Transcript: Ep. 5 - Tel-Aviv | Oct 08, 2017

A logo on a black background fades in and reads: "TVO Originals".

A map of Europe appears over an aerial view of the city of Tel Aviv.

A caption reads "Tel Aviv, Israel."

Mikael is in his fifties, with short wavy gray hair and he wears jeans and a white shirt.

Fast clips show images of the streets of Tel Aviv.

Mikael says IS EVERYTHING I'VE HEARD
ABOUT THIS PLACE REALLY TRUE?
IS IT A LITTLE ARCHITECTURAL
WONDERLAND?
IS IT THE THROBBING, PULSING
MIAMI OF THE MEDITERRANEAN?
CAN IT REALLY BE ONE OF THE
WORLD'S GREAT LGBT CAPITALS,
HERE IN A REGION PLAGUED
BY VIOLENCE
AND LIVING UNDER A CONSTANT
THREAT OF WAR?
I'M IN TEL AVIV.
BUT I AM ALSO IN A CITY
THAT I'VE HEARD
WILL SURPRISE ME.
FOR MORE THAN 70 YEARS
AT LEAST,
THE NEWS COMING OUT
OF THIS REGION
HAS BEEN OVERWHELMINGLY
NEGATIVE.
I AM GOING TO LOOK PAST
THE PROPAGANDA
AND THE FANCY CITY BRANDING.
AND I'M GOING TO MEET
PASSIONATE LOCALS
WHO WILL EXPLAIN TO ME
IN NO UNCERTAIN TERMS
THEIR URBAN REALITY.

In animation, Mikael’s body gets covered in maps and city models. He extends his hand and a miniature model of a city appears on his palm.

The title of the show reads "The Life-Sized City with Mikael Colville-Andersen."

(music plays)

Clips show images of Tel Aviv. An animated map appears with the caption "Tel Aviv."

Mikael says TEL AVIV. THIS IS A TOUGH ONE.
SUMMING UP THE BASICS
WOULD TAKE THE ENTIRE SHOW.
SO HERE'S THE CONDENSED VERSION
OF WHAT SETS THIS CITY APART,
AND WHAT MAKES THIS PLACE
SO COMPELLING.
IT WAS FOUNDED IN 1909
BY JEWISH SETTLERS,
JUST NORTH OF THE 4,000-YEAR-OLD
PALESTINIAN CITY OF JAFFA.
AT THE TIME, HOWEVER, TEL AVIV
WASN'T MUCH TO WRITE HOME ABOUT.
FAST-FORWARD TO 1948.
THE CREATION OF THE NEW
STATE OF ISRAEL
TRIGGERED A MASSIVE EXODUS
OF THE ARAB POPULATION.
AND, IN 1950,
JAFFA WAS ANNEXED
TO TEL AVIV.

Clips in black and white show images of settlers arriving and armed people on the streets.

Mikael says THE NEWCOMER GREW EXPONENTIALLY
WITH THE RISE OF THE NEW NATION,
AND THINGS CHANGED RADICALLY
FOR THE TWO CITIES
FORCED TO MERGE INTO ONE.
THE PLACE QUICKLY BECAME
THE EPICENTRE OF A MAJOR
POLITICAL AND CULTURAL DIVIDE.
TODAY, TEL AVIV'S REPUTATION
AS A LAID-BACK
AND LIBERAL PARTY CENTRAL
IN A HOTBED OF CONFLICT
SEEMS SURREAL.
BEHIND THE OPEN-MINDEDNESS
LIES A COMPLEX HISTORY
THAT STILL SHAPES
EVERYDAY LIFE.
AND BECAUSE OF THIS,
VERY FEW MODERN CITIES
EVOKE DIVISION AS MUCH
AS TEL AVIV DOES.
WHICH BEGS THE QUESTION:
HOW CAN TEL AVIVIANS NAVIGATE
THE HARDSHIPS THAT DEFINE
THEIR CITY?
WHERE AND HOW CAN THEY
MAKE IT LIFE-SIZED?
DARING PEOPLE FROM BOTH SIDES
OF THE DIVIDE
ARE TRYING TO ANSWER
THESE QUESTIONS
WITH CREATIVITY
AND BOLDNESS.
TOGETHER.

Mikael sits at a café with a Omer Krieger.

Omer is in his forties, clean-shaven and with very short white hair. He wears jeans and a blue shirt.

He says THERE IS THIS DASH
BETWEEN TEL AVIV AND JAFFA.
THIS DASH IS ALSO
A QUESTION MARK.
SO DO WE WANT TO MAINTAIN
THIS KIND OF DUALITY,
THESE TWO PLACES,
THESE TWO CITIES?
OR DO WE WANT TO UNITE AND SORT
OF CREATE THE SHARED CULTURE
FOR JEWS AND ARABS,
YOU KNOW?

A caption reads "Omer Krieger. Artist."

Mikael says THAT IS EXACTLY WHAT
OMER KRIEGER HOPES TO ACHIEVE
THROUGH HIS POLITICALLY ENGAGED
PERFORMANCES
AND IN HIS PERSONAL LIFE.
HE WAS BORN IN THE AFFLUENT
AND PREDOMINANTLY JEWISH
NORTH TEL AVIV.
BUT HE MOVED TO JAFFA,
WHERE THERE ARE MORE MOSQUES
THAN SYNAGOGUES.

A pop-up map shows the location of Jaffa and North Tel Aviv.

Omer says SO WE'RE NOT JUST THIS
KIND OF EUROPEAN ISLAND
THAT'S REALLY TOLERANT,
AND MODERNIST ARCHITECTURE.
YOU KNOW, IT'S ALL THIS KIND
OF NARRATIVE.
BUT SOMETHING RICHER.
THIS IS THE PLACE WHERE PEOPLE
FROM ALL AROUND THE COUNTRY COME
TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES,
TO BE FREE,
TO BE WHO THEY ARE,
YOU KNOW?
IT'S THE LARGEST CITY
IN ISRAEL.

Mikael says AND WE'RE AT THE GAY COMMUNITY
CENTRE HERE IN TEL AVIV.
HOW MUCH OF THIS
ENTHUSIASTIC EMBRACING
OF LGBT CULTURE IS REAL?
IS THERE A LOT
OF PINKWASHING,
OR IS IT ALSO AN AUTHENTIC PART
OF TEL AVIV'S CULTURE?

Omer says YOU KNOW, TEL AVIV AND ISRAEL,
THEY LIKE TO SHOW THEMSELVES
AS TOLERANT PLACES,
WHICH THEY MAY BE, YOU KNOW?
AND THEY ARE.
I THINK IT IS OVERLOOKING
SOME ASPECTS
THAT ARE MORE RESTRICTIVE
AND REGRESSIVE.
THE OCCUPATION OF PALESTINE,
SO THERE ARE MILLIONS OF PEOPLE
LIVING UNDER THE ISRAEL REGIME
WITH TWO PARALLEL LEGAL SYSTEMS,
YOU KNOW?
AND MILITARY PRESENCE
ON THEIR STREETS.

A pop-up map with the title "Palestinian Territories" shows the location of Tel Aviv, West Bank and Gaza.

Omer says THAT'S, YOU KNOW,
THE HORRIBLE REALITY
WE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR,
AS ISRAELI CITIZENS.
AND IN TEL AVIV,
FROM TIME TO TIME
YOU SEE THOSE HELICOPTERS
GOING DOWN TO GAZA,
YOU KNOW, ON THE COAST.
AND THIS IS BUBBLING, YOU KNOW?
THIS IS UNDERNEATH.
SO THIS IS KIND OF
A SOURCE OF TENSION.
THE THING KEEPS-- YOU KNOW,
THE INSTRUMENT'S TUNED
AND KEEPS PEOPLE
KIND OF ALERT.
THE POSSIBILITY
OF BEING DEAD, YOU KNOW,
ALSO PART OF THE STORY
OF THIS PLACE,
WHICH CAN BE VERY SUNNY
AND BEAUTIFUL,
YOUNG, (UNCLEAR).
THIS IS ANOTHER ASPECT
WHICH IS KIND OF, I THINK,
RADICALIZING THE CULTURE,
AND MAKING PEOPLE, LIKE,
PARTY EVEN HARDER.
HERE, THERE'S A SENSE
OF URGENCY, I THINK,
THAT PEOPLE FEEL.
AND IN ORDER TO STAY HERE,
YOU DO HAVE TO CHOOSE.

Mikael says IS TEL AVIV ALSO A LIGHTHOUSE,
A BEACON OF HOPE
FOR THE COUNTRY
AND THE REGION?

Omer says YEAH, AS A KIND OF MAYBE
POTENTIAL SYMBOL
FOR WHAT IT COULD BE.
CONNECTING, YOU KNOW,
EAST AND WEST,
ARAB AND EUROPEAN CULTURES.
I WOULD SAY BEING MORE INVITING,
YOU KNOW,
TO MIGRANTS,
TO MINORITIES,
TO PEOPLE WHO DON'T
FIND THEMSELVES ELSEWHERE.
RATHER THAN BECOMING
THIS FORTRESS,
I'D LIKE TO SEE A PLACE
MORE INCLUSIVE.
YEAH, A LIGHTHOUSE.
YOU KNOW, INVITING THE SHIPS
FROM THE STORMY SEA
TO THE SHORE.

(music plays)

A pop-up map shows the location of "Neve Sha’anan."

Mikael says I SET OFF FOR THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
OF NEVE SHA'ANAN,
FAR FROM THE BEACHES
AND THE GLASS TOWERS.
FUELLED BY AN INFLUX
OF AFRICANS FLEEING PERSECUTION
IN SUDAN AND ERITREA,
THE PLACE HAS RECENTLY UNDERGONE
A MASSIVE POPULATION BOOM.
NEVE SHA'ANAN IS NOW BURSTING
AT THE SEAMS.
THE PEOPLE HERE ARE POOR,
THAT'S FOR SURE.
BUT THIS IS WHERE TEL AVIV
IS REWRITING ITS HISTORY,
SEARCHING FOR CHANGE IN THE WAY
CITIZENS COME TOGETHER.

Mikael takes a walk on the neighbourhood with Robert.

Robert is in his thirties, with short brown hair and a beard. He wears jeans and a blue T-shirt.

Mikael says THE OFFICIAL POPULATION OF THIS
NEIGHBOURHOOD IS, WHAT, 5,000?

