WELL, I OFFERED
TO DO IT FOR HIM.

Mikael starts clipping and says THIS IS AN INCREDIBLY
STRESSING EXPERIENCE.
THE JAPANESE ESTHETIC.
EVERYTHING IS PERFECTLY FORMED
AND THAT WHOLE AMAZING
CULTURE THAT THEY HAVE.
I'M JUST AFRAID
OF MESSING UP A BUSH.
BUT WE'LL DO WHAT WE CAN.
DO YOU THINK THAT THE CITY
OF TOKYO DOES ENOUGH TO HELP
THE AGING POPULATION?
ARE THERE PROGRAMS
THAT THEY HAVE
THAT ARE HELPING THE SITUATION?

Hiromichi says "Not in a structured way. Some people offer help when they see someone in need. But there isn’t an organization that offers the services we are providing today."

(music plays)

Mikael says THIS IS WHERE MR. AOKI'S
SYSTEM PAYS OFF:
ALSO GET SOMETHING IN RETURN.
THEY'RE NOT PAID, BUT EACH
THAT CAN ONLY BE TRADED IN AT
LOCAL STORES.

A map shows the location of the Nakanobu District.

Mikael says IN THE END,
THESE GOOD DEEDS HELP KEEP
THE NEIGHBOURHOOD VIBRANT.

Hiromichi says "My office issues coupons. Our customers then purchase those coupons to hire our services. When a customer buys a 1,000 yen coupon, the volunteer gets a 500 yen voucher to spend in one of the participating stores and the other 500 yen is donated to our organization, our NPO. The system we have here makes elderly happy. And it keeps people healthy. The vouchers bring business to the shopping district. And better health reduces hospital visits. People don’t use their national health insurance as much. The government saves money that way."

A caption reads "1,000 yens = 11 Canadian Dollars."

Mikael says IS IT SPREADING TO OTHER PARTS
OF TOKYO AND JAPAN?

Hiromichi says "It’s starting to change, but not in Tokyo yet. It’s happening in Yokohama and Kawasaki."

They visit another house.

Hiromichi says "Hello there."

Mikael says HELLO!

Hiromichi says "He has come to help out."

A woman says "Thank you!"

Mikael says HOW OLD ARE YOU?

A man says "I’m 79."

Mikael says AND HOW DID THEY HEAR
ABOUT THE ORGANIZATION?

Another woman says "We saw the ad in the local shopping district. Mak

Mikael helps a volunteer put up wallpaper on the ceiling.

The volunteer says "Make it overlap with the masking tape. Once that’s in place, move this way. He’s pretty good. That’s okay for now."

Mikael says YOU ARE A VOLUNTEER?

The man says "Yes, I am."

Mikael says HOW LONG HAVE YOU
BEEN VOLUNTEERING
FOR THE ORGANIZATION?

The man says "I’ve been doing this for 15 years."

Mikael says WHY IS IT IMPORTANT
FOR YOU TO VOLUNTEER?

The man says "It’s a great way to interact with people
and it’s worthwhile work. It makes people happy, and that’s really nice."

The owner of the house says "Thank you very much. Thank you."

(music plays)

Mikael walks in a football pitch and says IT'S THE END OF A GREAT
WORKING DAY HERE, IN TOKYO,
AND I'VE INVITED SOME FRIENDS
TO PLAY A LITTLE FOOTBALL MATCH.
BUT THIS CITY IS A MASTER
AT SPACE MANAGEMENT,
BOTH INTERIORS BUT
ALSO URBAN DESIGN.
SO YOU HAVE TO CHECKOUT WHERE
WE'RE PLAYING FOOTBALL.
LOOK AT THIS: RIGHT ABOVE
SHIBUYA, IN SHIBUYA CROSSING.
THE MOST ICONIC
PART OF THE CITY,
ON A ROOF OF A SHOPPING CENTRE.
TEN FLOORS UP IN THE HEART
OF THIS CITY IS AMAZING.
TOKYO'S CONCEPT OF SPACE
MANAGEMENT GOES WAY BEYOND WHAT
I'VE SEEN ANYWHERE
ELSE IN THE WORLD.
INCREDIBLY TINY HOUSES,
UNDERGROUND BICYCLE
PARKING FACILITIES,
GARDENS INSIDE
OFFICE BUILDINGS.
THE CITY MAY BE DENSE,
BUT IT NEVER LACKS IDEAS
TO MAKE EVERYTHING FIT.
TOKYO. THIS WELL-OILED
URBAN MACHINE,
THIS BENCHMARK CITY
THAT OTHER CITIES
AROUND THE WORLD ASPIRE TO BE,
BUT WHERE ARE THE TREES?
THE GREEN CANOPY IN TOKYO
IS REALLY MINUSCULE COMPARED
TO MANY OTHER CITIES,
BUT THEN YOU LOOK UP HERE AND
YOU SEE A BUILDING LIKE THIS
AND YOU THINK KIND OF: "WOW!

He looks up at a high building with vertical gardens in its balconies.

Mikael says SOMEBODY'S MAKING AN EFFORT."
AND I'M GOING TO MEET A MAN WITH
A VISION FOR A GREENER TOKYO.

A man says "Mikael, nice to see you."

Mikael says NICE TO SEE YOU.

Mikael says WHEN NAVIGATING TOKYO'S
OCEAN OF CONCRETE,
YOU CAN, ON OCCASION, FORGET
THAT NATURE EVEN EXISTS.
BUT AS ALWAYS, THERE ARE
PEOPLE HERE WITH SOLUTIONS,
AND TATSUYA
IS ONE OF THEM.

A caption reads "Tatsuya Hiraga. Landscape Architect."

Tasuya is in his forties, clean-shaven and with short straight black hair. He wears black trousers, a white T-shirt and a black sports jacket.

H says HE'S PROVEN THAT
A ROOFTOP GARDEN IS COOL,
BUT THAT A FOUR-STORY
HIGH URBAN FOREST
BUILT ON TOP OF THE CITY
HALL IS WAY COOLER.