Robert says ON PAPER IT'S EVEN LESS
THAN 5,000.

Mikael says REALLY?

Robert says BUT ACTUALLY,
THERE'S ABOUT 40-,
45,000 PEOPLE LIVING HERE.

Mikael says WOW.

Robert says IN TINY, DIVIDED APARTMENTS.
TEN, FIFTEEN PEOPLE
JUST SHARING A ROOM.
AND THE LANDLORDS TAKE
BY THE BED.
SO IT'S ACTUALLY-- THE MOST
EXPENSIVE APARTMENTS IN TEL AVIV
ARE IN THIS RUN-DOWN AREA.

Mikael says JUST, LIKE, LOOK AT
A BUILDING LIKE THAT
AND YOU PROBABLY HAD, LIKE,
YOU KNOW,
10 PEOPLE LIVING IN THOSE SMALL
ROOMS UP THERE.

Robert says YEAH.

A caption reads "Robert Ungar. Architect and Co-founder of Onya Collective."

Mikael says ROBERT UNGAR,
ARCHITECT AND DESIGNER,
CO-FOUNDED THE ONYA COLLECTIVE.
THEY FOCUS ON WHAT IS CALLED
SOCIAL ARCHITECTURE.
ITS VOLUNTEERS TRIGGER SMALL
BUT INNOVATIVE PROJECTS
AS TOOLS TO IMPROVE THE EXISTING
URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE.
THEY'VE BEEN INVOLVED HERE
IN NEVE SHA'ANAN FOR YEARS.
SO, ROBERT, WHEN WE WERE DRIVING
HERE FROM DOWNTOWN TEL AVIV
AND TOOK A COUPLE OF TURNS
AND, WHAM.
REALLY, THE WHOLE SCENE
CHANGED FOR US.
I MEAN, THEY CALL THIS AREA
LITTLE AFRICA, AM I RIGHT?

A map pops up with the caption "Derech Menachem. Begin street."

Robert says LITTLE ERITREA.
SO THE BORDER YOU CROSSED
IS BEGIN STREET,
AND ACTUALLY A LINE,
A BIG ROAD THAT CROSSES BETWEEN
THE NORTH AND THE SOUTH.
AND ONCE YOU CROSS IT,
YOU REACH
THE ILLEGITIMATE AREA,
OR THE NEVE SHA'ANAN
NEIGHBOURHOOD.
IT'S JUST SOCIAL LINE,
ECONOMICAL LINE.
THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD HAS ALWAYS
BEEN THE BACKYARD OF TEL AVIV.
AND IN THE LAST 10 YEARS,
THESE PEOPLE COMING FROM
MOSTLY SUDAN AND ERITREA.
SO THESE PEOPLE CAME WALKING.
AROUND 60,000 PEOPLE ARRIVED.
ONLY THREE PEOPLE
GOT REFUGEE STATUS.

Mikael says THREE OUT OF 60,000?

Robert says YES.
AND THE REST ARE LIVING HERE.
THEY CAN WORK.
BUT THEY DON'T GET
ANY CIVIL RIGHTS.
THEY'RE NOT CONSIDERED
RESIDENTS.
THEY'RE NOT WRITTEN ANYWHERE.
SO THEY'RE CALLED OFFICIALLY,
BY GOVERNMENT PAPERS,
"THE INFILTRATORS,"
BECAUSE THEY INFILTRATED
THE BORDER ILLEGALLY.

Mikael says THAT'S NOT A NICE WORD.

Robert says AND...NO.

Mikael says OH, MAN.

Robert says AND THAT'S THE OFFICIAL NAME.
IT'S CONSIDERED
ONE OF THE MOST
DANGEROUS NEIGHBOURHOODS
IN ISRAEL.
PEOPLE ACTUALLY DON'T
COME CLOSE TO HERE.
WOMEN DON'T WALK ALONE
AT NIGHT.
BUT BASICALLY IT'S MOSTLY
A LOT OF FEAR FROM THE OTHER.

Mikael says DOES THE CITY HERE
WANT TO HAVE A SOLUTION
TO THIS PROBLEM,
AND THE STATE
IS STOPPING THAT?
OR ARE THEY ALL JUST
PUTTING THEIR HEADS IN THE SAND?

Robert says YEAH, SO LET'S PUT
SOME ORDER IN THIS.
THE STATE BASICALLY
IS IGNORING,
AND DOESN'T LOOK INTO
THESE SITUATIONS.
AND THE CITY IS NOT REALLY
DOING ANYTHING CLEAR.
THE MAYOR ALWAYS SAYS,
"IT'S NOT MY PROBLEM.
IT'S THE STATE'S PROBLEM."
UNDER THE RADAR, HE DOES HAVE
SOME INITIATIVES TO HELP.
IT'S UNFORTUNATELY VERY LITTLE
WHAT THE NEEDS ARE.
BECAUSE IT'S LESS THAN 5,000,
THERE IS NO HEALTH CLINIC.
THERE IS NO COMMUNITY CENTRE.
THERE'S NO PLACE FOR THE ELDERS.
IT'S VERY, VERY DENSE.
AND THE INFRASTRUCTURE
OBVIOUSLY CAN'T TAKE IT.
OTHER PLACES IN TEL AVIV,
YOU WON'T SEE
HUGE AMOUNTS OF GARBAGE,
RATS, COCKROACHES.
YOU KNOW, GAS BALLOONS
ON WINDOWS.
IT'S EVEN DANGEROUS.
THERE IS NO SAFETY REGULATION.
THEY JUST DO BASICALLY
WHAT THEY WANT.

Mikael says FREESTYLE.

Robert says YEAH.

Mikael says WE'RE WALKING DOWN THIS...
IT FEELS LIKE
THE MAIN STREET.
I MEAN, IT'S AMAZING
LIFE AND EVERYTHING.

Robert says IT'S ACTUALLY, I THINK, ONE OF
THE MOST LIVELY, HAPPY STREETS.
I MEAN, EVERYONE'S HERE.

Mikael says YEAH.

Robert says EVERYONE EXCEPT
MAINSTREAM ISRAELIS.

Mikael says OKAY, WAIT.
THAT IS A MONSTER BUILDING.

A caption reads "New Central Bus Station."

Robert says THAT'S THE CENTRAL BUS STATION.
THIS IS JUST A TINY
LITTLE PART OF IT
IT ACTUALLY GOES
FOUR BLOCKS.

Mikael says SECOND-LARGEST BUS STATION
IN THE WORLD AFTER MUMBAI.

A model of the bus station appears with a caption that reads "New Central Bus Station. 230,000 square metres. 8 floors. 8 kilometres access ramps."

Robert says IT WAS BUILT FOR HALF A MILLION
PEOPLE A DAY.
IT'S ALMOST SEVEN TIMES LARGER
THAN WHAT'S ACTUALLY NEEDED.

Mikael says THE NEW CENTRAL BUS STATION,
WHICH IS NEITHER NEW
NOR CENTRAL,
WAS BUILT IN THE EARLY '90S.
THE 230,000-SQUARE-METRE
BUS TERMINAL WAS EARMARKED
AS A COMMERCIAL HUB.
BUT BAD DESIGN AND BAD PLANNING
HAVE LEFT THE STATION
IN AN EMPTY,
RUN-DOWN STATE.
A MONUMENTAL WASTE OF SPACE
IN AN AREA WITH
SO LITTLE TO SPARE.
SO ROBERT AND FRIENDS
DECIDED TO START RIGHT HERE,
IN AN ABANDONED ENTRANCE
TO THE UNDERUSED BUS STATION.

A down pointing arrow pops up with the caption "Former Entrance."

Mikael says TURNING AN URBAN DEVELOPMENT
FAILURE
INTO SOMETHING USEFUL
FOR THE COMMUNITY.
URBAN CHAOS,
ARCHITECTURAL MONSTROSITY.
AND YOU GUYS ARE KIND OF
THE LINK BETWEEN THE TWO.

Robert says SO I THINK THIS IS WHY
WE ALSO CHOSE TO TAKE THIS SPOT,
BECAUSE FIRST OF ALL
IT'S CONNECTING TO THE STREETS.
AND I THINK ONE OF THE MAIN
CRIMES OF THIS BUILDING
IS THAT IT JUST TOTALLY
DISCONNECTED
THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
FROM ITSELF.
IT WAS FULL OF GARBAGE.
IT WAS ACTUALLY FULL
OF ALMOST TWO METRES OF GARBAGE.

Mikael says REALLY?

Robert says HOMELESS PEOPLE SLEPT HERE.
THERE WAS A HEROIN STATION HERE.
THIS IS MEL.

Mikael says HELLO.

Robert says SHE'S THE WORK MANAGER
FOR THE PLANTERS.
WE HAVE A POMEGRANATE TREE
TO PLANT.

Mel is in her twenties, with brown hair with highlights in an afro and she wears a gray T-shirt and beige trousers.

Mikael says SO WHERE DO YOU AND IT EXACTLY?

Mel says RIGHT THERE.

Mikael plants the tree in a wooden planter.

Mikael says ALL RIGHT.
MIKAEL
FOR THE DREAM BOYS,
A HIP-HOP BAND FROM SUDAN
NOW TRYING TO MAKE
TEL AVIV THEIR HOME,
THE STATION IS ON ITS WAY
TO BECOMING A CREATIVE SPACE
USED FOR REHEARSING
AND RECORDING MUSIC.
HEY, I'M MIKAEL.

A member of the group says HEY, HOW ARE YOU?

The man says GOOD, HEY.
GLAD TO SEE YOU.
(LAUGHING)

A caption reads "Hassan Abdula Adam. Dream Boyz."

Hassan is in his early thirties, with long braided brown hair and a stubble. HE wears a blue T-shirt and sunglasses over his head.

He says "Soon, our new song will be created."

Mikael says AWESOME. KIND OF WILD, HUH?
IN A BUS STATION,
YOU'RE JUST CREATING
A STUDIO.
SO THAT'S BADASS.

Hassan says "Why not? It’s great."

Mikael says IT'S GOING TO BE
THIS ENTIRE SPACE HERE?

A woman says YEAH, THEY'RE GOING TO PUT
ANOTHER WALL THERE.

Mikael says RIGHT HERE? OKAY.

The woman says ALL THE WAY THROUGH THE BACK.