A map appears with the caption "Toshima City Hall."

Mikael says LOOK AT THAT!
YOU JUST DON'T HAVE A SENSE
OF BEING ON THE TENTH FLOOR
OF A BUILDING. THIS IS...
YOU THINK?
NO! YOU JUST FEEL LIKE
YOU JUST WALKED INTO A GARDEN
ON GROUND LEVEL. IS IT JUST
LIKE A NICE THING TO HAVE,
A BIT OF A GARDEN ON THE ROOF,
OR WHAT IS THE ACTUAL
FUNCTION OF IT?

Toshima says "We call this place Toshima Forest."

TOSHIMA IS ONE OF EIGHT CENTRAL WARDS THAT MAKE UP THE TOKYO METROPOLITAN AREA.

A map shows the location of Toshima, Taito, Bunkyo, Shinjuku, Chiyoda, Shibuya, Chud, and Minato.

Mikael says IT HAS THE UNFORTUNATE
REPUTATION OF HAVING
THE LEAST GREEN SPACE
IN ALL OF JAPAN.

Toshima says "When we started the design, I researched greenery around here. We found out that there was an extinction of vegetation and insects. So we tried to preserve it by recreating local biodiversity on top of City Hall."

Mikael says THE IMPRESSIVE
URBAN GREEN SPACE
WAS DESIGNED USING ONLY
PLANTS AND INSECTS
INDIGENOUS TO THIS SPECIFIC
PART OF THE CITY.
HIRAGA EVEN RECREATED
THE TOSHIMA RIVER
BURIED IN THE 1960'S.
THE STREAM IS FED BY RECYCLED
RAIN WATER THAT IS ALSO USED
THE PLANTS GROWING INSIDE.

Toshima says "Each floor has its very own fishpond. Kids really like the fish and insects, they’re so into it. When they see them, their faces change."

Mikael says WHAT KIND OF INFLUENCE
DOES THIS BUILDING HAVE
ON THE FUTURE OF TOSHIMA?
WILL IT HAVE AN IMPACT
ON TRANSFORMING THE CITY
THAT WE SEE OUT THERE?

Toshima says "In Japan, 70 percent of the land is forest."

Mikael says 70.

Toshima says "Almost, and 20 percent are flatlands on which cities were built. You could see the mountains, like 25 years ago. But now, all the buildings rise up. I think the people who live in the city almost forget about that. That’s the main reason I put some green here."

Mikael says SO IT'S COME DOWN TO THIS:
NATURE NOW NEEDS TO BE
FEATURED IN A MUSEUM
IN ORDER TO BE PRESERVED.
ALTHOUGH, ON A POSITIVE
NOTE, MAYBE THIS IS JUST
THE FIRST STEP IN BRINGING
IT BACK TO THE CITY.
THIS ECO-MUSEUM IS AN
IMPORTANT EDUCATIONAL
AND SOCIAL TOOL. BUT TATSUYA
KNOWS THAT TOKYO NEEDS
WAY MORE THAN JUST THIS.
MINAMI-IKEBUKURO PARK
WAS ONCE A VACANT LOT,
BUT FAMILIES HAVE
NOW TAKEN OVER IT.

A map shows the location of the park.

Mikael says OF LAND REALLY MIGHT NOT BE
THAT IMPRESSIVE, BUT IN TOKYO,

Kids play and slide down a paved trail that follows the shape of a hill.

Toshima says "That’s craftsmanship. Kids really like this. I really wanted the kids to feel the landform. There used to be a little hill here, so I recreated that. Kids don’t really have a place to play in the city."

Mikael says IS THIS SOMETHING THAT COULD
BE REPLICATED ALL OVER TOKYO,
DO YOU THINK?

Toshima says "I believe so."

Mikael says THE CITY'S ADMINISTRATION
IS SLOWLY CATERING
TO THE CITIZEN DEMAND
FOR GREEN SPACE.
THERE IS, HOWEVER, ONE
THING THAT TOKYOITES
HAVE BEEN DOING FOR
AGES WITHOUT ANY HELP
FROM THE AUTHORITIES.
AND THAT... IS CYCLING.
BYRON KIDD IS AN
INTERNATIONAL AUTHORITY
ON BICYCLE INFRASTRUCTURE
AND LEGISLATION.

A caption reads "Byron Kidd. Editor."

Byron is in his forties, balding and with a goatee, and he wears glasses, jeans, a white T-shirt and a blue vest.

Mikael says AFTER 20 YEARS IN TOKYO,
HE'S STILL AMAZED BY
THE MILLIONS OF DAILY
COMMUTES MADE BY BIKE
IN A CITY WITH SO FEW
PROTECTED BIKE LANES.

Mikael and Byron take a bicycle ride.

Mikael says WHAT'S THE MODAL
SHARE FOR BICYCLE?

Byron says THE MODAL SHARE FOR
CYCLING IN TOKYO IS 14 percent.

Mikael says 14?

Byron says THAT'S A SPECTACULAR NUMBER,
WHEN YOU CONSIDER JUST
THE SHEER NUMBER OF JOURNEYS
BEING MADE BY TRAIN,
CAR AND TAXI.
14 percent OF ALL THOSE JOURNEYS
BEING MADE BY BICYCLE...

Mikael says I MEAN, THAT'S SMASHING.

Byron says IT'S SPECTACULAR. PEOPLE OFTEN
ASK ME WHY IS CYCLING SO POPULAR
IN TOKYO. AND IT'S A DIFFICULT
QUESTION TO ANSWER,
BECAUSE IT'S LIKE
ASKING A FISH:
"WHY DO YOU SWIM?"

They ride on a bicycle lane.

Mikael says THIS IS INFRASTRUCTURE?

Byron says THIS IS AS GOOD AS IT GETS.
FEEL PRIVILEGED.

Mikael says BIKE LANE'S GONE.
HOW MANY KILOMETERS OF
PAINTED LANES DO THEY HAVE?

Byron says THE NUMBER THAT WAS GOING
AROUND TWO OR THREE YEARS
AGO WAS 11 KILOMETERS.

Mikael says WHOA!

Byron says WHICH IS RIDICULOUS.

Mikael says HERE'S A SIGN.

Byron says THIS IS AMAZING BECAUSE
THIS IS ACTUALLY
A SEPARATE INFRASTRUCTURE,
ACCORDING TO
THE JAPANESE STANDARDS.
SO WHAT WE HAVE HERE
IS A HUGE SIDEWALK,
WIDE FOR JAPANESE STANDARDS,
THAT IS BEING SPLIT INTO TWO
WITH DIFFERENT COLORED TILES,
AND A WHITE LINE.
ACTUALLY, IT JUST
DISAPPEARED RIGHT HERE.
IT'LL COME BACK
AGAIN DOWN THERE.

Mikael says AND HERE'S ANOTHER
TOKYO PARADOX:
CYCLING LEVELS IN THE WORLD,
AND YET THE AUTHORITIES
SEEM TO IGNORE
THIS IMPORTANT REALITY.
EVEN WORSE, THEY
OFTEN TEND TO REGARD
BICYCLES AS A NUISANCE TO CAR
TRAFFIC AND PEDESTRIANS.

Byron says I MEAN, WE GOT A HEALTHY
POPULATION THAT ARE
CYCLING TO WORK.
WE'RE REDUCING THE DEPENDENCY
ON THE PUBLIC TRANSPORT SYSTEM.
WE'RE REDUCING THE LOAD
ON THE HEALTH INSURANCE SYSTEM.
AND THE GOVERNMENT GETS ALL
OF THAT FOR FREE BECAUSE
THEY'RE NOT INVESTING
IN CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE.

Mikael says IT'S LIKE THERE ARE
FEWER CYCLISTS NOW.

Byron says YEAH. AS WE GET TOWARDS
THE CENTRE OF THE CITY,
CLOSER TO THE LARGER STATIONS,
YOU WILL FIND THAT YOU GET
A LOT LESS PEOPLE CYCLING.
I MEAN, THE AVERAGE TRIP
DISTANCE BY BICYCLE
IN TOKYO IS ABOUT 2 KILOMETERS,
WHICH REFLECTS PEOPLE CYCLING
AROUND THEIR LOCAL
NEIGHBOURHOOD.
IF SOMEONE HAS TO
COME INTO THE CITY,
THEY'LL TAKE THE TRAIN.
ONE OF THE THINGS THAT
MAKE CYCLING WORK HERE
IS THE CYCLING LAWS.
BASICALLY, THE CYCLING LAWS
IN JAPAN GO COMPLETELY
UNINFORCED,
UNTIL THERE'S AN ACCIDENT.
SO BASICALLY, YOU'RE FREE
TO DO WHATEVER YOU LIKE,
AS LONG AS YOU'RE FINE
AND CONSIDERATE,
AND DON'T CAUSE ANY
HASSLE FOR ANYBODY ELSE.
AND THAT KIND OF LAWLESSNESS,
IF YOU WANT TO CALL IT
THAT, IS ANOTHER THING
THAT MAKES CYCLING WORK
IN TOKYO. I DON'T THINK
I CAN GO OUT AND START TELLING
COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD
TO IMPORT LAWLESSNESS BECAUSE...

Mikael says NO. NO.
DON'T DO THAT.
HOW DO YOU GROW
CYCLING IN TOKYO?

Byron says WE'VE ACTUALLY REACHED
A TIPPING POINT
AT THE MOMENT
IN TOKYO I BELIEVE.
THE 14 percent MODAL SHARE WHICH
WE WERE TALKING ABOUT EARLIER,
AND I THINK WE'VE REACHED
THE POINT WHERE IF WE CONTINUE
TO PILE CYCLISTS
ONTO THE SIDEWALK,
IN AMONGST PEDESTRIANS,
WE'RE ACTUALLY REACHING
A POINT WHERE THE SIDEWALKS
ARE GOING TO GET SATURATED.
SO I THINK FROM HERE ON IN,
WE HAVE TO SERIOUSLY CONSIDER
PROPER CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE,
OTHERWISE, I DON'T THINK
IT'S GOING TO BE VERY EASY
FOR US TO BREAK INTO 17 percent,
18 percent OR 19 percent OF MODAL SHARE.
SO THAT'S ONE OF THE THINGS
WE'D LIKE TO FOCUS ON
AT THE MOMENT.
IT'S ACTUALLY GETTING CYCLING
TAKEN SERIOUSLY BY THE CENTRAL
GOVERNMENT, SAYING: "O.K,
GUYS. WE'VE HAD A GOOD
OPEN DEAL HERE.
YOU'VE HAD A FREE RIDE.
BUT IF YOU REALLY
WANT THIS TO GROW,
THEN YOU'RE GOING TO HAVE
TO START PROVIDING US WITH
SOME PROPER CYCLING
INFRASTRUCTURE."
WHAT WE DID TODAY WAS
A JOURNEY TO THE TRAIN STATION,
WHICH IS A TYPICAL USAGE
OF THE BICYCLE IN TOKYO,
GOING HOME TO THE STATION.

Mikael says A LITTLE TINY NEIGHBOURHOOD.
NARROW STREETS, TO...

Byron says TO THIS.

Mikael says COMMUTER HUB.

Byron says A MASSIVE COMMUTER HUB.

Mikael says ARE WE HERE?

Byron says WE ARE. WE MADE IT.
NOT ONLY IS IT ANY COMMUTER HUB,
BUT IT IS SHINJUKU STATION.
THE BIGGEST STATION
IN THE WORLD.
THE BUSIEST STATION
IN THE WORLD, SHOULD I SAY.

Mikael says THE BUSIEST STATION
IN THE WORLD.

Byron says THE BUSIEST STATION WITH
3,6 MILLION PASSENGERS
PASSING THROUGH HERE
EVERY SINGLE DAY.

Mikael says IT'S LIKE THE WHOLE
POPULATION OF TORONTO
COMING IN AND OUT
OF HERE AND GOING TO WORK.