Mikael says USING THE RESOURCES
TO THEIR FULLEST,
THIS SOUND STUDIO WILL DOUBLE
AS AN INTERNET-TV NEWSROOM,
BROADCASTING FOR BOTH THE
SUDANESE COMMUNITY IN ISRAEL,
AND THOSE WHO STAYED BEHIND.

Another man says "We have no official status in Israel, so we’re going to speak in Hebrew to reflect the local problems. To raise awareness about what’s happening to us."

Mikael says PROJECTS LIKE THIS ARE
INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT
IN CITIES ALL OVER
THE WORLD.
40,000 LIVES INSIST
ON BEING LIVED HERE.
IT'S ONLY WITH
DIGNITY AND RESPECT
THAT THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD
WILL REALLY REACH
ITS TRUE LIFE-SIZED POTENTIAL
AND BECOME BEAUTIFUL.
IT IS WILD TO SEE HOW EVERYTHING
IN TEL AVIV
REVOLVES AROUND CHALLENGES
OF CO-EXISTENCE.
CO-EXISTENCE OF PEOPLE,
OF NEIGHBOURHOODS,
OF RELIGIONS AND BELIEFS,
OF OLD AND NEW.
MAN, EVEN THE ARCHITECTURE
DOESN'T SEEM TO EVOLVE
IN ANY KIND OF HARMONY.

Mikael points at a very old building standing next to a very futuristic one and says THIS IS LIKE A MARRIAGE THAT
SHOULD NEVER HAPPEN, YOU KNOW?
THIS IS-- THEY SHOULD NOT
GET TOGETHER.

Gilly says WELL, WELCOME
TO THE MIDDLE EAST.
(MIKAEL LAUGHING)

A caption reads "Gilly Karjevsky. Urban Project Curator."

Gilly is in her thirties, with wavy brown hair in a low ponytail and wears a print burgundy dress.

Mikael says GILLY KARJEVSKY IS CONCERNED
WITH TEL AVIV'S CHALLENGED
ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE.
YES, IT IS A WONDER OF BAUHAUS
AND MODERNIST ARCHITECTURE.
BUT, PARADOXICALLY,
IT IS FACED WITH AN IMPORTANT
HOUSING PROBLEM,
AND HASN'T QUITE YET GRASPED
HOW TO RECONCILE THE PAST
AND THE PRESENT.

Gilly saysYOU'RE ON ROTHSCHILD
BOULEVARD NOW.
THIS IS THE FIRST BOULEVARD
OF TEL AVIV.
IT IS THE HOME OF MANY
ORIGINAL BUILDINGS
FROM THE EARLY DAYS
OF THE CITY.

A map pops up and shows the extension of the boulevard.

Gilly says AND NOW YOU SEE THIS KIND OF
VERY INTERESTING RHYTHM
POPPING UP, RIGHT?
YOU HAVE, LIKE,
THIS MAJOR TOWER
AND THEN THIS RENOVATED
LITTLE VILLA.

Mikael says YEAH, YOU CAN SEE THE DISTANCE
BETWEEN OLD HISTORIC BUILDING
AND GLASS MONSTER.
LITERALLY, IF YOU CAN GET
THE CAMERA IN THERE.
LIKE, IT'S 20 CENTIMETERS.

Gilly says THEY'RE ACTUALLY CONNECTED.

Mikael says REALLY?

Gilly says YOU CAN WALK FROM
THE INSIDE OF THE LOBBY,
INTO THE OLD RENOVATED HOUSE,
WHICH, OF COURSE,
IS JUST A FACADE.
THIS IS WHAT ARCHITECTURE
CRITICS IN ISRAEL
CALL A TAXIDERMY.

Mikael says MM-HMM.

Gily says IT'S A STUFFED ANIMAL.

Mikael says WHAT, THE LITTLE ONE?

Gilly says IT LOOKS ALIVE
ON THE OUTSIDE,
BUT IT'S COMPLETELY DEAD
ON THE INSIDE.
IT'S NOT BEING USED.
IT'S CLOSED OFF TO THE PUBLIC.
IT CREATES SOMETHING
ON THE STREET LEVEL
THAT IS VERY UNINVITING
AND KIND OF EXCLUSIVE.

(music plays)

Mikael says BECAUSE OF CITY REGULATIONS,
DEVELOPERS WHO WANT
BUILDING PERMITS
HAVE TO PRESERVE THE FACADE
OF THESE HERITAGE BUILDINGS.
BUT THERE IS NO REGULATION
FOR THE INTERIORS.
AND SINCE IT'S NOT MANDATORY,
DEVELOPERS USUALLY
DON'T INVEST MONEY
INTO RENOVATING THE INTERIOR.
MORE OFTEN THAN NOT,
THEY'RE JUST LEFT EMPTY.
WE MOVE ON TO NEVE TZEDEK,
ONE OF THE OLDEST NEIGHBOURHOODS
IN TEL AVIV.
I SEE LIFE-SIZED STREETS
BUSTLING WITH LIFE,
FAMILIES AND COMMERCE.

He stops in front of a skyscraper and says AND THEN I SEE THIS.

Gilly says WHAT ON EARTH HAPPENED THERE?
WELCOME TO THE NEVE TZEDEK
TOWER.
IF EVER A TOWER
WAS BUILD HERE
TO CREATE ENDLESS DISPUTES
AND CONFLICTS, IT'S THIS ONE.
WHEN THE LAND WAS BOUGHT
BY THE DEVELOPER,
THE FIRST PLAN
THAT THEY APPLIED FOR,
THE PERMIT SAID 300 percent HEIGHT
OVER THE REGULAR PLAN.

Mikael says OKAY.

Gilly says AND THEN THEY
APPLIED AGAIN.
AND IN THE SECOND TIME
THEY APPLIED,
THEY GOT EVEN FURTHER
BUILDING RIGHTS.
HALF OF THE BUILDING
HAS A 6-METRE CEILING HEIGHT,
WHICH BASICALLY IS TWO FLOORS
FOR EVERY FLOOR.
THE PERMIT WAS FOR 30-SOMETHING
FLOORS,
BUT THE BUILDING IS REALLY
180 METRES HIGH,
WHICH IS SOMETHING LIKE
40-SOMETHING FLOORS.

Mikael says RIGHT.

Gilly says SO IT'S A CLEVER LOOPHOLE.

Mikael says AH, YEAH,

Gilly says THEY WERE FORCED TO CREATE
A PATH CONNECTING NEVE TZEDEK
OVER THE HISTORICAL
TRAIN LINES,
THROUGH THE COMPOUND,
WHICH FEELS VERY,
VERY PRIVATE AND PROTECTED,
TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
OF FLORENTINE.

A map shows the connection between the tower and Florentine.

Gilly says SO THE IDEA IS THAT THIS
IS A PUBLIC STREET
THAT WE'RE WALKING ON
RIGHT NOW.
BUT DOES IT FEEL PUBLIC
TO YOU?

Mikael says NO. AS SOON AS YOU ENTER
A SPACE LIKE THIS
UNDER A BUILDING LIKE THAT,
YOU FEEL LIKE
YOU'RE TRESPASSING.
LIKE, JUST, THAT'S HOW I FEEL.

Gilly says IT'S ALSO THE SITE
OF THE FIRST TRAIN LINE
THAT CONNECTED JAFFA
AND JERUSALEM.
UNDER THE BRIDGE,
WHERE THE PARKING IS NOW.
THIS SITE HAS
SO MUCH TO TELL,
BUT IT WILL NEVER TELL IT,
BECAUSE THE DEVELOPER HERE
IS NOT FORCED BY ANYONE
TO COMPLETE
THE RENOVATION PLAN
OF THE HISTORICAL BUILDINGS
AROUND US.
THESE HOUSES ARE NOT
CONNECTED TO ELECTRICITY.
THEY'RE NOT CONNECTED
TO SEWAGE.
AND, IN FACT, IF THE PUBLIC
WILL EVER USE THEM,
THEY WILL HAVE TO INVEST
MORE MONEY.

Mikael looks in a window and says YOU COULD HAVE, LIKE,
AN AWESOME LITTLE,
YOU KNOW,
INCUBATOR SPACE.
A WHOLE BUNCH OF SMALL,
YOUNG COMPANIES.

Gilly says YEAH, YOU COULD HAVE
A GALLERY, A STUDIO SPACE.
THIS PLACE COULD BE ALIVE
AND BURSTING FROM PEOPLE,
BECAUSE THERE'S FAMILIES LIVING
ON BOTH SIDES OF THIS SITE.

Mikael says AND IT WOULD CREATE A HUB,
A CONNECTION
BETWEEN THE TWO, YEAH.

Gilly points at the house and says THIS IS OUR PAST.
NOT VERY FAR AWAY,
BUT A RECENT PAST.

She now points at the tower and says AND THIS IS HOW WE VIEW
THE FUTURE.
SO WE'RE BUILDING
TOWARDS THE FUTURE
IN, LIKE, A MANIC, BUTCH,
SUPER-AGGRESSIVE WAY.
AND WE'RE NOT REALLY
TAKING CARE
OF WHAT WE'RE DOING
WITH OUR PAST.

(music plays)

Gilly says I'M TAKING YOU
TO A PICNIC.

Mikael says A PICNIC?

Gilly says A PICNIC THAT IS ALSO
A FORM OF PROTEST.
THIS LOOKS LIKE
THE PICNIC.
AND THERE IS NAAMA.

Mikael says HELLO. NICE TO MEET YOU.

Naama says HI.

Naama is in her late twenties, with long curly brown hair and wears glasses, a floral sleeveless top and a denim skirt.

A caption reads "Naama Riba. Journalist."

Mikael says OKAY.

Naama says "The municipality said to the developers: ‘You want so much building rights? You need to give a gift to the city.’ The municipality asked the developers
to build a public space. It’s called POPS: Privately Owned Public Space."

A caption reads "Pops. Private Owned Public Space."

Naama says "It’s a space that is public, but that is owned by the developers and the people who live
in the city have the right to use it. But the problem of this space is that it’s designed in a way that no one really knows that you can use it. And the people in the city need to know that they can stop here and drink a coffee. When I talked to the architects who designed
those areas, they told me: ‘we designed them like that because we didn’t want anyone to use them’."