Byron says EXACTLY, EXACTLY.
TOKYO'S GOT 48 percent MODAL SHARE
AND 3,6 MILLION PEOPLE
GO THROUGH THIS STATION EVERY
DAY. SO 14 percent OF 3,6 MILLION?
HALF A MILLION!
JUST FOR THIS ONE TRAIN STATION,
THERE ARE HALF A MILLION
BICYCLE JOURNEYS BEING
MADE EVERY SINGLE DAY.
SO THE NUMBERS ARE
MIND-BLOWING.

Mikael says IT KILLS ME.

(music plays)

Mikael says ONE THING ABOUT TOKYO
FASCINATES ME,
AND THAT IS THE UNIQUE CULTURE,
DESPITE THOUSANDS
OF YEARS OF HISTORY,
OF IMPERMANENCE
REGARDING STRUCTURES.
THE AVERAGE LIFESPAN OF
A BUILDING IN TOKYO
IS ONLY 26 YEARS.
THEY BUY A BUILDING,
THEY TEAR IT DOWN,
THEY BUILD SOMETHING NEW.
THERE ARE A LOT
OF TRADITIONAL DWELLINGS
FROM THE 1950'S
AND THE 1960'S
THAT SERVE
AN IMPORTANT PURPOSE.
AND WE'RE GOING TO MEET
A MAN WHO'S TRYING
TO PRESERVE THEM AND TRYING
TO CONVERT THEM TO MODERN
USE FOR THE FUTURE
DEVELOPMENT OF THE CITY.
WE DON'T KNOW THESE
NEIGHBOURHOODS.
IT'S REALLY HARD
TO FIND OUR WAY AROUND,
AND IF YOU CAN'T READ
JAPANESE EITHER...
PING-PONG TABLE! THAT'S WHAT
I WAS TOLD TO LOOK FOR,
RIGHT HERE.
HI! HELLO!

Yutaro says HI! NICE TO MEET YOU!

Yutaro is in his twenties, with short straight black hair and wears glasses, black trousers and a white shirt.

Mikael says AND YOU!
PLEASURE. THANK YOU.
HOW OLD IS THIS BUILDING?

Yutaro says IT'S LIKE 56 OR
57 YEARS OLD.
AND IN JAPAN,
THAT'S REALLY OLD.

A caption reads "Yutaro Muraji. Architect."

Mikael says YOUNG ARCHITECTS LIKE
YUTARO ARE ACTIVELY
REINVENTING TOKYO'S
NEIGHBOURHOODS.
YOU SEE, INTENSIVE BOMBING
DURING THE SECOND WORLD WAR
LEFT PARTS OF THE
MEGACITY IN RUINS.
LANDOWNERS REBUILT QUICKLY
AND CHEAPLY IN ORDER TO HOUSE
AN INCREASING
URBAN POPULATION.
AND SO, THE MOKU-CHIN,
THAT MEANS WOODEN
RENTAL, WAS BORN.
TODAY, THE REVITALIZATION
OF THESE GEMS
WHICH WOULD OTHERWISE
BE KNOCKED DOWN
IS ESSENTIAL
TO POST-GROWTH TOKYO.
SO HERE WE HAVE
THIS ONE EXAMPLE.
BUT HOW MANY ARE THERE
AROUND THE CENTRE OF TOKYO?

Yutaro says NEARLY 180,000
MOKU-CHIN APARTMENTS.

Mikael says 180,000?

Yutaro says YEAH, JUST IN TOKYO.
I CAN SHOW YOU
THIS INTERESTING MAP.
SO YOU SEE THIS GREEN
LAND OVER HERE?
THIS IS THE PALACE.

Mikael says THE IMPERIAL PALACE?

Yutaro says YEAH, YEAH.
THIS GREEN LINE IS
THE YAMANOTE LINE.
AND YOU SEE THIS RED AREA
OVER HERE SCATTERED AROUND?
THIS IS MOKUMITSU AREA,
WHICH MEANS WOODEN,
DENSELY BUILT UP AREA,
IT'S THE NATURE AREA.
SO MOKU-CHIN APARTMENTS
ARE ONE OF THE IMPORTANT
TYPOLOGY IN MOKUMITSU AREA.
YOU CAN EASILY FIND,
ON THE STREETS,
MOKU-CHIN EVERYWHERE.

Yutaro leaves the laptop on the ping pong table.

Mikael says YOU'RE JUST GOING TO LEAVE
YOUR LAPTOP ON THE...?

Yutaro says YEAH. IT'S O.K.
IT'S COOL? ALL RIGHT!

Yutaro says IT'S JAPAN!

Mikael says IT'S JAPAN!
SO YOU'RE NOT FROM
THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD?

Yutaro says NO.

A map shows the location of Yutaro’s office in the Kamata District.

Mikael says SO WHY DID YOU MOVE PARTICULARLY
TO THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD?

Yutaro says WE WERE ASKED TO RENOVATE
THIS APARTMENT.
WE MET WITH THE OWNER
AND ACTUALLY,
WHEN WE VISITED
THE BUILDING,
WE THOUGHT THAT
THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
AND THE BUILDING ITSELF
HAD HUGE POTENTIAL.
SO NOW, WE ARE PLANNING
TO RENOVATE THIS BUILDING TOO,
AND MAYBE TURN IT INTO
A RESTAURANT OR A CAFÉ,
AND ALSO A HOSTEL.
AND WE ARE NOW ALSO PLANNING
TO TEAR THIS FENCE DOWN,
AND THEN WE CAN CREATE
NEW CIRCULATION HERE.

Mikael says IT'S NOT JUST THE ONE
HOUSE THAT WE STARTED AT.
IT'S A WHOLE NETWORK
OF BUILDINGS
THAT YOU ARE RENOVATING?

Yutaro says YEAH. IF WE HAVE A CHANCE
TO ACTUALLY MAKE NEW PEOPLE
COME INTO THESE APARTMENTS,
IT WILL BE A GOOD FACTOR
TO GENERATE NEW VALUE.