Mikael says YEAH. THAT'S A CLASSIC PROBLEM.
DEVELOPERS, OH, WE HAVE TO MAKE
PUBLIC SPACE.
SO THEY MAKE IT.
BUT THE PEOPLE LIVING HERE
DON'T WANT PEOPLE TO SKATEBOARD
OR TO SIT ON BENCHES.
IT'S CRAZY.

Naama says "It just hurts the urban fabric. It also hurts the life of the city, because only rich people can live in these towers."

Mikael says ON THIS SPACE HERE,
WE'RE PROTESTING, RIGHT?

Naama says "I don’t think it’s a demonstration. It’s completely legal. It’s tactical urbanism."

Mikael says TACTICAL URBANISM.
ALL RIGHT, YEAH.

(music plays)

Mikael says NAAMA WANTS PEOPLE TO KNOW
THAT THE SPACES
SURROUNDING THIS CITY'S
GROWING NUMBER OF HIGH-RISES
ARE ACTUALLY PUBLIC.
AND NAAMA IS LETTING
HER FELLOW CITIZENS KNOW
ONE PICNIC AT A TIME.
WHAT COULD BE DONE TO THIS SPACE
TO MAKE IT MORE USED
BY THE CITIZENS?

Naama says "All the towers should be designed differently. For example, if you build a new tower, you can put a café in this area, or benches, or tables, or maybe you can put in wi-fi or maybe a little kiosk. And then, people will know that they can use it and they are welcome."

(music plays)

Mikael says TIME TO RENT A BIKE.
WELL, I CAN SEE THAT NUMBER 14'S
AVAILABLE.
AND OUT ON THE MEAN STREETS
OF TEL AVIV.
AND, STRANGELY, I'M GOING
TO BE GOING TO VISIT
A CAR PARKING LOT.

Heela says YOU MADE IT.

Mikael says I DID.

Heela is in her forties, with long curly brown hair in a half do. She wears glasses, denim shirts and a blue shirt.

Heela says THIS PARKING LOT
IS THE LAST OPPORTUNITY FOR
A PUBLIC SPACE IN FLORENTINE.
FOR A GREEN PUBLIC SPACE
IN FLORENTINE.

(music plays)

A caption reads "Heela Harel. Designer and Urban Activist."

Mikael says HEELA HAREL IS
A GRAPHIC DESIGNER
AND A VERY ACTIVE CITIZEN.
LIKE MANY, SHE THINKS
THAT PUBLIC SPACES,
ESPECIALLY GREEN ONES,
ARE KEY TO MAKING TEL AVIV
MORE LIVEABLE.
EVEN IF, IN HER NEIGHBOURHOOD
OF FLORENTINE,
IT MAY SEEM IMPOSSIBLE.

A map shows the location of Florentine, Jaffa and South Tel Aviv.

Heela says WELL, IT'S EXTREMELY SMALL.
AND IT'S VERY DENSE.
IT HAS TO BE ONE OF THE DENSEST
NEIGHBOURHOODS IN ISRAEL.
NOT ONLY TEL AVIV.
WOW.
AND IT WAS BUILD IN THE '20S
AS A WORKERS AREA.
SO IT HAS VERY SMALL PLAQUES.
ALL LIFE IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
HAPPENS ON THE STREETS.
THERE ARE A LOT OF BARS,
A LOT OF NIGHT LIFE.
BUT THERE ARE ALMOST
NO PUBLIC SPACES.

Mikael says FACED WITH SUCH
A GLARING PROBLEM,
RESIDENTS OF FLORENTINE
WERE THRILLED
WHEN THE CITY ANNOUNCED A MASTER
PLAN FOR CITYWIDE IMPROVEMENTS.
AFTER MASSIVE PUBLIC
CONSULTATIONS
PROMISING INCREASES
IN GREEN SPACES EVERYWHERE,
WHAT THE CITY HAD IN STORE
WAS A DISAPPOINTMENT
TO SAY THE LEAST.

Heela says WHAT THE MASTER PLAN DOES
IS ADD 60 MILLIMETRES
OF GREEN SPACE PER PERSON.

Mikael says THERE'S 60 MILLIMETRES?

Heela says SIXTY MILLIMETRES.
IT'S LIKE A STAMP, BASICALLY.
ALL OF THIS EFFORT, ALL OF THE
MONEY SPENT, ALL THE MEETINGS.
ALL OF THIS
FOR AN ADDITIONAL
6 CENTIMETRES
OF PUBLIC SPACE PER PERSON.
IT'S RIDICULOUS.

Mikael says THIS IS A DOG PARK?

Heela says YES.

Mikael says DOGS HAVE PARKS
IN FLORENTINE?
YOU GOT TO CALCULATE HOW MANY
SQUARE CENTIMETRES DOGS HAVE,
AND JUST THROW THAT
IN THE MUNICIPALITY.

(music plays)

Mikael says FINDING OUT-OF-THE-BOX SOLUTIONS
IS HEELA'S SPECIALTY.
SO SHE CAME UP WITH A PLAN
OF HER OWN.
FIRST MOVE: CONVERT THIS
MUNICIPAL PARKING LOT
INTO A PARK.
THANKS TO HEELA,
IN A COUPLE OF YEARS
THE DOGS WON'T BE THE ONLY ONES
WITH A PARK AROUND HERE.

Heela shows Mikael the plans and says THERE WERE A FEW STAGES,
BECAUSE FIRST OF ALL,
WE WANTED PEOPLE TO UNDERSTAND
WHAT WE WERE TALKING ABOUT.
IT'S VERY HARD TO THINK OF A
PARK HERE WHEN IT DOESN'T EXIST.
BUT WHEN YOU SEE A PICTURE,
YOU'RE LIKE, AH,
I'D RATHER HAVE THIS THAN THIS.
AND THAT'S HOW PEOPLE
GOT ONBOARD.
NOW, THIS IS THE NEIGHBOURHOOD.
SO THIS IS WHERE
WE ARE.
NOW, YOU CAN SEE ALL THE REST
OF THE PLOTS ARE TINY.
THESE ARE TINY LITTLE GARDENS
BETWEEN BUILDINGS.
THIS IS A PUBLIC SQUARE.
IT'S NOT GOING TO BE
A GREEN SPACE.
AND THIS IS WHAT I MEAN WHEN
THE CITY IS NOT CREATIVE ENOUGH.
THEY CAN CREATE
GREENER SPACES.
THEY CAN LAYER THINGS
ON TOP OF EACH OTHER.
THEY CAN MAKE A LITTLE BIT
OF A TALLER PUBLIC BUILDING
AND MAKE A BIGGER GREEN SPACE.

Mikael says WHERE OTHERS SEE DEAD SPACE,
HEELA SEES OPPORTUNITIES.
SHE SPOTS THE TINY GAPS
IN THE URBAN FABRIC,
NO MATTER HOW SMALL.
AND SHE REPURPOSES THEM,
MAKING THE CITY GREENER
AND MORE LIVEABLE.
SHE EVEN HELPED CREATED
ONE OF TEL AVIV'S
FIRST GUERILLA COMMUNITY
GARDENS,
ON THIS ONCE-EMPTY
CITY LOT.
BUT THE GARDEN IS NOW USED
AND CARED FOR BY NEIGHBOURS,
SCHOOLCHILDREN
AND EVEN PATIENTS
AT A NEARBY MENTAL HEALTH
HOSPITAL.
SHE INSPIRES OTHERS.
AND THE COMMUNITY SUPPORTS HER
IN RETURN,
IN SURPRISING WAYS.
ALMOST EVERY SATURDAY
WHEN WE COME TO WORK,
THERE'S SOME SURPRISE
WAITING FOR US THERE.
AND NOW THERE'S A PALATE.
THIS ONE IS A REALLY
GOOD ONE, BECAUSE...

Mikael says IT'S STURDY.

Heela says LAST WEEK WE FOUND A BUNCH
OF BAMBOO STICKS.
MOST OF OUR CHAIRS
HAVE BEEN DUMPED HERE.

Mikael says I MEAN, DO PEOPLE JUST
SORT OF LIKE DUMP A CHAIR
BECAUSE THEY KNOW THAT THOSE
WEIRD PEOPLE IN THE GARDEN
MIGHT USE IT?

Heela says YES.

Mikael says ALL RIGHT.

Heela says DEFINITELY.
EVENTUALLY, THIS WILL BE
SOME SORT OF A PUBLIC BUILDING.

Mikael says OKAY.

Heela says IN THE MEANTIME,
WE'RE TRYING KIND OF
TO MAKE A STATEMENT
BY PLANTING A LOT
OF FRUIT TREES.
HOPEFULLY WHEN
THEY NEED THIS PLOT,
THEY WILL FIND
ANOTHER SOLUTION.

Mikael says AND YOU GOT A BOUQUET.

Heela says BECAUSE I'M TAKING THIS
TO A FRIEND OF MINE
WHO OWNS A BAR AND HAPPENED
TO MOVE TO HIS NEW APARTMENT.
ALL I REMEMBER
FROM THAT SENTENCE IS "BAR."
GOOD, BECAUSE WE'RE GOING
TO HAVE A DRINK AND EAT.

Mikael says ARE WE?

Heela says YES.

They meet a man on the street.

Heela says HELLO.

Mikael says SO I'M LOOKING AT THAT
AND I'M THINKING,
YOU'RE TAKING ME
TO ANOTHER CAR PARKING SPOT.

Heela says I AM TAKING YOU TO ANOTHER
CAR PARK.

Mikael says REALLY?

Heela says BUT IT'S ONLY A CAR PARK
DURING THE DAY.

They enter a parking lot full of columns and light garlands.

Mikael says OH, WOW!

Heela says DO YOU LIKE
THIS CAR PARK?
NOW, THE TRICK IS
TO PARK YOUR BIKE
ON THE FARTHEST SIDE,
BECAUSE THIS FILLS UP
DURING THE NIGHT.

Mikael says OH, THAT'S AWESOME, MAN.
THAT'S A BICYCLE URBANIST'S
DREAM,
HEARING THAT STORY.

(music plays)

Mikael says PARKING LOT AND RUN-DOWN
SHOPPING CENTRE BY DAY,
THIS SPACE MORPHS
INTO A STUNNING
CULTURAL PLACE AT NIGHT.
BAR, RADIO STATION,
PERFORMANCE SPACE.
TEL AVIVIANS DON'T
JUST SIT THERE AND WAIT
FOR THE PERFECT SOLUTION.
THEY WORK WITH WHAT THEY HAVE
AND THEY COME UP WITH EXTREMELY
ORIGINAL RESULTS.

Walking down a stairway to a beach, Mikael says THERE'S AN INCREASING FOCUS
ON GREEN SPACES IN OUR CITIES.
BUT IT'S ONLY RECENTLY
THAT WE'RE TAKING A LONG,
HARD LOOK AT THE BLUE.
THE RIVERS AND LAKES,
THE HARBOURS AND SEAFRONTS
OF OUR CITIES.
THEY'VE BEEN INTEGRAL
TO URBAN LIFE FOR MILLENNIA.
BUT WE'VE ALSO TREATED THEM
AS SEWERS AND GARBAGE DUMPS.
BUT A PRISTINE
AQUATIC ENVIRONMENT
IS A KEY ELEMENT
IN ANY LIFE-SIZED CITY.
HELLO, GOOD MORNING.
GOOD MORNING.
YOU LOOK LIKE YOU'RE REALLY
READY TO GO.

A caption reads "Sarah Ohayon. Marine Ecologist, Sea Guards Project."

Sarah is in her thirties, with long slightly wavy brown hair and wears denim shorts and a white T-shirt.

Sarah says PEOPLE NEED OPEN SPACES.
TEL AVIV IS AN AREA WHERE
YOU HAVE MILLIONS OF PEOPLE
LIVING VERY,
VERY DENSELY.
OUR REAL OPEN SPACE IS THE SEA,
THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA.
IT SHOULD GET MORE ATTENTION
AND CONSERVATION FROM NOW ON.
FOR MANY YEARS,
THERE WAS A CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS DUMPING SITE,
JUST HERE AT THE NORTH
OF THE BEACH.
AND IT'S JUST PILED UP
AND WAS PUSHED INTO THE SEA.

A caption reads "Givat Aliyah Beach."

Mikael says OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND.

Sarah says YEAH.
AND THE MIDDLE 2000S,
LIKE 2003 AND ONWARDS,
THERE WAS A PROCESS
OF RESTORING THIS BEACH
AND TURNING IT INTO
A PUBLIC PARK.
YOU CAN SEE THE GRASS.
YOU CAN SEE THE PROMENADE.
AND YOU CAN WALK ALL, LIKE, FREE
FROM TEL AVIV TO THIS BEACH.
AND IT'S OPEN.

(music plays)

Mikael says CLEANING THE BEACH
AND TRANSFORMING IT INTO A PARK
IS A GREAT IDEA, ABSOLUTELY.
BUT TO SARAH, MAINTAINING
PUBLIC ACCESS TO BLUE SPACES
ALSO MEANS CLEANING
THE SEA ITSELF.

Mikael says YOU HAVE A GROUP OF VOLUNTEERS
HERE, AND YOU GO OUT AND DIVE.

Sarah says WE WANT TO REMOVE
HAZARDS
AND REMOVE GARBAGE
OUT OF THE WATER.
WE OPERATE REGULARLY.
WE DON'T JUST DO ONE THING
AND THEN DISAPPEAR.
WE ALREADY DIVED HERE
FOUR TIMES,
SO PEOPLE ARE GETTING TO KNOW,
AND THEY'RE ALSO ATTACHED
TO THE BEACH.

Mikael says I JUST REALIZED YOUR CREW
IS COMPLETELY GONE.

Sarah says YEAH, THEY'RE ON THE WATER.

Mikael says YOU GOT TO GREAT READY TOO.

Sarah says YEAH.

Mikael says ALL RIGHT.
IT'S A LITTLE BIT QUICKER
WHEN YOU'RE JUST SNORKELLING,
SO I'M GOING
TO GET READY TOO.

They get in diving gear and go in the water.

(INDISTINCT CHATTERING)

Mikael says SO THAT IS A LOT OF STUFF
WE GOT THERE.

Mikael says WHAT DID YOU FIND?

A woman says WE FOUND A FISHING NET.

Mikael says OH, YEAH?
WOMAN: THESE RINGS.
LOTS AND LOTS OF PIPES.

Sarah says THERE'S A LOT OF CONSTRUCTION
MATERIALS.
SO THAT'S WHAT WE FOUND
IN THE DIVES THAT WE DID HERE
IN THE LAST YEAR,
WHICH MEANS THEY CAME
FROM THIS PATH
WE WERE TALKING ABOUT
BEFORE.
WHATEVER WE DO IN THE BEACH
IS GETTING INTO THE SEA.
SOMETIMES WHEN WE TAKE GARBAGE,
WE TAKE SOME ANIMALS
THAT WERE TRAPPED
IN THE GARBAGE.
BUT WE WANT TO TAKE THEM BACK
INTO THE WATERS.
WE NEVER HAD AN OCTOPUS
CRAWLING OUT OF THE WATER.

Mikael grabs a small octopus and puts it back in the water.

(music plays)

Mikael says THERE'S VERY FEW THINGS
THAT GET ME OUT OF BED
AT 6:00 IN THE MORNING
ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD.
BUT A LITTLE BIT OF OLD-SCHOOL
URBAN ACTIVISM IS ONE OF THEM.
I'M GOING TO TALK
TO SOME PEOPLE
WHO ARE GOING TO PAINT
AN ILLEGAL BUS LANE.
BUS LANES SHOULD BE LEGAL.
THE CITY OF TEL AVIV
SHOULD BE DOING THIS THEMSELVES.
BUT THEY'RE NOT.
SO THESE PEOPLE ARE GOING
TO JUST TAKE
A LITTLE PIECE OF ASPHALT
HERE IN TEL AVIV
AND MAKE A VERY IMPORTANT POINT,
THAT WE CAN MOVE PEOPLE
MORE EFFICIENTLY
AROUND THE URBAN LANDSCAPE
FOR THE FUTURE OF TRANSPORT
IN OUR CITIES.

Clips show the volunteers painting arrows on the pavement.

Mikael says WHAT IS THE PROBLEM
HERE IN TEL AVIV
WITH MOVING PEOPLE AROUND?

Gil is in his thirties, with long curly blond hair and a beard. He wears glasses, jeans and a black polo shirt.

Gil says AROUND HALF A MILLION CARS
ENTER TEL AVIV EVERY DAY.
IT'S MORE THAN THE POPULATION
OF TEL AVIV ITSELF.
TEL AVIV IS RATED LAST
IN THE OLD CITY
IN TERMS OF BUS LANES,
THE AMOUNT OF BUSSES
PER CAPITA.
THE PUBLIC TRANSPORT
IS VERY SLOW,
AND PEOPLE DON'T CHOOSE
TO USE IT
AS MUCH AS THEY DO
IN OTHER CITIES IN THE WORLD.
WHAT SHOULD HAPPEN IS TO HAVE
DIRECT LINE TO WORK AREAS
AND BUS LANES.

A caption reads "Gil Yaakov. Director, 15 Minutes."

Mikael says IT'S NOT HARD TO SEE
WHY CITIES AROUND THE WORLD
NEED PEOPLE LIKE GIL YAAKOV.
FOUNDER OF THE ADVOCACY GROUP,
CALLED 15 MINUTES.
ACCORDING TO HIM,
15 MINUTES
IS THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF TIME
A BUS RIDE SHOULD TAKE,
CONSIDERING TEL AVIV'S
SMALL SCALE.
WE'RE ON IBN GABIROL,
ONE OF THE CITY'S
MAJOR ARTERIES.

A map shows the extension of the street.

Mikael says GIL AND HIS CREW ARE PAINTING
A MAKESHIFT BUS LANE,
RIGHT NEXT TO CITY HALL.
I'D CALL THAT AN EFFICIENT WAY
OF GETTING THEIR ATTENTION.

An animation shows the Tel Aviv Bus Map.

Gil says TODAY, THE BUS SYSTEM IS VERY
COMPLEX. IT'S LIKE SPAGHETTI.
YOU HAVE MANY STATIONS
AND LONG ROUTES.
AND ALSO THERE AREN'T
ENOUGH BUS LANES.
ONLY AROUND 18 percent OF THE PEOPLE
USE THE BUS TO GET TO WORK.

Mikael says EIGHTEEN?

Gil says 18 percent.
IT'S VERY LOW.

Mikael says YOUR HOMEYS ARE
PAINTING THE LANE.
BUT THEN A TRUCK ROLLS UP
IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BUS STOP.

Gil says BECAUSE THIS IS NOT
A REAL BUS LANE.
IT'S ALLOWED TO PARK
ON THE BUS LANE
UNTIL 8:00
IN THE MORNING.

Mikael says BUT IT'S A BUS STOP.
YOU SHOULDN'T BE ABLE
TO STOP IN FRONT OF A BUS STOP.

Gil says EXACTLY.
THERE ISN'T A REAL NETWORK
THAT IS FLUENT...

Mikael says WHICH IS KIND OF THE WHOLE
PURPOSE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT.
FROM THE FIRST DAY
WE HAD PUBLIC TRANSPORT,
IT WAS A NETWORK, RIGHT?

Gil says EXACTLY.
BUS LINES THAT EXIST NOW
ARE A RESULT OF PRESSURES.
AND THE CONCEPT THAT HERE
WE CAN DO A BUS LANE,
AND HERE IT'S COMPLICATED.
THE SHIFT THAT WE'RE TRYING TO
DO IS TO SHOW THE MUNICIPALITY
THAT THERE IS ENOUGH SPACE,
BECAUSE THEY DON'T SEE
THE PARKING AS A LANE.
AND SO THEY COULD SAY,
"OH, THERE ARE ONLY TWO LANES."
BUT THEN WE SHOW THEM THERE'S
A THIRD LANE FOR PARKING.
SO YOU HAVE ENOUGH SPACE.

Mikael says YEAH.

Gil says INSTEAD OF CARS,
YOU WANT TO GIVE SERVICE
TO PEOPLE.
THAT'S THE MOST IMPORTANT THING.

Mikael says YEAH.
AND A BUS.
FINALLY, A BUS IN THE BUS LANE.
I'VE BEEN WAITING
FOR THAT.

Gil says EXACTLY.
BUT NOW HE'S GOING TO GO
BACK TO A REGULAR LANE.

Mikael says I KNOW.