Mikael says IS THIS SOMETHING THAT REALLY
CAN HAVE AN EFFECT ON ALL
OF THESE NEIGHBOURHOODS?

Yutaro says MANY PEOPLE NOW RECOGNIZE
THE IMPORTANCE
TO REUSE THE EXISTING
OR RESPECT THE EXISTING.
BUT STILL THERE'S ALSO ANOTHER
BIG MONEY DEVELOPMENT MOVEMENT.
SO THERE ARE TWO THINGS
CO-EXISTING IN TOKYO RIGHT NOW.
SO I THINK THE IMPORTANT
THING IS TO EMPOWER THIS NEW
LITTLE MULTIPLE-ACTIVITY
COMMUNITY
THAT IS GOING ON IN TOKYO.
THIS IS ALSO A TYPICAL
MOKU-CHIN APARTMENT HERE.
BUT NOW, I SEE IT'S VACANT.
IT'S ALSO
A MOKU-CHIN APARTMENT.
THAT'S ALSO A
MOKU-CHIN APARTMENT.

Mikael says REUSING THESE OLD HOMES
IS AN EFFICIENT WAY
OF CREATING NEW HOUSING
AND NEW OFFICES.
BUT THIS IS JAPAN,
AND DESIGN OF SPACE HERE
IS VERY IMPORTANT.
YUTARO WANTS TO MAKE
ATTRACTIVE LIVING AND
WORKING ENVIRONMENTS,
STARTING WITH HIS OWN OFFICE.

Yutaro says WE THOUGHT THAT IT WOULD BE
A GOOD CHANCE FOR US TO USE
THIS BUILDING AS AN OFFICE.
ALSO, IT'S A DESIGN EXPERIMENT.
YOU KNOW, RENOVATING
THE HOUSE BY OURSELVES.
COME IN.

They walk in a small building.

Mikael says LIKE THESE ARE THE
EXISTING STRUCTURE.
WE DID NOTHING ON IT.
IT'S A REALLY JAPANESE
TRADITIONAL COLUMN
THAT APPEARS IN TATAMI ROOMS.

He lifts a door on a wooden platform and says THESE ARE...

Mikael helps him with the door.

Yutaro says THANK YOU!

Mikael says OH WOW!
THESE ARE JAPANESE TRADITIONAL

Yutaro says TILES FOR THE BATHROOM.
WE ARE NOW MAKING
A GLASS FLOOR OVER HERE.
THEN WE CAN SEE THIS.

Mikael says AND ENJOY IT.

Yutaro says LET ME SHOW YOU UPSTAIRS.

Mikael says UPSTAIRS!
AND ORIGINAL STAIRS.

Yutaro shows him some models and says YEAH.
SO THESE ARE SOME PROJECTS
THAT WE ARE WORKING ON.

Mikael says SO THIS IS A MOKU-CHIN.

Yutaro says IT'S ONE TYPE OF MOKU-CHIN.

Mikael says YEAH, THAT'S A BIG ONE
COMPARED TO THIS BUILDING.
WHO DESIGNED THEM?
THERE MUST HAVE BEEN SOME KIND
OF ARCHITECTURAL GUIDELINE,
OR WAS IT MORE FREESTYLE?

Yutaro says IT'S REALLY FREESTYLE.
THE INTERESTING PART IS THAT
THE JAPANESE CARPENTERS
HAVE REALLY HIGH SKILLS.
THEY JUST HAVE A SIMPLE PLAN
BY THE CLIENT, AND THEY HAVE
THE SKILLS TO BUILD IT UP
WITHOUT PICTURES.

Mikael says THERE'S A POETIC BEAUTY TO THAT.
ALL OF THESE BUILDINGS THAT
EXIST, THERE ARE NO BLUEPRINTS.
YOU HAVE TO GO BACKWARDS
AND DRAW THAT, RIGHT?
IT'S BEAUTIFUL.

Yutaro says IT'S KIND OF ONE OF
THE BEAUTIES OF TOKYO.
MOST OF THE NEIGHBOURHOODS
ARE BUILT LIKE THAT.

Mikael says THE NATURE OF THE MOKU-CHIN.
I MEAN, IT STARTED.
IT WAS ORGANIC.
AND IF YOU'RE GOING TO
RENOVATE THEM AND REUSE THEM,
YOU NEED STRUCTURE.

Yutaro says WE, OF COURSE, AS ARCHITECTS,
RENOVATE EACH APARTMENT,
BUT WE ALSO HAVE
THIS OPEN SOURCE WEBSITE
TO SPREAD OUR IDEAS
AND TO EMPOWER OWNERS OR
LOCAL REAL ESTATE COMPANIES.
WE HAVE THIS KIND OF NETWORK
TO MAKE MOKU-CHIN APARTMENTS
INTO A MORE VALUABLE
SOCIAL RESOURCE.

He shows Mikael pictures on a laptop and says THIS IS THE EXISTING STRUCTURE,
AND BY USING
THE MOKU-CHIN RECIPE,
PEOPLE CAN CHANGE IT LIKE THIS.
THIS IS THE INTERIOR. THIS IS
ONE OF THE RECIPE TO MAKE
THIS NATURAL WOODEN TEXTURE.
THE IDEA INSIDE THIS PROJECT
CAN ALSO BE USED
IN OTHER PLACES.

Mikael says BUT NOW,
WE'RE PLAYING PING-PONG.

Yutaro says O.K.

Mikael says IT'S ALL REALLY INTERESTING,
BUT THERE'S A PING-PONG
TABLE OUT THERE, ALL RIGHT?

Yutaro says YEAH. LET'S DO THAT.

(music plays)

Mikael says AFTER AN EASY
WIN AT PING-PONG,
AND I DO FEEL TERRIBLE
FOR BEATING YUTARO,
I'M OFF TO ONE OF
THE CITY'S MANY
PUBLIC BATH HOUSES
CALLED SENTOS.
WHAT BRINGS YOU TO THESE
PLACES AGAIN AND AGAIN?

Greg is in his thirties, bald and with a trimmed beard. He wears mustard yellow trousers, a black T-shirt and a black jacket.

Greg says OBVIOUSLY, YES,
I DO HAVE A SHOWER AT HOME
WHICH I USE ON A DAILY BASIS,
BUT WHAT I LOVE ABOUT
BATHS IS NOT ONLY
ARE THEY COMFORTABLE AND
THERE'S WONDERFUL HOT WATER
AND THEY'RE KEPT VERY
CLEAN IN JAPAN,
BUT I FIND THAT THEY'RE
GATHERING PLACES THAT REALLY
BRING THE COMMUNITY TOGETHER.
IT'S AN INTIMATE PUBLIC SPACE.
IT'S A PUBLIC SPACE IN WHICH
THERE'S JUST SORT OF A TACIT
UNDERSTANDING AND CONNECTION
IN EVERY COMMUNITY.

A caption reads "Gregg Dvorak. Author and Historian."

Mikael says GREG DVORAK IS
A PROFESSOR OF HISTORY.
IN THE 25 YEARS
HE'S LIVED IN TOKYO,
HE HAS VISITED HUNDREDS
OF THESE TRADITIONAL SENTOS.

Mikael and Gregg take a bath in a sento.

Mikael says WOULD YOU TALK TO PEOPLE
IN THE SENTO?

Gregg says YEAH. I MEAN, THAT
WOULDN'T BE STRANGE,
AND IT DOES HAPPEN A LOT,
ESPECIALLY WITH OLDER PEOPLE.
THEY PROBABLY WOULDN'T EVEN SEE
EACH OTHER OUTSIDE THE BATH.
IT'S JUST THE PEOPLE YOU
BUMP INTO AT THE BATH.
THERE'S A SENSE
OF ANONYMITY MAYBE,
THAT PEOPLE HAVE
GOING INTO THE BATH.
BUT AT THE SAME TIME, WHEN
YOU LIVE IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD,
YOU KNOW THAT THAT
GUY IS THE POSTMAN
OR THAT PERSON IS A POLICEMAN.
YOU SEE THIS WHOLE
SPECTRUM OF PEOPLE
ALL ACROSS THE SOCIAL
LANDSCAPE,
AND THEY'RE ALL SHARING
THE SAME WATER TOGETHER.
THERE'S THIS EXPRESSION
IN JAPAN WHICH MEANS
"NAKED RELATIONS."
THAT MEANS THAT YOU'RE
FRIENDLY ENOUGH
WITH SOMEONE THAT YOU CAN
GO TO THE BATH WITH THEM.
YOU DON'T HAVE ANY SECRETS.
IT'S KIND OF INTERESTING
THAT YOU CAN GO TO THE BATH
WITH THESE COMPLETE STRANGERS
AND YOU'RE ALSO SHARING
SOME LEVEL OF YOURSELF.
AND JAPANESE PEOPLE FIND THAT,
AND I CERTAINLY DO TOO,
IT'S BECOME PART OF MY LIFE.
IT'S COMFORTING.
IT REMINDS YOU THAT
YOU'RE CONNECTED.
IT'S ALL ABOUT
THE SOCIAL FABRIC.
THERE IS SOMETHING
ABOUT SOCIALIZATION
THAT HAPPENS
IN THE BATH AS WELL.
YOU SEE PARENTS TEACHING
THEIR CHILDREN HOW TO BATHE.
THESE ARE IMPORTANT RITUALS
AND IMPORTANT LIFE PROCESSES.
HOW PEOPLE FORM
A NEIGHBOURHOOD, REALLY.
IT'S JUST SUCH A GIVEN IN JAPAN
THAT PEOPLE DON'T TALK
ABOUT IT THAT MUCH.
THEY JUST KNOW.

Mikael says IT'S SOCIAL COHESION.

Gregg says YEAH. ABSOLUTELY.
THEY'RE A CORE.
THEY'RE A BIG PIECE
OF WHAT IT IS TO BE JAPANESE
AND WHAT IT IS
TO LIVE IN JAPAN,
WHAT IT IS TO PARTICIPATE
IN THIS PLACE.
WHAT IT IS TO PARTICIPATE
IN THE CITY FOR SURE,
ESPECIALLY IN TOKYO.

(music plays)

Mikael says NEIGHBOURHOOD SENTOS
HAVE BEEN AT THE HEART
OF SOCIETY FOR AGES.
BUT AS THEY DISAPPEAR,
AND THEY ARE, A SENSE
OF COMMUNITY IS FADING AWAY.
THE NEED FOR A NEW
CITIZEN-ORIENTED CHAPTER
IN TOKYO'S DEVELOPMENT
IS GREATER THAN EVER.
SO I CONTINUE ON MY QUEST AND
I FIND PEOPLE WHO ARE NOW
SHARING MUCH MORE THAN IDEAS.
THEY'RE SHARING BIKES,

Mikael enters a house and says "Hello."

He looks at a room full of bookshelves filled with books and says LOOK AT ALL THE BOOKS!
THEY'RE FROM EVERYWHERE.
NOT JUST JAPANESE BOOKS,
BUT FROM EVERYWHERE.

A caption reads "Atsushi Miura. Author."

Atsushi is in his late fifties, with short wavy graying hair and a beard. He wears jeans, a gray jacket and a coral scarf.

Mikael says ATSUSHI MIURA IS THE AUTHOR
OF
THE RISE OF SHARING,
A BOOK ABOUT THE EMERGENCE
BUT HE'S NOT JUST A WRITER.
HE ALSO ACTIVELY PARTICIPATES
IN THE TREND AND
HE'S BEEN SHARING
HIS MASSIVE AND IMPRESSIVE
BOOK COLLECTION
WITH CAFÉS ALL OVER
HIS NEIGHBOURHOOD.

A map shows the location of Nishiogikita District.