(music plays)

Mikael says EFFORTS ARE BEING MADE
TO TURN THE SITUATION AROUND.
AFTER YEARS
OF BROKEN PROMISES,
FALSE STARTS
AND DISCARDED PLANS,
WORK ON THE TEL AVIV LIGHT RAIL
SYSTEM HAS FINALLY BEGUN.
THE RED LINE, 33 STATIONS,
10 OF WHICH
WILL BE UNDERGROUND,
IS PLANNED TO OPEN...
EVENTUALLY.
THE GREEN AND PURPLE LINES
ARE SUPPOSED TO FOLLOW.
UNTIL THEN, TEL AVIVIANS
WILL HAVE TO BE PATIENT...
OR RELY ON GIL'S
PAINTING SKILLS.
TEL AVIV HAS ASPIRATIONS
OF BECOMING
A BICYCLE-FRIENDLY CITY.
AND IN THE GLOBAL CONTEXT,
THEY ARE AHEAD OF THE CURVE.
BUT IN ORDER TO TAKE IT
TO THE NEXT LEVEL,
THEY NEED TO DO TWO THINGS.
ONE OF THEM IS DO SOMETHING
ABOUT THE ELECTRIC BIKES,
THE E-BIKES, AND ESPECIALLY
THE E-SCOOTERS.
THEY HAVE NO PLACE MIXING
WITH REGULAR BIKES,
AND THEY CERTAINLY DON'T
BELONG ON SIDEWALKS.
THE SECOND THING THEY NEED TO DO
IS TO FIX THEIR INFRASTRUCTURE.
IT IS A WEIRD MIX
OF DIFFERENT STYLES,
DIFFERENT DESIGNS
THAT DON'T REALLY CONNECT
IN ANY COHESIVE,
INTELLIGENT WAY.
HERE YOU HAVE A BIKE LANE
ON THE SIDEWALK,
WHICH THEY KIND OF PAINTED...
THEY CHANGED THEIR MIND
IN THE MIDDLE OF IT.
HERE YOU HAVE A BI-DIRECTIONAL
CYCLE TRACK,
WHICH IS NOT AT ALL BEST
PRACTICE IN A CITY.
TWO THINGS THEY CAN DO TO BECOME
A WORLD-CLASS BICYCLE CITY.

(music plays)

Mikael says WITH ITS WHITE BEACHES
AND BLUE SEA,
IT'S EASY TO FORGET
THAT TEL AVIV SITS
SMACK-DAB IN A HOTBED
OF RELIGIOUS TURMOIL.
BUT THIS IS ISRAEL,
AND HERE, RELIGION
IS EVERYWHERE,
EVEN AT THE BUS STOP,
ESPECIALLY ON SATURDAY.

Roy says WE HAVE REMOVAL OF GARBAGE
ON SATURDAY.
WE HAVE EVERYTHING ON SATURDAY
BUT THE PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION.

Mikael says AND SATURDAY IS SHABBAT,
THE DAY OF REST.
THANKS TO A HANDFUL
OF RELIGIOUS CONSERVATIVES,
PUBLIC BUSES DON'T RUN
IN THE STREETS
OF LIBERAL TEL AVIV FROM
FRIDAY NIGHT TO SATURDAY NIGHT.
AND ROY THINKS THE CONSERVATIVES
SHOULDN'T DICTATE
HOW THE ENTIRE CITY
SPENDS ITS WEEKEND.

A caption reads "Roy Schwartz Tichon. Founder of Noa Tanúa."

Roy says WE HAVE A BIT OF CLASH
OF CULTURES.
80 percent OF THE PEOPLE IN ISRAEL
WANT IT,
AND IF YOU GO IN TEL AVIV,
IT'S GOING TO BE 99 percent
WHO WANT PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
DURING WEEKENDS, DURING SHABBAT.
THE ONLY PEOPLE THAT GET HURT
ARE THE PEOPLE
WHO DON'T HAVE MONEY.
AND TWO YEARS AGO, WE STARTED
TO OPERATE PRIVATE BUSES
AS A NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION
IN ORDER TO LET PEOPLE
RIDE ON SATURDAY.

Mikael says YOU JUST STARTED
YOUR OWN BUS COMPANY.
A NOT-FOR-PROFIT
BUS COMPANY.

Roy says YEAH, YEAH.

Mikael says YEAH, OKAY.

Mikael says SIMPLE AS THAT.
NOA TNUA...
THAT MEANS "MOVE FORWARD."

NOW RUNS TWO BUS LINES
AND CAN COUNT ON THE GOODWILL
OF 50 VOLUNTEERS
TO OPERATE THE PRIVATE BUSES
THEY RENT.
AND THE PASSENGER FARES COVER
THE COST OF THE BUS RENTALS.
ROY PLANS TO OPEN
A THIRD LINE SOON.
AND YOU JUST FOUND A LOOPHOLE,
AND YOU JUST DROVE A BUS
RIGHT THROUGH IT, RIGHT?
(LAUGHING)
THAT'S SO AWESOME, DUDE.
SITTING AT A BUS STOP
IN TEL AVIV ON SHABBAT
IS NOT A DUMB IDEA
WHEN YOU KNOW ROY,
THE BUS MAN ROY.

They get on a bus.

The driver says HI.

Mikael says HELLO.
I WAS SITTING AT A BUS STOP.

A woman says YEAH?

Mikael says AND I UNDERSTAND
THAT THAT WAS
A PRETTY SILLY THING TO DO
ON SHABBAT
UNTIL ROY SHOWS UP, RIGHT?

A caption reads "Yael Green."

Yael is in her forties, with brown hair in a low ponytail. She wears sunglasses, rusty red shorts and a gray T-shirt with an inscription in French.

She says YES, IT IS.

Mikael says WHERE ARE YOU GOING TODAY?

Yael says TO THE BEACH.

Mikael says AND SO THE BUS IS YOUR NORMAL
FORM OF TRANSPORTATION.

Yael says YES, IT IS. THE ONLY FORM
OF TRANSPORTATION.

A map shows the way from Ramat Gano Giv’Atayim to Bograshov Beach."

Mikael says YAEL LIVES WITH HER DAUGHTER
IN THE OUTSKIRTS
OF TEL AVIV.
SHE DOESN'T OWN A CAR,
AND SHE CAN'T AFFORD
THE TAXI RIDE DOWNTOWN.
SO BEFORE ROY CREATED
HIS SHABBAT BUS,
THEY WERE BASICALLY
STUCK AT HOME ON WEEKENDS.
AND HOW HAS THIS CHANGED,
YOU KNOW, YOUR LIFE--?

Yael says OH, COMPLETELY.
IF YOU LIVE CLOSE TO
TEL AVIV
AND THE SURROUNDING CITIES,
WHICH ARE RAMAT GAN, GIV'ATAYIM,
THINGS LIKE THAT,
YOU'RE SORT OF TRAPPED
IN A VERY NICE CITY
WITHOUT ANYTHING TO DO
ON A SATURDAY.
SO EVERYTHING THAT THERE IS
TO BE DONE
IS TO BE DONE IN TEL AVIV,
LIKE THE MAIN PARK
OF TEL AVIV, FOR INSTANCE.
AND EVERYTHING.
THEATRE, MOVIES, EVERYTHING.

Mikael says I MEAN, COMPARED TO OTHER
CITIES IN ISRAEL,
I MEAN, ARE A LOT OF THINGS
OPEN ON SHABBAT?

Yael says THERE IS ONE CITY IN ISRAEL.
YEAH?
TEL AVIV.

Mikael laughs and says OKAY.

(music plays)

Mikael says ROY'S GOAL IS CLEAR:
EVEN THOUGH HIS NON-PROFIT
IS A HIT,
HE ACTUALLY DREAMS OF GOING
COMPLETELY OUT OF BUSINESS.
BECAUSE YOU KNOW WHAT?
RUNNING BUSES ON SATURDAYS
SHOULD BE THE CITY'S JOB.
RISING COST OF LIVING,
PUBLIC TRANSPORT DEFICIENCY,
CONFLICTS BETWEEN
THE VESTED INTERESTS
OF DEVELOPERS AND CITIZENS:
THESE ARE VERY REAL
PROBLEMS.
BUT MORE OFTEN THAN NOT,
THEY'RE SWEPT ASIDE.
CONSIDERED LESS IMPORTANT
THAN THE CYCLICAL RELIGIOUS
AND CULTURAL STRUGGLES.
RENOWNED JEWISH ARCHITECT
SHARON ROTBARD
LIVES IN SHAPIRA,
A HISTORIC NEIGHBOURHOOD
NESTLED BETWEEN JAFFA
AND TEL AVIV.
AND, HEY, HE DOESN'T NEED
TO WALK FAR
TO SEE THE REAL-LIFE EFFECTS
OF THIS COUNTRY'S
CONFLICTED HISTORY.

A caption reads "Sharon Rotbard. Architect and author."

Sharon is in his fifties, clean-shaven and with short white hair. He wears jeans and a blue sweatshirt."

Sharon says Here we are in a part of the neighbourhood, which was annexed to the Shapira neighbourhood after the war of 1948. So all these buildings were built on top of the orchards, the orange groves of Jaffa."

A map shows the location of Shapira.

They enter a cemetery.

Mikael says WOW. WHAT IS THIS PLACE?
THIS LOOKS ABSOLUTELY
FASCINATING.

Sharon says "This is an Arabic cemetery. As you can see, it suffered a certain degree of vandalism. People came and started to peel all the marble and stone."

Mikael says THAT EXPLAINS WHY
IT LOOKS LIKE THAT, RIGHT? YEAH.

Sharon says "Yes. So I guess it was a in a much fancier state."

Mikael says ARE THERE ANY RECORDS
OF WHO THESE PEOPLE WERE?

Sharon says "Nothing. Everything that was existing before 1948 was completely wiped out."

(music plays)

Mikael says AND THAT'S THE STORY
SHARON WANTS TO TELL.
HIS CONTROVERSIAL BOOK,
WHITE CITY, BLACK CITY,
DEPICTS THE FACT
THAT THE WHITE CITY,
NAMELY TEL AVIV AND ITS FAMOUS
MODERNIST ARCHITECTURE,
WASN'T BUILT ON BARREN LAND
AS THE OFFICIAL STORY GOES,
BUT ON TOP OF THE BLACK CITY:
JAFFA.

Sharon says "I would say that the Black City could be defined by all the places and the stories, and the histories that didn’t make it in the narrative of the White City. Places that do not make it into the books are endangered. They might be demolished or disappear one day."