Mikael says TODAY, ALONG WITH AN
ARCHITECT-SLASH-CAFÉ OWNER,
WE'RE CHOOSING A FEW
MORE BOOKS TO SHARE.
THE SHARED ECONOMY.
HOW DID IT BECOME
SO IMPORTANT IN TOKYO?

Atsushi says "Tokyo is a major consumer capital. But residents are tired of overconsumption. People are seeking more enjoyable activities. Sharing is enjoyable. And also..."

Mikael says IT'S FINISHED?
ARE WE DONE CONSUMING?

Atsushi says FINISHING.

Mikael says FINISHING.
O.K. THERE YOU GO.
THIS IS YOUR COFFEE SHOP?

Ko says YES. AND MY OFFICE ALSO.

Mikael says AND YOUR OFFICE.
BUT YOU SUBLET.

A caption reads "Ko Iwana. Architect and Café Owner."

Ko is in his forties, with short black hair and a goatee. He wears beige trousers, a white T-shirt and a blue jacket.

Ko says YEAH. RIGHT NOW,
I DON'T DO LUNCHES,
SO I'M RENTING TO A LADY
WHO WANTED TO DO LUNCHES.

Mikael says SO SHE JUST COMES IN EVERY
DAY AND DOES LUNCH.

Ko says YEAH. I'M DOING THE COFFEE,
BUT I'M AN ARCHITECT.
MY MAIN WORK IS ARCHITECT.

Mikael says SO YOU'RE WORKING THROUGH
THE DAY, AND THEY TAKE OVER.
O.K. I LOVE THAT.
WE GO UP?

Inside the café, Atsushi says "When I first came to this cafe, I decided to put some of my books here."

Mikael says WHERE DO WE PUT THE BOOKS?
DOWN THERE, ON THE EMPTY SHELF?
HEY. THE SHARED
ECONOMY DOESN'T
JUST MAKE SENSE FINANCIALLY.
IT'S ALSO AN ESSENTIAL WAY TO
PULL PEOPLE OUT OF SOLITUDE.
IN 2012, THE AVERAGE
NUMBER OF PEOPLE
PER HOUSEHOLD DROPPED
TO LESS THAN TWO
FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY.
TOKYOITES LIVING ALONE
NOW REPRESENT THE MAJORITY.
IT GOES WITHOUT SAYING
THAT BUILDING A CLOSE-KNIT
COMMUNITY IS
OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE.

Mikael says IT'S A COMMUNITY KITCHEN
AND I'M GOING
TO HELP MAKE LUNCH.

Sachiko says "Yes, thank you."

Sachiko is in her fifties, with chin length straight brown hair. She wears jeans, a striped T-shirt and a blue apron.

A caption reads "Sachiko Takenouchi. Community Kitchen Organizer."

Mikael says WHEN HER CHILDREN
MOVED OUT
TWO YEARS AGO, SHE WAS
LEFT WITH AN EMPTY HOUSE.
SO SHE DECIDED
TO OPEN HER KITCHEN
TO HER LOCAL COMMUNITY,
INVITING STRANGERS IN TO COOK
WITH HER AND TO SHARE A MEAL.
THEY'RE NOT STRANGERS ANYMORE.

Mikael says WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR YOU
TO INVITE STRANGERS INTO
YOUR HOME TO SHARE FOOD?

Sachiko says "I hadn’t really interacted with my neighbours. So I took it upon myself to find a way to change that. I thought we should have a place where people in the neighbourhood could get together."

Mikael says FOR A SMALL FEE OF 1,000 YEN,
THAT'S ABOUT 10 BUCKS,
MEMBERS GET A KEY
TO THE BUILDING
AND CAN USE THE KITCHEN
AS THEY PLEASE.
THEY CAN COME ALONE
AND MEET PEOPLE HERE,
OR THEY CAN CREATE
THEIR OWN EVENTS
AND INVITE PEOPLE ONLINE.

Mikael says CAN YOU SEE THAT THIS HAS
A POSITIVE EFFECT
ON THE COMMUNITY?

Sachiko says "We were about 20 people at first, usually always the same people. Now there are 100 people altogether, so it varies. They cook together, or by themselves."

Mikael says THE MAIN IDEA IS THE FOOD
BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER?

Sachiko says "Food is important to everyone. People want to eat well. And they get to interact as they eat. They also get to communicate by cooking together."

Mikael says DO YOU WANT TO HELP?
THERE YOU GO.
THIS IS THE MAN, O.K.

Atsushi says "Thank you."

At the table, Mikael says LUNCHTIME IN TOKYO!
WHAT IS THE WORD FOR THIS?

Atsushi says "Kombini."

Mikael says CAN YOU EXPLAIN THIS WORD?

Atsushi says "Families used to have fun eating their meals together. Neighbours now get together to recreate the ritual of cooking and eating together. These kind of community activities
will be increasingly popular in Japan. They’re convenient for the neighbourhood, just like convenience stores are. They are "community conveniences."

Mikael says THIS IS A MOVEMENT.
THIS IS A TREND.
BUT HOW LONG IS THIS GOING TO
TAKE TO BECOME THE MAINSTREAM?

Atsushi says "It’s a very gradual trend at the moment. Maybe 30 years? It will happen by the time the younger people here, like the lady running the place, reach old age."

(music plays)

Now Mikael takes a walk with Kyoichi.

Kyoichi is in his fifties, balding and with a shadow of a beard, and he wears jeans and a blue sweatshirt.

Kyoichi says "It’s full all the time, it’s amazing."

Mikael says BUT THIS IS
A LIFE-SIZED STREET, RIGHT?

Kyoichi says "Yes, yes, yes."

Mikael says PEOPLE INTERACTING.
THERE ARE BIKES GOING THROUGH.

Kyoichi says "Yes. Right, right. If you drive a car here, you can’t honk. People will get really angry at you if you do. It’s a nice time to start drinking now."

A caption reads "Kyoichi Tsuzuki. Journalist, Curator and Photographer."

Mikael says IN THE MIND
OF KYOICHI TSUZUKI,
TOKYO HAS ALWAYS
EXISTED THROUGH
ITS SECRETLY SMALL
POSSIBILITIES.
HE SEES THE CITY AS
A CLUSTER OF TINY VILLAGES,
AND HE SHOWS ME THAT EVEN
IN THE BUSIEST PARTS OF TOKYO,
YOU CAN ALWAYS FIND A QUIET BAR
AND AN INTIMATE CONVERSATION.

A map shows the location of the Asakusa District.

Kyoichi says "It’s a nice feeling. It’s a really cozy neighbourhood."

Mikael says THIS IS COOL!
LOOK AT THIS BAR.
THIS IS AWESOME.

They sit at a bar and order pints.

Mikael says WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES
TOWARDS THE FUTURE?

Kyoichi says "Some people worry that Tokyo will totally change because of construction, demolition, and everything. Actually, I don’t think so because there’s no way it can change so much. There are so many small buildings and small houses. It’s not China, you can’t just move everything out to make something new."

Mikael says THE TRADITION OF SMALL
SPACES IN TOKYO IS UNIQUE.
THAT'S SOMETHING THAT'S HARD
TO TRANSFER TO NORTH AMERICA.

Kyoichi says "We don’t need that much space for basic living, you know? Four and a half tatamis is the basic room size of Japanese houses."

Mikael says THE TRADITIONAL WAY
OF MEASURING SPACE IN JAPAN
IS BY COUNTING THE NUMBER
OF TRADITIONAL FLOOR MATS
CALLED TATAMIS THAT FIT IN
A ROOM. A STANDARD ROOM
IS 6 TO 8 TATAMIS.
A SMALL ROOM IS 4,5.
THAT'S ABOUT 9 SQUARE METERS.
AND THAT'S WHAT
I CALL COMPACT LIVING.

Kyoichi says "A famous Zen saying is that you only need a half-tatami to meditate and one tatami for sleep. Larger than that would just be a luxury..."

Mikael says LUXURY. O.K.

Kyoichi says ."or vanity. ."

(music plays)

Mikael says THE JAPANESE HAVE BORROWED
THE ENGLISH WORD "DEEP."
TO DESCRIBE THE HIDDEN
CORNERS OF THEIR CITY.
THAT BAR WITH FOUR
OR FIVE SEATS.
A HANDFUL OF PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT.

Kyoichi says "Here is a place. Go ahead, after you."

Mikael says O.K. THAT'S SMALL.

Kyoichi says "Have a seat."

They buy beers.

Mikael says THIS IS JUST A LIVING
ROOM THAT SELLS BEER.
IT'S NOT EVEN A BAR
IN THAT SENSE.

Kyoichi says "It’s likely smaller than your living room."

Mikael says IS THAT YOUR TOKYO?
VERY SMALL AND COZY?

Kyoichi says "Yes, because the size creates cosiness, in a way. You know everyone. You know the owner and what you’re going to eat. They know you and it’s like an extension of your family. So that creates cosiness and it’s pretty much a Japanese attitude, in a way. We prefer small places."

(music plays)

Mikael says STANDING HERE
WAITING FOR A MAN
TO TAKE ME TO HIS
"DEEP" TATTOO PARLOR.

A man with his face blurred says HEY!
WE'RE GOING TO GO TO MY PLACE.

Mikael says YEAH.
TATTOOS...
THERE'S A BIT OF A STIGMA
ATTACHED TO THEM HERE IN JAPAN.
THEY'RE ASSOCIATED
WITH THE JAPANESE MAFIA,
THE YAKUZA.

The man says WE CAN TURN RIGHT.

Mikael says WE HAVE TO GO QUICK,
HE SAYS. ALL RIGHT.

The man says JUST A MOMENT.
WAIT?
ALL RIGHT. COME IN!

Mikael takes his shows off.

The man says YOU CAN USE THE SLIPPERS.

Mikael says SLIPPERS?
YEAH.

The artist starts working on Mikael’s tattoo.

Mikael says OUT OF ALL THE AMAZING THINGS
I'VE EXPERIENCED THIS WEEK,
I'VE DECIDED THAT
THE MOKUMITSU,
THE NEIGHBOURHOODS
THAT WERE HASTILY ERECTED
AFTER THE SECOND WORLD WAR,
THAT'S WHAT I'M GOING
TO GET TATTOOED HERE.
I REALIZE THAT THE TOKYO THAT
CAPTURED MY IMAGINATION,
THAT THRILLED ME AND FASCINATED
ME FOR SO MANY YEARS
IS A FABRICATED REALITY.
I'VE REALIZED THAT THE STAGE
OF THE URBAN THEATRE IS NOT
TO BE FOUND IN
A PLACE LIKE SHIBUYA
WITH ALL THE GLAM AND
THE NEON, AS CRAZY AS THAT IS.
DAILY LIFE IS PLAYED OUT IN
THE VAST INTRICATE LABYRINTHS
OF THE NEIGHBOURHOODS.
I'VE REALIZED THAT TOKYO
IS AN EPIC, AND INCREDIBLY
FRAGILE ARTISTIC MASTERPIECE.
WE CAN STAND BACK AND
REGARD IT AND BE IN AWE
OF IT, BUT IT'S REALLY
ONLY WHEN YOU MOVE CLOSER
AND STUDY THE DETAILS AND SEE
THE MILLIONS AND MILLIONS
OF TINY BRUSH STROKES THAT MAKE
UP THE WORK THAT YOU UNDERSTAND
WHY AND HOW THIS IS AN
AMAZING LIFE-SIZED CITY.

He checks on his tattoo on a mirror and says ALL OF THAT, THAT'S A CITY
THAT I WANT TO LIVE IN.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Hosted by Mikael Colville-Andersen.

Directed by Myriam Berthelet, Nicolas Boucher and Michel D.T. Lam.

Series director, Michel. D. T. Lam.

Producer, Nicolas Boucher.

Produced in association with TVO.

Executive producers, Jane Jankovic and Natasha Negrea.

Logo: DBC2.

Copyright 2017.

Watch: Ep. 6 - Tokyo