Mikael says AND TO PROVE THAT,
A PALESTINIAN VILLAGE
ONCE STOOD RIGHT HERE.
IT WAS DEMOLISHED TO MAKE WAY
FOR BUNGALOWS.
THE ONLY REMINDER
OF THE PAST
IS A SCAR LEFT
ON THE LAND ITSELF.

Sharon says "You see this layer of stone?
It’s called here a "krukar," it’s a kind of limestone. One of the differences between Jewish architecture and Arabic architecture in this region is the fact that to build those kind of structures, you need to get rid of this layer of stone. In all the areas where you have a meeting point,
you will have this section line."

Mikael says YOU CAN SEE THAT HERE.
YOU CAN SEE HOW HIGH IT IS HERE
AND YOU CAN SEE HOW LOW
THE HOMES ARE.

Sharon says "Yes, so what we see here is a kind of frontier."

Mikael says IS THAT THE CENTRAL
BUS STATION?

Sharon says "Yes, and you see that they were so greedy about space and land, they had to cut here."

Mikael says OH, THE JUST CUT IT.
YOU CAN SEE THAT.

Sharon says "Yes, they cut the vault."

Mikael says SLICED THE BUILDING.
WE'RE BUILDING THE BUS STATION,
WE JUST CHOP THINGS.
NOT EVEN BULLDOZING, JUST
SLICING HALF THE BUILDING OFF.
STUPID. THAT BUILDING,
IT'S BIZARRE.

Sharon says "It is quite difficult for me to be an architect when any act of construction, of building, is so charged with so much political significance. The White City is defined clearly as the only place in Tel Aviv where you conserve buildings."

Mikael says A LOT OF IT IS A TALE
OF DIVISION
THAT IS CONSTRUCTION
AND DESTRUCTION.
BUT THIS IS A CITY.
WHERE DO YOU GO FROM HERE?
WHEN DOES THE WHITE
AND THE BLACK
BECOME A NICE
SHADE OF GREY?

Sharon says "I can’t help but connect the story of Tel Aviv
and Jaffa to the story of Israel and Palestine. As far as I can see, the White City is much whiter, it is much richer. The Black City is much weaker. In a sense, Tel Aviv is much more inclined to fulfil the desires of tourists. But I have the impression that the city is always a place of conflict. When we see the city, we see the results, or the traces of those conflicts. This is true for Tel Aviv, and of course
it is true in almost any city that I know."

(music plays)

Mikael says FOR ALL OF TEL AVIV'S BRAVADO
AND THE FACE IT DESPERATELY
TRIES TO PRESENT TO THE WORLD,
THIS REMAINS A DIVIDED
AND SEGREGATED CITY.
I'M HERE IN JAFFA.
THE BRIDE OF THE SEA, THE FORMER
CAPITAL OF ARAB PALESTINE.
THIS CITY HAS EXISTED HERE
FOR MILLENNIA.
BUT EVER SINCE THE NEW KID
ON THE BLOCK SHOWED UP
JUST OVER A CENTURY AGO,
TEL AVIV,
THIS HAS BECOME A SYMBOL
OF THE DIVISION INHERENT
IN THE CITY.
HELLO.

Ibrahim says "Hi, how are you? Welcome."

Ibrahim is in his fifites, bald and clean-shaven. He wears black trousers and a white T-shirt with black rims.

Mikael says THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Ibrahim says "Thank you. I’m crazy about this place.
I like it very much."

Mikael says YOU'VE LIVED HERE
FOR MANY YEARS, OR...?

Ibrahim says "My family has been living here since the 16th Century."

Mikael says WHAT IS IT LIKE LIVING
IN THIS ANCIENT CITY?
HOW DO YOU FEEL THE CONTRAST
IN YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE?

Ibrahim says "This is part of Tel Aviv-Jaffa. Tel Aviv-Jaffa, if you compare it to other places, is a more welcoming city. Christians, Muslims,
Jewish people live together. Everybody expects and accepts each other. In Tel Aviv, the majority of people are Jewish.
Here, it’s something else, there’s a history. Living near is good because you have the budget of Tel Aviv-Jaffa. Tel Aviv is a very rich city. That’s one thing about being a part of Tel Aviv-Jaffa. The other part is something else. Tel Aviv is a newer city with high buildings. In Jaffa, you can build only three floors, which is like a village. It’s something else."

A caption reads "Ibrahim Abu Shindi. Director of the Arab Jewish Community centre."

Mikael says IBRAHIM ABU SHINDI
IS ALL FOR INCLUSIVENESS
AND PEACEFUL COHABITATION.
BUT HE'S CONCERNED WITH JAFFA'S
HIGH-SPEED GENTRIFICATION,
WHICH IS QUICKLY WIPING OUT
A LARGE PART
OF THE ARAB MEMORY.
SO TELL ME, IBRAHIM,
ABOUT THE NEIGHBOURHOOD
WE'RE IN RIGHT NOW
HERE IN JAFFA.

A map shows the location of Ajami.

Ibrahim says This is Ajami and we’re on Sha’arei Nikanor Street. It’s a Jewish name, most of the streets were given Jewish names. You can see an Arab family here.
As you can see, it’s a very poor place. They live here. They can come here and say: ‘Take 2 or 3 million dollars and leave.’ Then they build something like that.
They renovate something like that. Once, 90 percent of the people in Ajami were Arabs, Palestinians. 10 percent were Jewish people. Now, we’re talking about something
like 85-90 percent of residents are Jewish people. They are very rich families. All of the nice places you can see
belong to the Jewish families.

They walk to a pastry shop.

Ibrahim says "You know the zaatar?"

Mikael says OKAY, I KNOW IT, YEAH.
AND IN AN OLD BUILDING, TOO.

A man inside says "400 years, this building."

Mikael says 400 YEARS.
HAS IT ALWAYS BEEN A BAKERY?

The man says "As a bakery 70 years!"

Ibrahim says "The best pitas in Jaffa."

Mikael says BYE-BYE.

Ibrahim greets a neighbour and says "How are you doing? This is Canadian television. Talk to them about the neighbourhood
and how rich people are buying the houses.

The neighbour says "This land is sold."

Ibrahim says "It is?
They already sold this place
and they will build a building here, you know? They are sitting outside, the youth gathers in public spaces."

Mikael says THIS LOOKS NICE.
THIS LOOKS NICE.

Ibrahim says "They will not continue. ."

Mikael says WHERE WILL THEY SIT
WITH THEIR FRIENDS
AND DRINK TEA AFTER THAT?

Ibrahim says "Inside."

Mikael says INSIDE?
IT WASN'T LIKE
THERE WERE SO MANY BUILDINGS.

A woman says "They are building a lot! We used to be able to see the sea. I don’t live very far from here. We used to take the historical stairs to go to the beach, but not anymore."

Ibrahim says "History is dying because we can’t see the sea anymore. History is dying because of the new buildings. History is dying along with the simple life they had before. Thank you. All of our mosques, churches and schools are here, so we can’t leave. Nobody will accept us in Tel Aviv. I can’t move to Tel Aviv! Nobody will give me the opportunity to buy an apartment."

Mikael says WOW.

(music plays)

Mikael says IN REACTION TO THE TOUGH REALITY
OF HIS SEGREGATED CITY,
IBRAHIM CO-FOUNDED
THE ARAB JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE
IN 1993,
BRINGING THE TWO COMMUNITIES
TOGETHER.
NOW A CULTURAL MEETING POINT
CATERING TO MORE
THAN 3,000 MEMBERS,
IT IS SUPPORTED BY THE
MUNICIPALITY OF TEL AVIV-JAFFA.

They walk in the community centre.

Ibrahim says "As you see, there are usually people here. These are our two librarians. She’s an Arab. Muslim, she’s religious. And she’s a Jew. She’s a new immigrant from Russia."

Fast clips show children engaging in physical activities.

Ibrahim says "So, we have problems, but on the other hand,
we want to live together here, peacefully. Everybody, no matter who is who, Christian, Muslim or Jewish people. That’s the idea. We need to continue living together
without forgetting our history."

(music plays)

Mikael says IT SEEMS EVERYONE HERE
IS LOOKING FOR A WAY
TO ALLEVIATE THE CONFLICTS
THAT HAVE DEFINED
TEL AVIV-JAFFA'S PAST
AND TOO MUCH
OF ITS PRESENT.
LUCKILY, THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO
WON'T LET IT DEFINE ITS FUTURE.
PEOPLE WHO ARE DETERMINED
TO RAISE A NEW GENERATION
FOR WHOM THE OLD DIVIDES
WILL MEAN VERY LITTLE.

They walk under a garland on the street.

Mikael says AH, THIS LOOKS FESTIVE.

Asaf says EVERYTHING.

Asaf is in his thirties, with short brown hair in a crest and a beard and wears glasses, beige Bermuda shorts and a pale blue shirt.

Zohar says ACTUALLY, IT'S QUITE FUNNY.
IT SAYS RAMADAN KAREEM,
BUT ONLY IN HEBREW.
(LAUGHING)

Zohar is in her thirties with short straight brown hair with her head shaved on one side. She wears glasses, jeans and a black top.

Mikael says ALL RIGHT, OKAY.
(LAUGHING)
THIS IS, LIKE, REALLY LINED UP
FOR A PARTY HERE.
LOOK AT THAT.
LOOK AT ALL THE TABLES.
YOU'RE PROBABLY THINKING
THE SAME AS ME:
THIS LOOKS LIKE ANY
COMMUNITY GATHERING
ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD.
BUT TRUST ME,
THIS ONE IS VERY SPECIAL.
YOU SEE, ASAF, ZOHAR
AND THEIR TWO DAUGHTERS
ARE JEWISH IN JAFFA.
AND WE'RE HERE
TO CELEBRATE IFTAR,
THE EVENING MEAL
AFTER THE DAILY RAMADAN FAST.
AND THAT'S A MUSLIM TRADITION.

A caption reads "Asaf Ronel and Zohar Frydman. Residents of Jaffa."

Zohar says I'M ORIGINALLY FROM JERUSALEM
AND I LIVED HERE FOR A WHILE,
BUT I WAS NEVER INVITED,
OR IT WAS NEVER EXPECTED OF ME
TO BE PART OF THIS KIND
OF EVENT.

Asaf says "Jerusalem is a mixed city, but it’s completely segregated. I grew up living in a left-wing family, but still, I never had a Palestinian friend in my life. I grew up in a completely Jewish ghetto. And then, we found out that there is a possibility to live differently. There is a possibility in Jaffa for a community that is not segregated. We’re trying to fit it. We’re not trying to change anything."

Mikael says ASAF AND ZOHAR,
ALONG WITH THE LOVELY PEOPLE
AT THIS PARTY,
DIDN'T WANT THEIR KIDS
TO GROW UP IN A BUBBLE.
SO THEY FOUNDED A SCHOOL.
A MIXED SCHOOL.
AND THAT WAS NOT EASY.
UNFORTUNATELY,
THE EDUCATION SYSTEM
IS LIKE THE COUNTRY ITSELF:
COMPLETELY SEGREGATED.
HERE'S THE DEAL.
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS ARE DIVIDED
INTO DIFFERENT TRACTS:
ONE FOR ORTHODOX JEWS,
ONE FOR SECULAR JEWS,
AND ONE FOR PALESTINIAN
CHRISTIANS AND MUSLIMS.
AND THEY DON'T USUALLY MIX.
DESPITE THE ENDLESS RED TAPE
AND INCOMPREHENSION
FROM THE MUNICIPALITY,
PARENTS IN THIS NEIGHBOURHOOD
HAVE UNITED
TO CREATE THE HAND IN HAND
KINDERGARTEN AND SCHOOL,
IN WHICH 300 CHILDREN
OF ALL BACKGROUNDS
NOW LEARN ABOUT THE WORLD
TOGETHER.
SO THE SEGREGATION OF SCHOOLS
IN ISRAEL BASED ON NATIONALITY.
IS IT FORCED?

Asaf says "Theoretically, you can enrol your child in any school, but the Jewish school system
is only fit for Jewish children. The entire school year revolves around Jewish holidays. In Arab schools, obviously, it’s still under Israeli control, but you have different holidays. And here, in Hand in Hand,
we celebrate holidays from all religions. We have Christmas,
we have Passover and we have Ramadan Iftar."

Zohar says THIS ITSELF IS LIKE A VERY
AVANT-GARDE IDEA HERE.
I MEAN, PEOPLE ARE...

Mikael laughs and says REALLY?

Zohar says YEAH, BECAUSE IT'S LIKE EITHER
YOU'RE THIS OR YOU'RE THAT.

Asaf says "The children are growing up together. They’re learning together in the same classroom,
in the same kindergarten. One is speaking Hebrew
and the other is speaking Arabic."

Mikael says IN THE SAME CLASS? TWO TEACHERS?

Asaf says "Same class with two teachers."

Zohar says THEY'RE COMPLETING
EACH OTHER'S SENTENCES.

Asaf says "So they learn both languages naturally, organically. Then, when Ruth came back from kindergarten, she said: ‘I’m Hudi and my friend is Moslem’,
which is Muslim. Then I said: ‘Hudi’ is ‘Yahudi’,
which is Jewish in Arabic. She was referring to herself as Jewish in Arabic, and she was able to recognize her own identity and her friend’s identity in his language. It doesn’t need to be a zero-sum game. It’s not like if we gain, the Palestinians lose. There is a place for all of our identities. All of our nationalities, all of our religions can be together. The children are our future. Even if we fail ourselves to change that, at least we are raising children who are different than us. We won’t raise them in a Jewish ghetto only
knowing people who are like them. This is the Middle East.
The people here are Arabs. They speak Arabic.
They’re Muslims, they’re Christians. They’re also Jewish. And she won’t be a foreigner, she won’t be a stranger to that. She will be growing up inside it, without giving up her own identity. This is the part where we’re doing
the selection where only Muslims can eat, because they're the ones who are fasting."

Mikael says THEY CAN'T EAT YET.
IT'S STILL FOUR MINUTES TO GO.

Asaf says "No, they’re preparing their plates. We need to make sure there’s no way for any Jew to sneak in and try to steal some food before the sun sets. We’re waiting for the muezzin."

Mikael says I MEAN, I WOULD TOTALLY
PILE UP MY PLATE
SO IT WAS IN FRONT OF ME
AT 7:49.

Asaf says "This is what they’re doing right now."

Mikael says IT DOESN'T STOP.

Asaf says "IT’s the only one table."

Mikael says IT'S THE FIRST TABLE.
(NO AUDIO)

Najeeb is in his forties, clean-shaven and with short gray hair. He wears jeans and a black T-shirt.

He says "When we started five years ago, there were only a few families. And now, look. More than 500 people."

A caption reads "Najeeb Haddad. Resident of Jaffa."

Mikael says NAJEEB IS CHRISTIAN AND ARAB.
AND HIS DAUGHTER JUST FINISHED
FIRST GRADE
AT HAND IN HAND SCHOOL,
LEARNING IN BOTH
ARABIC AND HEBREW.
IT'S AMAZING,
BUT THIS PROJECT
IS SO MUCH MORE THAN A SCHOOL
AND A KINDERGARTEN.
NAJEED, ASAF, ZOHAR,
AND ALL THE PARENTS HERE
HAVE CREATED A DEEP AND
MUCH-NEEDED SENSE OF COMMUNITY.
SO IF IT WASN'T FOR
THE KINDERGARTEN AND THE SCHOOL,
AND EVENTS LIKE THIS,
WOULD YOU BE FRIENDS?

Najeed says "I don’t know, because maybe we wouldn’t have met. But now, we are a big community, and the community started before the kindergarten. We were a smaller community, we created a kindergarten and then a school, and then we grew. And we now know a lot of people that we wouldn’t have known or wouldn’t have met before. It’s a very special place."

Mikael says YOU'RE GOING TO NEED
A BIGGER COURTYARD
IN A COUPLE OF YEARS,

Najeeb says "Yeah. When we need it, we’ll find it."

Mikael says YEAH.

(music plays)

Mikael says THE EVENING ENDS
WITH A POIGNANT MOMENT,
AS EVERYONE TAKES FANOUS,
THE TRADITIONAL MUSLIM LANTERNS,
ONTO THE STREETS OF JAFFA.
MEN WITH KIPPAHS
WALK SIDE BY SIDE
WITH WOMEN WEARING
HEAD SCARVES.
I DON'T KNOW
IF SUCH VAST CONFLICTS
HAVE EVER BEEN RESOLVED
THROUGH SMALL ACTIONS,
BUT I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS ONE
CERTAINLY GIVES ME HOPE.
SO IS THIS AN UNUSUAL THING,
THAT JEWS AND ARABS
ARE DOING THIS TOGETHER?

Asaf says "Unfortunately, yes. It’s kind of unique for such a community to exist. For me it’s a huge beacon of hope."

Mikael enters a tattoo parlour and says says HOW ARE YOU DOING?
MIKAEL. I GOT A LITTLE BIT
OF INK
THAT I HOPE
YOU CAN HELP ME WITH.
THIS OLD MAP OF JAFFA
FROM, I THINK, THE 1920S.

The owner says COOL.

Mikael says I HAVE, LIKE, A TATTOO
WITH DIFFERENT CITIES.
SORT OF MAKING MY OWN URBAN MAP.

The owner says VERY NICE.

Mikael says THIS IS A SECTION OF IT
THAT I DREW MYSELF HERE.

He shows the owner a section on his shoulder and says SO YOU COULD, LIKE, WALK
FROM MODI'IN IN, YOU KNOW...

The owner says INTO JAFFA...

Mikale says THROUGH JAFFA...

The owner says AND BACK TO PARIS.

Mikael says YEAH, BACK TO PARIS,
AND GO FOR A COFFEE
IN MONTREAL.
WHAT I WANT IS, LIKE, A LOGO
IN THE MIDDLE OF THE TOWN.
A GRAPHIC DETAIL OF THIS...
IT'LL BE THE ARABIC FOR JAFFA.
(NEEDLE BUZZING)

The owner starts tattooing.

Mikael says I DON'T KNOW
WHAT YOU WOULD CHOOSE
BETWEEN TEL AVIV OR JAFFA.
IN THE URBAN CONTEXT,
TEL AVIV IS THE NEW KID
ON THE BLOCK.
A LITTLE OVER A CENTURY OLD.
A BIT OF A ROWDY TEENAGER.
JAFFA, ON THE OTHER HAND,
OLDER BROTHER, PERHAPS.
MORE EXPERIENCED.
STORIED STREETS.
SO I'M GOING WITH JAFFA.
BUT BOTH OF THESE CITIES,
DESPITE THE CHALLENGES,
COMPLEMENT ONE OTHER,
THEY FEED OFF ONE ANOTHER.
AND THAT HAS TO CONTINUE.
AWESOME. THANKS, BROTHER.

The owner says SURE, THANK YOU.

Mikael says PLEASURE.

(music plays)

Mikael says I WILL NEVER TRULY UNDERSTAND
THE COMPLEX,
MULTI-LAYERED ASPECTS
OF THIS PLACE.
BUT I AM FASCINATED
BY TEL AVIV AND BY JAFFA.
THE DANISH PHILOSOPHER
SOREN KIERKEGAARD
WROTE THAT EVERYONE
WANTS PROGRESS,
BUT NO ONE WANTS CHANGE.
INDEED, OUR CITIES ARE ENGAGED
IN A CONSTANT TUG-OF-WAR
BETWEEN A COMFORTABLE
STATUS QUO
AND FUTURE URBAN DEVELOPMENT.
HERE, THERE ARE MANY
ROPES IN PLAY.
BETWEEN THE CITIZENS
AND THE CITY,
THE CITY AND THE STATE,
THE WHITE CITY AND THE BLACK.
I DON'T KNOW HOW THE GAME
WILL END,
BUT I DO KNOW THAT TEL AVIV
AND JAFFA REMAIN A SAFE HARBOUR
WITH A SHINING LIGHTHOUSE,
SIGNALLING HOPE
TO THEIR REGION,
BUT ALSO TO CITIES
AROUND THE WORLD.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Hosted by Mikael Colville-Andersen.

Directed by Myriam Berthelet, Nicolas Boucher and Michel D.T. Lam.

Series director, Michel. D. T. Lam.

Producer, Nicolas Boucher.

Produced in association with TVO.

Executive producers, Jane Jankovic and Natasha Negrea.

Logo: DBC2.

Copyright 2017.

Watch: Ep. 5 - Tel-Aviv